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Cornerstone Biblical Commentary Series (CBC) (9 vols.)
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Overview

The nine-volume Cornerstone Biblical Commentary Series helps teachers, pastors, students, and laypersons understand every thought contained in the Bible. The commentary focuses on the words of Scripture, the theological truths of Scripture, and original language texts as well as English translations of the Bible. Nearly 100 scholars from various church backgrounds and several countries contributed to this massive commentary.

This series is structured to explain meaning of every passage in Scripture. Each book of the Bible includes a substantial introduction that offers important historical background. Readers are taken through the Bible, passage by passage, followed by a section of notes on the Greek and Hebrew behind the English of the New Living Translation. This section includes contributions from scholars on important interpretive issues, pointing readers to significant textual, contextual, and theological matters.

With the Logos edition of the Cornerstone Biblical Commentary Series, you can read the commentary on the text alongside the New Living Translation, as well as the Greek and Hebrew texts in your digital library! Perform powerful searches and word studies and click your way to Greek and Hebrew definitions. What’s more, you can also link the Cornerstone Biblical Commentary to the other commentaries in your library for quick and accurate research for scholarly projects, sermon preparation, and personal study.

Key Features

  • Introductions to the historical and cultural context, literary style, major themes, and theological concerns
  • Exegetical and textual notes
  • Explanations of context and major theological themes

Praise for the Print Edition

An enormously helpful series for the layperson and pastor alike because it centers on the theological message of each book and ties it directly to the text. This approach has been needed for some time and will be an invaluable supplement to other commentary series.

Grant Osborne

A treasure house of insight into the biblical text. Written by some of the best scholars working today, it is an essential tool for pastors, students, church leaders, and lay people who want to understand the text and know how it relates to our lives today. Like the New Living Translation text it uses as its base, this commentary series is extremely readable.

—Tremper Longman

Individual Titles

Genesis, Exodus

  • Authors: John N. Oswalt and Allen P. Ross
  • Publisher: Tyndale
  • Publication Date: 2008
  • Pages: 576

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5

Genesis and Exodus lay the groundwork for the rest of the Bible—God’s creation, the Fall and the promise of salvation, the patriarchs, and journey out of Egypt and into the wilderness. In their commentary on Genesis and Exodus, John N. Oswalt and Allen P. Ross explore the central themes of these important books.

About the Authors

Allen P. Ross is Professor of Divinity at Beeson Divinity School, Stamford University. His articles have appeared in Biblical Viewpoint, Bibliotheca Sacra, and Kindred Spirit, and he has contributed to the Bible Knowledge Commentary, the Christian Life Bible, and the Biblical Hebrew Handbook. He is the author of numerous books, including Creation and Blessing: A Guide to the Study and Exposition of Genesis and Holiness to the Lord.

John N. Oswalt (PhD, Brandeis University) is Research Professor of Old Testament at Wesley Biblical Seminary in Jackson, Mississippi. He was the Old Testament editor of the Wesley Bible and also served as consulting editor for the New International Dictionary of Old Testament Theology and Exegesis. He has written six books, including a 2-volume commentary on Isaiah in the New International Commentary on the Old Testament series and commentary on Isaiah in the New International Version Application Commentary series. He has been a member of the translation teams for the New International Version and the New Living Translation.

Job, Ecclesiastes, Song of Songs

  • Authors: August H. Konkel and Tremper Longman III
  • Publisher: Tyndale
  • Publication Date: 2006
  • Pages: 416

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5

The books of Job, Ecclesiastes, and Song of Songs belong to the category of writings typically termed “wisdom literature.” Biblical wisdom may be defined as the exposition of a fundamental order within the universe, and wisdom is to know and follow this order. The reality of life is that the affirmations of traditional wisdom often contradict the experience of the faithful. Bad things happen to good people; and, conversely, good things often happen to bad people. August H. Konkel confronts the tension in the book of Job between the idea that virtue has its own reward and the reality that the virtuous often suffer. In his commentary on Ecclesiastes and Song of Songs, Tremper Longman III explores the meaning of life and love.

About the Authors

August Konkel (PhD, Westminster Theological Seminary) has been professor of Old Testament at Providence Seminary since 1984 and president of the College and Seminary since 2001. A contributor to the New International Dictionary of Old Testament Theology and Exegesis, he has forthcoming commentaries on Chronicles (Herald Press) and on Kings (Zondervan).

Tremper Longman III (PhD, Yale University) is the Robert H. Gundry Professor of Biblical Studies at Westmont College. Tremper has authored or coauthored seventeen books, including A Biblical History of Israel. He was also one of the main translators of the New Living Translation and has served as a consultant for other well-known Bible translations as well.

