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The Works of H. A. Ironside (65 vols.)

by Ironside, H. A., Pitt, F. W.

Loizeaux Brothers, Singspiration 1901–2009

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The Works of H. A. Ironside (65 vols.)
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Overview

The Works of H.A. Ironside contains 65 volumes of the most important sermons, commentaries, and writings from one of America’s most influential preachers—now including the complete set of Ironside commentaries!

Inspired by Dwight Moody, Ironside comforted and challenged a generation of evangelicals during two world wars and an economic depression. He spoke to a lay audience, and made the Bible understandable and accessible to as many people as possible, earning himself the title, “the Archbishop of fundamentalism.” His preaching blurs the line between sermonizing and storytelling, and his commentaries are filled with examples and anecdotes that made sense to his readers, then and now. A lack of formal education never stopped Ironside from becoming a prolific writer and influential thinker. In all, he wrote nearly one hundred books and preached thousands of sermons in front of millions of people. His sermons were heard widely on the radio, and thousands more were distributed around the world in pamphlets and tracts.

Now, Ironside’s first edition commentaries and his most-loved sermons and addresses are available in this singular collection, giving you access to the works of one of America’s greatest preachers and one of fundamentalism’s most prolific writers. This set includes 32 commentaries and dozens of sermons, along with lectures, addresses, and tracts which cover the most pressing theological and social topics from his time and ours. Topics covered include eschatology, prophecy, pneumatology, prayer, and the holiness movement, along with his impassioned sermons and lectures.

What’s more, with the Logos edition of The Works of H.A. Ironside and the powerful tools in your Logos Bible Software library, the words which changed the history of American evangelicalism are now available at the click of a mouse! The accessibility of Ironside’s writings and the power of his words make The Works of H.A. Ironside ideal for anyone interested in preaching, dispensationalism, and practical commentaries on nearly every book of the Bible.

Key Features

  • 64 books, plus 25 shorter pamphlets and tracts
  • Hundreds of sermons
  • The original first editions of Ironside’s commentaries

Praise for the Print Edition

[Ironside] was a brilliant man, but he preached with simplicity.

—J. V. McGee, Through the Bible Radio Program

Harry Ironside is a great example of a preacher full of God’s Word.

R. Kent Hughes, Acts: The Church Afire

Individual Titles

Addresses on the Book of Joshua

  • Author: H.A. Ironside
  • Publication Date: 1950

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5

The book of Joshua is distinctly the book of the inheritance. We see redemption in Exodus, holiness in Leviticus, trial and testing in Numbers, the government of God in Deuteronomy. The book of Joshua, and the subject of inheritance, naturally follows. From desert wanderings to settlement in Canaan, to the change in leadership from Moses to Joshua, to the reiteration of God’s faithfulness, H. A. Ironside’s commentary on Joshua describes the process by which the Israelites made their inheritance from God their own.

Notes on the Book of Ezra

  • Author: H.A. Ironside
  • Publication Date: 1946

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5

The book of Ezra concerns a special work of God, because it describes the Israelites’ movement from idolatry and exile into a home of faith in God. In this volume, Ironside shows how the story in Ezra describes not only Israelite history, but embodies the story of the church in every age—¬the transition from bondage to freedom, from decay to life, from exile to a home in God.

Nehemiah: An Expository Commentary

  • Author: H.A. Ironside
  • Publication Date: 1913

This commentary, published first in 1913 under the title Notes on the book of Nehemiah, draws from the book of Nehemiah a treasure trough of edifying notes and explanations, relevant for all believers regardless of era. Ironside’s straight-forward tone will be of great profit to those seeking a clear exposition of biblical truths. As he declares himself in the Prefatory Note, “[N]o attempt has been made to write for scholars or to produce a literary work. But in the simplest way, I have sought to emphasize important truths that are being neglected in many places where they need to be pressed more insistently than ever.”

Esther: An Expository Commentary

  • Author: H.A. Ironside
  • Publication Date: 1921

Esther: An Expository Commentary is an insightful guide to the book of Esther. Written in the hope that God would “richly bless your effort to bring to the surface what His Spirit has laid up for us in the little book,” Ironside’s commentary thoroughly examines each chapter of Esther, bringing God’s actions and His call to obedience to the fore. As Ironside states in his preface, “The book of Esther contains principles of great value at all times, but especially at the present one, when some who delve very little into the word of God are liable to wonder at some of His ways, and grow discouraged in the path of obedience. It is needful therefore, that such, and all of us, should have detailed before us the fact that ‘obedience is better than sacrifice, and to hearken than the fat of rams.’”

Studies on Book One of the Psalms

  • Author: H.A. Ironside
  • Publication Date: 1952

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5

Perhaps no portion of Scripture has meant more to the people of God nor spoken more to the experience of following God than the book of Psalms. This book is a vehicle of prayer and praise. The Psalms reveal the remarkable design of God, the searing honesty of the Psalmists, and the full-orbed spectrum of emotion. Ironside’s commentary works through Psalms 1–41, revealing the full range of the Psalmists words to God and God’s response.

