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International Critical Commentary Old Testament (27 vols.)
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Overview

The International Critical Commentary, published by T&T Clark International, has long held a special place among works on the Bible. It brings together all the relevant aids to exegesis: linguistic and textual, archaeological, historical, literary, and theological, with a comprehensiveness and quality of scholarship unmatched by any other series. This set includes all of the International Critical Commentaries on the Old Testament.

The ICC series has also been rather difficult to purchase in its entirety, due in part to the cost of the print volumes, numerous revisions of various volumes, and the fact that most retailers do not offer the entire set as one purchase. The Logos edition contains the most recent edition of each title and provides an easy way to own every volume of this often-cited commentary set.

If you were to purchase all 27 volumes in print at suggested retail price, the cost would be over $1,500.00. The Logos edition provides a substantial discount and presents the content in a more flexible medium than print!

This series is under the editorship of Professor J. A. Emerton of Cambridge, Professor C. E. B. Cranfield of Durham and Professor G. N. Stanton of Cambridge.

Note: Many of the titles in this series have gone through a number of revisions. See the bibliography for a list of editions included in the Logos ICC product.

Individual Titles

Genesis

  • Author: John Skinner
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 1910
  • Pages: 552

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

John Skinner’s 1910 Commentary on Genesis was for many years the standard English-language text. Incorporating Hebrew text throughout and packed with references, his commentary, like his lectures, is clear, illuminating, and impressive.

John Skinner studied in Scotland and Germany at the end of the nineteenth century. He held pulpits in the Free Church of Scotland from 1880 until 1890, when he was elected to the faculty of what is now Westminster College, Cambridge. There he became one of the earliest English-language scholars to incorporate the documentary hypothesis in his teaching and writing. Skinner was elected principal in 1908, and given principal emeritus status in 1922. He died in 1925 while revising Genesis.

Numbers

  • Author: G. Buchanan Gray
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 1903
  • Pages: 489

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

G. Buchanan Gray wrote this commentary on Numbers to enable readers to study and interpret the book in light of new discoveries.

Most Bible readers have the impression that Numbers is a dull book only relieved by the brilliancy of the Balaam chapters and some snatches of old Hebrew songs, but, as Professor Gray shows with admirable skill and insight, its historical and religious value is not that which lies on the surface. Professor Gray’s commentary is distinguished by fine scholarship and sanity of judgment; it is impossible to commend it too warmly.

Saturday Review

George Buchanan Gray (1865–1922) was a congregational clergyman and biblical scholar. He was professor of Hebrew and Old Testament exegesis in Mansfield College, Oxford. He authored the volume Isaiah 1–27, and coauthored volume 1 and volume 2 of Job, in the International Critical Commentary series, among other writings.

Deuteronomy

  • Author: S. R. Driver
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 1902
  • Pages: 434

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Edited by Alfred Plummer, Charles Augustus Briggs, and S. R. Driver, this commentary on Deuteronomy provides a fantastic backdrop to the study of Deuteronomy. An indespensible resource for the serious Bible scholar, student, or pastor.

It is a pleasure to see at last a really critical Old Testament commentary in English upon a portion of the Pentateuch, and especially one of such merit. This I find superior to any other commentary in any language upon Deuteronomy.

E. L. Curtis, professor, Yale University

Samuel Rolles Driver was an Old Testament and Semitic languages scholar. He was educated at Winchester School and Oxford University, where he became a fellow of New College in 1870, and from 1875 was also a tutor. He was awarded the Pusey and Ellerton scholarship in 1866, the Kennicott scholarship in 1870 (both Hebrew), and the Houghton Syriac prize in 1872. In 1883 he succeeded E. B. Pusey in the Regius Chair of Hebrew at Oxford, which he occupied for the rest of his life.

Judges

  • Author: G. F. Moore
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 1910
  • Pages: 476

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G. F. Moore’s work was of importance in four fields—the shaping of US scholarship, the reshaping of US concepts of religion, the study of the Hebrew Bible, and the study of Tannaitic Judaism. Of his many articles in the Andover Review and Cheyne’s Encyclopaedia Biblica, his commentary on Judges remains most valuable.

