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Black's New Testament Commentary (BNTC) (13 vols.)
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Overview

Black’s New Testament Commentary presents a reliable and enlightening exposition of the New Testament for modern readers. Written by highly respected biblical scholars initially under the editorial direction of Dr. Henry Chadwick, and now of Morna D. Hooker, each commentary offers a paragraph-by-paragraph exposition based on the author’s own fresh translation of the biblical text. Since its appearance nearly thirty-five years ago, Black's New Testament Commentary Series has been hailed by both scholars and pastors for its insightful interpretations and reliable commentary.

Logos is pleased to offer Black’s New Testament Commentary in 13 volumes—the same text which underlies the Hendrickson edition. With the Logos edition of Black’s New Testament Commentary, you can perform powerful searches and access a wealth of information on the Bible quickly and easily! Hovering over Scripture references displays the text from the Greek New Testament or your English translation, and you can link Black’s New Testament Commentary to the other commentaries in your digital library for accurate research and a fuller understanding of the Bible. Pastors, students, scholars, and general readers will find this series a welcome and essential aid to a better understanding of the New Testament.

Key Features

  • An insightful introduction to the important historical, literary, and theological issues
  • Key terms and phrases from the translation highlighted in the commentary where they are discussed
  • Explanations of special Greek or foreign terms
  • References to important primary and secondary literature

Individual Titles

The Gospel According to Saint Mark

  • Author: Morna D. Hooker
  • Editor: Morna D. Hooker
  • Series: Black's New Testament Commentary (BNTC)
  • Pages: 432

Sample pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

The Gospel According to Saint Mark injects fresh life into the series! Basing her observations on her own new translation of the Greek text, Hooker explores, pericope by pericope, what the author of Mark's Gospel wanted his original readers to understand, what he says about the historical Jesus and the early community of the faithful, and what he conveys theologically throughout the entire Gospel.

For the better part of her distinguished career, Morna Hooker has been a keen student of Mark's Gospel. In this commentary, she forges from twenty years of research her understanding of Mark's presentation of Jesus. With the sure touch of a mature scholar, she guides the reader through the text of Mark in a non-technical way that is both insightful and eminently readable. At a time in which pastors and students face a veritable flood of new commentaries, this one commends itself as a valuable yet manageable resource. Those who use it will find it stimulating and enriching.

—Jack Dean Kingsbury, Aubrey Lee Brooks Professor of Biblical Theology, Union Theological Seminary

In view of some recent commentaries and interpretations of the Marcan Gospel, this is a welcome relief. All readers, theologians, pastors, campus and hospital ministers, and especially educated lay folk, will profit from the study of Mark's Gospel with this commentary. It is a balanced attempt to interpret Mark 'at every level,' but primarily from that of 'the evangelist himself'—how he understood 'the nature of the good news about Jesus Christ.' Hooker has wisely sought to summarize the theology of the Marcan Gospel, and she does it well.

—Joseph A. Fitzmyer, SJ, Catholic University of America

Morna D. Hooker is Lady Margaret’s Professor Emerita in the University of Cambridge, and a Fellow of Robinson College. Her recent books include: From Adam to Christ: Essays on St Paul, A Commentary on The Gospel According to St Mark, Not Ashamed of the Gospel, The Signs of a Prophet, and Paul: A Short Introduction. She is editor of Black’s New Testament Commentaries, and has been joint editor of the Journal of Theological Studies since 1985.

The Gospel According to Saint John

  • Author: Andrew T. Lincoln
  • Editor: Morna D. Hooker
  • Series: Black's New Testament Commentary (BNTC)
  • Pages: 592

Sample pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Of the New Testament accounts of the life of Jesus Christ, none remains as enthralling and enigmatic, provocative and profound as the Gospel according to Saint John. Introducing the book’s historical, literary, and theological backgrounds, Andrew Lincoln provides a pericope by pericope exposition of this ancient biography. While maintaining focus on the message of the text, he includes relevant discussion of narrative sequence, likely social function of individual passages, and relation to the Synoptic Gospels. From penetrating analysis of the Christology of the Fourth Gospel to adept discussion of the seeming hostility to the Jews, Lincoln offers balanced approaches to key Johannine issues. Readers along the whole theological spectrum will benefit from this masterful study.