Isaiah, Jeremiah, Lamentations

  • Authors: Larry L. Walker and Elmer A. Martens
  • Publisher: Tyndale
  • Publication Date: 2006
  • Pages: 608

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5

These beautiful and eloquent books contain some of the most striking poetry and prophecy in the entire Old Testament. The book of Isaiah has been remarkably influential on art, music, political theory, missions, and evangelism over a long period of time, and many who are unfamiliar with Scripture can still recognize phrases and concepts from this great book. Likewise, the books of Jeremiah and Lamentation reveal God’s unfailing love in the middle of struggle, God’s faithfulness in times of transition, and God’s warnings against sinful excess. Larry L. Walker’s commentary on Isaiah, and Elmer A. Martens’ commentary on Jeremiah and Lamentations bring the vivid imagery and poignant prophecy to life.

About the Authors

Elmer A. Martens is professor emeritus of Old Testament and president emeritus at Mennonite Brethren Biblical Seminary in Fresno, California, where he has taught for over thirty years. He is the author of God’s Design, A Focus on Old Testament Theology, and the volume on Jeremiah in the Believers Church Bible Commentary (19 vols.). He was co-editor of The Flowering of Old Testament Theology and served for several years as the editor of the journal, Direction.

Larry L. Walker held a professional teaching career with time split between Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary and Mid-America Baptist Seminary. Since his retirement in 1998, he has done adjunct teaching at several seminaries. He authored a commentary on Zephaniah for the Expositor’s Bible Commentary and is also a contributor to the New International Dictionary of Old Testament Theology and Exegesis.

Minor Prophets: Hosea–Malachi

  • Author: Richard D. Patterson and Andrew E. Hill
  • Publisher: Tyndale
  • Publication Date: 2008
  • Pages: 672

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5

The Minor Prophets speak the words of God during the most historically and theologically significant moments in Israel’s history. From warnings of destruction to words of hope during despair, from plagues and peril to promises of a Messiah, the Minor Prophets capture the full range of God’s relationship with Israel and Judah during a tumultuous and shifting history. In their commentary, Richard D. Patterson and Andrew E. Hill help modern readers navigate the complex terrain of the Minor Prophets.

About the Authors

Richard D. Patterson (AB, Wheaton College; MDiv, Northwest Baptist Theological Seminary; ThM Talbot Theological Seminary; MA, PhD, University of California Angeles) was chairman of the Department of Biblical Studies and professor of Semitic Languages and Literatures at Liberty University, Lynchburg, Virginia. He contributed to The Expositor’s Bible Commentary and has written articles for Grace Theological Journal, the Journal of the Evangelical Theological Society, and other scholarly journals.

Andrew E. Hill (PhD, University of Michigan) is Professor of Old Testament Studies at Wheaton College. His current research interests include the Old Testament, worship studies, Ancient-Future models for biblical interpretation, and pedagogy for biblical studies. He is a contributor to The Complete Library of Christian Worship, and is author of the commentary on Malachi in the Anchor Yale Bible.

Matthew, Mark

  • Authors: Darrell L. Bock and David L. Turner
  • Publisher: Tyndale
  • Publication Date: 2006
  • Pages: 576

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5

As the first Gospel in the Christian canon and the first book of the New Testament, Matthew has attracted significant attention. It contains the Sermon on the Mount, the Lord’s Prayer, the Beatitudes and End Times parables and prophecies. It describes the nature of the kingdom of heaven, and reveals the Messiah to a Jewish audience. In his accessible commentary, Darrell L. Bock explores the central themes of the Gospel of Matthew, along with interpretive challenges, and the relationship between Matthew and the other Synoptic Gospels. This commentary also includes a detailed outline of the Gospel and an extensive bibliography.

The Gospel of Mark, of all the Gospels, contains the shortest and most succinct account of the life of Jesus. In fact, says David L. Turner in the introduction to his commentary, “Mark is more a Gospel of action than of teaching.” Jesus and his disciples move from city to city, and the stories are punctuated by little more than the favorite Markan transition: “Immediately.” Yet Mark, more than any other Gospel, highlights Jesus as the suffering Son of Man, and provides rich parallels to Old Testament themes. And the end of the Gospel shows that the experience of rejection and suffering challenged even the apostle’s commitment to discipleship. Both the original and modern readers have much to learn from the Gospel of Mark. Mark gives us one of the earliest glimpses as to how the church presented Jesus and his life to others who needed to be established in their walk with God.

About the Authors

David L. Turner is a graduate of Cedarville University, Grace Theological Seminary, and Hebrew Union College—Jewish Institute of Religion, Cincinnati. He has been professor of New Testament at Grand Rapids Theological Seminary since 1986 and has previously published several articles on the Gospel of Matthew.

