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IVP Evangelical Theology Collection (11 vols.)
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Overview

Established in 1992, the annual Wheaton Theology Conference has existed to explore the parameters of Evangelical theology in North America. Since its inception, more than one hundred of today’s most respected Christian thinkers have gathered in Wheaton, IL to deliver essays addressing the issues that most affect the contemporary Church. Selected essays from eleven of these conferences were made available in print form through InterVarsity Press.

Now, Logos is proud to offer in electronic form the volumes first published by IVP. The IVP Evangelical Theology Collection covers the gamut of theological issues concerning the Church over the past twenty years. Topics addressed in this collection cover everything from racial and egalitarian issues, to attempts at outlining a theology of justification and ecclesiology as they are represented throughout the greater Christian Tradition.

Few theology conferences have been established to address such a broad scope of pressing theological topics at such a crucial time in the history of the Evangelical movement. The Logos edition of these volumes will allow you to easily find corresponding scripture references and search each essay against your existing digital library. With this Logos collection you will be able to quickly search and access important ideas from these individual essays for your sermons, class notes, or research projects without having to hunt through the print edition.

Key Features

  • Eleven years of the Wheaton Theology Conference in one collection
  • Covers the spectrum of pressing issues in contemporary theology
  • More than one hundred forty essays in all!

Praise for the Print Edition

…an excellent resource for anyone considering the issue of women in ministry.

—Sandi Bradford, Enrichment

Individual Titles

Ancient Faith For the Church's Future

  • Editors: Mark Husbands and Jeffrey P. Greenman
  • Publisher: Downers Grove, IVP
  • Publication Date: 2008
  • Pages: 272

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Mark Husbands and Jeffrey P. Greenman bring together select essays from the 2007 Wheaton Theology Conference, Ancient Faith for the Church's Future demonstrates the vitality and significance of the early church for contemporary Christian witness and practice. These fourteen essays provide for a significant evangelical ressourcement by considering the importance of the thought and practice of the patristic church especially for:

  • Interpreting Scripture
  • Engaging in missional witness through hospitality, social justice and evangelism
  • Renewing our worship and prayer
  • Grasping afresh our salvation through Jesus Christ, and
  • Authentically engaging our surrounding culture

Fresh and forward-looking, this book leads the way toward a deeply rooted church that points beyond contemporary evangelical accommodation to civil religion, privatism and enlightenment methodologies toward its true vocation to bear vital witness to God's present and coming kingdom.

Contributors include: Christopher A. Hall, Brian E. Daley, S.J., D. H. Williams, Michael Graves, Peter J. Leithart, Nicholas Perrin, Christine Pohl, George Kalantzis, Alan Kreider, John Witvliet, Paul I. Kim, D. Stephen Long, and Jason Byassee.

About the Editors

Mark Husbands (Ph. D., University of St. Michael's College) is Leonard and Marjorie Maas Associate Professor of Reformed Theology at Hope College. He has also taught at Wheaton College, Wheaton, Illinois, and at Tyndale College and Seminary and Sheridan College in Toronto. While a Master’s student at Wycliffe College at the Toronto School of Theology, he was senior editor of Prolegomena, an academic journal in theology.

Jeffery P. Greenman (Ph. D., University of Virginia) is Associate Dean of Biblical and Theological Studies and Professor of Christian Ethics at Wheaton College, Wheaton, Illinois.

Biblical Theology: Retrospect and Prospect

  • Editor: Scott J. Hafemann
  • Publisher: Downers Grove, IVP
  • Publication Date: 2002
  • Pages: 300

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

The turn of the millennium appears to be a good time for a fresh assessment of the discipline of Biblical Theology, where it has been, the status of various questions within it and its future prospects. Scott Hafemann pulls together a stellar team of practitioners, scholars from the disciplines of both Old and New Testament studies, to give us a status report.

After an introductory essay by Hafemann looking back on recent history, John H. Sailhammer (Southeastern Baptist), Brian G. Toews (Philadelphia College of the Bible), William J. Dumbrell (Presbyterian Theological Centre, Australia), Stephen G. Dempster (Atlantic Baptist), Richard Schults (Wheaton College), Gerald H. Wilson (Asuza Pacific) and M. Jay Wells chart the current state of Old Testament questions. James M. Scott (Trinity Western), Andreas J. Köstenberger (Southeaster Baptist), G. K. Beale (Wheaton College) and Peter Stuhlmacher (Tübingen) examine the state of New Testament studies.