This quality addition to the well-respected Black’s New Testament Commentary replaces the earlier work (1968) of Sanders and Mastin. Lincoln provides his own fresh translation of the gospel text, preferring to make it more literal in nature for purposes of study. His substantial introduction provides the reader an informative overview of current interpretation. One significant feature of Lincoln’s own perspective is that he joins those scholars who believe that John knew the Synoptic Gospels and that his own gospel represents a unique and creative interpretation of the Synoptic tradition. The commentary itself is incisive and provides the reader with a reliable literary and theological interpretation of the Fourth Gospel.

The Bible Today

This new commentary on the Fourth Gospel provides both a worthy addition to the respected Black’s New Testament Commentary series and a serious replacement for its widely cited predecessor in that series, by J. N. Sanders and B. A Mastin... In this work, Lincoln both draws on a wide range of Johannine scholarship and bravely forges new paths at times, respecting consensus but seeking to break new ground. After an extensive introduction of the major issues debated in Johannine studies today, Lincoln’s work turns to commentary on passages followed by theological summary. The work is extremely well-written and readable. No reader of commentaries, even at a lay level, will have trouble understanding the prose. Most of his exegetical and literary judgments are sound and well-researched. . . . All told, this work is a significant one. Although its format is aimed more for students than for scholars, the distinctive elements in its approach and the arguments advanced for them will also make this commentary important for scholarly consideration.

Review of Biblical Literature

Andrew Lincoln, Portland Professor of New Testament at the University of Gloucestershire, England, offers a paragraph-by-paragraph exposition based on his own fresh translation of the biblical texts. His book includes introductions to the important historical, literary, and theological issues; key terms and phrases from the translation highlighted in the commentary; explanations of special Greek or foreign terms; references to important primary and secondary literature; and a scripture index. He makes available a wealth of contemporary scholarship, carefully discussing authorship; the identity of the beloved disciple; the Christology of the Fourth Gospel; the Gospel's apparent hostility to the Jews; historicity and truth; and John's relation to the synoptics. Throughout the commentary he inserts suggestions for further reading.

Theology Digest

Andrew T. Lincoln is the Portland Professor of New Testament at the University of Gloucestershire. His previous publications include Truth on Trial and the commentary for Colossians in Volume 11 of the New Interpreter’s Bible.

The Epistle to the Romans

  • Author: C. K. Barrett
  • Editor: Morna D. Hooker
  • Series: Black's New Testament Commentary (BNTC)
  • Pages: 304

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C. K. Barrett's exegetical prowess, evidenced most distinctly in his volumes on the First and Second Epistles to the Corinthians, also in the Black's series, has long been appreciated in the world of biblical studies. Now, in his long-awaited, newly revised, verse-by-verse exposition of Romans, Barrett further enhances our understanding of the book of Romans, early Christianity, the apostle Paul and his theology, and the New Testament. This revised edition has been reworked and updated, and the inclusion of an index of ancient sources further adds to its usefulness. A master of thoroughness, historical backgrounds, and ancient languages, Barrett offers insights for scholars, ministers, students, and anyone who wants to know more about Paul's Epistle to the Romans.

C. K. Barrett is Emeritus Professor of Divinity at the University of Durham. He is especially known for having authored numerous scholarly articles and books, including Commentary on St. John, The First Epistle to the Corinthians, The Second Epistle to the Corinthians (in this collection), The New Testament Background: Selected Documents, and Acts, part of the International Critical Commentaries.

The First Epistle to the Corinthians

  • Author: C. K. Barrett
  • Editor: Morna D. Hooker
  • Series: Black's New Testament Commentary (BNTC)
  • Pages: 432

Sample pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Perhaps more than any other Pauline letter, 1 Corinthians is known for affording insight into the nature and world of the earliest Christian communities. Whether it concerns Corinthian disputes over wisdom, debates over speaking in tongues, or questions about resurrection, 1 Corinthians shows us the early church—warts and all. And that is what makes it such exciting—and relevant—reading today! Eminent New Testament scholar C. K. Barrett makes the text come alive both in its original setting and in the life of the church today. Barrett's arguments will challenge even the most seasoned scholars to rethink their interpretation of the many controversial passages.