Professor Moore has more than sustained his scholarly reputation in this work, which gives us for the first time in English a commentary on Judges not excelled, if indeed equalled, in any language of the world.

L. W. Batten, P. E. Divinity School, Philadelphia

Although a critical commentary, this work has its practical uses, and by its divisions, headlines, etc., it is admirably adapted to the wants of all thoughtful students of the Scriptures. Indeed, with the other books of the series, it is sure to find its way into the hands of pastors and scholarly laymen.

Portland Zion’s Herald

Like its predecessors, this volume will be warmly welcomed—whilst to those whose means of securing up-to-date information on the subject of which it treats are limited, it is simply invaluable.

Edinburgh Scotsman

George Foot Moore was one of the most important American teachers of religion. He was born in West Chester, Pennsylvania, in 1851 and died in Cambridge, Massachusetts, in 1931. Moore graduated Yale in 1872 and from Union Theological Seminary in 1877. His ordination to the Presbyterian ministry came in 1878, and later he became professor of Hebrew in Andover Theological Seminary in 1883. In 1902 he went to Harvard and was made professor of the history of religion just two years later.

Samuel I and II

  • Author: H. P. Smith
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 1899
  • Pages: 421

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

For over 100 years, the International Critical Commentary series has held a special place among works on the Bible. It has sought to bring together all the relevant aids to exegesis—linguistic and textual no less than archaeological, historical, literary and theological—with a level of comprehension and quality of scholarship unmatched by any other series.

Professor Smith’s Commentary will for some time be the standard work on Samuel, and we heartily congratulate him on scholarly work so faithfully accomplished.

The Athenaum

The literary quality of the book deserves mention. We do not usually go to commentaries for models of English style. But this book has a distinct, though unobtrusive, literary flavor. It is delightful reading. The translation is always felicitous, and often renders further comment needless.

The Evangelist

The author exhibits precisely that scholarly attitude which will commend his work to the widest audience.

The Churchman

Henry Preserved Smith (1847–1926) was an American biblical scholar. Educated both at Amherst College and Lane Theological Seminary, he eventually became an instructor therewith. He continued his study of theology in Berlin and Leipzig. Later he was tried for heresy in his Presbytery, in Cincinnati, Ohio. Smith retired from the denomination, and in 1893, upon becoming a professor at Andover Theological Seminary, entered the ministry of the Congregational Church. From 1897 to 4099 he was a professor in Amherst College, and in 1907 became a professor in the Meadville Theological School (now affiliated with the University of Chicago).

Kings I and II

  • Author: H. S. Gehman and James A. Montgomery
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 1951
  • Pages: 574

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

For over 100 years, the International Critical Commentary series has held a special place among works on the Bible. It has sought to bring together all the relevant aids to exegesis—linguistic and textual no less than archaeological, historical, literary, and theological—with a level of comprehension and quality of scholarship unmatched by any other series.

The commentary . . . is a powerful example of painstaking and erudite scholarship, reflecting the results of life’s work. . . . pays particular attention to the significance of recent archaeological discoveries which have a bearing on the period of history under review.

—The Baptist Quarterly

H. S. Gehman was professor of Old Testament lanugage and literature, Princeton University.

James A. Montgomery was a professor at the University of Pennsylvania and Philadelphia Divinity School. He earned his PhD, in 1904 from the University of Pennsylvania, and was given the honorary degree of Doctor of Sacred Theology in 1908. Montgomery was named lecturer on Semitics at the University of Pennsylvania, and then one year later, assistant professor of Hebrew and Aramaic. In 1914, he was promoted to professor of Hebrew and Aramaic, a position he held until he was named emeritus professor of Hebrew and Aramaic in 1938. Through his distinguished academic career, Montgomery made a name for himself in the fields of Semitics and Oriental studies. He authored a number of books on the Orient and the Middle-East, and his works were considered by scholars in the field to be the most complete and well-researched publications on that subject.