Proverbs: An Expository Commentary

  • Author: H.A. Ironside
  • Publication Date: 1908

Proverbs: An Expository Commentary offers an insightful elucidation of Proverbs for those accustomed to reading the common-sense epigrams and aphorisms comprising the book. As Ironside says in the preface, “…it is just because its chapters abound in pithy truisms that the marrow is often lost sight of by those who have been accustomed to hearing of reading them all their lives. The present work is an attempt to press home upon the heart and conscience, with a view to the increase of every-day godliness, this distinctively practical portion of the word of God.”

Examining the book verse by verse, Ironside’s commentary is packed full of inspiring and edifying observations. The work also includes a helpful introduction and outline. First published in 1908 as Notes on the Book of Proverbs, the volume’s is still a valuable Bible study resource nearly a hundred years later.

Addresses on the Song of Solomon

  • Author: H.A. Ironside
  • Publication Date: 1933

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5

Culled from his own notes on his series of lectures on the Song of Solomon to the Moody Memorial Church in Chicago, Ironside reworks his addresses into this singular commentary. In his introduction, Ironside evaluates competing interpretations of the Song of Solomon—the extent to which the book is about literal love between two individuals or a symbolic love between Yahweh and Israel or Christ and the church. The rest of the book is devoted to chapter-by-chapter analysis of the text, in which Ironside blurs the boundary between exegesis and exposition, weaving into his interpretation poetry, hymnody, and examples from the contemporary era. He takes care to note the themes from Song of Solomon which appear in the New Testament, and links the book to key themes of the Gospel narrative and significant moments in Christ’s ministry.

Expository Notes on the Prophet Isaiah

  • Author: H.A. Ironside
  • Publication Date: 1952

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5

This volume includes an exposition of Isaiah’s prophecy for his own time and for the future of Israel. Notably, Ironside finished this volume only a few weeks before he died, and the first edition was published posthumously.

Notes on the Prophecy and Lamentations of Jeremiah

  • Author: H.A. Ironside
  • Publication Date: 1906

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5

Jeremiah is one among many of Israel’s prophets—Isaiah before him, Daniel and Ezekiel after—yet Jeremiah’s prophecy reveals like no other the sentiments of Yahweh and the evil of Judah as their independence evaporated and exile in Babylon began. Jeremiah’s message was one of honesty, lament, and condemnation, and he was punished for it. Yet God continued to speak prophetically through Jeremiah—the lone voice of Yahweh to his people throughout the early years of exile. Ironside’s commentary on the prophecy of Jeremiah takes us on a chapter-by-chapter journey through the entire book, revealing the tenuous relationship between God and his people.

Expository Notes on Ezekiel the Prophet

  • Author: H.A. Ironside
  • Publication Date: 1949

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5

Ezekiel opens abruptly with a visually captivating description of God. Amid the wheels, the visions, the dry bones, and more, Ezekiel chronicles in bizarre ways the presence of God in Babylonian exile. With pastoral honesty, Ironside’s chapter-by-chapter commentary on the book of Ezekiel reveals the message of God for the people of Judah and for the church today.

Daniel: An Expository Commentary

  • Author: H.A. Ironside
  • Publication Date: 1920

This commentary on Daniel the Prophet by H. A. Ironside, published first in the early years of the 20th century under the title Lectures on Daniel the Prophet, is still well-liked and widely-read today. Its enduring popularity nearly a hundred years later, attested to by the continuous reprinting of the book, can only be explained by its straight-forward, clear and persuasive exposition of the author’s thought.

Notes on the Minor Prophets

  • Author: H.A. Ironside
  • Publication Date: 1909

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5

The minor prophets are short and their message is often swift. But they must not be overlooked, says Ironside, for they convey an important history between God and the people of Israel, Judah, and the surrounding nations. More importantly, they reveal the character of God. Through the minor prophets, we see God revealed through both harsh words and soothing language, in both justice and mercy, and through plagues, oracles, and miracles. In this volume, Ironside’s chapter-by-chapter commentary brings to the fore the most important themes from the minor prophets.

This volume includes commentary on:

  • Hosea
  • Joel
  • Amos
  • Obadiah
  • Jonah
  • Micah
  • Nahum
  • Habakkuk
  • Zephaniah
  • Haggai
  • Zechariah
  • Malachi

Expository Notes on the Gospel of Matthew

  • Author: H.A. Ironside
  • Publication Date: 1948

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5

The Gospel of Matthew is pre-eminently a Jewish Gospel, written to address Jewish concerns and customs, and to recount the story of Jesus from a Jewish perspective. In his chapter-by-chapter analysis of the book, Ironside shows that readers of Matthew must bear in mind the dominant metaphors of kingdom in order to understand the life of Christ from a Jewish perspective, and to understand the Gospel in our own era.

Expository Notes on the Gospel of Mark

  • Author: H.A. Ironside
  • Publication Date: 1948

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5

In this commentary, Ironside remains thoughtfully attuned to the active and dynamic pace of the Gospel of Mark, while explaining the nature of Christ as the servant and as the Son of Man. His chapter-by-chapter analysis includes timely words for his original audience and for contemporary readers.