Questions surrounding the unity of the Bible are explored by Christopher R. Seitz (St. Andrew's, Scotland), Nicholas Perrin (Westminster Abbey), Stephen E. Fowl (Loyola-Baltimore), Daniel P. Fuller (Fuller Theological Seminary) and Ted M. Dornan (Taylor University). The prognosis for biblical theology is then suggested by Paul R. House (Wheaton College) and Graeme Goldsworthy (Moore Theological College, Australia).

About Scott J. Hafemann

Scott J. Hafemann (Th. D., Tübingen) is the Mary F. Rockefeller Distinguished Professor of New Testament at Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary in South Hamilton, Massachusetts. Prior to joining the faculty of Gordon-Conwell, he served from 1995 to 2004 as the Gerald F. Hawthorne Professor of New Testament Greek and Exegesis at Wheaton College and Graduate School in Wheaton, Illinois. His books include Suffering and the Ministry of the Spirit; Paul, Moses and the History of Israel; an NIV Application Commentary on 2 Corinthians; and The God of Promise and the Life of Faith: Understanding the Heart of the Bible.

Care for the Soul: Exploring the Intersection of Psychology & Theology

  • Editors: Mark R. McMinn and Timothy R. Phillips
  • Publisher: Downers Grove, IVP
  • Publication Date: 2001
  • Pages: 364

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

For two millennia Christians have been caring for souls. Since the Enlightenment, though, the Christian concept of the soul has been usurped by modern and postmodern notions of the self. "Somehow we misplaced the soul even as we developed a thriving science of the psyche," lament the editors of this volume. Thus there is a clash between Western therapeutic culture and the church's understanding of the soul's nature and its care.

As a result, some Christians deride psychology as dangerous. Others believe that it has much to offer Christians interested in caring for the soul. What is the proper relationship between psychology and theology? Is soul care the shared task of these two fields? This collection of essays is a multidisciplinary dialogue on the interface between psychology and theology that takes seriously the long, rich tradition of soul care in the church.

Contributors include: Jeffry H. Boyd, Ellen T. Charry, Deborah van Deusen Hunsinger, L. Gregory Jones, Stanton L. Jones, Cynthia Neal Kimball, Bryan N. Maier, Michael Mangis, Philip G. Monroe, Stephen K. Moroney, Dennis L. Okholm, David Powlison, Robert C. Roberts, Richard L. Schultz, Myrla Seibold, Brett Webb-Mitchell and David Alan Williams.

About the Editors

Mark R. McMinn (Ph. D., Vanderbilt University) is a professor of psychology at George Fox University where he teaches in the Graduate Department of Clinical Psychology. He is a licensed clinical psychologist, board certified with the American Board of Professional Psychology and a Fellow of the American Psychological Association.

Timothy R. Phillips (Ph. D., Vanderbilt University) was associate professor of historical and systematic theology at Wheaton College, where he was instrumental in starting and organizing the annual Wheaton College Theology Conference.

Christian Apologetics in the Postmodern World

  • Editors: Timothy R. Phillips and Dennis L. Okholm
  • Publisher: Downers Grove, IVP
  • Publication Date: 2008
  • Pages: 272

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5

In Christian Apologetics in the Postmodern World some of evangelicalism's most stimulating thinkers consider three possible apologetic responses to postmodernity. William Lane Craig argues that traditional evidentialist apologetics remains viable and preferable. Roger Lundin, Nicola Creegan and James Sire find the postmodern critique of Christianity and Western culture more challenging, but reject central features of it. Philip Kenneson, Brian Walsh and J. Richard Middleton, on the other hand, argue that key aspects of postmodernity can be appropriated to defend orthodox Christianity.

An essential feature are the trenchant chapters by Ronald Clifton Potter, Dennis Hollinger and Douglas Webster considering issues facing the local church in light of postmodernity. The volume’s editors and John Stackhouse also add important introductory essays that orient the reader to postmodernity and various apologetic strategies.