Darrell L. Bock (PhD, University of Aberdeen) is research professor of New Testament studies at Dallas Theological Seminary. He is the author or editor of many books, including the volumes on Luke in the Baker Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament (8 vols.) and the IVP New Testament Commentary Series (18 vols.). He is also author of the bestselling Breaking the Da Vinci Code.

Luke, Acts

  • Authors: William J. Larkin and Allison A. Trites
  • Publisher: Tyndale
  • Publication Date: 2007
  • Pages: 688

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5

The Gospel of Luke, which has been described by Ernest Renan as “the most beautiful book in the world” is the first part of a 2-volume work devoted to the life of Jesus and the opening years of the Christian church. In Luke’s Gospel, we are introduced to “everything Jesus began to do and teach” prior to his ascension. In the second volume, the book of Acts, Luke picks up the story of the years following the Ascension, showing the growth of the Christian movement and noting the stages of its expansion from Jerusalem to Rome. Luke’s perspective on the life of Jesus and the early Christian movement is vitally important for gaining a grasp of the overall message of the New Testament, and the commentary by William J. Larking and Allison A. Trites guides readers through.

About the Authors

William J. Larkin is an ordained minister in the Presbyterian Church in America and has an active ministry in adult Christian education, particularly Bible teaching. He holds a BA from Wheaton College, a BD from Princeton Theological Seminary, and a PhD from the University of Durham, England, and has served in various pastorates as well as being on faculty at Columbia Biblical Seminary and School of Missions since 1975. He also served on the Bible Translation Committee for the NLT. He is also the author of the commentary on Acts in the IVP New Testament Commentary Series.

Allison A. Trites served as professor of Greek and New Testament at the Acadia Divinity College in Wolfville, Nova Scotia, for thirty-seven years. He has also provided leadership beyond the walls of the college, having served as president of the United Baptist Convention of the Atlantic Provinces, chair of the Deacon’s Board of the Wolfville Baptist Church, Baptist representative on the Canadian Council for Theological Education, as well as countless other volunteer positions.

The Gospel of John, 1–3 John

  • Authors: Wendell C. Hawley, Grant R. Osborne, and Philip W. Comfort
  • Publisher: Tyndale
  • Publication Date: 2007
  • Pages: 432

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5

The Gospel of John is so simple that it is often the first biblical book given to recent converts to help them understand Christian truth, and yet it is so difficult that only experienced scholars attempt to study it. It is paradoxically the most accessible and yet the most complex of the four Gospels. In his accessible commentary, Grant Osborne explains the core themes of the Gospel of John.

After reading and studying John’s Gospel, a person might wonder how the great truths presented in it were lived out in the church. Readers might also wonder how they themselves can better understand and experience the truths revealed by Jesus—ideas such as “walking in the light,” “remaining in Christ,” and “loving one another.” The epistles of John tell how Christians in the late first century were practicing (or not practicing) the profound truths proclaimed by Jesus. In their commentary, Philip W. Comfort and Wendell C. Hawley show how the epistles of John provide key insights into how we today can live in the Spirit of Jesus to experience spiritual transformation and love for the members of Christ’s community, the church.

About the Authors

Philip W. Comfort has studied English Literature, Greek, and New Testament at the Ohio State University and the University of South Africa. He has taught at Wheaton College, Trinity Episcopal Seminary, and Columbia International University. He currently teaches at Coastal Carolina University and is a senior editor of Bible reference at Tyndale House Publishers. Comfort is co-editor of the Life Application Bible Commentary New Testament, The Text of the Earliest New Testament Greek Manuscripts, and the Holman Treasury of Key Bible Words, available from Logos as part of the Holman Reference Collection (11 vols.).

Wendell C. Hawley graduated from the University of Oregon and from Western Baptist Seminary. He was awarded the L.L.D. from California Graduate School of Theology and the D.D. degree from Western Baptist Seminary, Portland, Oregon.

Grant R. Osborne is professor of New Testament at Trinity Evangelical Divinity School. Prior to his work at Trinity, he served as a pastor for over four years and taught at Winnipeg Theological Seminary and the University of Aberdeen. He received his Master of Arts in New Testament from Trinity Evangelical Divinity School, and the Doctor of Philosophy in New Testament from the University of Aberdeen, Scotland. He is author of The Hermeneutical Spiral, the commentary on Romans in the IVP New Testament Commentary, and co-editor of the Life Application Bible Commentary New Testament.

