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Classic Sermon Library Builder (100 vols.)
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Classic Sermon Library Builder (100 vols.)

by 37 authors

55 publishers 1771–2006

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Overview

Craft meaningful sermons with insights from the best preachers in history. This extensive collection assembles classic sermons from the fourth to the twentieth century, on practical topics, doctrinal issues, and on verses throughout the Bible. Dozens of notable preachers are represented, from John Wycliffe to John Henry Newman, and George Whitefield to D.L. Moody. Delve into the messages they shared with the congregations they loved and discover priceless examples of preaching as an art.

In Logos, these sermons are enhanced by amazing functionality. The Logos 5 Sermon Starter includes features which retrieve sermons from your library by simply searching for the relevant Bible verses. With a few clicks, discover what important ministers have preached on the same passage you are preaching on. With Logos Bible Software, the most efficient and comprehensive research tools help you write timeless sermons in less time.

Key Features

  • Elevates personal sermon writing to an art form
  • Provides unique and useful tools for writing compelling sermons
  • Utilizes the expertise of respected and notable preachers throughout history
  • Benefits congregations by providing hundreds of examples of exemplary sermons

Product Details

Individual Sermons

Individual Titles

Parochial and Plain Sermons, vol. 1

  • Author: John Henry Newman
  • Publisher: Rivingtons
  • Publication Date: 1868
  • Pages: 349

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10

From the first time Newman shared these sermons between 1825 and 1843, they have “have acted like leaven on the mind and language and literature of the Church . . . and have marked and era in her history.” Newman provides “words of guidance and support, and consolation and encouragement,” which continue to resound in the hearts and minds of modern Christians.

This volume contains 26 sermons covering topics such as private prayer, Christian manhood, the resurrection of the body, and the Christian mysteries.

John Henry Newman (1801–1890) was a priest and Cardinal in the Roman Catholic Church. His father was a banker and his mother’s family was French Huguenot. Newman was raised in a strict Calvinist home and received his primary education at the famous Ealing School. John Henry Newman graduated from Trinity College, Oxford in 1821 and was elected to a fellowship at Oriel College, Oxford in the following year. On June 13, 1824 he was ordained into the Anglican priesthood. From the early 1830s until 1845, Newman was a leading figure in the Oxford Movement, a group of Anglican priests and scholars from Oxford who sought to restore the rites of the Anglican church to their Apostolic roots in the Early Church. Between 1842 and 1845, during a time of solitude and the completion of Essay on the Development of Christian Doctrine, Newman underwent a process conversion to Roman Catholicism. Newman also published the Oxford Conservative Journal during this time period as a platform for retracting any negative remarks he previously assailed towards the Roman Church.

He was officially received into the Catholic Church on October 9, 1845. The conversion of John Henry Newman to Catholicism was the result of a life’s long struggle to reconcile the historic faith handed down from the Apostles with his own Anglican tradition. Frustrated with the errors inherent in both Protestantism and Roman Catholicism, Newman abandoned his search for the via media (or, middle way) of Anglicanism and converted to the Roman Catholic Church. In 1848, Newman founded the Birmingham Oratory at Maryvale and began ministering to the Catholic population of the city. In 1851, the Bishops of Ireland elected to start a Catholic university in Dublin and they appointed Newman to be the founder and first rector of the institution. Maintaining his ministry at the Birmingham Oratory, Newman established what would become University College, Dublin. His Idea of a University was prepared for founding faculty of the university at Dublin. On May 12, 1879 Pope Leo XIII appointed Newman to the college of Cardinals. John Henry Cardinal Newman died on August 11, 1890. Cardinal Newman is currently under consideration by the Vatican for sainthood.

Parochial and Plain Sermons, vol. 2

  • Author: John Henry Newman
  • Publisher: Rivingtons
  • Publication Date: 1868
  • Pages: 402

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10

From the first time Newman shared these sermons between 1825 and 1843, they have “have acted like leaven on the mind and language and literature of the Church . . . and have marked and era in her history.” Newman provides “words of guidance and support, and consolation and encouragement,” which continue to resound in the hearts and minds of modern Christians.

This volume contains 32 sermons covering topics such as martyrdom, the incarnation, ceremonies of the church, and the dangers of wealth.

John Henry Newman (1801–1890) was a priest and Cardinal in the Roman Catholic Church. His father was a banker and his mother’s family was French Huguenot. Newman was raised in a strict Calvinist home and received his primary education at the famous Ealing School. John Henry Newman graduated from Trinity College, Oxford in 1821 and was elected to a fellowship at Oriel College, Oxford in the following year. On June 13, 1824 he was ordained into the Anglican priesthood. From the early 1830s until 1845, Newman was a leading figure in the Oxford Movement, a group of Anglican priests and scholars from Oxford who sought to restore the rites of the Anglican church to their Apostolic roots in the Early Church. Between 1842 and 1845, during a time of solitude and the completion of Essay on the Development of Christian Doctrine, Newman underwent a process conversion to Roman Catholicism. Newman also published the Oxford Conservative Journal during this time period as a platform for retracting any negative remarks he previously assailed towards the Roman Church.

He was officially received into the Catholic Church on October 9, 1845. The conversion of John Henry Newman to Catholicism was the result of a life’s long struggle to reconcile the historic faith handed down from the Apostles with his own Anglican tradition. Frustrated with the errors inherent in both Protestantism and Roman Catholicism, Newman abandoned his search for the via media (or, middle way) of Anglicanism and converted to the Roman Catholic Church. In 1848, Newman founded the Birmingham Oratory at Maryvale and began ministering to the Catholic population of the city. In 1851, the Bishops of Ireland elected to start a Catholic university in Dublin and they appointed Newman to be the founder and first rector of the institution. Maintaining his ministry at the Birmingham Oratory, Newman established what would become University College, Dublin. His Idea of a University was prepared for founding faculty of the university at Dublin. On May 12, 1879 Pope Leo XIII appointed Newman to the college of Cardinals. John Henry Cardinal Newman died on August 11, 1890. Cardinal Newman is currently under consideration by the Vatican for sainthood.

Parochial and Plain Sermons, vol. 3

  • Author: John Henry Newman
  • Publisher: Rivingtons
  • Publication Date: 1868
  • Pages: 387

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9

From the first time Newman shared these sermons between 1825 and 1843, they have “have acted like leaven on the mind and language and literature of the Church . . . and have marked and era in her history.” Newman provides “words of guidance and support, and consolation and encouragement,” which continue to resound in the hearts and minds of modern Christians.

This volume contains 25 sermons on several significant biblical figures (Abraham, Saul, David), submission to church authority, the doctrine of baptism, and more.

John Henry Newman (1801–1890) was a priest and Cardinal in the Roman Catholic Church. His father was a banker and his mother’s family was French Huguenot. Newman was raised in a strict Calvinist home and received his primary education at the famous Ealing School. John Henry Newman graduated from Trinity College, Oxford in 1821 and was elected to a fellowship at Oriel College, Oxford in the following year. On June 13, 1824 he was ordained into the Anglican priesthood. From the early 1830s until 1845, Newman was a leading figure in the Oxford Movement, a group of Anglican priests and scholars from Oxford who sought to restore the rites of the Anglican church to their Apostolic roots in the Early Church. Between 1842 and 1845, during a time of solitude and the completion of Essay on the Development of Christian Doctrine, Newman underwent a process conversion to Roman Catholicism. Newman also published the Oxford Conservative Journal during this time period as a platform for retracting any negative remarks he previously assailed towards the Roman Church.

He was officially received into the Catholic Church on October 9, 1845. The conversion of John Henry Newman to Catholicism was the result of a life’s long struggle to reconcile the historic faith handed down from the Apostles with his own Anglican tradition. Frustrated with the errors inherent in both Protestantism and Roman Catholicism, Newman abandoned his search for the via media (or, middle way) of Anglicanism and converted to the Roman Catholic Church. In 1848, Newman founded the Birmingham Oratory at Maryvale and began ministering to the Catholic population of the city. In 1851, the Bishops of Ireland elected to start a Catholic university in Dublin and they appointed Newman to be the founder and first rector of the institution. Maintaining his ministry at the Birmingham Oratory, Newman established what would become University College, Dublin. His Idea of a University was prepared for founding faculty of the university at Dublin. On May 12, 1879 Pope Leo XIII appointed Newman to the college of Cardinals. John Henry Cardinal Newman died on August 11, 1890. Cardinal Newman is currently under consideration by the Vatican for sainthood.

Parochial and Plain Sermons, vol. 4

  • Author: John Henry Newman
  • Publisher: Rivingtons
  • Publication Date: 1868
  • Pages: 343

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10

From the first time Newman shared these sermons between 1825 and 1843, they have “have acted like leaven on the mind and language and literature of the Church . . . and have marked and era in her history.” Newman provides “words of guidance and support, and consolation and encouragement,” which continue to resound in the hearts and minds of modern Christians.

This volume contains 23 sermons covering topics such as the visible church, moral consequences of sin, fasts and festivals, and more.

John Henry Newman (1801–1890) was a priest and Cardinal in the Roman Catholic Church. His father was a banker and his mother’s family was French Huguenot. Newman was raised in a strict Calvinist home and received his primary education at the famous Ealing School. John Henry Newman graduated from Trinity College, Oxford in 1821 and was elected to a fellowship at Oriel College, Oxford in the following year. On June 13, 1824 he was ordained into the Anglican priesthood. From the early 1830s until 1845, Newman was a leading figure in the Oxford Movement, a group of Anglican priests and scholars from Oxford who sought to restore the rites of the Anglican church to their Apostolic roots in the Early Church. Between 1842 and 1845, during a time of solitude and the completion of Essay on the Development of Christian Doctrine, Newman underwent a process conversion to Roman Catholicism. Newman also published the Oxford Conservative Journal during this time period as a platform for retracting any negative remarks he previously assailed towards the Roman Church.

He was officially received into the Catholic Church on October 9, 1845. The conversion of John Henry Newman to Catholicism was the result of a life’s long struggle to reconcile the historic faith handed down from the Apostles with his own Anglican tradition. Frustrated with the errors inherent in both Protestantism and Roman Catholicism, Newman abandoned his search for the via media (or, middle way) of Anglicanism and converted to the Roman Catholic Church. In 1848, Newman founded the Birmingham Oratory at Maryvale and began ministering to the Catholic population of the city. In 1851, the Bishops of Ireland elected to start a Catholic university in Dublin and they appointed Newman to be the founder and first rector of the institution. Maintaining his ministry at the Birmingham Oratory, Newman established what would become University College, Dublin. His Idea of a University was prepared for founding faculty of the university at Dublin. On May 12, 1879 Pope Leo XIII appointed Newman to the college of Cardinals. John Henry Cardinal Newman died on August 11, 1890. Cardinal Newman is currently under consideration by the Vatican for sainthood.

Parochial and Plain Sermons, vol. 5

  • Author: John Henry Newman
  • Publisher: Rivingtons
  • Publication Date: 1868
  • Pages: 356

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10

From the first time Newman shared these sermons between 1825 and 1843, they have “have acted like leaven on the mind and language and literature of the Church . . . and have marked and era in her history.” Newman provides “words of guidance and support, and consolation and encouragement,” which continue to resound in the hearts and minds of modern Christians.

This volume contains 24 sermons including several for Advent, Christmas, and Epiphany.

John Henry Newman (1801–1890) was a priest and Cardinal in the Roman Catholic Church. His father was a banker and his mother’s family was French Huguenot. Newman was raised in a strict Calvinist home and received his primary education at the famous Ealing School. John Henry Newman graduated from Trinity College, Oxford in 1821 and was elected to a fellowship at Oriel College, Oxford in the following year. On June 13, 1824 he was ordained into the Anglican priesthood. From the early 1830s until 1845, Newman was a leading figure in the Oxford Movement, a group of Anglican priests and scholars from Oxford who sought to restore the rites of the Anglican church to their Apostolic roots in the Early Church. Between 1842 and 1845, during a time of solitude and the completion of Essay on the Development of Christian Doctrine, Newman underwent a process conversion to Roman Catholicism. Newman also published the Oxford Conservative Journal during this time period as a platform for retracting any negative remarks he previously assailed towards the Roman Church.

He was officially received into the Catholic Church on October 9, 1845. The conversion of John Henry Newman to Catholicism was the result of a life’s long struggle to reconcile the historic faith handed down from the Apostles with his own Anglican tradition. Frustrated with the errors inherent in both Protestantism and Roman Catholicism, Newman abandoned his search for the via media (or, middle way) of Anglicanism and converted to the Roman Catholic Church. In 1848, Newman founded the Birmingham Oratory at Maryvale and began ministering to the Catholic population of the city. In 1851, the Bishops of Ireland elected to start a Catholic university in Dublin and they appointed Newman to be the founder and first rector of the institution. Maintaining his ministry at the Birmingham Oratory, Newman established what would become University College, Dublin. His Idea of a University was prepared for founding faculty of the university at Dublin. On May 12, 1879 Pope Leo XIII appointed Newman to the college of Cardinals. John Henry Cardinal Newman died on August 11, 1890. Cardinal Newman is currently under consideration by the Vatican for sainthood.

Parochial and Plain Sermons, vol. 6

  • Author: John Henry Newman
  • Publisher: Rivingtons
  • Publication Date: 1868
  • Pages: 371

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10

From the first time Newman shared these sermons between 1825 and 1843, they have “have acted like leaven on the mind and language and literature of the Church . . . and have marked and era in her history.” Newman provides “words of guidance and support, and consolation and encouragement,” which continue to resound in the hearts and minds of modern Christians.

This volume contains 25 sermons including several for the Lent, Easter, and Ascension.