This is a commentary which is both scholarly and religious, both readable and erudite. . . . Barrett has a marvelous gift of helping the reader to see not only what Paul is saying, but what he is saying it about. . . . a commentary destined to be subject to the rigorous test of constant use.

—G. B. Caird, Expository Times

C. K. Barrett is Emeritus Professor of Divinity at the University of Durham. He is especially known for having authored numerous scholarly articles and books, including Commentary on St. John, The First Epistle to the Corinthians, The Second Epistle to the Corinthians (in this collection), The New Testament Background: Selected Documents, and Acts, part of the International Critical Commentaries.

The Second Epistle to the Corinthians

  • Author: C. K. Barrett
  • Editor: Morna D. Hooker
  • Series: Black's New Testament Commentary (BNTC)
  • Pages: 384

Sample pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

 
2 Corinthians is one of the most difficult writings in the New Testament to interpret. Yet, this commentary, which follows Barrett's works on Romans and 1 Corinthians in the same series, is superb in every respect. The author's command of the Greek language, his skillful use of the Old Testament and background writings, and his sensitive handling of complex exegetical problems provide a panorama of a mature scholar's work which is at times almost breathtaking. Moreover, the restrained use of Greek and technical terms makes this commentary as useful for the layman or pastor as it is for the scholar.

Review and Expositor

It is clear. . . . that we are here under the guidance of one who is not only an expert scholar but also an experienced commentator.

The Expository Times

These [the Corinthian letters and Romans] are among the greatest of New Testament writings and Barrett is among the greatest of present day commentators. He has put us all very much in his debt with his earlier works and this latest volume does nothing to diminish our gratitude. . . . This book will take its place as a standard work and will enrich our studies for years to come.

Churchman

C. K. Barrett is Emeritus Professor of Divinity at the University of Durham. He is especially known for having authored numerous scholarly articles and books, including Commentary on St. John, The First Epistle to the Corinthians, The Second Epistle to the Corinthians (in this collection), The New Testament Background: Selected Documents, and Acts, part of the International Critical Commentaries.

The Epistle to the Galatians

  • Author: James D. G. Dunn
  • Editor: Morna D. Hooker
  • Series: Black's New Testament Commentary (BNTC)
  • Pages: 400

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Paul's letter to the Galatians may be the boldest exposition of the Gospel and one of the best examples that Paul's theology first and foremost emerged within the framework of a living community. Dunn's sensitivity to the letter's larger flow of thought and his adept hand at guiding us through the sometimes murky waters of Paul's thought combine to make this commentary refreshingly accessible and eminently serviceable. With a penetrating but never pedantic analysis, Dunn opens Paul's letter to the troubled believers in Galatia with a skill that comes only with knowing the subject exceedingly well.

It is welcome news that the addition to this well-known series of New Testament commentaries intended for a wide readership has now been supplied. A special welcome awaits James Dunn's edition of Galatians which stands as a companion piece to his monumental Romans. The new volume is accessible to a wider audience since it is written in an attractively simple and succinct style, yet tackling the hard problems this epistle poses. Ministers and students will appreciate Dunn's restatement of his earlier contributions to Pauline theology and his reactions to the ongoing debate on such issues as the 'works of the law.' The general reader, moreover, will find this a sure-footed and profitable guide to what is in some ways the heart of Paul's gospel, both doctrinal and ethical.

—Professor R. P. Martin, The University of Sheffield

James D. G. Dunn is Lightfoot Professor of Divinity, University of Durham and is the author of, among other books, the two volumes Romans 1–8 and Romans 9–16 of the Word Biblical Commentary, The Epistles to the Colossians and to Philemon in The New International Greek Testament Commentary (12 vols.), Unity and Diversity in New Testament Theology, and Christology in the Making.

The Epistle to the Ephesians

  • Author: John Muddiman
  • Editor: Morna D. Hooker
  • Series: Black's New Testament Commentary (BNTC)
  • Pages: 360

In this comprehensive new commentary, John Muddiman begins by arguing that to be able to draw conclusions about the text of Ephesians, each scholar must take a position about its Pauline or non-Pauline authorship. He therefore offers an extensive introduction, which discusses various approaches to this question, including his own, detailing the evidence for each position. All the perspectives of major modern scholars are discussed and assessed, particularly on the question of Ephesians’ relationship to Colossians. The implications of the question of authorship for evaluating Paul's theology are extensively discussed.