Chronicles I and II

  • Author: E. L. Curtis, Albert Madsen
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 1910
  • Pages: 534

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This account of I and II Chronicles provides a comprehensive, thought-provoking exegesis of two Old Testament books.

To those whose work calls for a strictly critical commentary on the text and the sources this commentary is commended. It is a report of progress along these lines, a guide to the literature, a display of the material for discussion. For this purpose there is no other one book in English of equal value with this work of Professor Curtis.

John D. Davis, The Princeton Theological Review

Edward L. Curtis was professor of the Hebrew language and literature in the Divinity School of Yale University.

Albert Madsen was the pastor of the First Congregational Church at Newburgh, New York.

Ezra and Nehemiah

  • Author: L. W. Batten
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 1913
  • Pages: 384

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This commentary covers the books of Ezra and Nehemiah, bringing a fresh and insightful look to the Old Testament. L. W. Batten’s superb biblical scholarship shines through in the nearly 400 pages that make up this commentary.

L. W. Batten was professor of the literature and interpretation of the Old Testament, General Theological Seminary in New York and a former chairman of the Society for Biblical Scholarship (1928).

Esther

  • Author: L. B. Paton
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 1908
  • Pages: 334

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Lewis B. Paton’s champion commentary is a helpful and interesting resource for the study of the Old Testament heroine, Esther.

Lewis B. Paton served as professor of Old Testament exegesis and criticism at Hartford Theological Seminary.

Job

  • Author: S. R. Driver, G. Buchanan Gray
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 1921
  • Pages: 360

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The Logos version of the commentary on the book of Job is a single-volume commentary, comprised of two parts: Part One (376 pages), being “Commentary,” and Part Two (360 pages), being “Philological Notes.”

Samuel Rolles Driver was an Old Testament and Semitic languages scholar. He was educated at Winchester School and Oxford University, where he became a fellow of New College in 1870, and from 1875 was also a tutor. He was awarded the Pusey and Ellerton scholarship in 1866, the Kennicott scholarship in 1870 (both Hebrew), and the Houghton Syriac prize in 1872. In 1883 he succeeded E. B. Pusey in the Regius Chair of Hebrew at Oxford, which he occupied for the rest of his life.

George Buchanan Gray (1865–1922) was a congregational clergyman and biblical scholar. He was professor of Hebrew and Old Testament exegesis in Mansfield College, Oxford. He authored the volume Isaiah 1–27 in the International Critical Commentary series, among other writings.

Psalms: Volume 1

  • Authors: C. A. Briggs, E. G. Briggs
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 1921
  • Pages: 360

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The Psalms contain some of the Bible’s most beautiful, poetic writings. C. A. Briggs and E. G. Briggs elucidate each Psalm, unpacking the ancient words of the psalmists in a way that is relevant to today.

Christian scholarship seems here to have reached the highest level yet attained in study of the book which in religious importance stands next to the Gospels. His work upon it is not likely to be excelled in learning, both massive and minute, by any volume of the International Series, to which it belongs.

The Outlook

We have in this work what we should expect, extreme thoroughness, scholarly precision, and depth of insight.

The Churchman

It is scarcely too much to say that we have here in compact form the best available commentary upon the first book of the psalter. It is not simply grammatical and lexical, but it embodies the best results of the author’s study of biblical theology. These serve to bring out doubly the significance and import of these hymns of worship of ancient Israel.

The Westminster

Charles Augustus Briggs (1841–1913) was an American theologian and Hebrew scholar. Born in New York City, he was educated at the University of Virginia (1857–1860), graduated at the Union Theological Seminary in 1863, and studied further at the University of Berlin. He was pastor of the Presbyterian church of Roselle, New Jersey (1869–1874) and professor of Hebrew and Cognate languages in Union Theological Seminary 1874–1891. From 1880 to 1890 he was an editor of the Presbyterian Review. In 1892 he was tried for heresy by the presbytery of New York and acquitted; the general assembly, however, suspended Briggs in 1893. He was ordained a priest of the Protestant Episcopal Church in 1899. He has been awarded many honoraries degrees and was the author of many publications.