John Henry Newman (1801–1890) was a priest and Cardinal in the Roman Catholic Church. His father was a banker and his mother’s family was French Huguenot. Newman was raised in a strict Calvinist home and received his primary education at the famous Ealing School. John Henry Newman graduated from Trinity College, Oxford in 1821 and was elected to a fellowship at Oriel College, Oxford in the following year. On June 13, 1824 he was ordained into the Anglican priesthood. From the early 1830s until 1845, Newman was a leading figure in the Oxford Movement, a group of Anglican priests and scholars from Oxford who sought to restore the rites of the Anglican church to their Apostolic roots in the Early Church. Between 1842 and 1845, during a time of solitude and the completion of Essay on the Development of Christian Doctrine, Newman underwent a process conversion to Roman Catholicism. Newman also published the Oxford Conservative Journal during this time period as a platform for retracting any negative remarks he previously assailed towards the Roman Church.

He was officially received into the Catholic Church on October 9, 1845. The conversion of John Henry Newman to Catholicism was the result of a life’s long struggle to reconcile the historic faith handed down from the Apostles with his own Anglican tradition. Frustrated with the errors inherent in both Protestantism and Roman Catholicism, Newman abandoned his search for the via media (or, middle way) of Anglicanism and converted to the Roman Catholic Church. In 1848, Newman founded the Birmingham Oratory at Maryvale and began ministering to the Catholic population of the city. In 1851, the Bishops of Ireland elected to start a Catholic university in Dublin and they appointed Newman to be the founder and first rector of the institution. Maintaining his ministry at the Birmingham Oratory, Newman established what would become University College, Dublin. His Idea of a University was prepared for founding faculty of the university at Dublin. On May 12, 1879 Pope Leo XIII appointed Newman to the college of Cardinals. John Henry Cardinal Newman died on August 11, 1890. Cardinal Newman is currently under consideration by the Vatican for sainthood.

Parochial and Plain Sermons, vol. 7

  • Author: John Henry Newman
  • Publisher: Rivingtons
  • Publication Date: 1868
  • Pages: 257

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10

From the first time Newman shared these sermons between 1825 and 1843, they have “have acted like leaven on the mind and language and literature of the Church . . . and have marked and era in her history.” Newman provides “words of guidance and support, and consolation and encouragement,” which continue to resound in the hearts and minds of modern Christians.

This volume contains 18 sermons covering topics such as the crucifixion, the unity of the church, the duty of self-denial, and the season of Epiphany.

John Henry Newman (1801–1890) was a priest and Cardinal in the Roman Catholic Church. His father was a banker and his mother’s family was French Huguenot. Newman was raised in a strict Calvinist home and received his primary education at the famous Ealing School. John Henry Newman graduated from Trinity College, Oxford in 1821 and was elected to a fellowship at Oriel College, Oxford in the following year. On June 13, 1824 he was ordained into the Anglican priesthood. From the early 1830s until 1845, Newman was a leading figure in the Oxford Movement, a group of Anglican priests and scholars from Oxford who sought to restore the rites of the Anglican church to their Apostolic roots in the Early Church. Between 1842 and 1845, during a time of solitude and the completion of Essay on the Development of Christian Doctrine, Newman underwent a process conversion to Roman Catholicism. Newman also published the Oxford Conservative Journal during this time period as a platform for retracting any negative remarks he previously assailed towards the Roman Church.

He was officially received into the Catholic Church on October 9, 1845. The conversion of John Henry Newman to Catholicism was the result of a life’s long struggle to reconcile the historic faith handed down from the Apostles with his own Anglican tradition. Frustrated with the errors inherent in both Protestantism and Roman Catholicism, Newman abandoned his search for the via media (or, middle way) of Anglicanism and converted to the Roman Catholic Church. In 1848, Newman founded the Birmingham Oratory at Maryvale and began ministering to the Catholic population of the city. In 1851, the Bishops of Ireland elected to start a Catholic university in Dublin and they appointed Newman to be the founder and first rector of the institution. Maintaining his ministry at the Birmingham Oratory, Newman established what would become University College, Dublin. His Idea of a University was prepared for founding faculty of the university at Dublin. On May 12, 1879 Pope Leo XIII appointed Newman to the college of Cardinals. John Henry Cardinal Newman died on August 11, 1890. Cardinal Newman is currently under consideration by the Vatican for sainthood.

Parochial and Plain Sermons, vol. 8

  • Author: John Henry Newman
  • Publisher: Rivingtons
  • Publication Date: 1868
  • Pages: 268

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10

From the first time Newman shared these sermons between 1825 and 1843, they have “have acted like leaven on the mind and language and literature of the Church . . . and have marked and era in her history.” Newman provides “words of guidance and support, and consolation and encouragement,” which continue to resound in the hearts and minds of modern Christians.

This volume contains 18 sermons on topics such as joy in religion, conversions, miracles, worship, and more.

John Henry Newman (1801–1890) was a priest and Cardinal in the Roman Catholic Church. His father was a banker and his mother’s family was French Huguenot. Newman was raised in a strict Calvinist home and received his primary education at the famous Ealing School. John Henry Newman graduated from Trinity College, Oxford in 1821 and was elected to a fellowship at Oriel College, Oxford in the following year. On June 13, 1824 he was ordained into the Anglican priesthood. From the early 1830s until 1845, Newman was a leading figure in the Oxford Movement, a group of Anglican priests and scholars from Oxford who sought to restore the rites of the Anglican church to their Apostolic roots in the Early Church. Between 1842 and 1845, during a time of solitude and the completion of Essay on the Development of Christian Doctrine, Newman underwent a process conversion to Roman Catholicism. Newman also published the Oxford Conservative Journal during this time period as a platform for retracting any negative remarks he previously assailed towards the Roman Church.

He was officially received into the Catholic Church on October 9, 1845. The conversion of John Henry Newman to Catholicism was the result of a life’s long struggle to reconcile the historic faith handed down from the Apostles with his own Anglican tradition. Frustrated with the errors inherent in both Protestantism and Roman Catholicism, Newman abandoned his search for the via media (or, middle way) of Anglicanism and converted to the Roman Catholic Church. In 1848, Newman founded the Birmingham Oratory at Maryvale and began ministering to the Catholic population of the city. In 1851, the Bishops of Ireland elected to start a Catholic university in Dublin and they appointed Newman to be the founder and first rector of the institution. Maintaining his ministry at the Birmingham Oratory, Newman established what would become University College, Dublin. His Idea of a University was prepared for founding faculty of the university at Dublin. On May 12, 1879 Pope Leo XIII appointed Newman to the college of Cardinals. John Henry Cardinal Newman died on August 11, 1890. Cardinal Newman is currently under consideration by the Vatican for sainthood.

Sermons Bearing on Subjects of the Day

  • Author: John Henry Newman
  • Publisher: Rivingtons
  • Publication Date: 1869
  • Pages: 424

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10

Though its themes still resonate today, these 26 sermons from John Henry Newman were intended “to be read and understood mainly with reference to their direct or indirect bearing on the occasion and circumstances of their first publication. They have necessarily an historical and controversial aspect, though most of them treat of matters of deep and unfailing interest, and of vast practical importance.” He preaches on several topics, including the church’s place in history, personal faith, the offices of Christ, and wisdom.

John Henry Newman (1801–1890) was a priest and Cardinal in the Roman Catholic Church. His father was a banker and his mother’s family was French Huguenot. Newman was raised in a strict Calvinist home and received his primary education at the famous Ealing School. John Henry Newman graduated from Trinity College, Oxford in 1821 and was elected to a fellowship at Oriel College, Oxford in the following year. On June 13, 1824 he was ordained into the Anglican priesthood. From the early 1830s until 1845, Newman was a leading figure in the Oxford Movement, a group of Anglican priests and scholars from Oxford who sought to restore the rites of the Anglican church to their Apostolic roots in the Early Church. Between 1842 and 1845, during a time of solitude and the completion of Essay on the Development of Christian Doctrine, Newman underwent a process conversion to Roman Catholicism. Newman also published the Oxford Conservative Journal during this time period as a platform for retracting any negative remarks he previously assailed towards the Roman Church.

He was officially received into the Catholic Church on October 9, 1845. The conversion of John Henry Newman to Catholicism was the result of a life’s long struggle to reconcile the historic faith handed down from the Apostles with his own Anglican tradition. Frustrated with the errors inherent in both Protestantism and Roman Catholicism, Newman abandoned his search for the via media (or, middle way) of Anglicanism and converted to the Roman Catholic Church. In 1848, Newman founded the Birmingham Oratory at Maryvale and began ministering to the Catholic population of the city. In 1851, the Bishops of Ireland elected to start a Catholic university in Dublin and they appointed Newman to be the founder and first rector of the institution. Maintaining his ministry at the Birmingham Oratory, Newman established what would become University College, Dublin. His Idea of a University was prepared for founding faculty of the university at Dublin. On May 12, 1879 Pope Leo XIII appointed Newman to the college of Cardinals. John Henry Cardinal Newman died on August 11, 1890. Cardinal Newman is currently under consideration by the Vatican for sainthood.

Sermons Preached Before the University of Oxford

  • Author: John Henry Newman
  • Publisher: Francis and John Rivington
  • Publication Date: 1844
  • Pages: 354

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10

This volume includes 14 sermons on the theory of religious belief given by John Henry Newman at the University of Oxford in the mid-nineteenth century. He discusses natural and revealed religion, faith and reason, human responsibility, justice, and more.

John Henry Newman (1801–1890) was a priest and Cardinal in the Roman Catholic Church. His father was a banker and his mother’s family was French Huguenot. Newman was raised in a strict Calvinist home and received his primary education at the famous Ealing School. John Henry Newman graduated from Trinity College, Oxford in 1821 and was elected to a fellowship at Oriel College, Oxford in the following year. On June 13, 1824 he was ordained into the Anglican priesthood. From the early 1830s until 1845, Newman was a leading figure in the Oxford Movement, a group of Anglican priests and scholars from Oxford who sought to restore the rites of the Anglican church to their Apostolic roots in the Early Church. Between 1842 and 1845, during a time of solitude and the completion of Essay on the Development of Christian Doctrine, Newman underwent a process conversion to Roman Catholicism. Newman also published the Oxford Conservative Journal during this time period as a platform for retracting any negative remarks he previously assailed towards the Roman Church.

He was officially received into the Catholic Church on October 9, 1845. The conversion of John Henry Newman to Catholicism was the result of a life’s long struggle to reconcile the historic faith handed down from the Apostles with his own Anglican tradition. Frustrated with the errors inherent in both Protestantism and Roman Catholicism, Newman abandoned his search for the via media (or, middle way) of Anglicanism and converted to the Roman Catholic Church. In 1848, Newman founded the Birmingham Oratory at Maryvale and began ministering to the Catholic population of the city. In 1851, the Bishops of Ireland elected to start a Catholic university in Dublin and they appointed Newman to be the founder and first rector of the institution. Maintaining his ministry at the Birmingham Oratory, Newman established what would become University College, Dublin. His Idea of a University was prepared for founding faculty of the university at Dublin. On May 12, 1879 Pope Leo XIII appointed Newman to the college of Cardinals. John Henry Cardinal Newman died on August 11, 1890. Cardinal Newman is currently under consideration by the Vatican for sainthood.

Discourses Addressed to Mixed Congregations

  • Author: John Henry Newman
  • Publisher: Patrick Donahoe
  • Publication Date: 1853
  • Pages: 282

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

The sermons in this collection were originally given by John Henry Newman at the Oratory of St. Philip Neri. They were published in 1853 and cover topics such as divine mysteries, faith and doubt, the glories of Mary, the Passion, and more.

John Henry Newman (1801–1890) was a priest and Cardinal in the Roman Catholic Church. His father was a banker and his mother’s family was French Huguenot. Newman was raised in a strict Calvinist home and received his primary education at the famous Ealing School. John Henry Newman graduated from Trinity College, Oxford in 1821 and was elected to a fellowship at Oriel College, Oxford in the following year. On June 13, 1824 he was ordained into the Anglican priesthood. From the early 1830s until 1845, Newman was a leading figure in the Oxford Movement, a group of Anglican priests and scholars from Oxford who sought to restore the rites of the Anglican church to their Apostolic roots in the Early Church. Between 1842 and 1845, during a time of solitude and the completion of Essay on the Development of Christian Doctrine, Newman underwent a process conversion to Roman Catholicism. Newman also published the Oxford Conservative Journal during this time period as a platform for retracting any negative remarks he previously assailed towards the Roman Church.

He was officially received into the Catholic Church on October 9, 1845. The conversion of John Henry Newman to Catholicism was the result of a life’s long struggle to reconcile the historic faith handed down from the Apostles with his own Anglican tradition. Frustrated with the errors inherent in both Protestantism and Roman Catholicism, Newman abandoned his search for the via media (or, middle way) of Anglicanism and converted to the Roman Catholic Church. In 1848, Newman founded the Birmingham Oratory at Maryvale and began ministering to the Catholic population of the city. In 1851, the Bishops of Ireland elected to start a Catholic university in Dublin and they appointed Newman to be the founder and first rector of the institution. Maintaining his ministry at the Birmingham Oratory, Newman established what would become University College, Dublin. His Idea of a University was prepared for founding faculty of the university at Dublin. On May 12, 1879 Pope Leo XIII appointed Newman to the college of Cardinals. John Henry Cardinal Newman died on August 11, 1890. Cardinal Newman is currently under consideration by the Vatican for sainthood.

Sermons Preached on Various Occasions

  • Author: John Henry Newman
  • Publisher: Burns and Lambert
  • Publication Date: 1858
  • Pages: 331

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10

Between 1850 and 1857, John Henry Newman preached to several congregations—from Birmingham to Westminster to the Catholic University of Ireland. He collected 12 sermons from that period and assembled them as a gift for his friend Dr. Henry Edward Manning, provost of Westminster. The sermons discuss the Pharisees, the power of divine grace, the mission of St. Philip Neri, and more.