Ephesians is already well served with excellent commentaries by Barth, Schnackenburg, Lincoln, Best and O’Brien. But this, the latest in the Black’s New Testament Commentaries, certainly deserves a place with them. It is concise, stimulating, packed with careful argument and exegetical insight, yet remains readable, and is thoroughly original.

Theology

Muddiman takes a fresh look at the question of the letter’s authorship….His commentary on the contents of the letter is particularly rich and condensed….This commentary is much more manageable in size than most [contemporary commentaries on Ephesians] but doesn’t seem to sacrifice any quality or depth.

The Bible Today

The Epistle to the Ephesians is John Muddiman’s contribution to Black’s New Testament Commentary. Muddiman begins at the beginning, by arguing that a reader’s conclusions about Ephesians must be based on whether Paul is the author of the letter. He then explores various approaches to the question and their implications for Pauline theology. This series allows the writers to present their own translations of the Greek text, with paragraph-by-paragraph exposition.

—Resources for Preaching and Teaching, Christianity Today

John Muddiman is G. B. Caird Fellow in New Testament Studies at Mansfield College, Oxford.

The Epistle to the Philippians

  • Author: Markus Bockmuehl
  • Editor: Morna D. Hooker
  • Series: Black's New Testament Commentary (BNTC)
  • Pages: 352

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Designed to make the latest scholarship on Philippians accessible to a broader readership, this commentary brings to life both the letter's historical setting and its vigorously theological purpose. A number of important recent studies of the social and religious context of first-century Philippi are considered here for the first time in a commentary, and the author offers a critical engagement with several of the newer approaches to Pauline interpretation, including questions of rhetoric and social convention. Theological highlights include the themes of Christian joy in all circumstances, the Philippians' active stake-holding partnership in the gospel, and above all the pervasive passion for a union with Christ in following his self-humbling example of service. Giving due attention both to the theological heritage of Paul's Jewish background and to the Greco-Roman social and religious setting of his readership, this commentary relates a well-grounded understanding of the letter's first-century impact to the wider concerns of Christian theology.

Markus Bockmuehl presently serves as Lecturer in Divinity, Cambridge University. The author of numerous scholarly articles, he also wrote Revelation and Mystery in Ancient Judaism and Pauline Christianity and This Jesus: Martyr, Lord, Messiah, available from Logos as part of Studies in Jesus and the Gospels (23 vols.). He is the translator and editor of Introduction to the Talmud and Midrash (2nd ed.), and is presently working on Halakhah in the Synoptics and Acts for the prestigious Compendia Rerum Iudaicarum ad Novum Testamentum series.

First and Second Epistles to the Thessalonians

  • Author: Ernest Best
  • Editor: Morna D. Hooker
  • Series: Black's New Testament Commentary (BNTC)
  • Pages: 416

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The 1974 estimate by Interpretation that Ernest Best's volume on 1 & 2 Thessalonians "is probably the best exegetical study of 1 and 2 Thessalonians available . . . a superb commentary" continues to ring true nearly twenty years later. This is indeed one of the finest commentaries on 1 & 2 Thessalonians available—in any language. The Journal of Theological Studies called it "exhaustive" and concluded by saying that the commentary is "reliable, judicious, and nearly always lucid. He [Best] . . . takes us as far as we can reasonably go in understanding the mind of Paul as it expressed itself in these writings."

...a great help to pastors and teachers...

Journal of Biblical Literature

Biblical students have long needed a thorough modern commentary on these two letters to Thessalonica. Ernest Best...has responded with a volume that admirably fills this lacuna.

Anglican Theological Review

Ernest Best is Professor Emeritus and Dean of Faculty, University of Glasgow, and has published widely in the field of biblical studies, including Mark: The Gospel as Story, Second Corinthians (Interpretation series), Ephesians, available from Logos as part of the Sheffield/T & T Clark Bible Guides Collection, and Paul and His Converts. He has also written the volume on Ephesians as part of the International Critical Commentary Series.