Addresses on the Gospel of Luke

  • Author: H.A. Ironside
  • Publication Date: 1947

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5

Contains over eighty addresses on the Gospel of Luke, which taken together, amount to a commentary on the entire book. Ironside’s addresses not only cover familiar topics—such as Jesus’ birth, death, and resurrection—but also the central themes of the Gospel as they are found in the parables, prophecy, and discourses. This accessible commentary to the Gospel of Luke makes the key themes sensible and practical for today.

Addresses on the Gospel of John

  • Author: H.A. Ironside
  • Publication Date: 1942

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5

In this volume of nearly seventy addresses on the Gospel of John, Ironside compares the four Gospels to one another and shows how each communicates an important facet of the Gospel message. John, however, uniquely communicates the deity of Christ. From the beginning, through the discourses, to the end of the Gospel, John presents Jesus as the Eternal Word made flesh for the redemption of the world. This commentary on the Gospel of John reinforces Jesus’ deity not only in the stories and the discourses in the book itself, but in the joys and struggles of contemporary culture. Ironside pays as much attention to the text as he does the pastoral implications for today.

Lectures on the Book of Acts

  • Author: H.A. Ironside
  • Publication Date: 1943

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5

Ironside shows that in the book of Acts, God has provided a pattern for Christian testimony, missionary effort, world evangelism, and building Christian churches—a pattern we would do well to follow. From a literary standpoint, Acts seems unfinished—the story ends without a conclusion—perhaps to illustrate the continuing work of the apostles in our own time. Ironside’s commentary on Acts makes their work begun at Pentecost more visible in the present.

Lectures on the Epistle to the Romans

  • Author: H.A. Ironside
  • Publication Date: 1928

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5

Romans is perhaps the most influential and most widely-read book of the New Testament. It is international, forward-thinking, philosophical, and theologically rich. Ironside’s eleven lectures amount to nearly 200 pages of commentary on the entire epistle. He begins with a lengthy excursus on the central themes of Romans, before working chapter-by-chapter through the entirety of the book. The final two lectures emphasize the practical application of Romans for today.

Addresses on the First Epistle to the Corinthians

  • Author: H.A. Ironside
  • Publication Date: 1938

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5

The city of Corinth found itself geographically located on a trade route and culturally located at the center of Greco-Roman society during the first century. Art, philosophy, literature, and commerce flourished in this city, but the church there found itself mired in pervasive moral corruption. Paul’s words of advice, encouragement, and reproach are made clear and understandable with Ironside’s commentary on 1 Corinthians, based on the famous sermons he preached from 1934–1935 at Moody Memorial Church in Chicago.

Addresses on the Second Epistle to the Corinthians

  • Author: H.A. Ironside
  • Publication Date: 1939

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5

Ironside continues his exposition of Paul’s letters to the Corinthians with this collection of his addresses on 2 Corinthians. This epistle contains practical advice on generosity, reconciliation, and forgiveness. Ironside reiterates Paul’s hardships and suffering, yet reasserts the veracity of his message against the claims of false apostles. This letter amounts to a testimony of faith in God amid suffering and weakness.

Expository Messages on the Epistle to the Galatians

  • Author: H.A. Ironside
  • Publication Date: 1940

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5

The epistle of Galatians defends the Gospel message against those who seek to substitute legality for grace. This epistle recounts the temptation to revert to false teaching, to meaningless ritual, and to legal observance. Ironside’s commentary on Galatians conveys the urgency of Paul’s rebuke and the perseverance of God’s grace without regard for prior mistakes.

In the Heavenlies: Practical Expository Addresses on the Epistle to the Ephesians

  • Author: H.A. Ironside
  • Publication Date: 1937

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5

The book of Ephesians begins with doctrine and ends with instruction—“for often that is the divine order of Scripture,” says Ironside. His commentary on Ephesians follows the same pattern, first devoted to the work of God, and second, to the outcome of God’s work in the lives of individuals. Ironside weaves poetry, hymnody, and portions of his sermons around an easy-to-read, devotional commentary on each chapter of Ephesians.

Notes on the Epistle to the Philippians

  • Author: H.A. Ironside
  • Publication Date: 1922

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5

Philippians has to do with our state rather than our standing, with responsibility rather than privilege, with communion rather than union. In other words, this epistle is suited to our wilderness journey, written to guide our feet while going through the world. Paul’s letter to the Philippians is rooted in his pastoral concern and his desire to orient this concern around the person of Jesus. Ironside’s chapter-by-chapter commentary makes Paul’s theological motivations and pastoral concerns patently clear.

Lectures on the Epistle to the Colossians

  • Author: H.A. Ironside
  • Publication Date: 1929

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5

Paul’s letter to the Colossians counters false teaching, and Ironside’s commentary on the book underscores the prescience of Paul’s words for our own era. Ironside connects the problems of the Colossian church with the concerns of the modern church, and cautions contemporary readers against threats to the Gospel in all times and places. His exposition of Colossians is bolstered by his familiarity with both the fractured church in the twentieth century and the philosophical systems that plagued the first century church. Yet his commentary remains driven by Paul’s words of hope found in Colossians 2:9: “For in Christ all the fullness of the Deity lives in bodily form, and in Christ you have been brought to fullness.”