John Henry Newman (1801–1890) was a priest and Cardinal in the Roman Catholic Church. His father was a banker and his mother’s family was French Huguenot. Newman was raised in a strict Calvinist home and received his primary education at the famous Ealing School. John Henry Newman graduated from Trinity College, Oxford in 1821 and was elected to a fellowship at Oriel College, Oxford in the following year. On June 13, 1824 he was ordained into the Anglican priesthood. From the early 1830s until 1845, Newman was a leading figure in the Oxford Movement, a group of Anglican priests and scholars from Oxford who sought to restore the rites of the Anglican church to their Apostolic roots in the Early Church. Between 1842 and 1845, during a time of solitude and the completion of Essay on the Development of Christian Doctrine, Newman underwent a process conversion to Roman Catholicism. Newman also published the Oxford Conservative Journal during this time period as a platform for retracting any negative remarks he previously assailed towards the Roman Church.

He was officially received into the Catholic Church on October 9, 1845. The conversion of John Henry Newman to Catholicism was the result of a life’s long struggle to reconcile the historic faith handed down from the Apostles with his own Anglican tradition. Frustrated with the errors inherent in both Protestantism and Roman Catholicism, Newman abandoned his search for the via media (or, middle way) of Anglicanism and converted to the Roman Catholic Church. In 1848, Newman founded the Birmingham Oratory at Maryvale and began ministering to the Catholic population of the city. In 1851, the Bishops of Ireland elected to start a Catholic university in Dublin and they appointed Newman to be the founder and first rector of the institution. Maintaining his ministry at the Birmingham Oratory, Newman established what would become University College, Dublin. His Idea of a University was prepared for founding faculty of the university at Dublin. On May 12, 1879 Pope Leo XIII appointed Newman to the college of Cardinals. John Henry Cardinal Newman died on August 11, 1890. Cardinal Newman is currently under consideration by the Vatican for sainthood.

Sermons to the Novices Regular

  • Author: Thomas à Kempis
  • Translator: Vincent Scully
  • Publisher: Kegan Paul, Trench, Trubner & Co.
  • Publication Date: 1907
  • Pages: 255

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

As sub-prior for Monastery of Mount St. Agnes, Thomas à Kempis was in charge of instructing new candidates in the obligations, burdens, duties, and difficulties of monastic life, as well as relating rules and statutes of the Order. Sermons to the Novices Regular consists of 30 instructional sermons that were directed at the “young Religious.”

Thomas à Kempis (1380–1471) was born in Kempen, Germany. In 1392, Thomas travelled to the Netherlands to attend school, and there he was introduced to the Brethren of the Common Life, followers of Gerard Groote’s Modern Devotion movement. After finishing school, he devoted his life to the movement, joining the Mount St. Agnes monastery. Thomas’ works evinced wide learning and deep biblical knowledge, and his work The Imitation of Christ is considered a classic in Christian literature.

A Meditation on the Incarnation of Christ, Sermons on the Life and Passion of Our Lord, and Of Hearing and Speaking Good Words

  • Author: Thomas à Kempis
  • Translator: Vincent Scully
  • Publisher: Kegan Paul, Trench, Trubner & Co.
  • Publication Date: 1907
  • Pages: 256

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

This volume contains Thomas à Kempis’ reflections on testimonies from the Old and New Testaments in A Meditation on the Incarnation of Christ. Also included are 35 sermons, including five Christmas sermons, and the short essay Hearing and Speaking Good Words.

Thomas à Kempis (1380–1471) was born in Kempen, Germany. In 1392, Thomas travelled to the Netherlands to attend school, and there he was introduced to the Brethren of the Common Life, followers of Gerard Groote’s Modern Devotion movement. After finishing school, he devoted his life to the movement, joining the Mount St. Agnes monastery. Thomas’ works evinced wide learning and deep biblical knowledge, and his work The Imitation of Christ is considered a classic in Christian literature.

The Voice of God in the Present Hour

  • Author: R.A. Torrey
  • Publisher: Fleming H. Revell
  • Publication Date: 1917
  • Pages: 255

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

This volume contains a collection of R.A. Torrey’s sermons, preached between autumn of 1916 and spring of 1917 at The Church of the Open Door in Los Angeles, California, amidst the trials and anxieties of the First World War. With titles including “God’s Guidance and How to Get It,” “Why I Believe That Jesus Christ Is God in Human Form,” and “The Secret of Abiding Peace, Abounding Joy, and Abundant Victory in War Times and at All Times,” there are kernels of wisdom that still resonate strongly with readers. These sermons are brimming with passion and remain a treasury of spiritual insights and biblical exegesis.

R.A. Torrey (1856–1928) was both an evangelist and a Bible scholar. Long associated with evangelist D.L. Moody, he became most prominent during world preaching tours in 1902 and 1921. His preaching in Wales in 1902 has been noted as one cause for the Welsh revivals of the early 1900s. He was the first superintendent of the Moody Bible Institute and wrote numerous devotional and theological books. Spiritual awakening followed R.A. Torrey throughout his career as an evangelist. In revivals with the popular gospel singer Charles W. Alexander, Torrey filled meeting halls with his magnetic presence, passion, and earnestness.

How to Promote & Conduct a Successful Revival

  • Author: R.A. Torrey
  • Publisher: Fleming H. Revell
  • Publication Date: 1901
  • Pages: 348

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

In this text, Torrey collects experiences of “men whom God has used in winning souls to Christ and building up believers” in order to provide a resource for the “thousands of ministers and other Christian workers . . . longing for a true revival of God’s work, but with no experimental or even theoretical knowledge of how to go to work to promote such a revival.” This text also includes the chapters “The Holy Spirit in a Revival,” “The Place of Prayer in a Revival,” and a series of sermons condensed into outline form. Suggestive outlines come from eminent evangelists including Torrey, D.L. Moody, Charles G. Finney, Charles Spurgeon.

R.A. Torrey (1856–1928) was both an evangelist and a Bible scholar. Long associated with evangelist D.L. Moody, he became most prominent during world preaching tours in 1902 and 1921. His preaching in Wales in 1902 has been noted as one cause for the Welsh revivals of the early 1900s. He was the first superintendent of the Moody Bible Institute and wrote numerous devotional and theological books. Spiritual awakening followed R.A. Torrey throughout his career as an evangelist. In revivals with the popular gospel singer Charles W. Alexander, Torrey filled meeting halls with his magnetic presence, passion, and earnestness.

Revival Addresses

  • Author: R.A. Torrey
  • Publisher: Fleming H. Revell
  • Publication Date: 1903
  • Pages: 271

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Torrey delivered these 17 powerful and inspirational sermons over a number of years while preaching in Japan, China, Australia, Tasmania, New Zealand, India, England, and Scotland.

Sermons included:

  • God
  • God Is Love
  • Found Wanting
  • The Judgment Day
  • Every Man’s Need of a Refuge
  • The Drama of Life in Three Acts
  • A Question That Should Startle Every Man Who Is Not a Christian
  • A Solemn Question
  • Refuges of Lies
  • The Way of Salvation
  • What It Costs Not to Be a Christian
  • The Most Important Question That Any Man Ever Asked or Answered
  • One of the Saddest Utterances That Ever Fell from the Lips of the Son of God
  • What Are You Waiting For?
  • Excuses
  • Heroes and Cowards
  • Three Fires

R.A. Torrey (1856–1928) was both an evangelist and a Bible scholar. Long associated with evangelist D.L. Moody, he became most prominent during world preaching tours in 1902 and 1921. His preaching in Wales in 1902 has been noted as one cause for the Welsh revivals of the early 1900s. He was the first superintendent of the Moody Bible Institute and wrote numerous devotional and theological books. Spiritual awakening followed R.A. Torrey throughout his career as an evangelist. In revivals with the popular gospel singer Charles W. Alexander, Torrey filled meeting halls with his magnetic presence, passion, and earnestness.

Talks to Men about the Bible and the Christ of the Bible

  • Author: R.A. Torrey
  • Publisher: Fleming H. Revell
  • Publication Date: 1904
  • Pages: 138

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Built on sermons that Torrey gave during his many years of preaching, Talks to Men about the Bible and the Christ of the Bible aims to explain the important doctrines of Christianity to those who haven’t been exposed to the Bible and the teachings of Christ.

R.A. Torrey (1856–1928) was both an evangelist and a Bible scholar. Long associated with evangelist D.L. Moody, he became most prominent during world preaching tours in 1902 and 1921. His preaching in Wales in 1902 has been noted as one cause for the Welsh revivals of the early 1900s. He was the first superintendent of the Moody Bible Institute and wrote numerous devotional and theological books. Spiritual awakening followed R.A. Torrey throughout his career as an evangelist. In revivals with the popular gospel singer Charles W. Alexander, Torrey filled meeting halls with his magnetic presence, passion, and earnestness.

The Power of God unto Salvation

  • Author: Benjamin B. Warfield
  • Publisher: Presbyterian Board of Publication
  • Publication Date: 1903
  • Pages: 254

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

The Power of God unto Salvation contains a collection of sermons preached by Warfield in the chapel of Princeton Theological Seminary, which address both the pastoral and theological concerns of his students. These sermons cover a broad range of topics, including divine revelation, salvation, God’s omnipotence, and the person of the Holy Spirit, and reveal Warfield’s theological commentary on key texts.

Benjamin Breckinridge Warfield was born in 1851 in Lexington, Kentucky. He studied mathematics and science at Princeton University and graduated in 1871. In 1873, he decided to enroll at Princeton Theological Seminary, where he was taught by Charles Hodge. He graduated from seminary in 1876, and was married shortly thereafter. He traveled to Germany later that year to study under Franz Delitazsch.

After returning to America, Warfield taught at Western Theological Seminary (now Pittsburgh Theological Seminary). In 1881, Warfield cowrote an article with A.A. Hodge on the inspiration of Scripture—a subject which dominated his scholarly pursuits throughout the remainder of his lifetime. When A.A. Hodge died in 1887, Warfield became professor of theology at Princeton, where he taught from 1887–1921. History remembers Warfield as one of the last great Princeton Theologians prior to the seminary’s reorganization and the split in the Presbyterian Church. B.B. Warfield died in 1921.

The Saviour of the World

  • Author: Benjamin B. Warfield
  • Publisher: Hodder and Stoughton
  • Publication Date: 1916
  • Pages: 270

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

The Saviour of the World contains nine of Warfield’s sermons preached in the chapel of Princeton Theological Seminary. Each sermon is based on a significant text of the New Testament, including the parable of the Prodigal Son, the metaphor of Jesus as the Lamb of God, God’s love, God’s glory, the resurrection, and the incarnation. Conversational in tone and firmly rooted in the Bible, his sermons in The Saviour of the World reveal the clear connection between his theology and his understanding of the Bible.

Benjamin Breckinridge Warfield was born in 1851 in Lexington, Kentucky. He studied mathematics and science at Princeton University and graduated in 1871. In 1873, he decided to enroll at Princeton Theological Seminary, where he was taught by Charles Hodge. He graduated from seminary in 1876, and was married shortly thereafter. He traveled to Germany later that year to study under Franz Delitazsch.

After returning to America, Warfield taught at Western Theological Seminary (now Pittsburgh Theological Seminary). In 1881, Warfield cowrote an article with A.A. Hodge on the inspiration of Scripture—a subject which dominated his scholarly pursuits throughout the remainder of his lifetime. When A.A. Hodge died in 1887, Warfield became professor of theology at Princeton, where he taught from 1887–1921. History remembers Warfield as one of the last great Princeton Theologians prior to the seminary’s reorganization and the split in the Presbyterian Church. B.B. Warfield died in 1921.

Faith and Life

  • Author: Benjamin B. Warfield
  • Publisher: Longmans, Green, and Co.
  • Publication Date: 1916
  • Pages: 458

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5

It became something of a tradition at Princeton Theological Seminary for prominent professors to addresses students in an informal setting on Sunday afternoons. Some of these professors included Archibald Alexander, Samuel Miller, and Charles Hodge. B.B. Warfield continued this tradition during his tenure as professor. Faith and Life includes 41 addresses and sermons from those classes in accessible and easy-to-understand language. This volume brings one of America’s greatest theologians and one of Princeton’s most memorable professors within reach of non-technical readers.

Benjamin Breckinridge Warfield was born in 1851 in Lexington, Kentucky. He studied mathematics and science at Princeton University and graduated in 1871. In 1873, he decided to enroll at Princeton Theological Seminary, where he was taught by Charles Hodge. He graduated from seminary in 1876, and was married shortly thereafter. He traveled to Germany later that year to study under Franz Delitazsch.

After returning to America, Warfield taught at Western Theological Seminary (now Pittsburgh Theological Seminary). In 1881, Warfield cowrote an article with A.A. Hodge on the inspiration of Scripture—a subject which dominated his scholarly pursuits throughout the remainder of his lifetime. When A.A. Hodge died in 1887, Warfield became professor of theology at Princeton, where he taught from 1887–1921. History remembers Warfield as one of the last great Princeton Theologians prior to the seminary’s reorganization and the split in the Presbyterian Church. B.B. Warfield died in 1921.

Sermons on Several Occasions

  • Author: John Wesley
  • Publisher: Logos Research Systems, Inc.
  • Publication Date: 1999
  • Pages: 909

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

From the preface: “. . . I am not conscious, that there is any one point of doctrine, on which I am accustomed to speak in public, which is not here, incidentally, if not professedly, laid before every Christian reader. Every serious man who peruses these, will therefore see, in the clearest manner, what these doctrines are which I embrace and teach as the essentials of true religion.”

John Wesley (1703–1791) is recognized as the founder of Methodism. An acclaimed preacher, Wesley traveled extensively on horseback and drew large crowds for his outdoor sermons. A contemporary of William Wilberforce, Wesley was a strong voice opposing slavery in England and the United States. His influence upon modern Christianity can be seen by the large number of Methodist organizations in the Wesleyan tradition all over the world.