Psalms: Volume 2

  • Authors: C. A. Briggs, E. G. Briggs
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 1907
  • Pages: 571

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The Psalms contain some of the Bible’s most beautiful, poetic writings. C. A. Briggs and E. G. Briggs elucidate each Psalm, unpacking the ancient words of the psalmists in a way that is relevant to today.

Christian scholarship seems here to have reached the highest level yet attained in study of the book which in religious importance stands next to the Gospels. His work upon it is not likely to be excelled in learning, both massive and minute, by any volume of the International Series, to which it belongs.

The Outlook

We have in this work what we should expect: extreme thoroughness, scholarly precision, and depth of insight.

The Churchman

It is scarcely too much to say that we have here in compact form the best available commentary upon the first book of the Psalter. It is not simply grammatical and lexical, but it embodies the best results of the author’s study of biblical theology. These serve to bring out doubly the significance and import of these hymns of worship of ancient Israel.

The Westminster

Charles Augustus Briggs (1841–1913) was an American theologian and Hebrew scholar. Born in New York City, he was educated at the University of Virginia (1857–1860), graduated at the Union Theological Seminary in 1863, and studied further at the University of Berlin. He was pastor of the Presbyterian church of Roselle, New Jersey (1869–1874) and professor of Hebrew and Cognate languages in Union Theological Seminary 1874–1891. From 1880 to 1890 he was an editor of the Presbyterian Review. In 1892 he was tried for heresy by the presbytery of New York and acquitted; the general assembly, however, suspended Briggs in 1893. He was ordained a priest of the Protestant Episcopal Church in 1899. He has been awarded many honoraries degrees and was the author of many publications.

Proverbs

  • Author: C. H. Toy
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 1899
  • Pages: 554

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This remarkable commentary on Proverbs shows Crawford Howell Toy’s excellent biblical knowledge and scholarship. Focused and engaging, it is an essential study on Proverbs.

. . . the crown (for having most furthered understanding in the nineteenth century) belongs to Crawford H. Toy’s voluminous interpretation of the book of Proverbs.

—Rudolf Smend ,theologian, Germany

This commentary demonstrates Toy’s mastery of ancient languages, and exhibits his convictions about Israelite monotheism.

Southern Baptist Journal of Theology

Crawford Howell Toy was an American biblical scholar from Norfolk, Virginia. He received his MA from the University of Virginia before going on to Southern Baptist Theological Seminary in Greenville, South Carolina. His time at the seminary was brief as the Civil War broke out and he became an infantry chaplain for the Confederacy. He continued his studies in the States after the war, but eventually headed to Berlin where he studied theology, Sanskrit, and Semitics. In 1869, the trustees of Southern Seminary invited Toy back, this time to become professor of Old Testament interpretation and Oriental languages. His resignation came after 10 years with the seminary due to a theological controversy. From 1880, until his retirement in 1909, Toy was Hancock Professor of Hebrew and Other Oriental Languages at Harvard, and from 1880–1903 was Dexter Lecturer on Biblical Literature. He was a member of the editorial board of The Jewish Encyclopedia, and a contributor to learned journals. His notable writings include, Judaism and Christianity, and Introduction to the History of Religions.

Ecclesiastes

  • Author: G. A. Barton
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 1908
  • Pages: 212

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G. A. Barton’s wisdom on Ecclesiastes rings true for all hoping to gain understanding of this Old Testament book.

G. A. Barton taught at Haverford College, Bryn Mawr, and the University of Pennsylvania where he was professor of Semitic languages from 1922–1931 and professor emeritus from 1932–1942. His many articles and books cover a wide range of topics in areas such as biblical studies, religion, and linguistics. He was also involved in archaeological projects throughout the Middle East and was the director of the American School of Oriental Research in Baghdad from 1921–1934.