Addresses on the First and Second Epistles of Thessalonians

  • Author: H.A. Ironside
  • Publication Date: 1947

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5

In his volume on 1 & 2 Thessalonians, Ironside revisits the important pastoral concerns found in Paul’s earliest letters. His chapter-by-chapter commentary serves as an accessible introduction to the controversial topics found in these epistles, such as the rapture, Christ’s second coming, and false teaching.

Addresses on Timothy, Titus & Philemon

  • Author: H.A. Ironside
  • Publication Date: 1947

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5

1 & 2 Timothy and Titus are letters of counsel from the heart of a pastor. In them, Paul gives encouragement, instruction, and practical ministry advice fitting not only for his recipients but for modern readers. The book of Philemon deals with the Gospel within the context of complex cultural and social arrangements. How does the Gospel apply to an escaped slave? Ironside’s commentary outlines the key themes of each of these books in accessible and easy-to-understand language.

Studies in the Epistle to the Hebrews

  • Author: H.A. Ironside
  • Publication Date: 1932

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5

The epistle to the Hebrews, perhaps more than anywhere else in the New Testament, outlines the fulfillment of Old Testament ritual and prophecy in the person and work of Jesus Christ. Ironside’s commentary explores in detail the priesthood, the sacrificial nature of redemption, and the New Covenant.

Expository Notes on the Epistle of James

  • Author: H.A. Ironside
  • Publication Date: 1947

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5

James, the brother of Jesus, occupied a prominent place in the Jerusalem church, as is mentioned in the book of Acts. The tone of James bears the imprint of his Jewish upbringing, but his insistence in Acts 15 that Christians were not obligated to follow Jewish customs points to his lifelong wrestling between the Gospel of Christ and the ritual of his Jewish past. These seemingly contradictory sentiments are present in the book of James as well.

This epistle has been met with skepticism—most notably by Martin Luther, who thought it contradictory to the Gospel. Ironside, however, explains that James tactfully outlines a living faith—lives exemplified by righteous living and godly behavior. Most importantly, Ironside shows that James deals not with abstruse doctrinal themes but with practical Christian ethics.

Expository Notes on the Epistles of Peter

  • Author: H.A. Ironside
  • Publication Date: 1947

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5

1 & 2 Peter were written primarily to Christian Jews of the dispersion, who lived in various provinces in western Asia. Like James, 1 & 2 Peter are not doctrinal, though the great doctrines of Christianity are in clear view throughout the epistles. They are practical epistles, full of exhortations and references to Old Testament history, and centered on the twin concepts of suffering and glory. Ironside’s commentary makes 1 & 2 Peter more accessible to modern readers than ever before.

Addresses on the Epistles of John

  • Author: H.A. Ironside
  • Publication Date: 1931

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5

John’s epistles speak against errors concerning the deity of Christ. In particular, he addresses Gnosticism, Docetism, and Montanism—teachings which have plagued the church ever since John’s first warnings. Ironside’s commentary on 1, 2, & 3 John serves as an excellent starting point for discussions about false teachings in the church today.

An Exposition of the Epistle of Jude

  • Author: H.A. Ironside
  • Publication Date: 1931

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5

Jude may be described as a prophetic history of the apostasy of Christendom from its beginning in apostolic days to its consummation at the end of the age. Ironside’s commentary on the book reminds readers—then and now—that they live in the middle of the fulfillment of Jude’s message.

Revelation: An Expository Commentary

  • Author: H.A. Ironside
  • Publication Date: 1919

After the First World War, at a time when the “corruption of the human heart” was clearly evident, Ironside recognized a “need for some… exposition of the last prophetic book of the Bible which would take cognizance” of the prophetic importance of the war’s atrocities. Published first in 1920 as Lectures on the Book of Revelation, this lucid account of John’s vision and its meaning will profit all believers wishing to better understand this mysterious and illuminating text. As the author states in the introduction, “It is certainly cause for deep regret that to so many Christians the Book of Revelation seems to be what God never intended it should be—a sealed book… It is clearly evident that this portion of Holy Scripture was given for our instruction and edification, but thousands of the Lord’s people permit themselves to be robbed of blessing by ignoring it.”

The Poems of H. A. Ironside

  • Author: H.A. Ironside
  • Publication Date: 1962
  • Pages: 32

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5

Although Ironside is known for his prolific writing, captivating preaching, and gifted storytelling, he also penned numerous poems and hymn texts. This volume contains twenty-seven poems that cover the key themes of Ironside’s life and ministry, such as forgiveness, redemption, Christ’s return, and future glory. These poems complement Ironside’s other sermons and writings, but also provide inspiration on their own.

The Continual Burnt Offering

  • Author: H.A. Ironside
  • Publication Date: 1994
  • Pages: 379

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4

This volume includes 366 devotional readings—one for each day of the year. Each devotional contains a short passage of Scripture, followed by brief and accessible reflections written by Ironside himself. Poems and hymns conclude each devotional. Some of the material is taken from Ironside’s sermons and other writings, but much of it is original to this volume. These devotions are ideal for families, couples, and individuals looking to take their Bible reading to the next level. This volume also includes a yearly Bible-reading plan.