Selected Sermons of George Whitefield

  • Author: George Whitefield
  • Publisher: Logos Research Systems
  • Publication Date: 1999
  • Pages: 462

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

George Whitefield, a friend of both John Wesley and Benjamin Franklin, is considered to be one of the instrumental forces in the beginning of what is known as “The Great Awakening”. Whitefield, an English itinerant preacher who was passionate in his oratory, attracted some of the largest crowds of his day. Thousands would gather in fields to hear him preach as he traveled both the English countryside and the colonies, soon to become the United States of America. Selected Sermons of George Whitefield contains over 50 of Whitefield’s sermons, on a variety of topics, and are still edifying to read and study today.

George Whitefield (1714–1770) was one of the founders of Methodism and influential in the spread of the Great Awakening in both Britain and the British North American colonies. He believed in preaching his sermons without notes in order to allow room for the Holy Spirit to guide his speaking, and was known for his theatrical delivery.

Whitefield studied at Oxford, where he met Charles and John Wesley. The Wesley brothers were a part of what was referred to as the “Holy Club” on campus, which Whitefield joined and by which he was quite influenced, later becoming the president. In 1738, he came to America for the first of seven trips he would make across the ocean. During this first trip, he founded the orphanage Bethseda just outside of Savannah, Georgia.

Throughout his life, he toured all over New England, England, Scotland, and Wales, preaching to crowds of up to tens of thousands at a time, greatly influencing the Great Awakening and the early Methodist Church.

Ninety-Six Sermons, vol. 1

  • Author: Lancelot Andrewes
  • Publisher: John Henry Parker
  • Publication Date: 1841
  • Pages: 454

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Volume one of Ninety-Six Sermons contains “Sermons of the Nativity: Preached on Christmas Day” and “Sermons of Repentance and Fasting: Preached on Ash Wednesday.”

Lancelot Andrewes (1555–1626) was born in All Hallows, Barking, in London. He graduated from Cambridge University with a BA and an MA. He became a fellow of Pembroke Hall, Cambridge, in 1576. He was ordained in 1580 and made master of Pembroke Hall and chaplain to the Archbishop of Canterbury in 1589. The following year he became chaplain to Queen Elizabeth I. Andrewes’ sermons recommended him to James I, who made him general editor of the Authorized Version (King James Version) of the Bible. In 1605, Andrewes became bishop of Chichester. His sermon following the foiled Gunpowder Plot in 1606 became the foundation for celebrations that continue today. He eventually became bishop of Winchester, a position he held until his death in 1626.

Ninety-Six Sermons, vol. 2

  • Author: Lancelot Andrewes
  • Publisher: John Henry Parker
  • Publication Date: 1841
  • Pages: 428

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Volume two of Ninety-Six Sermons contains “Sermons Preached in Lent” and “Sermons of the Resurrection: Preached on Easter Day.”

Lancelot Andrewes (1555–1626) was born in All Hallows, Barking, in London. He graduated from Cambridge University with a BA and an MA. He became a fellow of Pembroke Hall, Cambridge, in 1576. He was ordained in 1580 and made master of Pembroke Hall and chaplain to the Archbishop of Canterbury in 1589. The following year he became chaplain to Queen Elizabeth I. Andrewes’ sermons recommended him to James I, who made him general editor of the Authorized Version (King James Version) of the Bible. In 1605, Andrewes became bishop of Chichester. His sermon following the foiled Gunpowder Plot in 1606 became the foundation for celebrations that continue today. He eventually became bishop of Winchester, a position he held until his death in 1626.

Ninety-Six Sermons, vol. 3

  • Author: Lancelot Andrewes
  • Publisher: John Henry Parker
  • Publication Date: 1841
  • Pages: 401

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Volume three of Ninety-Six Sermons contains “Sermons of the Resurrection” and “Sermons of the Sending of the Holy Ghost: Preached on Whit Sunday.”

Lancelot Andrewes (1555–1626) was born in All Hallows, Barking, in London. He graduated from Cambridge University with a BA and an MA. He became a fellow of Pembroke Hall, Cambridge, in 1576. He was ordained in 1580 and made master of Pembroke Hall and chaplain to the Archbishop of Canterbury in 1589. The following year he became chaplain to Queen Elizabeth I. Andrewes’ sermons recommended him to James I, who made him general editor of the Authorized Version (King James Version) of the Bible. In 1605, Andrewes became bishop of Chichester. His sermon following the foiled Gunpowder Plot in 1606 became the foundation for celebrations that continue today. He eventually became bishop of Winchester, a position he held until his death in 1626.

Ninety-Six Sermons, vol. 4

  • Author: Lancelot Andrewes
  • Publisher: John Henry Parker
  • Publication Date: 1843
  • Pages: 410

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Volume four of Ninety-Six Sermons contains “Sermons of the Conspiracy of the Gowries: Preached upon the Fifth of August” and “Sermons of the Gunpowder Treason: Preached upon the Fifth of November”

Lancelot Andrewes (1555–1626) was born in All Hallows, Barking, in London. He graduated from Cambridge University with a BA and an MA. He became a fellow of Pembroke Hall, Cambridge, in 1576. He was ordained in 1580 and made master of Pembroke Hall and chaplain to the Archbishop of Canterbury in 1589. The following year he became chaplain to Queen Elizabeth I. Andrewes’ sermons recommended him to James I, who made him general editor of the Authorized Version (King James Version) of the Bible. In 1605, Andrewes became bishop of Chichester. His sermon following the foiled Gunpowder Plot in 1606 became the foundation for celebrations that continue today. He eventually became bishop of Winchester, a position he held until his death in 1626.

Ninety-Six Sermons, vol. 5

  • Author: Lancelot Andrewes
  • Publisher: John Henry Parker
  • Publication Date: 1843
  • Pages: 558

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Volume five of Ninety-Six Sermons contains “Certain Sermons Preached at Sundry Times, upon Several Occasions,” “Nineteen Sermons upon Prayer in General and the Lord’s Prayer in Particular,” and “Seven Sermons upon the Temptation of Christ in the Wilderness.”

Lancelot Andrewes (1555–1626) was born in All Hallows, Barking, in London. He graduated from Cambridge University with a BA and an MA. He became a fellow of Pembroke Hall, Cambridge, in 1576. He was ordained in 1580 and made master of Pembroke Hall and chaplain to the Archbishop of Canterbury in 1589. The following year he became chaplain to Queen Elizabeth I. Andrewes’ sermons recommended him to James I, who made him general editor of the Authorized Version (King James Version) of the Bible. In 1605, Andrewes became bishop of Chichester. His sermon following the foiled Gunpowder Plot in 1606 became the foundation for celebrations that continue today. He eventually became bishop of Winchester, a position he held until his death in 1626.

Sermons and Addresses

  • Author: J.A. Broadus
  • Publisher: H.M. Wharton & Co.
  • Publication Date: 1886
  • Pages: 445

Preserved in this work are the texts of 21 sermons and addresses Broadus delivered on a wide range of occasions. Topics range from worship to sanctification, from evangelism to prayer to an exhortation to read the Bible by books.

Most of Broadus’ preaching is intensely practical and will encourage your spiritual growth. As he summarized his calling, “The greatest privilege of earthly life is to give some fellow creature the blessed Word of God, and then try by loving speech and example, to bring home to the heart and conscience . . . the truths it contains.”

J.A. Broadus was one of the founding faculty of Southern Baptist Theological Seminary and professor of homiletics. A master of clarity in communication and sympathy with his audience, he was also considered to be one of the foremost American pastors during the last half of the nineteenth century.

Sermons by Hugh Latimer

  • Author: Hugh Latimer
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press
  • Publication Date: 1844
  • Pages: 551

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Sermons by Hugh Latimer contains a memoir of Latimer and 30 of his sermons.

  • Sermons on the Card
  • Sermon on the Epistle for the Twenty-first Sunday after Trinity, 1535
  • Sermons before the Convocation of the Clergy, 1536
  • Sermon of the Plough, 1548
  • Seven Sermons Preached before King Edward the Sixth, 1549
  • Last Sermon Preached before Edward the Sixth, 1550
  • Sermon Preached at Stamford, 1550
  • Sermons on the Lord’s Prayer, 1552
  • Sermon on the Gospel for St. Simon and St. Jude’s Day, 1552
  • Sermons Preached in Lincolnshire, 1552

Hugh Latimer (1487–1555) was born in a farming community in Thurcaston, Leicestershire, England. He attended Cambridge University; he was made a fellow of Clare College in 1510 and earned an MA in 1514. Latimer was ordained in 1515 and made university preacher and chaplain in 1524. The same year, he earned a bachelor of divinity. He was made bishop of Worcestor in 1535, but was jailed and made to resign after he opposed Henry VIII’s six articles. He was freed by Henry’s son, Edward VI, and made the court preacher. When Mary I took the throne, Latimer was tried and convicted of heresy. In October 1555, he was burned at the stake along with Nicholas Ridley, near Balliol College, Oxford.

Sermons and Remains of Hugh Latimer

  • Author: Hugh Latimer
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press
  • Publication Date: 1845
  • Pages: 526

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Sermons and Remains of Hugh Latimer contains 15 sermons, 15 letters and miscellaneous doctrinal documents. The sermons include:

  • Sermons Preached in Lincolnshire, 1552 (cont.)
  • Sermon Preached at Bexterley on Christmas Day, 1552
  • Sermon Preached at Grimsthorpe on St. Stephen’s Day, 1552
  • Sermon Preached at Grimsthorpe on St. John the Evangelist’s Day, 1552
  • Sermon Preached at Grimsthorpe on Twelfth Day, 1553
  • Sermon Preached the First Sunday after Epiphany, 1552
  • Sermon Preached the Second Sunday after Epiphany
  • Sermon Preached the Third Sunday after Epiphany
  • Sermon Preached the Fourth Sunday after Epiphany
  • Sermon Preached the Fifth Sunday after Epiphany
  • Sermon Preached on Septuagesima Sunday
  • Sermon Preached on Sexagesima Sunday

Hugh Latimer (1487–1555) was born in a farming community in Thurcaston, Leicestershire, England. He attended Cambridge University; he was made a fellow of Clare College in 1510 and earned an MA in 1514. Latimer was ordained in 1515 and made university preacher and chaplain in 1524. The same year, he earned a bachelor of divinity. He was made bishop of Worcestor in 1535, but was jailed and made to resign after he opposed Henry VIII’s six articles. He was freed by Henry’s son, Edward VI, and made the court preacher. When Mary I took the throne, Latimer was tried and convicted of heresy. In October 1555, he was burned at the stake along with Nicholas Ridley, near Balliol College, Oxford.

The Whole Works of Thomas Boston, vol. 3: Sermons, Part 1

  • Author: Thomas Boston
  • Publisher: Aberdeen: George and Robert King
  • Publication Date: 1852
  • Pages: 655

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Contents Include:

  • 38 sermons
  • Crook in the Lot
  • On Church Communion

Thomas Boston (1676–1732) was born in Duns, Berwickshire to a devout Presbyterian family. Boston attended the University of Edinburgh and graduated in 1697. He was ordained in 1699 and became a minister in the Presbyterian Church at Simprin. In 1707, he moved from Simprin to Ettrick, Scotland, where he grew in popularity and became well known for his preaching. Boston served for many years in Ettrick, and became enormously influential in Scottish Presbyterianism. Boston was a prolific author throughout this life, and by the end of the eighteenth century, his works had becoming standard reading for Presbyterian ministers. He is best known for The Crook in the Lot and Human Nature in Its Fourfold State, based on a series of sermons preached at Simprin.

The Whole Works of Thomas Boston, vol. 4: Sermons, Part 2

  • Author: Thomas Boston
  • Publisher: Aberdeen: George and Robert King
  • Publication Date: 1852
  • Pages: 550

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Contents Include:

  • 40 sermons
  • Farewell Sermon at Simprin
  • The Distinguishing Character of Real Christians

Thomas Boston (1676–1732) was born in Duns, Berwickshire to a devout Presbyterian family. Boston attended the University of Edinburgh and graduated in 1697. He was ordained in 1699 and became a minister in the Presbyterian Church at Simprin. In 1707, he moved from Simprin to Ettrick, Scotland, where he grew in popularity and became well known for his preaching. Boston served for many years in Ettrick, and became enormously influential in Scottish Presbyterianism. Boston was a prolific author throughout this life, and by the end of the eighteenth century, his works had becoming standard reading for Presbyterian ministers. He is best known for The Crook in the Lot and Human Nature in Its Fourfold State, based on a series of sermons preached at Simprin.

The Whole Works of Thomas Boston, vol. 6: Sermons and Discourses on Several Important Subjects in Divinity

  • Author: Thomas Boston
  • Publisher: Aberdeen: George and Robert King
  • Publication Date: 1849
  • Pages: 682

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Contents Include:

  • Miscellaneous Questions
  • Miscellaneous Tracts
  • Practical Discourses

Thomas Boston (1676–1732) was born in Duns, Berwickshire to a devout Presbyterian family. Boston attended the University of Edinburgh and graduated in 1697. He was ordained in 1699 and became a minister in the Presbyterian Church at Simprin. In 1707, he moved from Simprin to Ettrick, Scotland, where he grew in popularity and became well known for his preaching. Boston served for many years in Ettrick, and became enormously influential in Scottish Presbyterianism. Boston was a prolific author throughout this life, and by the end of the eighteenth century, his works had becoming standard reading for Presbyterian ministers. He is best known for The Crook in the Lot and Human Nature in Its Fourfold State, based on a series of sermons preached at Simprin.