Romans, Galatians

  • Authors: Gerald Borchert and Roger Mohrlang
  • Publisher: Tyndale
  • Publication Date: 2007
  • Pages: 356

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5

Paul’s letter to the Romans is one of the most significant writings ever to come from the hand of a Christian. Theologically, it is certainly the most important of all of Paul’s letters, and many would say it is the single most important document in the entire New Testament. Of all the New Testament writings, it is Romans that gives us the most comprehensive exposition and analysis of the Christian Gospel, and it is Romans which has been among the most influential letters in the church and the western world. In his commentary on Romans, Roger Mohrlang’s unveils the history, the literary significance, and the power of Paul’s most important epistle.

Galatians revolves around the issue of gaining acceptance or status with God. Does a person work for it, or is it acceptance as a gift? If it is a gift, what is its relationship to responsible, moral living? The difference between what is acquired by human effort and what is a gift from God is basic to Paul’s understanding of the nature of authentic Christian freedom, authentic Christianity, and even the Gospel message itself. Gerald Borchert’s commentary on Galatians describes the nature of the churches in Galatia as they explored these tensions.

About the Authors

Roger Mohrlang has earned a BS from Carnegie Institute of Technology, an MA from Fuller Theological Seminary, and the DPhil in New Testament from University of Oxford. He served as a Bible translator and translation consultant in Africa for over seven years, has served as a visiting professor at various colleges, and is currently Professor of Biblical Studies at Whitworth College, where he has been since 1988. His areas of expertise include Paul’s letters and New Testament ethics.

Gerald Borchert is retired professor of New Testament from both Southern Baptist Theological Seminary and Northern Baptist Theological Seminary. He is currently Thesis Director at the Institute for Worship Studies, Jacksonville, Florida, and part-time Professor of New Testament at Carson Newman College. He earned his BA from the University of Alberta, an LLB, from University of Alberta Law School, an MDiv from Eastern Baptist Theological Seminary, his ThM at Princeton Theological Seminary and his PhD from Princeton Theological Seminary and Princeton University (1967). He has also done post-doctoral work at numerous schools and has served as a pastor and interim pastor variously throughout his career. He is the author of the commentary on John 1–11 in the New American Commentary.

Ephesians, Philippians, Colossians, 1–2 Thessalonians, Philemon

  • Authors: Harold W. Hoehner, Peter H. Davids, and Philip W. Comfort
  • Publisher: Tyndale
  • Publication Date: 2007
  • Pages: 456

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5

The Pauline epistles represent perhaps the most influential and powerfully-written body of literature in the Christian tradition. In them, we witness Paul’s correspondence, his pastoral heart, his theological musings, and his affirmation of the grace of God. While some are autobiographical and others are devoted to strictly theological themes, all have profoundly shaped the emergence of Christianity and the development of theology. The commentaries by Harold W. Hoehner (Ephesians), Phil W. Comfort (Philippians, 1 & 2 Thessalonians) and Peter H. Davids (Colossians, Philemon) help modern readers understand the nature and purpose of these Pauline epistles.

About the Authors

Harold W. Hoehner is Professor of New Testament at Dallas Theological Seminary and is well known for his work on biblical chronology in the first century. He is also the author of a commentary on Ephesians in the Baker Exegetical Commentary series.

Philip W. Comfort has studied English Literature, Greek, and New Testament at the Ohio State University and the University of South Africa. He has taught at Wheaton College, Trinity Episcopal Seminary, and Columbia International University. He currently teaches at Coastal Carolina University and is a senior editor of Bible reference at Tyndale House Publishers. Comfort is co-editor of the Life Application Bible Commentary New Testament, The Text of the Earliest New Testament Greek Manuscripts, and the Holman Treasury of Key Bible Words, available from Logos as part of the Holman Reference Collection (11 vols.).

Peter Davids is a Professor of Biblical Theology at Stephen’s University. He served as a missionary educator in Europe, training Christian leaders in the German-speaking world, and has written commentaries on James and 1 Peter, and authored The Letters of 2 Peter and Jude in the Pillar New Testament Commentary. He is also co-editor (with Ralph Martin) of The Dictionary of the Later New Testament and Its Development.

Product Details

  • Title: Cornerstone Biblical Commentary Series
  • General Editor: Philip W. Comfort
  • Publisher: Tyndale
  • Volumes: 9
  • Pages: 4,780

About Philip W. Comfort

Philip W. Comfort has studied English Literature, Greek, and New Testament at the Ohio State University and the University of South Africa. He has taught at Wheaton College, Trinity Episcopal Seminary, and Columbia International University. He currently teaches at Coastal Carolina University and is a senior editor of Bible reference at Tyndale House Publishers. Comfort is co-editor of the Life Application Bible Commentary New Testament, The Text of the Earliest New Testament Greek Manuscripts, and the Holman Treasury of Key Bible Words, available from Logos as part of the Holman Reference Collection (11 vols.).