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Homer’s Odyssey (4 vols.)
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Homer’s Odyssey (4 vols.)

by

Harvard University Press, William Heinemann 1919

Runs on Windows, Mac and mobile.
$25.99

Overview

Perhaps the best-known and most influential of the Greek epics, Homer’s works stand in a class by themselves. The Odyssey is one of the oldest existing works of Western literature and played an important role in shaping subsequent Greek culture. Its influence carries up to present day. One of the most important literary works of the twentieth century, James Joyce’s Ulysses, is a direct and intentional parallel of the Odyssey (Ulysses is the Latin version of Odysseus, the main character in the Odyssey).

This collection contains the complete texts in their Loeb Classical Library editions. Each text is included in its original Greek, with an English translation for side-by-side comparison. Use Logos’ language tools to go deeper into the Greek text and explore Homer’s elegance. You can also use the dictionary lookup tool to examine difficult English words used by the translator. If you are at all interested in the study of rhetoric, literature, or Greek—whether you’re a classical scholar who wants the convenience of Homer at a click or a student approaching Greek for the first time—Homer’s Odyssey is a must.

In the Logos edition, this volume is enhanced by amazing functionality. Scripture citations link directly to English translations, and important terms link to dictionaries, encyclopedias, and a wealth of other resources in your digital library. Perform powerful searches to find exactly what you’re looking for. Take the discussion with you using tablet and mobile apps. With Logos Bible Software, the most efficient and comprehensive research tools are in one place, so you get the most out of your study.

Key Features

  • Contains the Loeb Classical Library editions
  • Includes extensive, in-depth indexes
  • Provides both the original Greek text and the English translation

Product Details

Individual Titles

Odyssey, vol. 1

  • Author: Homer
  • Translator: A.T. Murray
  • Series: Loeb Classical Library
  • Publisher: Harvard University Press
  • Publication Date: 1919
  • Pages: 248

This volume contains A.T. Murray’s English translation of the first volume of Homer’s Odyssey.

Odyssey, vol. 1: Greek Text

  • Author: Homer
  • Series: Loeb Classical Library
  • Publisher: Harvard University Press
  • Publication Date: 1919
  • Pages: 248

This volume contains the Greek text of the first volume of Homer’s Odyssey.

Odyssey, vol. 2

  • Author: Homer
  • Translator: A.T. Murray
  • Series: Loeb Classical Library
  • Publisher: Harvard University Press
  • Publication Date: 1919
  • Pages: 240

This volume contains A.T. Murray’s English translation of the second volume of Homer’s Odyssey.

Odyssey, vol. 2: Greek Text

  • Author: Homer
  • Series: Loeb Classical Library
  • Publisher: Harvard University Press
  • Publication Date: 1919
  • Pages: 240

This volume contains the Greek text of the second volume of Homer’s Odyssey.

About Homer

Homer (ca. 8th century BC) is the subject of intense debate regarding his life and origins. No solid biographical information exists for Homer, though legends abound. His name is related to a Greek word meaning “blind,” giving rise to the tradition of Homer as the blind bard. Many modern scholars dismiss the notion of Homer as a single author, arguing that the works attributed to him are based on many generations of oral story telling. When speaking of Homer, these scholars are referring to the date in which the works attributed to Homer were created. Some scholars suggest that Homer refers to the function of redacting oral tradition into a coherent whole.

About A. T. Murray

Augustus Taber Murray (1866–1940) was born to a Quaker family in New York City. He graduated from Haverford College in 1885 and earned a PhD from Johns Hopkins University in 1890. He also studied at the universities of Leipzig and Berlin. In 1892 he became a professor of Greek at Stanford University, where he remained for the rest of his life. He was also on the managing committee of the American School of Classical Studies in Athens, Greece, for 30 years.