The Whole Works of Thomas Boston, vol. 9: Sixty-Six Sermons

  • Author: Thomas Boston
  • Publisher: Aberdeen: George and Robert King
  • Publication Date: 1851
  • Pages: 620

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Contents Include:

  • 66 sermons

Thomas Boston (1676–1732) was born in Duns, Berwickshire to a devout Presbyterian family. Boston attended the University of Edinburgh and graduated in 1697. He was ordained in 1699 and became a minister in the Presbyterian Church at Simprin. In 1707, he moved from Simprin to Ettrick, Scotland, where he grew in popularity and became well known for his preaching. Boston served for many years in Ettrick, and became enormously influential in Scottish Presbyterianism. Boston was a prolific author throughout this life, and by the end of the eighteenth century, his works had becoming standard reading for Presbyterian ministers. He is best known for The Crook in the Lot and Human Nature in Its Fourfold State, based on a series of sermons preached at Simprin.

The Whole Works of Thomas Boston, vol. 10: A Series of Sermons and The Christian Life Delineated

  • Author: Thomas Boston
  • Publisher: Aberdeen: George and Robert King
  • Publication Date: 1851
  • Pages: 636

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Contents Include:

  • 28 sermons
  • The Christian Life Delineated

Thomas Boston (1676–1732) was born in Duns, Berwickshire to a devout Presbyterian family. Boston attended the University of Edinburgh and graduated in 1697. He was ordained in 1699 and became a minister in the Presbyterian Church at Simprin. In 1707, he moved from Simprin to Ettrick, Scotland, where he grew in popularity and became well known for his preaching. Boston served for many years in Ettrick, and became enormously influential in Scottish Presbyterianism. Boston was a prolific author throughout this life, and by the end of the eighteenth century, his works had becoming standard reading for Presbyterian ministers. He is best known for The Crook in the Lot and Human Nature in Its Fourfold State, based on a series of sermons preached at Simprin.

The Trial and Triumph of Faith

  • Author: Samuel Rutherford
  • Publisher: Assembly’s Committee
  • Pages: 412

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

A collection of Samuel Rutherford’s sermons on faith. His oratories work through an examination and discussion of the person of Christ. Rutherford addresses the pursuit of Christ, the act of will in coming to Christ, Christ’s inability to be hidden, and the all-consuming grace Christ offers. In 27 sermons, he faithfully takes on the encounters with Christ present in Scripture, focusing primarily on the Canaanite woman described in Matthew 15 and Mark 7, and offers an interpretation and application of these faith-seeking accounts.

Samuel Rutherford (1600–1661) was a Scottish Presbyterian theologian and author. He served as a Scottish commissioner to the Westminster Assembly. Rutherford was a regent of humanity at Edinburgh University.

Fourteen Communion Sermons by the Rev. Samuel Rutherford

  • Author: Andrew Bonar
  • Edition: 2nd
  • Publisher: Charles Glass & Co.
  • Publication Date: 1876
  • Pages: 372

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Andrew Bonar compiles Samuel Rutherford’s communion addresses and discourses into a single easy-to-access volume. These sermons, preached in Galloway in the 1630s, were transcribed by attendees; they cover a wide variety of topics concerning Christ and faith.

Andrew Bonar (1810–1892) was a Scottish minister, theologian, and author. A man of devout faith, Bonar was quoted as having said, “It was in the year 1830 that I found the Savior, or rather, that he found me and laid me on his shoulders rejoicing, and I have never parted company with him all these 62 years.”

Quaint Sermons of Samuel Rutherford

  • Author: Andrew Bonar
  • Publisher: Hodder and Stoughton
  • Publication Date: 1885
  • Pages: 372

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

A collection of sermons by Samuel Rutherford transcribed by an unknown listener as they were presented from the pulpit. Written with faithful detail, the manuscripts have since been updated to reflect changes in language across the centuries, while retaining Northern English idioms and language. This volume contains footnotes on language discrepancies and gives readers a comprehensive window into Rutherford’s theology.

Andrew Bonar (1810–1892) was a Scottish minister, theologian, and author. A man of devout faith, Bonar was quoted as having said, “It was in the year 1830 that I found the Savior, or rather, that he found me and laid me on his shoulders rejoicing, and I have never parted company with him all these 62 years.”

A Sermon Preached on Sunday, April 4, 1742, Before the University of Oxford

  • Author: Charles Wesley
  • Publisher: W. Strahan
  • Publication Date: 1742
  • Pages: 29

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Charles Wesley is best remembered by his hymns, having written over 6,000 of them. Many have become standard classics, and are still used today—including “Hark! The Herald Angels Sing,” “Christ the Lord Is Risen Today,” “Love Divine, all Loves Excelling,” and “Soldiers of Christ, Arise.”

This volume contains Charles Wesley’s stirring sermon on Ephesians 5:14.

Charles Wesley (1707–1788) and his brother, John Wesley, were the principle leaders of the Methodist movement. Son of Susanna Wesley and Samuel Wesley, Charles was born in Epworth, Lincolnshire, England. He graduated with a master’s in classical languages and literature from Christ Church, Oxford, where he also formed the Oxford Holy Club. In 1735, Charles and his brother sailed to America where Charles served as chaplain to the garrison at Fort Fredrica. One year later he returned to England. Charles and his brother traveled Britain extensively, often preaching outdoors or in town halls. Although Charles and John never officially left the Church of England, the Methodist movement that they planted quickly spread across England, Scotland, Wales, Ireland, and to colonial America. Today, over seventy-million people belong to Methodist organizations in the Wesleyan tradition all over the world.

Sermons of the Late Rev. Charles Wesley

  • Author: Charles Wesley
  • Publisher: Baldwin, Cradock, and Joy
  • Publication Date: 1816
  • Pages: 244

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

In the eighteenth century, traveling from place to place and preaching in the open air was extraordinary and new, and it was certainly irregular. Seeking to diffuse knowledge and awaken a sense of religion in the common people, brothers John and Charles Wesley, along with their friend and fellow preacher George Whitefield, excited the astonishment as well as the censure of the public with their preaching.. They felt it was of utmost importance to educate the common people in the principles of religion and the social duties of life—even if it meant preaching the Word in open-air fields against tradition. Sermons of the Late Rev. Charles Wesley brings together 13 of Charles’ best sermons, each characterized with his poetic style and spirit-filled love for God.

Charles Wesley (1707–1788) and his brother, John Wesley, were the principle leaders of the Methodist movement. Son of Susanna Wesley and Samuel Wesley, Charles was born in Epworth, Lincolnshire, England. He graduated with a master’s in classical languages and literature from Christ Church, Oxford, where he also formed the Oxford Holy Club. In 1735, Charles and his brother sailed to America where Charles served as chaplain to the garrison at Fort Fredrica. One year later he returned to England. Charles and his brother traveled Britain extensively, often preaching outdoors or in town halls. Although Charles and John never officially left the Church of England, the Methodist movement that they planted quickly spread across England, Scotland, Wales, Ireland, and to colonial America. Today, over seventy-million people belong to Methodist organizations in the Wesleyan tradition all over the world.

The Life of the Rev. Charles Wesley, vol. 1

  • Author: Thomas Jackson
  • Publisher: John Mason
  • Publication Date: 1841
  • Pages: 591

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Thomas Jackson’s The Life of the Rev. Charles Wesley is a comprehensive and faithful record of the life of remarkable preacher and poet Charles Wesley. Jackson intertwines the rise and progress of Methodism while providing a complete account of Charles’ life and writings. Includes personal letters, poems, hymns, historical documents, sermons, essays, and more.

Mr. Jackson may be called, in an especial manner, the historian of Methodism, and is probably one of the best-read and most useful men in the connexion.

The Church of England Quarterly Review

Thomas Jackson (1783–1873) joined the Methodist society in 1801 and from 1804–1824 he was an itinerant in the Wesleyan connection, occupying important circuits. He was professor of divinity in the Theological College at Richmond from 1842–1861. Jackson was the author and editor of numerous works, including The Life of John Goodwin, Memoirs of the Life and Writings of the Rev. Richard Watson, A Library of Christian Biography, and The Institutions of Christianity.

The Life of the Rev. Charles Wesley, vol. 2

  • Author: Thomas Jackson
  • Publisher: John Mason
  • Publication Date: 1841
  • Pages: 578

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Thomas Jackson’s The Life of the Rev. Charles Wesley is a comprehensive and faithful record of the life of remarkable preacher and poet Charles Wesley. Jackson intertwines the rise and progress of Methodism while providing a complete account of Charles’ life and writings. Includes personal letters, poems, hymns, historical documents, sermons, essays, and more.

Thomas Jackson (1783–1873) joined the Methodist society in 1801 and from 1804–1824 he was an itinerant in the Wesleyan connection, occupying important circuits. He was professor of divinity in the Theological College at Richmond from 1842–1861. Jackson was the author and editor of numerous works, including The Life of John Goodwin, Memoirs of the Life and Writings of the Rev. Richard Watson, A Library of Christian Biography, and The Institutions of Christianity.

The Works of the Late Rev. Robert Murray McCheyne, vol. 1

  • Author: Robert Murray McCheyne
  • Publisher: R. Carter
  • Publication Date: 1848
  • Pages: 580

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

In the first section of volume 1, the reader is treated to the memoir of Robert Murray McCheyne. A short life was McCheyne’s, but a powerful one filled with the Holy Spirit and adventure. Following McCheyne’s memoir are the personal letters to fellow clergy men and family which are often quoted for their eloquence and demonstration of deep faith. McCheyne’s published lectures and a selection of his most popular sermons is contained within as well.

Robert Murray McCheyne was born in 1813 and educated in his hometown of Edinburgh at the University of Edinburgh. He served as a missionary and minister, before dying at the early age of 29 in 1843.

The Works of the Late Rev. Robert Murray McCheyne, vol. 2

  • Author: Robert Murray McCheyne
  • Publisher: R. Carter
  • Publication Date: 1848
  • Pages: 530

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

After the glowing reception of The Works of the Late Rev. Robert Murray McCheyne, vol. 1 was published in 1844, the demand for the complete sermons of McCheyne was magnificent. Still widely recognized and taught, McCheyne’s sermons are profound in their compassion and wisdom, enlightened with humanity and grace, but written with the humbled tone of the common man.

Robert Murray McCheyne was born in 1813 and educated in his hometown of Edinburgh at the University of Edinburgh. He served as a missionary and minister, before dying at the early age of 29 in 1843.

Memoir and Remains of the Rev. Robert Murray McCheyne

  • Author: Andrew A. Bonar
  • Publisher: William Midddleton
  • Publication Date: 1852
  • Pages: 612

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Written by Andrew Alexander Bonar, brother of Horatius Bonar, this is a moving and passionate account of Robert Murray McCheyne. Bonar, a great friend of McCheyne, wrote this biography a year after the death of McCheyne. He includes a detailed and insightful portrayal of McCheyne’s youth and ministry, providing personal anecdotes, as well as quotes and poems from McCheyne. The work is also comprised of dozens of letters, sketches of sermons, and several essays previously published. This biography and collection of McCheyne’s writings will enhance your understanding and appreciation of this devoted man of God.

Andrew Alexander Bonar was a minister of the Free Church of Scotland; born Edinburgh May 29, 1810, youngest brother of Horatius Bonar. He died in Glasgow December 30, 1892.

Family Sermons

  • Author: Horatius Bonar
  • Publication Date: 1863
  • Pages: 456

Sample Pages: 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

In Family Sermons, Bonar provides 52 short sermons, one for every Sabbath of the year, meant for family reading and discussion.

This is a very handsome volume externally, the typography is clear and beautiful, and its contents will be warmly appreciated by many Christian families. Dr. Bonar’s book is all that could be desired. . . . We cordially recommend these ‘Family Sermons.’

Weekly Review

These are short sermons, 52 in number, designed to illustrate the glorious gospel in some of its manifold aspects, by one of the most popular living writers of Scotland.

The Biblical Repertory and Princeton Review

Horatius Bonar was born and raised in Edinburgh, Scotland, in a family with a long history of ministry in the Church of Scotland. After graduating from the University of Edinburgh in 1838 (where he studied under Thomas Chalmers), Bonar was ordained and became pastor of the North Parish, Kelso, where he remained for 28 years. He joined the Free Church of Scotland after “the Great Disruption” of 1843, and in 1853 he earned a doctor of divinity degree from the University of Aberdeen. In 1867 he took over ministry duties at Chalmers Memorial Church in Edinburgh, and in 1883 he was elected moderator of the general assembly of the Church of Scotland. A prolific author, he wrote and edited numerous books, biographies, articles, poems, tracts, and over 600 hymns. Horatius Bonar died on May 31, 1889.

Horatius Bonar: A Memorial

  • Author: Horatius Bonar
  • Publication Date: 1889
  • Pages: 112

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Bonar’s first and last sermons are collected in this volume, along with essays about his life and work from contemporary ministers. A moving portrait of a gifted preacher and prolific author from those who knew him best.

Horatius Bonar was born and raised in Edinburgh, Scotland, in a family with a long history of ministry in the Church of Scotland. After graduating from the University of Edinburgh in 1838 (where he studied under Thomas Chalmers), Bonar was ordained and became pastor of the North Parish, Kelso, where he remained for 28 years. He joined the Free Church of Scotland after “the Great Disruption” of 1843, and in 1853 he earned a doctor of divinity degree from the University of Aberdeen. In 1867 he took over ministry duties at Chalmers Memorial Church in Edinburgh, and in 1883 he was elected moderator of the general assembly of the Church of Scotland. A prolific author, he wrote and edited numerous books, biographies, articles, poems, tracts, and over 600 hymns. Horatius Bonar died on May 31, 1889.

Twelve Select Sermons

  • Author: D.L. Moody
  • Publisher: Fleming H. Revell
  • Publication Date: 1884
  • Pages: 136

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

The 12 sermons contained in this volume are considered some of Moody’s very best. They cover Genesis 3, Romans 3:22, 1 Corinthians 15, Luke 19:10, Isaiah 55:6, Matthew 22:42, Luke 14:18–20, Leviticus 17:2, and a two-part sermon on heaven.