Full Assurance: A Series of Messages for Anxious Souls

  • Author: H.A. Ironside
  • Publication Date: 1937
  • Pages: 127

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5

Ironside penned these messages with a simple goal in mind: “to make as plain as I possibly can just how any troubled soul may find settled peace with God.” He is concerned with doubters and skeptics, and especially those too indifferent to investigate Christianity. Drawing from biblical reflection and his own experience, Ironside finds words to comfort those who doubt, and provides simple and honest exposition for skeptics.

Four Golden Hours

  • Author: H.A. Ironside
  • Publication Date: 1920
  • Pages: 233

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5

This collection of four lectures on Christ’s second coming broaches a subject normally avoided for its controversy. Ironside delivered these lectures to more than 3,000 eager listeners in Kingsway Hall in London because, he says, controversial doctrines such as these—like the virgin birth and Christ’s resurrection—deserve full attention. These lectures cover the implications of the Second Coming for Israel, for the Gentiles, and for the Church, and serve as the precedent for eschatological discussion in early twentieth century fundamentalist circles.

The Mission of the Holy Spirit

  • Author: H.A. Ironside
  • Publication Date: 1950
  • Pages: 64

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5

Ironside’s five addresses on the work of the Holy Spirit are rooted in Christ’s promise that he would send a Comforter to accomplish Christ’s work throughout the world and into the present. Ironside distinguishes the Spirit’s work from emotion or ecstasy—the presence of the Spirit does not constitute merely a subjective encounter, but rather an active regeneration and a continuation of Christ’s work into the lives of present believers. As in all of Ironside’s sermons, these addresses on the Holy Spirit blur the line between sermonizing and storytelling, making them an accessible introduction to the work of the Holy Spirit.

Praying in the Holy Spirit

  • Author: H.A. Ironside
  • Publication Date: 1946
  • Pages: 61

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5

Why should we pray? What hinders prayer? How do we pray according to the will of God? This series of ten short meditations on prayer stems from Ironside’s reflection on the command found in Jude 20 to “pray in the Spirit.” These meditations answer the basic questions about prayer which concerned Ironside’s original listeners as much as they perplex modern readers.

Care for God’s Fruit Trees

  • Author: H.A. Ironside
  • Publication Date: 156
  • Pages: 1945

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5

This series of sermons and articles covers such diverse topics as the resurrection, the Gospel of John, the connection between the Messiah and Israel, king Uzziah, and Sabbath-keeping. Each sermon reflects on the theme of a particular verse—such as the fruit trees mentioned in Deuteronomy 20:19—and ends with stories of the same theme found in contemporary life. This book captures the essence of Ironside’s preaching method: beginning with a text or doctrine and moving toward the present, all while using riveting prose and winsome storytelling to make the Bible come alive.

Holiness: The False and the True

  • Author: H.A. Ironside
  • Publication Date: 1935
  • Pages: 87

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5

Ironside begins this volume with an autobiographical account of the role of holiness in his own conversion, and uses his personal experience to make general observations about the holiness movement. He retells the story of his childhood years and his journey toward conversion, including the formative events of his father’s death, his involvement with the Salvation Army, and his struggle with doubt. The second part of Holiness: The False and the True contains an easy-to-understand explication of the doctrine of sanctification and its role in the holiness movement.

Letters to a Roman Catholic Priest

  • Author: H.A. Ironside
  • Publication Date: 1954
  • Pages: 48

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5

This volume contains four short letters to a Roman Catholic priest whom Ironside met on a train. In this correspondence, Ironside challenges the priest on the similarities and differences between the Roman Catholic Church and early twentieth-century Protestantism. He also questions the priest on consubstantiation and transubstantiation, the role of the Mass, the place of devotion to Mary, and justification by faith. In the final letter, Ironside compares his views of Scripture and tradition with the views of the priest. This selection of correspondence reveals a tenuous relationship between Protestants and Catholics in Ironside’s era, yet testifies to his unswerving belief and thorough command of doctrine.

The Four Hundred Silent Years

  • Author: H.A. Ironside
  • Publication Date: 1914
  • Pages: 104

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5

“History repeats itself in manifold ways,” writes Ironside in the introduction, “and he who is wise will not despise its instruction.” In The Four Hundred Silent Years, Ironside provides an easy-to-understand account of the period between the end of Malachi and the beginning of Matthew. In it, he provides not merely a chronological outline or a series of biological sketches, but traces the warnings of Ezra and Nehemiah, along with Josephus and other Jewish historians. He covers the end of the priestly rule, the days of the Maccabees, the end of the Asmonean Dynasty, and the Edomites. The final chapter is devoted to a brief commentary on the major writings of Jewish literature, including the Apocrypha.

Ironside’s intention to draw practical lessons from the intertestamental period makes this the perfect book for anyone interested in an introduction to this important historical era and the implications for the modern church.

The Midnight Cry!

  • Author: H.A. Ironside
  • Publication Date: 1915
  • Pages: 56

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5

When will Christ return? How do we respond to his command to “watch and pray”? Ironside confronts these questions with bold interpretations of prophecy, and warnings for urgent repentance. He first appeals to skeptics with evidence that the church now exists at the close of history, before tackling the history of the Gentiles and the prospects for the future of unbelievers. He also devotes a chapter to the history and the nation of Israel and its role in Christ’s return. This fascinating account will interest anyone concerned with the fulfillment of biblical prophecy and the anticipation of Christ’s second coming.