Isaiah 1–5

  • Author: H. G. M. Williamson
  • Series: International Critical Commentary
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2006
  • Pages: 448

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Hugh Williamson’s Isaiah 1–5 is the first of three volumes in a important new commentary on Isaiah 1–27. For over 100 years International Critical Commentaries have had a special place among works on the Bible. They bring together all the relevant aids to exegesis—linguistic, textual, archaeological, historical, literary, and theological—to help the reader understand the meaning of the books of the Old and New Testaments. The new commentaries continue this tradition. All new evidence now available is incorporated and new methods of study are applied. The authors are of the highest international standing. No attempt has been made to secure a uniform theological or critical approach to the biblical text: contributors have been invited for their scholarly distinction, not for their adherence to any one school of thought.

H. G. M. Williamson is Regius Professor of Hebrew at the University of Oxford, UK. He is the author of Ezra, Nehemiah in the Word Biblical Commentary series and Ezra and Nehemiah in the Sheffield Old Testament Guides.

Isaiah 1–27

  • Author: George Buchanan Gray
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 1912
  • Pages: 472

George Gray, author of several International Critical Commentary volumes, brings a high level of biblical scholarship to this commentary on the the book of Isaiah.

Of great value is the commentary of G. Buchanan Gray on the first 27 chapters of Isaiah. From the point of view of philology the work is excellent, and the discussion of the versions is very valuable. The book will long remain a standard work of reference.

Westminster Theological Journal

George Buchanan Gray (1865–1922) was a congregational clergyman and biblical scholar. He was professor of Hebrew and Old Testament exegesis in Mansfield College, Oxford. He has authored several volumes in the International Critical Commentary series, among other writings.

Isaiah 40–55, vol. 1

  • Authors: John Goldingay and David Payne
  • Series: International Critical Commentary
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2006
  • Pages: 424

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Isaiah 40–55 is unusually challenging on both the macro and micro levels. To combine literary sensibilities with traditional textual and historical methods is challenging as well. These informative, careful, and copiously researched volumes respectably fill a long-felt gap and will surely be sought as important reference works in the study of Isaiah for decades to come.

Interpretation

One of the latest additions to the eminent International Critical Commentary series is this joint production of J. Goldingay and D. Payne. In the preface, the authors lay out briefly the long history of the ICC’s delay in publishing a complete commentary on the book of Isaiah, and describe the process with which they worked: Payne is primarily responsible for the textual and philological notes, while Goldingay produced the bulk of the explicitly exegetical work and the lengthy introduction . . . The two authors have succeeded, independently in their respective tasks and jointly through their interaction, in producing a detailed and ultimately quite judicious commentary on the 16 chapters of the book of Isaiah normally taken to be a literary unit within this corpus . . . In form and content these two volumes are a fitting addition to the ICC, and . . . are sure to provide a solid foundation for planned volumes on the remaining chapters.

—Jeremy M. Hutton, assistant professor, department of Hebrew and Semitic studies, University of Wisconsin-Madison

John Goldingay is David Allan Hubbard Professor of Old Testament at Fuller Theological Seminary, Pasadena, California, and formerly principal of St John’s Theological College, Nottingham, United Kingdom. He has written numerous commentaries, including Psalms (3 vols.) in the Baker Commentary on the Old Testament Wisdom and Psalms, Isaiah in the Understanding the Bible Commentary Series, and Daniel in the Word Biblical Commentary series.

David Payne was director of studies at London School of Theology (London Bible College).

Isaiah 40–55, vol. 2

  • Authors: John Goldingay and David Payne
  • Series: International Critical Commentary
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2006
  • Pages: 392

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Scholars and serious students will be enriched as they carefully work through this study.

Dianne Bergant, distinguished professor of Old Testament studies, Catholic Theological Union

The commentary constitutes a detailed exegetical discussion, including interaction with ancient and medieval Jewish and Christian sources as well as modern commentators. Although interpreters will invariably find much to challenge, this highly detailed commentary presents a very useful resource to interpreters of Isaiah 40–55.