With the effect of these addresses when spoken, the whole land is acquainted, and now that they are written, they will tend to keep in force the impressions they have already made.

Methodist

Mr. Moody’s happy style, abounding in striking anecdote and illustration, make it a most readable and convincing volume.

The Watchman

Full of earnest enthusiasm which characterizes everything Mr. Moody does, and it will read with interest.

Detroit Free Press

Dwight Lyman Moody (1837–1899) was born in Northfield, Massachusetts. His father died soon after, and Moody was forced to work to support the family at an early age. In 1854, Moody took a job at his uncle’s shoe store and one of the conditions upon employment was that he should regularly attend his uncle’s church. It was at this church where his conversion took place. He moved to Chicago in 1856, and after working as a successful Sunday school teacher and building a membership of 1,500 pupils, the Illinois Street Church was formed. He then began his revival work, which would become his life long endeavor.

Beginning in 1872, Moody would travel and preach in Great Britain, winning the esteem of many prominent evangelicals. When he returned to America, he had invitations all over the country for speaking engagements. For the next 20 years, Moody would travel the globe, packing churches and revival halls with those wanting to hear him preach. He was honest, preached a Calvinistic creed which he accepted with all his heart, and was a master of an effective style. During all of his travels, he found time to write and publish numerous works.

Moody was also known for the educational institutions he started. The Illinois Street Church he started was later renamed in his honor to Moody Church. In 1886, Moody established the Chicago Evangelization Society for the education and training of Christian workers. This institution was renamed the Moody Bible Institute in his honor after he passed away in 1899.

New Sermons, Addresses, and Prayers

  • Author: D.L. Moody
  • Publisher: Henry S. Goodspeed Co.
  • Publication Date: 1877
  • Pages: 704

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

New Sermons, Addresses, and Prayers contains 73 sermons and 24 addresses by D.L. Moody, as well as 10 illustrations. Includes the popular sermons “How Memory Torments the Lost Soul,” “Who Are Christians?,” and “What to Do with Doubts.”

Dwight Lyman Moody (1837–1899) was born in Northfield, Massachusetts. His father died soon after, and Moody was forced to work to support the family at an early age. In 1854, Moody took a job at his uncle’s shoe store and one of the conditions upon employment was that he should regularly attend his uncle’s church. It was at this church where his conversion took place. He moved to Chicago in 1856, and after working as a successful Sunday school teacher and building a membership of 1,500 pupils, the Illinois Street Church was formed. He then began his revival work, which would become his life long endeavor.

Beginning in 1872, Moody would travel and preach in Great Britain, winning the esteem of many prominent evangelicals. When he returned to America, he had invitations all over the country for speaking engagements. For the next 20 years, Moody would travel the globe, packing churches and revival halls with those wanting to hear him preach. He was honest, preached a Calvinistic creed which he accepted with all his heart, and was a master of an effective style. During all of his travels, he found time to write and publish numerous works.

Moody was also known for the educational institutions he started. The Illinois Street Church he started was later renamed in his honor to Moody Church. In 1886, Moody established the Chicago Evangelization Society for the education and training of Christian workers. This institution was renamed the Moody Bible Institute in his honor after he passed away in 1899.

Moody’s Latest Sermons

  • Author: D.L. Moody
  • Publisher: Fleming H. Revell
  • Publication Date: 1900
  • Pages: 126

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Moody’s Latest Sermons contains the following seven sermons:

  • “The Ninety-First Psalm”
  • “The Eighth Chapter of Romans”
  • “Temptation”
  • “Four Questions from God”
  • “The Transfiguration”
  • “Mary and Martha”
  • “Revivals”

Dwight Lyman Moody (1837–1899) was born in Northfield, Massachusetts. His father died soon after, and Moody was forced to work to support the family at an early age. In 1854, Moody took a job at his uncle’s shoe store and one of the conditions upon employment was that he should regularly attend his uncle’s church. It was at this church where his conversion took place. He moved to Chicago in 1856, and after working as a successful Sunday school teacher and building a membership of 1,500 pupils, the Illinois Street Church was formed. He then began his revival work, which would become his life long endeavor.

Beginning in 1872, Moody would travel and preach in Great Britain, winning the esteem of many prominent evangelicals. When he returned to America, he had invitations all over the country for speaking engagements. For the next 20 years, Moody would travel the globe, packing churches and revival halls with those wanting to hear him preach. He was honest, preached a Calvinistic creed which he accepted with all his heart, and was a master of an effective style. During all of his travels, he found time to write and publish numerous works.

Moody was also known for the educational institutions he started. The Illinois Street Church he started was later renamed in his honor to Moody Church. In 1886, Moody established the Chicago Evangelization Society for the education and training of Christian workers. This institution was renamed the Moody Bible Institute in his honor after he passed away in 1899.

The Overcoming Life and Other Sermons

  • Author: D.L. Moody
  • Publisher: Fleming H. Revell
  • Publication Date: 1896
  • Pages: 127

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

The Overcoming Life contains the following nine sermons:

  • “The Overcoming Life”
    • Part 1: The Christian’s Warfare
    • Part 2: Internal Foes
    • Part 3: External Foes
  • “Results of True Repentance”
  • “True Wisdom”
  • “Come Thou and All Thy House into the Ark”
  • “Humility”
  • “Rest”
  • “Seven ‘I Wills’ of Christ”

Dwight Lyman Moody (1837–1899) was born in Northfield, Massachusetts. His father died soon after, and Moody was forced to work to support the family at an early age. In 1854, Moody took a job at his uncle’s shoe store and one of the conditions upon employment was that he should regularly attend his uncle’s church. It was at this church where his conversion took place. He moved to Chicago in 1856, and after working as a successful Sunday school teacher and building a membership of 1,500 pupils, the Illinois Street Church was formed. He then began his revival work, which would become his life long endeavor.

Beginning in 1872, Moody would travel and preach in Great Britain, winning the esteem of many prominent evangelicals. When he returned to America, he had invitations all over the country for speaking engagements. For the next 20 years, Moody would travel the globe, packing churches and revival halls with those wanting to hear him preach. He was honest, preached a Calvinistic creed which he accepted with all his heart, and was a master of an effective style. During all of his travels, he found time to write and publish numerous works.

Moody was also known for the educational institutions he started. The Illinois Street Church he started was later renamed in his honor to Moody Church. In 1886, Moody established the Chicago Evangelization Society for the education and training of Christian workers. This institution was renamed the Moody Bible Institute in his honor after he passed away in 1899.

Life Words from Gospel Addresses of D.L. Moody

  • Editor: G.F.G. Royle
  • Publisher: John Snow and Co.
  • Publication Date: 1875
  • Pages: 128

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Life Words from Gospel Addresses of D.L. Moody contains extracts from D.L. Moody’s sermons delivered in Glasgow, Manchester, and London in 1874.

Dwight Lyman Moody (1837–1899) was born in Northfield, Massachusetts. His father died soon after, and Moody was forced to work to support the family at an early age. In 1854, Moody took a job at his uncle’s shoe store and one of the conditions upon employment was that he should regularly attend his uncle’s church. It was at this church where his conversion took place. He moved to Chicago in 1856, and after working as a successful Sunday school teacher and building a membership of 1,500 pupils, the Illinois Street Church was formed. He then began his revival work, which would become his life long endeavor.

Beginning in 1872, Moody would travel and preach in Great Britain, winning the esteem of many prominent evangelicals. When he returned to America, he had invitations all over the country for speaking engagements. For the next 20 years, Moody would travel the globe, packing churches and revival halls with those wanting to hear him preach. He was honest, preached a Calvinistic creed which he accepted with all his heart, and was a master of an effective style. During all of his travels, he found time to write and publish numerous works.

Moody was also known for the educational institutions he started. The Illinois Street Church he started was later renamed in his honor to Moody Church. In 1886, Moody established the Chicago Evangelization Society for the education and training of Christian workers. This institution was renamed the Moody Bible Institute in his honor after he passed away in 1899.

The New Life in Christ Jesus

  • Author: C.I. Scofield
  • Publisher: The Bible Institute Colportage Association
  • Publication Date: 1915
  • Pages: 117

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Originally preached to congregations in Texas and Massachusetts, the New Life in Christ Jesus is a collection of nine sermons on the Christian’s life in Jesus Christ. Scofield narrows in on what the life of a Christian is to look like practically when being lived out and under the control of the Holy Spirit. Each of these nine sermons discuss in some way the new and glorious life which the believer has received in Christ.

A series of address of especial helpfulness. They contain hope and instruction for the reader who may be tired of an unfruitful and defeated life.

The Bookseller, Newsdealer and Stationer

C.I. Scofield (1843–1921) is considered one of the early influential American proponents of dispensationalism. He is widely recognized as the editor of the Scofield Reference Bible, first published in 1909. He is the author of a number of books as well as a contributor to the four-volume set The Fundamentals. Before his life as a minister and theologian, Scofield was a member of the Kansas House of Representatives as well as US district attorney for the state of Kansas.

Things New and Old: Old and New Testament Studies

  • Author: C.I. Scofield
  • Publisher: Our hope
  • Publication Date: 1920
  • Pages: 323

C.I. Scofield’s Things New and Old: Old and New Testament Studies is a compilation of Scofield’s Sunday school lessons and sermons preached on various topics related to biblical doctrine. Each chapter is thorough and packed with theological exposition.

C.I. Scofield (1843–1921) is considered one of the early influential American proponents of dispensationalism. He is widely recognized as the editor of the Scofield Reference Bible, first published in 1909. He is the author of a number of books as well as a contributor to the four-volume set The Fundamentals. Before his life as a minister and theologian, Scofield was a member of the Kansas House of Representatives as well as US district attorney for the state of Kansas.

No Room in the Inn and Other Interpretations

  • Author: C.I. Scofield
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press
  • Publication Date: 1917
  • Pages: 156

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

The compilation of 26 public sermons contained in No Room in the Inn is aimed at guiding the Christian in both faith and life. In his typical manner, C.I. Scofield desires to help the believer in his daily walk with Christ, pointing him to the Scriptures for guidance and daily practical advice to grow closer to the Lord Jesus Christ.

C.I. Scofield (1843–1921) is considered one of the early influential American proponents of dispensationalism. He is widely recognized as the editor of the Scofield Reference Bible, first published in 1909. He is the author of a number of books as well as a contributor to the four-volume set The Fundamentals. Before his life as a minister and theologian, Scofield was a member of the Kansas House of Representatives as well as US district attorney for the state of Kansas.

In Many Pulpits with Dr. C.I. Scofield

  • Publisher: Oxford University Press
  • Publication Date: 1922
  • Pages: 317

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

In Many Pulpits with Dr. C.I. Scofield is a collection various sermons from the beloved C.I. Scofield. The topics of these sermons consist of various theological subjects, covering areas such as the deity of Jesus Christ, salvation by faith alone, the Bible, prayer, and the resurrection of Jesus Christ.

...Twenty-seven of the best sermons preached Dr. C.I. Scofield.

—The New American Church Monthly

C.I. Scofield (1843–1921) is considered one of the early influential American proponents of dispensationalism. He is widely recognized as the editor of the Scofield Reference Bible, first published in 1909. He is the author of a number of books as well as a contributor to the four-volume set The Fundamentals. Before his life as a minister and theologian, Scofield was a member of the Kansas House of Representatives as well as US district attorney for the state of Kansas.

The Complete Works of Stephen Charnock (5 vols.)

  • Author: Stephen Charnock
  • Publisher: James Nichos
  • Volumes: 5
  • Pages: 2,804

Stephen Charnock was an influential Puritan minister, whose writings and sermons combined theological acumen, a thorough understanding of Scripture, and a clear grasp of philosophy. He ministered in the context of theological controversy and political upheaval, and contributed to the establishment of Reformed orthodoxy in seventeenth century England and Ireland.

The Complete Works of Stephen Charnock contains 64 theological discourses—2,804 pages of rich Puritan writing on biblical and theological topics. This collection also contains Charnock’s seminal work, The Existence and Attributes of God, found in the first two volumes. This work has become a classic text on the doctrine of God, and examines in detail God’s foreknowledge and sovereignty, and discusses the possibility of free will and natural law. No Reformed theologian prior to Charnock treated God’s existence and attributes with such clarity and depth—in fact, his was one of the first works solely devoted to the subject to appear in the Reformed theological tradition, and has become a standard work on the subject. His positions have been echoed and refined by generations of theologians, and most recently have contributed to contemporary debates over free will, foreknowledge, and the openness of God.

The place of Stephen Charnock among theologians has long been definite and distinguished. . . . Massive, substantial, and thorough, [Charnock’s works] well represent the religious thinking and character of the man.

The Evangelical Witness and Presbyterian Review

Stephen Charnock was born in 1628 in London, and little is known about his childhood. He studied at Emmanuel College, Cambridge, under William Sancroft. Upon graduation, he became a minister in Southwark, and moved to Oxford in 1652, where he was appointed a fellow of New College. Charnock moved to Ireland in 1656, where he served as chaplain to Henry Cromwell, the son of Oliver Cromwell. While he was in Ireland, he preached regularly each week in Dublin. His sermons were delivered without notes, and Charnock became popular in the city. In 1675, Charnock moved back to London to become a minister at Crosby Hall. He remained in London until his death on July 27, 1680.

Bunyan’s Last Sermon

  • Author: John Bunyan
  • Editor: George Offor
  • Publisher: John Knox Press, 2006
  • Publication Date: 2006
  • Pages: 3

Sample Pages: 1 | 2

This very brief text contains the words of the last sermon preached by John Bunyan, probably taken from the notes of one of his hearers. When it was first published, the title page read: “Mr. John Bunyan’s last sermon, at London, preached at Mr. Gamman’s meeting-house, near Whitechapel, August 19th, 1688, upon John 1:13: showing a resemblance between a natural and a spiritual birth; and how every man and woman may try themselves, and know whether they are born again or not.”