The Epistle of James

  • Author: Sophie Laws
  • Editor: Morna D. Hooker
  • Series: Black's New Testament Commentary (BNTC)
  • Pages: 288

Sample pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Considered as a part of the Christian canon, the epistle of James is an oddity. It lacks almost all of what might be thought to be the distinctive marks of Christian faith and practice. Luther, in fact, denies that James is the work of an apostle, because of what he sees to be its opposition to Paul in its interpretation of justification.

The chief interest of the epistle of James is in its evidence of the way the nature of Christianity was understood by the author, his readers, and perhaps by those who accepted his work as part of Scripture. In his reinterpretation of traditional ideas in new situations, in his insistence on the right practice of prayer and of charity, and in his appeal to the nature of man and the nature of God in establishing rules for conduct, the author of the epistle deserves a continued hearing.

it maintains the high standard of this series. The exposition is lucid, all the main cruces are discussed in detail, and the lengthy, well-structured introduction presents the conclusions which . . . Laws has formed as a result of her detailed study of the text...In Sophie Laws' James, then, we have what will assuredly come to be one of the standard commentaries on this intriguing and delightful letter.

The Expository Times

One could hardly fail to be pleased with the content of the work. Laws writes with an engaging style which normally presents her case as clearly as space allows...the challenge of meeting a first-class mind is invigorating. This is not a boring commentary.

Anglican Theological Review

...not only maintains the high standards of the Black's series but also fares well in comparison with . . . scholarly studies in French and German...The book is a fine example of the well-informed and balanced exegesis which typifies British New Testament scholarship.

Journal for the Study of the New Testament

[This] commentary is surely a success and worthy of careful use. It rarely fails to clarify difficult passages; and it will inform a reader quickly and thoroughly of the relationship of James to Christian hortatory literature. Its moderation, thoroughness, and readability strongly recommend it to pastor and scholar alike.

Interpretation

...a perceptive and careful attempt to tackle the enigmas posed by the epistle of James.

Scottish Journal of Theology

Sophie Laws is Professor at Regent's College, London.

The Epistles of Peter and Jude

  • Author: J. N. D. Kelly
  • Editor: Morna D. Hooker
  • Series: Black's New Testament Commentary (BNTC)
  • Pages: 416

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The letters of Peter and Jude are among the most pastorally sensitive in the entire New Testament, because they contain messages of encouragement and warning. In his commentary on the epistles of Peter and Jude, Kelly offers an introduction and overview of the important literary, textual, and theological themes. With only nine chapters on which to comment, Kelly has ample room for adequate discussion of problem passage and challenging interpretations.

Great erudition lightly carried, precise attention to detail which always illuminates and never obscures the argument, clarity of treatment even when the subject is itself confused, and an infectious enthusiasm for the task of decoding an ancient and well-loved text.

The Expository Times

J. N. D. Kelly was Principal of St. Edmund Hall, Oxford, from 1951 to 1979. He was the author of many books, including Early Christian Creeds, Early Christian Doctrines, Jerome, the Oxford Dictionary of Popes, and Golden Mouth.

The Pastoral Epistles

  • Author: J. N. D. Kelly
  • Editor: Morna D. Hooker
  • Series: Black's New Testament Commentary (BNTC)
  • Pages: 288

Sample pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

These three letters, which form a distinct group in the Pauline corpus, claim to be dispatches of the great Apostle to two of his most trusted lieutenants. The Pastorals have a special interest an importance. As letters they differ from the majority of Pauline letters, being written for individuals rather than churches. They lift the curtain revealingly from aspects of the Apostle’s activities which are largely ignored in the rest of his correspondence. They show us something of his relations with his more intimate, responsible colleagues, and illustrate his concern for administrative arrangements, his approach to practical problems, and the new emphases in his later theology. They also supply fascinating glimpses of the Church’s life and organization, and of the doctrinal distortions with which it had to wrestle. As J. N. D. Kelly shows, their evidence for Paul’s movements and attitude is immeasurably precious.

Dr. Kelly's contribution to Black's New Testament Commentaries is of the first order: an excellent book in every way. The exposition in particular is sheer pleasure to study, and the reader cannot fail to admire the author's skill in combining a large amount of information, and detailed discussion of the various interpretations that can be put upon Greek constructions, with an easy but dignified style.