Life Laid Down: A Brief Memoir of Fannie M. Arthur

  • Author: H.A. Ironside
  • Publication Date: 1917
  • Pages: 87

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5

This volume affirms Ironside’s conviction that the only writing more important than Christian biography is the Bible itself. His account of Fannie M. Arthur’s life combines her letters with secondary sources to produce a compelling and inspiring story. Although born in Philadelphia, she spent the formative years of her childhood in Costa Rica, as the daughter of missionary parents. When her parents moved back to the United States, Arthur’s urge to return abroad remained. After working for a publisher and attending nursing school, Fannie Arthur transitioned into mission work in Honduras. During one of her return trips, she died in Guatemala, ending a life of devotion to God, but inspiring a future generation of mission efforts.

Ironside’s captivating storytelling and makes this the perfect volume for anyone interested in Christian biography and the history of missions.

Setting the Stage for the Last Act of the Great World Drama

  • Author: H.A. Ironside
  • Publication Date: 1937
  • Pages: 32

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5

In this lecture, Ironside retells the story of the End Times using the framework of a theatrical drama. He divides the End Times into five acts: the first four precede Christ’s death on the cross, and we now find ourselves in the fifth and final act of an unfolding drama. Gleaning from prophesy in Daniel and Revelation, Ironside interprets the events of history through the lens of apocalyptic prophesy, and predicts wars, political uprisings, and the future of Israel by interpreting the fulfilled prophecy of the past.

Setting the Stage for the Last Act of the Great World Drama, revised edition

  • Author: H.A. Ironside
  • Publication Date: 1949
  • Pages: 32

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5

This second edition incorporates historical events during the time elapsed from the first edition, including the Great Depression and the Second World War.

The Mass Versus the Lord’s Supper

  • Author: H.A. Ironside
  • Publication Date: 1926
  • Pages: 32

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This volume contains the text of a sermon delivered at the Moody Memorial Church in Chicago on June 27, 1926 at an evangelistic rally held one day after a Eucharistic Conference. In this sermon, Ironside discerns whether Christ’s body is physically present in the bread and wine of the Mass, and, if so, the implications for our understanding of Christ’s original sacrifice on the cross. He contends that Roman Catholic practices subvert the Gospel, and favors the simpler, Protestant method of celebrating the Lord’s Supper.

Looking Backward Over a Third of a Century of Prophetic Fulfillment

  • Author: H.A. Ironside
  • Publication Date: 1931
  • Pages: 29

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How do the events of history precede the final return of Christ? In this sermon delivered at the Bible Institute in Los Angeles on January 8, 1930, Ironside reflects on the events of the first thirty-three years of his own life which indicate Christ’s imminent return. In particular, he notes the rise of Zionism and the support for the nation of Israel, and he interprets World War I in light of prophecy in Revelation and Daniel.

Sailing With Paul: Simple Papers for Young Christians

  • Author: H.A. Ironside
  • Publication Date: 1913
  • Pages: 78

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What does it mean to sail with Paul? It is to know Paul’s Savior and share Paul’s blessings, says Ironside. Join Ironside as he travels with Paul—both geographically and theologically—to uncover the mysteries of Paul’s theology and the stories of his travels. Ironside devotes special attention to the themes which concerned his congregation, such as conversion, forgiveness, justification and sanctification, baptism and the Lord’s Supper, and Christ’s return. More importantly, each of these theological themes serves as the bedrock of Pauline theology. Ultimately, the end of Paul’s geographic journey in Rome merges with his theological goal: to be with Jesus.

Divine Priorities and Other Messages

  • Author: H.A. Ironside
  • Publication Date: 1945
  • Pages: 104

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In this collection of nine sermons, preached within the context of a World War, Ironside implored his congregants to reconsider their priorities at the same time that their country—embarking on a massive war effort—was re-examining its own. To whom do we owe true allegiance? Can rationing goods for the war effort teach us something about our devotion to Christ? After all, says Ironside, Christ is more deserving of our obligations. In these sermons, Ironside covers the life and work of Jesus, missions, and the connection between divine healing and the atonement. Ironside also responds to a Roman Catholic priest’s allegation that Protestantism lay at the source of the world’s problems and that it ought to be abolished.

The Unchanging Christ and Other Sermons

  • Author: H.A. Ironside
  • Publication Date: 1942
  • Pages: 159

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This collection is based on twelve sermons Ironside delivered in the 1930s at Moody Memorial Church, which were originally heard by more than three thousand individuals. Ironside primarily devotes his attention to issues relating to the life and work of Christ, but also covers Pentecost and prophecy—the outworking of Jesus’ life in the rest of the New Testament and in the present. These sermons uniquely connect Christ’s life with important theological topics, such as forgiveness, the priesthood of all believers, and the Second Coming. This collection also includes sermons on practical components of the Christian life, which reveal a rare glimpse into Ironside’s reflections on less-controversial social issues, such as tithing, godly behavior, and procrastination.