Bunyan has always been one of the most popular of the Puritans—no doubt because, while possessing the Word-centeredness as well as the depth of doctrine and experience of other Puritans, he also possessed a warm simplicity of style.

—Reformation and Revival Ministries, Reformation and Revival

Bunyan is best known for his ageless classic, The Pilgrim’s Progress. His literary genius in this work [is such] that people are prone to forget that this tinker from Bedford was first and foremost a Pastor and preacher . . .

Thomas K. Ascol, The Founders Journal

For over 150 years the accepted edition of The Works of John Bunyan has been that edited by George Offor . . . This scholarly labor has contributed much toward a better appreciation of Bunyan’s gospel motivated writings . . .

—From Bunyan Ministries

John Bunyan (1628–1688) is one of the most prominent Puritans of all time. Bunyan was well known as a respected preacher during his lifetime and remembered through his writing to this day—namely The Pilgrim’s Progress.

After joining the Bedford Baptist Church of Bedford, England, in 1654, Bunyan began preaching in nearby villages. He was prosecuted under an Elizabethan act against nonconformity and imprisoned for three months which was extended to 12 years. Bunyan became the pastor of St. John’s Church the same month as his release from prison.

Sermons to the Spiritual Man

  • Author: William G.T. Shedd
  • Publisher: Charles Scribner & Co.
  • Publication Date: 1884
  • Pages: 421

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Shedd’s Sermons to the Spiritual Man complements his Sermons to the Natural Man. Whereas his previous collection of sermons emphasized sin and suffering, this volume preaches forgiveness and victory over sin. Sermons to the Spiritual Man contains 26 sermons on the glory of God, faith, holiness, sanctification, prayer, evangelism, and numerous other topics.

William G.T. Shedd was born in 1820 in Acton, Massachusetts. He attended the University of Vermont, where he studied under James Marsh and encountered the writings of Samuel Taylor Coleridge. He graduated in 1839 and entered Andover Theological Seminary, where he studied under Leonard Woods. At Andover, he became committed to Calvinism in general and Presbyterianism in particular. Upon graduating in 1843, he became a minister at the congregational church in Brandon, Vermont for two years. He taught at the University of Vermont from 1845 to 1852, at Auburn Theological Seminary from 1852 to 1854, and at Andover Theological Seminary from 1854 to 1862. He began teaching at Union Theological Seminary in 1864, where he remained until his death in 1894. While at Union, he defended the Reformed theology of old school Presbyterianism against the increasing influence of modernism and higher criticism. In addition to the works included in this collection, he is also well-known for his 7 volume Complete Works of Samuel Taylor Coleridge and his Dogmatic Theology.

Sermons to the Natural Man

  • Author: William G.T. Shedd
  • Publisher: Charles Scribner & Co.
  • Publication Date: 1871
  • Pages: 422

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

This volume contains 20 sermons on sin and salvation. Each sermon is preached with a clear view of sin in mind, and outlines the necessity and benefits of redemption in Christ. In these sermons, Shedd outlines the doctrine of the atonement, and argues that only the atonement completely meets and satisfies God’s demands of human beings. Shedd preaches against the pervasive sins of his time and ours—the doctrine of natural virtue, innate goodness, and self-reliance.

William G.T. Shedd was born in 1820 in Acton, Massachusetts. He attended the University of Vermont, where he studied under James Marsh and encountered the writings of Samuel Taylor Coleridge. He graduated in 1839 and entered Andover Theological Seminary, where he studied under Leonard Woods. At Andover, he became committed to Calvinism in general and Presbyterianism in particular. Upon graduating in 1843, he became a minister at the congregational church in Brandon, Vermont for two years. He taught at the University of Vermont from 1845 to 1852, at Auburn Theological Seminary from 1852 to 1854, and at Andover Theological Seminary from 1854 to 1862. He began teaching at Union Theological Seminary in 1864, where he remained until his death in 1894. While at Union, he defended the Reformed theology of old school Presbyterianism against the increasing influence of modernism and higher criticism. In addition to the works included in this collection, he is also well-known for his 7 volume Complete Works of Samuel Taylor Coleridge and his Dogmatic Theology.

Select English Works of John Wyclif, vol. 1

  • Editor: Thomas Arnold
  • Publisher: Clarendon Press
  • Publication Date: 1869
  • Pages: 412

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Volume one of the Select English Works of John Wyclif contains 123 sermons divided into three sections: Sermons for the Sunday Gospels, and those for the Commune and Proprium Sanctorum (Common of Saints and Proper of Saints). Thomas Arnold provides the original Latin titles for each sermon, the Scripture passage it is based on, and valuable notes.

Thomas Arnold (1823–1900) was educated at University College, Oxford. He taught English literature at numerous colleges and universities and was the author and editor of numerous works, including A Manual of English Literature: Historical and Critical, Catholic Higher Education in Ireland, Notes on Beowulf, and Passages in a Wandering Life.

Select English Works of John Wyclif, vol. 2

  • Editor: Thomas Arnold
  • Publisher: Clarendon Press
  • Publication Date: 1871
  • Pages: 423

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Volume two of the Select English Works of John Wyclif contains 171 sermons and two tracts: “Vae Octuplex, or Eight Woes Denounced against the Friars” and “Of Ministers in the Church, an Exposition of Matthew XXV.” Thomas Arnold provides the original Latin titles for each sermon, the Scripture passage it is based on, and valuable notes.

Thomas Arnold (1823–1900) was educated at University College, Oxford. He taught English literature at numerous colleges and universities and was the author and editor of numerous works, including A Manual of English Literature: Historical and Critical, Catholic Higher Education in Ireland, Notes on Beowulf, and Passages in a Wandering Life.

The Works of the Rev. Isaac Watts, D.D. in Nine Volumes, vol. 1

  • Author: Isaac Watts
  • Publisher: William Baynes
  • Publication Date: 1812
  • Pages: 627

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Contents:

  • Memoirs of Dr. Watts
  • Dedication
  • Preface
  • 43 Sermons on Various Occasions

Isaac Watts (1674–1748) was a writer of English hymns, theologian, and logician. He is recognized as the “Father of English Hymnody” and is credited with some 750 hymns. Many of his hymns remain in active use today.

As a young boy, Watts began to write poems and hymns to please his mother. He received an excellent education as a child and studied at the nonconformist academy at Stoke Newington. After he completed his education, Watts began to write hymns and also tutored the family of Sir John Hartopp. At age 26, Watts became a pastor, but his poor health kept him from his duties. In 1712, Isaac Watts went to live with the Abney family in Stoke Newington for a short time, and ended up staying there permanently. During his stay, he would occasionally preach, but mostly devoted his time to writing hymns, sermons for publications, essays, discourses, and poems. He died peacefully at the age of 74.

The Works of the Rev. Isaac Watts, D.D. in Nine Volumes, vol. 2

  • Author: Isaac Watts
  • Publisher: William Baynes
  • Publication Date: 1812
  • Pages: 614

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Contents:

  • 12 Sermons on Various Subjects
  • Evangelical Discourses on Several Subjects
  • Death and Heaven or the Last Enemy Conquered, and Separate Spirits Made Perfect
  • The Doctrine of the Passions
  • Of the Love of God and the Use and Abuse of the Passions

Isaac Watts (1674–1748) was a writer of English hymns, theologian, and logician. He is recognized as the “Father of English Hymnody” and is credited with some 750 hymns. Many of his hymns remain in active use today.

As a young boy, Watts began to write poems and hymns to please his mother. He received an excellent education as a child and studied at the nonconformist academy at Stoke Newington. After he completed his education, Watts began to write hymns and also tutored the family of Sir John Hartopp. At age 26, Watts became a pastor, but his poor health kept him from his duties. In 1712, Isaac Watts went to live with the Abney family in Stoke Newington for a short time, and ended up staying there permanently. During his stay, he would occasionally preach, but mostly devoted his time to writing hymns, sermons for publications, essays, discourses, and poems. He died peacefully at the age of 74.

The Works of Lyman Beecher, vol. 2: Sermons Delivered on Various Occasions

  • Author: Lyman Beecher
  • Publisher: John P. Jewett & Company
  • Publication Date: 1852
  • Pages: 450

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Sermons Included

  • The Government of God Desirable
  • The Remedy for Dueling
  • A Reformation of Morals Practicable and Indispensable
  • The Building of Waste Places
  • The Bible a Code of Laws
  • The Design, Rights, and Duties of Local Churches
  • The Faith Once Delivered to the Saints
  • Resources of the Adversary, and Means of Their Destruction

Lyman Beecher was born in 1775 in Connecticut, the son of a blacksmith. He was educated at Yale and later, at Yale Divinity School. He was the father of 13 children, many of whom grew up to be famous in their own right, including Henry Ward Beecher and Harriet Beecher Stowe. He was a staunch Presbyterian Calvinist, promoting wide-spread evangelism and revival. He died in 1863.

The Inward Witness and Other Discourses

  • Author: William Burt Pope
  • Publisher: T. Woolmer
  • Publication Date: 1885
  • Pages: 310

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

This series of discourses by William Burt Pope flows out of the idea of Christ’s indwelling presence and the impact of that presence as the fundamental truth of the Christian life. Delivered on important occasions, these compiled sermons and lectures offer a glimpse into Pope’s rhetorical style and the depth of his teaching and orator—a clear view of his doctrinal stances on Christ’s person and work in the believer’s life.

William Burt Pope (1822–1903) was a nineteenth-century Methodist theologian and scholar. He studied theology at Richmond College before becoming a Methodist minister in 1841. In 1867, he was appointed professor of systematic theology at Didsbury College in Manchester, where he lectured and wrote prolifically. In 1877, he became president of the British Wesleyan Conference. His Compendium of Christian Theology is the most influential Methodist systematic theology of its time.

Cambridge Sermons

  • Author: Joseph Barber Lightfoot
  • Publisher: MacMillan & Co.
  • Publication Date: 1890
  • Pages: 334

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Cambridge Sermons includes eight sermons preached by J.B. Lightfoot in Trinity College Chapel from 1861 to 1875, along with 11 additional sermons preached at Cambridge between 1868 and 1883. This volume includes sermons on the life of Esau, the relationship between Edom and Israel in Isaiah’s prophecy, and sermons on numerous New Testament texts.

Joseph Barber Lightfoot was born on April 13, 1828 in Liverpool. He attended King Edward’s School in Birmingham before enrolling at Trinity College, Cambridge. He edited the Journal of Classical and Sacred Philology from 1854 to 1859.

In 1852 he was elected a fellow of Cambridge, and was ordained in 1854. He became tutor of Trinity College in 1857, professor of divinity in 1861, and anon of St. Paul’s Cathedral in 1871. Lightfoot preached regularly and participated in various ecclesiastical activities. He gained enormous popularity for his defense of the New Testament in response to Walter Richard Cassel’s Supernatural Religion. Lightfoot also participated on the committee for an English revision of the New Testament.

In 1879, Lightfoot became bishop of Durham, where he continued his theological study, writing, and preaching. In addition to the works included in this collection, Lightfoot also wrote commentaries on Galatians, Philippians, and Colossians and Philemon. Lightfoot died on December 21, 1889, and was succeeded as bishop by his lifelong friend, Brooke Foss Westcott.

Sermons Preached in St. Paul’s Cathedral

  • Author: Joseph Barber Lightfoot
  • Publisher: MacMillan & Co.
  • Publication Date: 1893
  • Pages: 314

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

In 1871, Lightfoot became canon at St. Paul’s Cathedral. This volume contains 22 of the numerous sermons he preached there. Included are four sermons from the epistles to the Corinthians, sermons from the Gospels, a sermon on David and Nathan, a sermon on Balaam and Balak, as well as others.

Joseph Barber Lightfoot was born on April 13, 1828 in Liverpool. He attended King Edward’s School in Birmingham before enrolling at Trinity College, Cambridge. He edited the Journal of Classical and Sacred Philology from 1854 to 1859.

In 1852 he was elected a fellow of Cambridge, and was ordained in 1854. He became tutor of Trinity College in 1857, professor of divinity in 1861, and anon of St. Paul’s Cathedral in 1871. Lightfoot preached regularly and participated in various ecclesiastical activities. He gained enormous popularity for his defense of the New Testament in response to Walter Richard Cassel’s Supernatural Religion. Lightfoot also participated on the committee for an English revision of the New Testament.

In 1879, Lightfoot became bishop of Durham, where he continued his theological study, writing, and preaching. In addition to the works included in this collection, Lightfoot also wrote commentaries on Galatians, Philippians, and Colossians and Philemon. Lightfoot died on December 21, 1889, and was succeeded as bishop by his lifelong friend, Brooke Foss Westcott.

The Contemporary Pulpit Library: Sermons by Bishop Lightfoot

  • Author: Joseph Barber Lightfoot
  • Publisher: Thomas Whittaker
  • Publication Date: 1890
  • Pages: 186

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

This volume—part of a series in the Contemporary Pulpit Library—contains 13 sermons in all, including sermons on women in the Gospel, sermons on the history of Israel, and three sermons on Christianity and paganism.

Joseph Barber Lightfoot was born on April 13, 1828 in Liverpool. He attended King Edward’s School in Birmingham before enrolling at Trinity College, Cambridge. He edited the Journal of Classical and Sacred Philology from 1854 to 1859.

In 1852 he was elected a fellow of Cambridge, and was ordained in 1854. He became tutor of Trinity College in 1857, professor of divinity in 1861, and anon of St. Paul’s Cathedral in 1871. Lightfoot preached regularly and participated in various ecclesiastical activities. He gained enormous popularity for his defense of the New Testament in response to Walter Richard Cassel’s Supernatural Religion. Lightfoot also participated on the committee for an English revision of the New Testament.