About the Editors

Timothy R. Phillips (Ph. D., Vanderbilt University) was associate professor of historical and systematic theology at Wheaton College, where he was instrumental in starting and organizing the annual Wheaton College Theology Conference.

Dennis L. Okholm (Ph. D., Princeton Theological Seminary) teaches in the department of theology and philosophy at Haggard School of Theology, Azusa Pacific University. Previously he was associate professor of theology at Wheaton College in Wheaton, Illinois. He is also an ordained minister in the Presbyterian Church (USA), and an oblate of a Benedictine monastery (Blue Cloud Abbey, SD).

Evangelicals and Scripture: Tradition, Authority, and Hermeneutics

  • Editors: Vincent E. Bacote, Laura C. Miguelez, and Dennis L. Okholm
  • Publisher: Downers Grove, IVP
  • Publication Date: 2004
  • Pages: 245

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

By definition, a high view of Scripture inheres in evangelicalism. However, there does not seem to be a uniform way to articulate an evangelical doctrine of Scripture.

Taking up the challenge, Vincent Bacote, Laura Miguélez and Dennis Okholm present twelve essays that explore in depth the meaning of an evangelical doctrine of Scripture that takes seriously both the human and divine dimensions of the Bible. Selected from the presentations made at the 2001 Wheaton Theology Conference, the essays approach this vital subject from three directions.

Stanley J. Grenz, Thomas Buchan, Bruce L. McCormack and Donald W. Dayton consider the history of evangelical thinking on the nature of Scripture.

John J. Brogan, Kent Sparks, J. Daniel Hays and Richard L. Schultz address the nature of biblical authority.

Bruce Ellis Benson, John R. Franke, Daniel J. Treier and David Alan Williams explore the challenge of hermeneutics, especially as it relates to interpreting Scripture in a postmodern context.

Together these essays provide a window into current evangelical scholarship on the doctrine of Scripture and also advance the dialogue about how best to construe our faith in the Word of God, living and written, that informs not only the belief but also the practice of the church.

About the Editors

Vincent E. Bacote (Ph. D., Drew University) is assistant professor of theology at Wheaton College in Wheaton, Illinois.

Laura C. Miguelez is assistant professor of theology at Wheaton College in Wheaton, Illinois.

Dennis L. Okholm (Ph. D., Princeton Theological Seminary) teaches in the department of theology and philosophy at Haggard School of Theology, Azusa Pacific University. Previously he was associate professor of theology at Wheaton College in Wheaton, Illinois. He is also an ordained minister in the Presbyterian Church (USA), and an oblate of a Benedictine monastery (Blue Cloud Abbey, SD).

Justification: What’s at Stake in the Current Debates

  • Editors: Mark Husbands and Daniel Treier
  • Publisher: Downers Grove, IVP
  • Publication Date: 2004
  • Pages: 282

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

In Justification: What’s at Stake in the Current Debates, Mark Husbands and Daniel J. Treier bring together notable evangelical scholars and teachers to address from biblical, historical, theological and ecumenical perspectives key questions that prevent complete unity between Roman Catholic and Protestant branches of the church and raise tensions even among Protestant denominations. Witnessing to certain signs of hope, these essays also acknowledge points of caution. But for every reader who is looking for guidance and orientation to this doctrine and current discussion, this book provides a wealth of charitable yet incisive insight.

About the Editors

Mark Husbands (Ph. D., University of St. Michael's College) is Leonard and Marjorie Maas Associate Professor of Reformed Theology at Hope College. He has also taught at Wheaton College, Wheaton, Illinois, and at Tyndale College and Seminary and Sheridan College in Toronto. While a Master’s student at Wycliffe College at the Toronto School of Theology, he was senior editor of Prolegomena, an academic journal in theology.

Daniel J. Treier (M. Div. and Th. M., Grand Rapids Theological Seminary; Ph.D., Trinity Evangelical Divinity School) is associate professor of theology at Wheaton College in Wheaton, Illinois. He has also taught at Trinity Evangelical Divinity School and Cornerstone University in Grand Rapids, MI. He is an associate editor of the Dictionary for Theological Interpretation of the Bible.