The Teaching of the So-called Plymouth Brethren: Is it Scriptural?

  • Author: H.A. Ironside
  • Publication Date: 1985
  • Pages: 23

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What is the proper place of symbolism and ritual in the Church? What is the role of the clergy? According to the Plymouth Brethren in the nineteenth century, ritual has no place in the church, and the very notion of clergy—in the words of John Darby, one of the movement’s founders—is heretical. Their skeptical assessment of scripture and tradition raised the ire of not a few church leaders, among them A. H. Strong. After Strong penned a damning indictment of the Plymouth Brethren movement, H. A. Ironside weighed in on the controversy at the request of a congregant, and, in doing so, brought needed clarity to a hotly debated topic.

In this volume, Ironside examines each of Strong’s sixteen objections to the Plymouth Brethren movement, using Scripture as his model and tradition as his guide. Although the controversy has subsided—thanks, in part, to Ironside’s thoughtful engagement—the core issues still remain, and the relevance of Ironside’s analysis continues to address issues the modern church faces. Decades later, this important book still has the capacity to teach, guide, and inspire.

Baptism: What Saith the Scripture?

  • Author: H.A. Ironside
  • Publication Date: 1930
  • Pages: 48

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How is baptism connected to conversion? Forgiveness? Salvation? Should the church baptize children? Can someone be baptized twice? Who has the authority to baptize?

The controversy which surrounds these topics stems from too much philosophizing and, says Ironside, a misreading of Scripture. Ironside aims to solve the problem by offering a comprehensive and clear scriptural teaching on baptism. He examines the words of Jesus, the ministry of Paul, and the controversies in the New Testament church. In the end, Ironside faults many preachers and teachers for reading their own teaching into Scripture; not deriving their teaching out of Scripture—the proper way to adduce a theology of Baptism.

Baptism: What Saith the Scripture? addresses significant issues from Ironside’s own life—appropriately so, since discussions about baptism are as much theological topics as they are autobiographical stories.

Lectures on the Levitical Offerings

  • Author: H.A. Ironside
  • Publication Date: 1951
  • Pages: 78

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The book of Leviticus is commonly avoided for its obscure sacrifices, empty rituals, and mundane ceremonies which the modern church is no longer obligated to practice. Yet that makes Leviticus no less important. Although Ironside warns against basing doctrine on the Levitical offerings, he does successfully show that the Old Testament is meant to illustrate and emphasize the central doctrines of the New Testament. In particular, Leviticus illuminates the doctrine of the atonement, and each of the five offerings found in Leviticus foreshadows the work of Christ. The book of Leviticus should not be discarded, but studied, and Ironside’s volume offers an excellent introduction.

What Think Ye of Christ?

  • Author: H.A. Ironside
  • Publication Date: 1953
  • Pages: 31

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The doctrine of the incarnation has been met, throughout the history of the church, with skepticism, ridicule, and outright rejection. Ironside tackles each objection to this central doctrine, and compares modern movements—such as Mormonism and Seventh-Day Adventism—to the historical heresies of Gnosticism and Arianism. He also launches into lengthy diatribes against modernism and higher criticism, and successfully defends the veracity and credibility of the incarnation. This important work provides a comprehensive and accessible introduction to this central doctrine.

Adders’ Eggs and Spider’s Webs, or Human Theories vs. Divine Revelation

  • Author: H.A. Ironside
  • Publication Date: 1924
  • Pages: 31

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How does sin manifest itself in the world? In the Church? The title of this volume is inspired by Isaiah 59:5—“They hatch adders’ eggs and weave the spider’s web”—which describes actions of those guilty of sin against God. Ironside warns against the dangers of sin creeping into the church, such as doubts about the efficacy of prayer, an embrace of modernism and liberalism, and the tenability of evolution.

Salvation and Reward

  • Author: H.A. Ironside
  • Publication Date: 1930
  • Pages: 32

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We are saved “by grace alone,” says Paul, but “faith without deeds is useless,” according to James.

These two, seemingly contradictory, notions of salvation exist in the Gospel, and have been the source of perennial controversy in the church ever since. Is our salvation a race to run or a prize to be obtained? Both, says Ironside, and the presence of both metaphors in the New Testament is not accidental. Finishing the race happens only by God’s mercy—the prize.

The Eternal Security of the Believer

  • Author: H.A. Ironside
  • Publication Date: 1934
  • Pages: 48

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Can a believer ever be lost? Do those who rescind their belief in Christ compromise their eternal salvation? How do we reconcile “…nothing can separate us from the love of Christ” with Jesus’ words of warning in John 10: “I never knew you.”?

Ironside addresses these questions—solicited from members of his congregation—in a series of lectures and sermons at the Moody Memorial Church. He roots his answers in clear, biblical exposition, and resolves important theological and pastoral concerns within his own church. Ironside’s thoughtful answers in easy-to-understand language continue to allay the concerns of individuals grappling with the same issues.

The Only Begotten Son

  • Author: H.A. Ironside
  • Publication Date: 1926
  • Pages: 29

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The Gospels refer to Jesus as God’s “only begotten son” five times, and they mention “the firstborn son” five more times. This phrase has found its way into our creeds, confessions, hymnody, and common vocabulary, but what does it mean?