Journal of Theological Studies

The judgment on this important volume must be that it is a learned, judicious, and well-written treatment, with some fresh insights. It deserves careful study, perhaps especially from those students who too easily dismiss the conservative position [on Pauline authorship].

Interpretation

J. N. D. Kelly was Principal of St. Edmund Hall, Oxford, from 1951 to 1979. He was the author of many books, including Early Christian Creeds, Early Christian Doctrines, Jerome, the Oxford Dictionary of Popes, and Golden Mouth.

The Revelation of Saint John

  • Author: Ian Boxall
  • Editor: Morna D. Hooker
  • Series: Black's New Testament Commentary (BNTC)
  • Pages: 350

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Replacing George B. Caird’s earlier volume, fellow Oxford scholar Ian Boxall’s new edition in this popular series offers a clear and lucid study of St. John’s apocalypse. Arising out of a critical awareness of the historical and theological issues surrounding the interpretation of Revelation, Boxall’s exposition opens with an enlightening introduction to the first-century context of this difficult book.

Introducing the background to the Apocalypse, Boxall leads the reader on a pericope-by-pericope exposition of the book. As with other volumes in the series, remarks are based on the author’s own translation. Key terms and phrases from the translation are highlighted where they are discussed, and explanations of special Greek or foreign terms are provided. References to important primary and secondary literature are also included for further research.

In his 18-page introduction to the book of Revelation, Boxall, senior tutor and tutorial fellow in New Testament and Greek at St. Stephen's House, Oxford University, and a member of the university's theology faculty, as well as author of Revelation: Vision and Insight, treats the character of the book, its visionary material, author and date, the Patmos context, the setting of the primary addressees, the theater of reception, and structure. Then he presents his exposition according to the following outline: prologue (Rev 1:1-8), inaugural vision and seven messages (1:9-3:22), throne vision and seven seals (4:1-8:1), seven trumpets (8:2–11:18), seven visions (11:19-15:4), seven bowls (15:5-19:10), seven final visions (19:11-22:11), and epilogue (22:12-21 ).

New Testament Abstracts

A new addition to this well-respected commentary series, this study of Revelation is excellent. A professor of New Testament at Oxford University, Boxall provides an exceptionally clear and lucid analysis of this challenging New Testament book. His introduction considers the literary and theological nature of the work and also wrestles with the question of whether or not the author should be identified with John the son of Zebedee—a traditional identification that Boxall does not rule out. The commentary itself is informed and theologically mature. This would be a fine way to acquire a balanced and up-to-date treatment of Revelation.

The Bible Today

This is a very useful short commentary. . . . It has a good, up-to-date bibliography, engages a range of interpretations, and guides the reader through the maze of alternative views with caution and common sense. It is a worthy successor.

Review of Biblical Literature

...Boxall provides a good introductory commentary to the Apocalypse of John…and brings the discussion of Revelation up to date with reference to contemporary scholarship.

Ashland Theological Journal

Boxall has produced a scholarly, well-written, highly readable commentary on the book of Revelation. It is ideal for pastors on a budget looking for a commentary that does not advocate an idiosyncratic interpretation but carefully considers a plurality of viewpoints. It will prove equally valuable in introductory-level seminary courses and for students just getting their feet wet in the study of Revelation.

Journal of the Evangelical Society

Ian Boxall is Senior Tutor in New Testament and Greek at St. Stephen’s House, Oxford University. He is the author of Revelation: Vision and Insight.

Product Details

  • Title: Black’s New Testament Commentary (13 vols.)
  • Editor: Morna D. Hooker
  • Series: Black's New Testament Commentary (BNTC)
  • Volumes: 13
  • Pages: 5,014

About Morna D. Hooker

Morna D. Hooker is Lady Margaret’s Professor Emerita in the University of Cambridge, and a Fellow of Robinson College. Her recent books include: From Adam to Christ: Essays on St Paul, A Commentary on The Gospel According to St Mark, Not Ashamed of the Gospel, The Signs of a Prophet, and Paul: A Short Introduction. In addition to serving as editor of Black’s New Testament Commentaries, she has also been joint editor of the Journal of Theological Studies since 1985.