Marvin A. Sweeney, professor of Hebrew Bible, Claremont School of Theology

Isaiah 40–55 is unusually challenging on both the macro and micro levels. To combine literary sensibilities with traditional textual and historical methods is challenging as well. These informative, careful, and copiously researched volumes respectably fill a long-felt gap and will surely be sought as important reference works in the study of Isaiah for decades to come.

Interpretation

One of the latest additions to the eminent International Critical Commentary series is this joint production of J. Goldingay and D. Payne. In the preface, the authors lay out briefly the long history of the ICC’s delay in publishing a complete commentary on the book of Isaiah, and describe the process with which they worked: Payne is primarily responsible for the textual and philological notes, while Goldingay produced the bulk of the explicitly exegetical work and the lengthy introduction . . . The two authors have succeeded, independently in their respective tasks and jointly through their interaction, in producing a detailed and ultimately quite judicious commentary on the 16 chapters of the book of Isaiah normally taken to be a literary unit within this corpus . . . In form and content these two volumes are a fitting addition to the ICC, and . . . are sure to provide a solid foundation for planned volumes on the remaining chapters.

—Jeremy M. Hutton, assistant professor, Department of Hebrew and Semitic Studies, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Every comment is supported by meticulous argument and clearly expressed, with the purpose of enabling readers to interpret Isaiah 40–55 for themselves. This purpose is undoubtedly achieved.

J. E. Tollington, minister of religion, The Margaret Beaufort Institute of Theology

John Goldingay is David Allan Hubbard Professor of Old Testament at Fuller Theological Seminary, Pasadena, California, and formerly principal of St John’s Theological College, Nottingham, United Kingdom. He has written numerous commentaries, including Psalms (3 vols.) in the Baker Commentary on the Old Testament Wisdom and Psalms, Isaiah in the Understanding the Bible Commentary Series, and Daniel in the Word Biblical Commentary series.

David Payne was director of studies at London School of Theology (London Bible College).

Jeremiah 1–25

  • Author: William McKane
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 1986
  • Pages: 658

A timeless commentary on the book of Jeremiah, William McKane’s work provides a comprehensive look at this Old Testament prophet.

William McKane was professor emeritus of Hebrew and Oriental languages at the University of St. Andrews.

Jeremiah 26–52

  • Author: William McKane
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 1986
  • Pages: 1,396

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A timeless commentary on the book of Jeremiah, William McKane’s work provides a comprehensive look at this Old Testament prophet.

William McKane was professor emeritus of Hebrew and Oriental languages at the University of St. Andrews.

Lamentations

  • Author: R. B. Salters
  • Series: International Critical Commentary
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2010
  • Pages: 416

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R. B. Salters, honorary reader in Hebrew at the University of St Andrews provides a masterful commentary on Lamentations, as befits this prestigious commentary series.

R. B. Salters is honorary reader in Hebrew at the University of St. Andrews. He is the author of Jonah and Lamentations in the Sheffield Old Testament Guides.

Ezekiel

  • Author: G. A. Cooke
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 1936
  • Pages: 557

G. A. Cooke’s Ezekiel offers verse-by-verse commentary with historical and linguistic background to provide context and clarity to the text.

G. A. Cooke was Regius Professor of Hebrew and Canon of Christ Church, Oxford.

Daniel

  • Author: J. A. Montgomery
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 1927
  • Pages: 478

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J. A. Montgomery’s cogent exegesis provides a look at the eschatology found within this Old Testament prophetic book, illuminating the prophecy, theology, and historical content of Daniel.