The Beauty of God: Theology and the Arts

  • Editors: Daniel Treier, Mark Husbands and Roger Lundin
  • Publisher: Downers Grove, IVP
  • Publication Date: 200
  • Pages: 272

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Editors Mark Husbands, Roger Lundin and Daniel J. Treier present ten essays from the 2006 Wheaton Theology Conference that explore a Christian approach to beauty and the arts.

Theology has much to contribute in providing a place for the arts in the Christian life, and the arts have much to contribute to the quality of Christian life, worship and witness.

The 2006 Wheaton Theology Conference explored a wide-ranging Christian approach to divine beauty and the earthly arts. Written and illustrated by artists and theologians, these essays illuminate for us the Christian significance of the visual arts, music and literature, as well as sounding forth the theological meaning and place of the arts in a fallen world—fallen, yet redeemed by Christ.

Here is a veritable feast for pastors, artists, theologians and students eager to consider the profound but not necessarily obvious connection between Christianity and the arts.

Contributors include: Jeremy S. Begbie, Bruce Ellis Benson, E. John Walford, Bruce Herman, Roy Anker, Jill Pelaez Baumgaertner, James Fodor, Roger Lundin, and Edward T. Oakes, S.J.

About the Editors

Daniel J. Treier (M. Div. and Th. M., Grand Rapids Theological Seminary; Ph.D., Trinity Evangelical Divinity School) is associate professor of theology at Wheaton College in Wheaton, Illinois. He has also taught at Trinity Evangelical Divinity School and Cornerstone University in Grand Rapids, MI. He is an associate editor of the Dictionary for Theological Interpretation of the Bible.

Mark Husbands (Ph. D., University of St. Michael's College) is Leonard and Marjorie Maas Associate Professor of Reformed Theology at Hope College. He has also taught at Wheaton College, Wheaton, Illinois, and at Tyndale College and Seminary and Sheridan College in Toronto. While a Master’s student at Wycliffe College at the Toronto School of Theology, he was senior editor of Prolegomena, an academic journal in theology.

Roger Lundin (Ph. D., University of Connecticut) is Blanchard Professor of English at Wheaton College, Wheaton, IL. He is the author of many books and articles including Nature to Experience: The American Search for Cultural Authority, Emily Dickinson and the Art of Belief, The Culture of Interpretation: Christian Faith and the Postmodern World and The Promise of Hermeneutics (with Anthony Thiselton and Clarence Walhout).

The Community of the Word: Toward an Evangelical Ecclesiology

  • Editors: Mark Husbands and Daniel Treier
  • Publisher: Downers Grove, IVP
  • Publication Date: 2005
  • Pages: 291

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

In The Community of the Word, editors Mark Husbands and Daniel J. Treier bring together thirteen scholars and teachers to explore the history of evangelical ecclesiology and the continuing discussion regarding the nature of the church, the question of sacraments, the relation of church to society, and the church's moral character and missional witness.

Contributors include: William J. Abraham, Gary D. Badcock, Craig A. Carter, Ellen T. Charry, William A. Dyrness, Darrell L. Guder, D. G. Hart, Willie James Jennings, Dennis L. Okholm, James K. A. Smith, Allen Verhey, John Webster and Jonathan R. Wilson.

About the Editors

Mark Husbands (Ph. D., University of St. Michael's College) is Leonard and Marjorie Maas Associate Professor of Reformed Theology at Hope College. He has also taught at Wheaton College, Wheaton, Illinois, and at Tyndale College and Seminary and Sheridan College in Toronto. While a Master’s student at Wycliffe College at the Toronto School of Theology, he was senior editor of Prolegomena, an academic journal in theology.

Daniel J. Treier (M. Div. and Th. M., Grand Rapids Theological Seminary; Ph.D., Trinity Evangelical Divinity School) is associate professor of theology at Wheaton College in Wheaton, Illinois. He has also taught at Trinity Evangelical Divinity School and Cornerstone University in Grand Rapids, MI. He is an associate editor of the Dictionary for Theological Interpretation of the Bible.

 

The Gospel in Black and White

  • Editor: Dennis L. Okholm
  • Publisher: Downers Grove, IVP
  • Publication Date: 1997
  • Pages: 194

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

After signal victories of the civil rights movement in the sixties, recent events have shown that the divide between black and white Americans remains alarmingly wide. And as African- and Euro-Americans perhaps increasingly find themselves at odds politically and culturally, Sunday-morning worship dismayingly remains the most segregated hour of the week.

