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Select Works of Alexei Khomiakov (2 vols.)
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Select Works of Alexei Khomiakov (2 vols.)

by ,

Ve J. Van Buggenhoudt, Rivington, Percival & Co. 1864–1895

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Overview

The Select Works of Alexei Khomiakov brings together two texts examining the Orthodox Church, and Khomiakov’s insistence on the truth of its doctrine. The Orthodox Doctrine on the Church expounds upon the notion that the entirety of Christian doctrine is largely divided, summarized by Khomiakov’s belief that “Rome kept unity at the expense of freedom, while Protestants had freedom but lost unity.” Russia and the English Church presents a cordial conversation between two believers from different churches, discussing the theology behind their opposing beliefs. When they were finally published posthumously, Khomiakov’s writings had profound influence on the Russian Orthodox Church and Russian figures such as Fyodor Dostoevsky, Constantine Pobedonostsev, and Vladimir Solovyov. Together, these two volumes offer an insightful glimpse into the distinctive theology of the Eastern Orthodox Church.

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Key Features

  • An essay on Orthodox doctrine
  • A series of letters between two learned men from different churches

Individual Titles

The Orthodox Doctrine on the Church: An Essay

  • Author: Alexei Khomiakov
  • Publisher: J. Van Buggenhoudt
  • Publication Date: 1864
  • Pages: 28

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

This essay on the Orthodox Church was first circulated in pamphlets, with neither a title nor Khomiakov’s name. Its purpose was to convey that “only in the self-consciousness of the Orthodox Church is preserved the entireness of Christian doctrine, which, in the rationalistic sphere of the Latino-Protestant world, have, so to say, split into two opposite and, apparently, mutually exclusive terms: of unity of confession and freedom of conscience, of faith justifying without works, and of works in the sense of merits supplementary to faith.”

Russia and the English Church: During the Last Fifty Years

  • Authors: Alexei Khomiakov and William Palmer
  • Translator: William John Birkbeck
  • Publisher: Rivington, Percival & Co.
  • Publication Date: 1895
  • Pages: 227

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Russia and the English Church is a series of correspondence between Alexei Khomiakov and William Palmer, which was published for the Eastern Church Association. The letters “have been selected as the best means of putting before English Churchmen a point of view in matters of theology . . . different from that to which they are accustomed.” The letters represent a cordial conversation between two believers from different churches.

William Palmer (1811–1879) was an English theologian, Anglican priest, and fellow of Magdalen College, Oxford. He visited Russia multiple times and concerned himself with the possibility of intercommunion between the Anglican and Orthodox churches. He eventually converted to Catholicism.

Product Details

  • Title: Select Works of Alexei Khomiakov
  • Authors: Alexei Khomiakov and William Palmer
  • Volumes: 2
  • Pages: 255

About Alexei Khomiakov

Alexei Stepanovich Khomiakov (1804–1860) was a nineteenth-century Russian theologian and writer. Most of his writings were published posthumously, as his life was preoccupied with other pursuits. Once published, his writings had profound influence on both the Russian Orthodox Church, and Russian figures such as Fyodor Dostoevsky, Constantine Pobedonostsev, and Vladimir Solovyov. Khomiakov’s perspective on the state of the Christian church is perhaps best described in his own words: “Rome kept unity at the expense of freedom, while Protestants had freedom but lost unity.” Khomiakov died from cholera, which he contracted while attempting to treat a peasant who had the disease. His other work includes The Church Is One.