James A. Montgomery was professor at the University of Pennsylvania and Philadelphia Divinity School. He earned his PhD, in 1904 from the University of Pennsylvania, and was given the honorary degree of doctor of Sacred Theology in 1908. Montgomery was named lecturer on Semitics at the University of Pennsylvania, and then one year later, assistant professor of Hebrew and Aramaic. In 1914, he was promoted to professor of Hebrew and Aramaic, a position he held until he was named emeritus professor of Hebrew and Aramaic in 1938. Through his distinguished academic career, Montgomery made a name for himself in the fields of Semitics and Oriental studies. He authored a number of books on the Orient and the Middle-East, and his works were considered by scholars in the field to be the most complete and well-researched publications on that subject.

Hosea

  • Author: A. A. Macintosh
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 1997
  • Pages: 600

This esteemed commentary by A. A. Macintosh carefully examines the prophetic book of Hosea.

In this commentary, the result of a 15 year effort, Macintosh succeeds admirably in applying traditional linguistic and historical tools of exegesis.

The Catholic Biblical Quarterly

This fine, learned and patient commentary will be a great resource for those who wish to engage in a detailed study of Hosea . . . Macintosh is tireless in his attempts to elucidate Hosea’s language, ranging widely over scholarship of many centuries, but always building his comments into a lucid and coherent synthesis. . . . This is a distinguished, ‘advanced’ commentary that blends conservatism and innovation, and a worthy addition to the ICC.

Philip Satterthwaite, Anvil

A. A. Macintosh was president of St. John’s College, Cambridge.

Amos and Hosea

  • Author: W. R. Harper
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 1905
  • Pages: 424

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For over 100 years, the International Critical Commentary series has held a special place among works on the Bible. W. R. Harper’s definitive commentary on Amos and Hosea features original language studies, historical facts, and scriptural cross-references.

I shall have pleasure in recommending it to all students in our seminary. This book fills, in the most favorable manner, a long-felt want for a good critical commentary on two of the most interesting books in the Old Testament.

Lewis B. Paton, professor of Hebrew, Hartford Theological Seminary

Nothing at all worthy of consideration has been passed by. The consequence is that when one carefully studies what has been brought together in this volume, either upon some passage of the two prophets treated, or upon some question of critical or antiquarian importance in the introductory portion of the volume, one feels that he has obtained an adequately exhaustive view of the subject.

The Interior

William R. Harper was professor of Semitic languages and literatures in the University of Chicago.

Micah, Zephaniah, Nahum, Habakkuk, Obadiah, and Joel

  • Authors: John Merlin Powis Smith, W. H. Ward, and J. A. Bewert
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 1911
  • Pages: 560

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John Merlin Powis Smith, W. H. Ward, and J. A. Bewert provide outstanding commentary for the Old Testament books of Micah, Zephaniah, Nahum, Habakkuk, Obadiah, and Joel in this volume.

John Merlin Powis Smith was assistant professor of Semitic languages and literatures at the University of Chicago.

Julias A. Bewer was associate professor of biblical philology at the Union Theological Seminary in New York.

William Hayes Ward graduated Phillips Academy, Andover, Amherst College, and the Andover Theological Seminary. He served as a pastor, and as a professor of Latin at Ripon College in Wisconsin. He was part of the editorial staff of the New York Independent, rising by degrees to editor in chief, and then honorary editor. He was twice president of the American Oriental Society.

Haggai, Zechariah, Malachi, and Jonah

  • Authors: J. A. Bewer, J. M. P. Smith, H. G. Mitchell
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 1912
  • Pages: 515 total | Haggai and Zechariah: 362 pages | Malachi: 88 pages | Jonah: 65 pages

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The Logos version has been made into three separate resource files for easier functionality. The purchase of this title will contain all three files covering Haggai, Zechariah, Malachi, and Jonah, making it comparable to the single-volume print edition.

John Merlin Powis Smith was assistant professor of Semitic languages and literatures at the University of Chicago.

Julias A. Bewer was associate professor of biblical philology at the Union Theological Seminary in New York.

Hinckley G. Mitchell was professor of Hebrew and Old Testament exegesis at Tufts College.

Product Details

  • Title: International Critical Commentary
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Volumes: 27
  • Pages: 26,481