Yet Christians of both races affirm that the gospel calls them together, that they at least should be one people, of one Lord, one faith, one baptism. In that spirit, the incisive and challenging essays in this book consider what rigorous theological work can contribute to the noble and ongoing quest for racial reconciliation.

Some of the church's most exciting black and white thinkers are gathered here by editor Dennis Okholm to address issues of theological method, hermeneutics, soteriology, ecclesiology and social ethics—always with an eye to closing the gaping wound of racism and serving God's kingdom across color lines.

Contributors include: Ronald C. Potter, Willie James Jennings, Vincent Bacote, Gary W. Deddo, Michael G. Cartwright, Craig S. Keener, J. Julius Scott Jr., Cheryl J. Sanders, and Pamela Baker Powell.

About Dennis L. Okholm

Dennis L. Okholm (Ph. D., Princeton Theological Seminary) teaches in the department of theology and philosophy at Haggard School of Theology, Azusa Pacific University. Previously he was associate professor of theology at Wheaton College in Wheaton, Illinois. He is also an ordained minister in the Presbyterian Church (USA), and an oblate of a Benedictine monastery (Blue Cloud Abbey, SD).

The Nature of Confession

  • Editors: Timothy R. Phillips and Dennis L. Okholm
  • Publisher: Downers Grove, IVP
  • Publication Date: 1996
  • Pages: 298

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Are we witnessing a paradigm shift? Can evangelicals and postliberals make common confession? Might they even combine forces to reinvigorate the church—its theology and its mission—for a new era? In this groundbreaking book, creative evangelical and postliberal thinkers explore exactly how they agree and disagree along a range of issues, from epistemology and theological method to doctrinal concerns.

Evangelical contributors include such significant theologians as Alister McGrath and Gabriel Fackre. Postliberal contributors include George Lindbeck, a "founding father" of postliberalism, and George Hunsinger, the former student and major interpreter of the late Hans Frei, another "founder" of postliberalism.

In The Nature of Confession we are presented with the beginnings of a robust discussion of real importance to both the academy and the church.

About the Editors

Timothy R. Phillips (Ph. D., Vanderbilt University) was associate professor of historical and systematic theology at Wheaton College, where he was instrumental in starting and organizing the annual Wheaton College Theology Conference.

Dennis L. Okholm (Ph. D., Princeton Theological Seminary) teaches in the department of theology and philosophy at Haggard School of Theology, Azusa Pacific University. Previously he was associate professor of theology at Wheaton College in Wheaton, Illinois. He is also an ordained minister in the Presbyterian Church (USA), and an oblate of a Benedictine monastery (Blue Cloud Abbey, SD).

Women, Ministry and the Gospel

  • Editors: Mark Husbands and Timothy Larsen
  • Publisher: Downers Grove, IVP
  • Publication Date: 2007
  • Pages: 300

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

This outstanding collection of essays, presented at the 2005 Wheaton Theology Conference, explores the current issue of women in ministry from biblical, theological and ecclesiological perspectives. Bringing to bear the ministerial and sociological insights on the issue, this impressive integrative work aims to break through the current impasse between complementarians and egalitarians. These essays point the way forward for women and men in ministry in our churches.

Contributors include: Henri Blocher, Timothy George, James Hamilton, I. Howard Marshall, Cheryl J. Sanders, Sarah Sumner and Mary Stewart Van Leeuwen.

About the Editors

Mark Husbands (Ph. D., University of St. Michael's College) is Leonard and Marjorie Maas Associate Professor of Reformed Theology at Hope College. He has also taught at Wheaton College, Wheaton, Illinois, and at Tyndale College and Seminary and Sheridan College in Toronto. While a Master’s student at Wycliffe College at the Toronto School of Theology, he was senior editor of Prolegomena, an academic journal in theology.

Timothy Larsen is Professor of Theology at Wheaton College in Wheaton, Illinois. He is a Fellow of the Royal Historical Society and has been elected a Visiting Fellow, Trinity College, Cambridge.

Product Details

  • Title: IVP Evangelical Theology Collection
  • Publisher: IVP
  • Volumes: 11
  • Pages: 2,649