In 1879, Lightfoot became bishop of Durham, where he continued his theological study, writing, and preaching. In addition to the works included in this collection, Lightfoot also wrote commentaries on Galatians, Philippians, and Colossians and Philemon. Lightfoot died on December 21, 1889, and was succeeded as bishop by his lifelong friend, Brooke Foss Westcott.

An Exposition of the Parables and Express Similitudes of Our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ

  • Author: Benjamin Keach
  • Publisher: Aylott and co.
  • Publication Date: 1858
  • Pages: 904

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Originally written in 1701, this classic work has seen several reprinted versions in the nineteenth century and beyond. In this volume, Keach introduces each parable as a sermon, with lessons that help the reader find application. Keach’s thorough familiarity with Scripture shines in every page of this study as he compares epistle messages and Old Testament commands with the lessons of each parable, providing the reader wide and deep access to scriptural study surrounding the parables.

This work has always enjoyed popularity among those who love the racy quaint style of divines of the old school. As may be expected there are multitudes of fancied allusions, and not always a regard to any fixed principles of interpretations; yet the volume, in every page, contains matter which cannot be read without improvement. As an illustration of the wit of the author, he says, in the parable of the rich husbandman, ‘the poor man’s belly in the rich man’s barn.’

The Journal of Sacred Literature and Biblical Record

A book peculiarly and happily calculated under the divine blessing to enlighten the mind, establish the judgment, and comfort the heart.

—Samuel Medley, founder of University College, London

The author, a self-taught Baptist of strong Calvinistic opinions, lived towards the end of the seventeenth century, and had several sturdy encounters with the Baxters, Owens, and other learned nonconformists of his day, who were not willing to receive his theological dogmas for truth and were equally indisposed to admit his knowledge of divinity.

The Literary Churchman: A Critical Record of Religious Publications

Benjamin Keach (1640–1704) was an early Baptist (sometimes called Particular Baptist or Baptist Puritan) and a preacher at Horslydown church in London. He was best known for writing The Baptist Catechism (also called Keach’s Catechism, although the work is so old his authorship is debated) and A Key to Open Scripture Metaphors (also called Tropologia), as well as a hymnbook that provoked debate among early Baptists. His church was the first among the Baptists to sing hymns, as opposed to psalms and paraphrases.

Sermons on the Parables of Our Blessed Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ

  • Author: William Martin Trinder
  • Publisher: Baldwin, Cradock, and Joy
  • Publication Date: 1816
  • Pages: 392

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Compiled in the final years of his life, these 33 sermons contain Trinder’s preaching series on the parables of Jesus. With ample cross-references and Bible references, Trinder guides readers to see how the whole Bible is represented in Jesus’ parables.

William Martin Trinder (1747–1818) entered university at the young age of 16. He graduated from the University of Leyden, where he earned his MD, and then from Exeter College, Oxford, where he received his bachelor of civil law in 1770 and, later, his bachelor of laws. He wrote essays and books on medicinal waters and compilations of his sermons. He published Sermons on the Parables of our Blessed Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ in 1816 while living in Hertfordshire.

Writings and Translations of Myles Coverdale, Bishop of Exeter

  • Author: Myles Coverdale
  • Editor: George Pearson
  • Publisher: University Press
  • Publication Date: 1844
  • Pages: 544

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Contents:
  • The Old Faith
  • A Spiritual and Most Precious Pearl
  • Fruitful Lessons
  • A Treatise on the Lord’s Supper
  • The Order of the Church of Christ in Denmark and Other Countries for the Lord’s Supper, Baptism, and Holy Wedlock
  • Abridgement of the Enchiridion of Erasmus

Myles Coverdale (1488–1569) was educated at Cambridge and known for his work in translating the Bible into the English vernacular, producing the first complete Bible in English in 1535. He became bishop of Exeter in 1551, but fled during the Reformation. Coverdale spent time living and working in Germany, Switzerland, and Denmark before settling in London as the rector of St. Magnus.

Remains of Myles Coverdale

  • Author: Myles Coverdale
  • Editor: George Pearson
  • Publisher: University Press
  • Publication Date: 1846
  • Pages: 618

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Contents:
  • Prologues to the Translation of the Bible
  • Treatise on Death
  • Hope of the Faithful
  • Exhortation to the Carrying of Christ’s Cross
  • Exposition upon the Twenty-Second Psalm
  • Confutation of the Treatise of John Standish
  • Defense of a Certain Poor Christian Man
  • Letters
  • Ghostly Psalms and Spiritual Songs

Myles Coverdale (1488–1569) was educated at Cambridge and known for his work in translating the Bible into the English vernacular, producing the first complete Bible in English in 1535. He became bishop of Exeter in 1551, but fled during the Reformation. Coverdale spent time living and working in Germany, Switzerland, and Denmark before settling in London as the rector of St. Magnus.

The Unchanging Christ and Other Sermons

  • Author: H.A. Ironside
  • Publication Date: 1942
  • Pages: 159

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5

This collection is based on 12 sermons Ironside delivered in the 1930s at Moody Memorial Church, which were originally heard by more than 3,000 individuals. Ironside primarily devotes his attention to issues relating to the life and work of Christ, but also covers Pentecost and prophecy—the outworking of Jesus’ life in the rest of the New Testament and in the present. These sermons uniquely connect Christ’s life with important theological topics, such as forgiveness, the priesthood of all believers, and the Second Coming. This collection also includes sermons on practical components of the Christian life, which reveal a rare glimpse into Ironside’s reflections on less-controversial social issues, such as tithing, godly behavior, and procrastination.

Harry Allen Ironside, one of the twentieth century’s greatest preachers, was born in Toronto, Canada on October 14, 1876. Though his education stopped with grammar school, his fondness for reading and a retentive memory put his learning to use. His scholarship was recognized in academic circles when he received honorary degrees from Wheaton College and Bob Jones University and was invited as frequent lecturer at Dallas Theological Seminary. Ironside was appointed to the boards of numerous Bible institutes, seminaries, and Christian organizations. He also served as director of the Africa Inland Mission.

Ironside preached widely throughout the United States and abroad. He served as pastor of Moody Memorial Church from 1930 to 1948, and during his lifetime, he preached more than 7,000 sermons to over 1.25 million listeners.

The Scourge of God: A Sermon

  • Author: John Williamson Nevin
  • Publisher: Johnston & Stockton
  • Publication Date: 1832
  • Pages: 24

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

In July of 1832, a city-wide fast was observed in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. The danger of an Asiatic cholera outbreak loomed over the city and John Williamson Nevin took center stage at the First Presbyterian church to address the “angel of death” standing on the “borders with a commission to destroy.” His sermon implored people not only to pray and humble themselves before God, but also to seek practical, preventative safeguards against the potential plague.

This volume includes his full sermon along with the resolution correspondence concerning the city-wide fast.

John Williamson Nevin (1803–1886) was an American theologian and professor. He studied at Princeton University and was a professor of biblical literature at Western Theological Seminary in Allegheny, Pennsylvania and an ordained minister in the Presbyterian Church. Well-versed in German, he studied contemporary German theologians, and eventually converted to the German Reformed Church, accepting a position at the Church’s seminary in Mercersburg, Pennsylvania. He and his colleagues developed a conservative doctrinal position that was eventually labeled the “Mercersburg Theology.”

Sermons on Gospel Themes

  • Author: Charles Grandison Finney
  • Publisher: E.J. Goodrich
  • Publication Date: 1876
  • Pages: 417

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Charles Finney’s Sermons on Gospel Themes includes 24 sermons preached by Finney at Oberlin College between 1845 and 1861. These sermons integrate spiritual life with experience and emotions and emphasize a profound commitment to moral living as an evidence of faith—the hallmarks of Finney’s theology. This volume also includes sermons on conversion, Christian experience, the atonement, sin and salvation, and prayer.

Charles Grandison Finney was born on August 29, 1792 in Litchfield, Connecticut. He studied law, but his plans were altered when he underwent a dramatic conversion experience at the age of 29. Finney later wrote of his conversation experience: “I could feel the impression, like a wave of electricity, going through and through me. Indeed it seemed to come in waves and waves of liquid love” (from Memoirs of Rev. Charles G. Finney).

Finney became pastor of the Free Presbyterian Chatham Street Chapel and later the Broadway Tabernacle. He spoke as a refined and expert orator and became a widely popular evangelist, organizing and preaching at numerous revivals and meetings throughout New England. He also traveled to England. As many as one million people heard Finney preach throughout his career, and many of them underwent conversion experiences. Finney also spoke at length about social issues, and became an ardent abolitionist. In 1835, Finney was appointed as a professor of theology at Oberlin College, and became its president in 1851, where he remained until 1866.

Charles Finney died on August 17, 1875.

Sermons on Important Subjects

  • Author: Charles Grandison Finney
  • Publisher: Thomas Tegg
  • Publication Date: 1839
  • Pages: 312

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

In Sermons on Important Subjects, Finney addresses those whom he feels have misrepresented him and who have exaggerated theological claims. He clarifies, in these sermons, his theological stance against his opponents, especially on topics related to evangelism, the nature of sin, and total depravity. He also offers methods for mitigating the effects and consequences of sin in practical Christian life.

Charles Grandison Finney was born on August 29, 1792 in Litchfield, Connecticut. He studied law, but his plans were altered when he underwent a dramatic conversion experience at the age of 29. Finney later wrote of his conversation experience: “I could feel the impression, like a wave of electricity, going through and through me. Indeed it seemed to come in waves and waves of liquid love” (from Memoirs of Rev. Charles G. Finney).

Finney became pastor of the Free Presbyterian Chatham Street Chapel and later the Broadway Tabernacle. He spoke as a refined and expert orator and became a widely popular evangelist, organizing and preaching at numerous revivals and meetings throughout New England. He also traveled to England. As many as one million people heard Finney preach throughout his career, and many of them underwent conversion experiences. Finney also spoke at length about social issues, and became an ardent abolitionist. In 1835, Finney was appointed as a professor of theology at Oberlin College, and became its president in 1851, where he remained until 1866. Charles Finney died on August 17, 1875.

God and Bread with Other Sermons

  • Author: Marvin Vincent
  • Publisher: Dodd, Mead, and Company
  • Publication Date: 1884
  • Pages: 395

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

This is a collection of 20 sermons delivered by Vincent to his congregation. Vincent published them at their request.

Sermons Include

  • God and Bread
  • Does it Pay?
  • The Single Need
  • Facing God
  • Light and Loyalty
  • The Ordered Steps
  • Fidelity and Dominion
  • Extra Service
  • The Pride of Care
  • The Plough and the Kingdom
  • Joy and Judgment
  • Silent before God
  • A Leper’s Logic
  • Prayer and Panoply
  • The Daysman
  • The Lesson of Ripeness
  • Strength, Victory, and Knowledge in Youth
  • God and the Times of Ignorance
  • The Promise of Incompleteness
  • Only a Little While

Marvin Vincent was born in 1834 in New York, the son of a clergyman. A professor at Union Theological Seminary and a pastor, Vincent was best known for his work in textual criticism and biblical scholarship.

Princeton Sermons (1893)

  • Authors: Princeton Theological Seminary Faculty
  • Publisher: Fleming H. Revell Company
  • Publication Date: 1893
  • Pages: 352

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

In 16 powerful addresses, Princeton Sermons takes us inside the chapel of the Theological Seminary at Princeton during the years 1891–1892. These “represent the ordinary sermons preached Sabbath by Sabbath” by the esteemed Princeton faculty, including professors, the dean, and the president of the University. The audience consisted chiefly of divinity students, and this collection provides a window into Princeton Seminary life during a period of growth and great scholarship. These sermons are as powerful and resonant as the day these great faculty members—including B.B. Warfield, Caspar Wistar Hodge Jr. (youngest son of Charles Hodge), and William H. Green—preached them.

Abounding in high thinking and clear speaking, with sentences sharp as the crack of a whip, which will stick to the memory like epigrams.

The Presbyterian and Reformed Review

The World’s Great Sermons (10 vols.)

  • Editor: Grenville Kleiser
  • Publisher: Funk & Wagnalls Company
  • Volumes: 10
  • Pages: 2,417

The World’s Great Sermons brings together 10 volumes full of the best sermons ever preached—from the fourth century to the twentieth! Over 100 notable preachers are represented, from Basil of Caesarea to Charles Spurgeon. Each sermon is preceded by a short biography of its author and after each sermon title the Scripture references that are covered in the sermon are given. These sermons were selected not only for their literary and rhetorical excellences, but in every case for their deep spiritual insight and for strengthening your Christian faith.

Grenville Kleiser (1868–1935) was an author, editor, and motivational speaker. He wrote numerous works on the art of public speaking, including How to Argue and Win, Successful Methods of Public Speaking, How to Improve Your Conversation, Christ: The Master Speaker, and How to Build Mental Power.

Puritan Sermons Collection (6 vols.)

  • Volumes: 6
  • Pages: 4,151

The Puritans are remembered for their vast expository on the Bible, their simplification of doctrine and worship, and their passionate preaching. This remarkable collection of classical sermons consists of six volumes of practical as well as doctrinal discourses, preached by some of the most renowned Puritan ministers of the seventeenth century. Published between 1659 and 1689, over 70 preachers contributed to these historically important volumes, including such luminaries as Thomas Manton, Richard Baxter, John Howe, Mathew Poole, and John Owen. This extraordinary anthology is packed with solid Scriptural exegesis and profound spiritual insight.

Filled with the devotional spirit and energy that Puritan sermons were notorious for, the Puritan Sermons Collection (6 vols.) is a window into the English Reformation of the seventeenth century. Advocating their autonomy from Rome, these preachers were among the powerful political force that left the Church of England and condemned the practices of the Catholic Church. Although some of these sermons exude the contentious politics of the day, the sermons contained in these volumes symbolize the powerful and historically significant impact the Puritans had on Christianity and biblical exegesis. Each volume contains over 25 distinguished sermons.

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