Ironside links together disparate passages of Scripture which contain this phrase to determine what it means for God to become flesh and dwell among us. More importantly, he shows how the life of Jesus on earth reveals to us the nature of God as a deity.

The Oxford Group Movement: Is it Scriptural?

  • Author: H.A. Ironside
  • Publication Date: 1943
  • Pages: 32

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The New Testament church is often held as a model for how the church should function and grow. Frank Buchman’s attempts in 1908 to return to the teachings of the New Testament church gained a wide following in America and were popularized when the group he founded migrated to Oxford. They became known as the Oxford Group, and alternatively as First Century Christianity.

But were their motivations scriptural? Ironside peers behind the mask of their good intentions, and implores them to confess their sins before God.

Not Wrath… But Rapture

  • Author: H.A. Ironside
  • Publication Date: 1941
  • Pages: 48

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What is meant by the “Great Tribulation”? Will the church endure the tribulation? Is the rapture a tenable belief? Ironside contrasts the judgment of God with salvation to determine to the basis for the events of the future. He also introduces biblical prophecy and connects it to historical events, and also offers an exhaustive biblical survey of the Great Tribulation. Most importantly, Ironside explains that the Great Tribulation differs from God’s wrath or fury. Ultimately, God’s judgment and wrath—and the events of the tribulation—are overcome by salvation and love. He explains that the End Times should not lead to fear, but inspire hope.

Wrongly Dividing the Word of Truth

  • Author: H.A. Ironside
  • Publication Date: 1938
  • Pages: 66

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In this volume, Ironside examines dispensationalism in light of Scripture. Originally published as a series of enormously popular articles in Serving and Waiting, the magazine of the Philadelphia School of the Bible, Ironside addresses the nature and progression of God’s revelation, and cautions readers against following our own ideas farther than Scripture intends. He also discourages the teachings of ultra-dispensationalism, or Bullingerism, and discusses the function of baptism and the Lord’s Supper in dispensationalist teaching.

Death and Afterwards

  • Author: H.A. Ironside
  • Publication Date: 1936
  • Pages: 48

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What happens when we die? This question invariably confronts everyone. Yet, as Ironside shows in these three addresses, Christians respond differently—and less fearfully—than non-Christians to the question. Ironside surveys the New Testament in search of answers, and finds that in the absence of God, death constitutes a hapless void at best—but more likely the afterlife is filled with eternal punishment. He devotes his final address to the existence of the body and soul in the afterlife.

Great Words of the Gospel

  • Author: H.A. Ironside
  • Publication Date: 1950
  • Pages: 124

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This volume contains ten sermons preached at Moody Memorial Church intended for recent converts, but, says Ironside, they will benefit mature believers as well. He covers the basic tenets of Christianity, such as redemption, justification and sanctification, the resurrection, and future glorification. This volume fittingly summarizes Ironside’s thought, and offers a glimpse into his pastoral concern.

Pamphlets and Short Works by H.A. Ironside

  • Author: H.A. Ironside
  • Pages: 236

In addition to Ironside’s books, The Works of H.A. Ironside also includes twenty-five of Ironside’s shorter publications, including pamphlets, sermon notes, tracts, as well as individual lectures and sermons.

  • After Death, What?
  • Another Gospel!
  • Apostolic Faith Missions and the So-Called Second Pentecost
  • •Bearing About in the Body the Dying of the Lord Jesus
  • The Blackness of Darkness Forever
  • The Christian and His Money
  • A Churchman or a Christian—Which?
  • Healing—Is it in the Atonement?
  • For Your Sakes: Abbreviated Notes of an Address Given to the Pueblo Indians
  • Good Sinner
  • Hebrew’s Search for the Blood of Atonement
  • The Holy Trinity: An Address
  • How an Actress Was Saved: A True Story
  • "I’m In for a Good Time"
  • Implications of the Resurrection
  • The Mormon’s Mistake; Or, What Is the Gospel?
  • My Conversion to God
  • The Only Two Religions
  • The Real St. Patrick
  • The Right Priest for a Death-Bed
  • The Stone That Will Fall from Heaven
  • There Was No Room In the Inn
  • The Unity School of Christianity
  • Which Thief?
  • Who Will Be Saved in the Coming Period of Judgment?

Product Details

  • Title: The Works of H. A. Ironside
  • Author: H. A. Ironside
  • Volumes: 65
  • Pages: More than 6,000

About H. A. Ironside

Harry Allen Ironside, one of the twentieth century’s greatest preachers, was born in Toronto, Canada on October 14, 1876. Though his education stopped with grammar school, his fondness for reading and a retentive memory put his learning to use. His scholarship was recognized in academic circles when he received honorary degrees from Wheaton College and Bob Jones University and was invited as frequent lecturer at Dallas Theological Seminary. Dr. Ironside was appointed to the boards of numerous Bible institutes, seminaries, and Christian organizations. He also served as director of the Africa Inland Mission.

Ironside preached widely throughout the United States and abroad. He served as pastor of Moody Memorial Church from 1930 to 1948, and during his lifetime, he preached more than 7,000 sermons to over 1.25 million listeners.