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Focus on the Bible Commentaries (41 vols.)
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Overview

The Focus on the Bible Commentaries (41 vols.) are packed with contributions by top evangelical scholars and pastors, and are designed to be readable for ordinary Christians, reliable for in-depth study of the Bible, and relevant for daily Christian life. Discover not only what the music of the Psalms, the plight of Job, the story of Jesus, and the spread of the New Testament church meant then, but what these stories—and the whole of Scripture—means today!

For each section of the Bible, the Focus on the Bible Commentaries summarize the passage of Scripture, including the intentions of the authors, the historical and cultural environment, and the questions and issues raised by a particular passage. But most importantly, the Focus on the Bible Commentaries bring you into the heart of the Bible, by explaining Scripture in an accessible way that makes sense for daily Christian living.

In the Logos edition, this valuable collection is enhanced by amazing functionality. Scripture citations link directly to English translations, and important terms link to dictionaries, encyclopedias, and a wealth of other resources in your digital library. Perform powerful searches to find exactly what you’re looking for. Take the discussion with you using tablet and mobile apps. With Logos Bible Software, the most efficient and comprehensive research tools are in one place, so you get the most out of your study.

Key Features

  • Contains chapter-by-chapter commentary
  • Provides accessible and readable exposition
  • Includes contributions from top evangelical scholars
  • Incorporates material useful for preaching, teaching, and both personal and group Bible study

Individual Titles

Deuteronomy: The Commands of a Covenant God

  • Author: Allan Harman
  • Publisher: Christian Focus
  • Publication Date: 2007
  • Pages: 320

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5

The word ‘Deuteronomy’ is a misnomer. It means ‘the second law.’ The name is taken from Deuteronomy 17:18 where the expression really means having a copy of the law. Deuteronomy is therefore not a second, different law, but a renewal of the covenant made on Mount Sinai. For a people on the brink of entering the Promised Land, Deuteronomy confirmed God’s gracious promises as they prepared for new horizons and adventures.

He keeps the connectedness of the text before us and yet can dash off to capture a Hebrew participle or suffix, pilfer a bit of Near Eastern background, or serve up the succinct result of a word study—all to light up a passage.

Dale Ralph Davis, former professor of Old Testament, Reformed Theological Seminary

Allan Harman has recently retired from the posts of principal and professor of Old Testament at the Presbyterian Theological College in Melbourne, Australia. He has taught graduate courses at Ontario Theological Seminary, Toronto and Reformed Theological Seminary, Jackson.

Joshua: No Falling Words

  • Author: Dale Ralph Davis
  • Publisher: Christian Focus
  • Publication Date: 2008
  • Pages: 208

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6

This exposition is rooted first in a thorough analysis of the Hebrew text, employing helpful insights from archaeology and linguistics, and second in the major theological and literary themes discovered in each section. Finally the author brings the fragments together in an expository treatment which addresses the important topics of application.

A happy blend of exegetical and historical study on the one hand, and homiletical treatment and application on the other. Ideas pop out everywhere, even in the most unlikely places. New insights abound. No one who reads this book will ever find Joshua dull and tedious again.

—Richard A. Bodey, professor of homiletics, Trinity Evangelical Divinity School

Dale Ralph Davis is pastor of Woodland Presbyterian Church, Hattiesburg, Mississippi. Previously he was professor of Old Testament at Reformed Theological Seminary, Jackson, Mississippi.

Judges: Such Great Salvation

  • Author: Dale Ralph Davis
  • Publisher: Christian Focus
  • Publication Date: 2006
  • Pages: 240

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5

The Church has a problem with the book of Judges. It is so earthy, puzzling, primitive and violent—so much so that the church can barely stomach it. It falls under the category of “embarrassing scripture.” Such an attitude is, of course, wrong, so Dale Ralph Davis here makes Judges digestible by analyzing the major literary and theological themes discovered in each section, providing a theocentric exposition.

Dr. Davis has a great sense of fun. He must often have his class or his congregation in stitches!

Christian Arena

The most practical expository work that this reviewer has ever encountered.

Southwestern Journal of Theology

An excellent . . . crisp, lively . . . exposition on Judges.

Bibliotheca Sacra

Dale Ralph Davis is pastor of Woodland Presbyterian Church, Hattiesburg, Mississippi. Previously he was professor of Old Testament at Reformed Theological Seminary, Jackson, Mississippi.

Judges & Ruth

  • Author: Stephen Dray
  • Publisher: Christian Focus
  • Publication Date: 2006
  • Pages: 160

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

In the lawless period of the history of Israel between the invasion of Canaan and the establishment of the monarchy there existed military leaders, national heroes called the Judges. The lesson of the book of Judges is that Israel’s survival depended upon loyalty to God and that disloyalty always ended in disaster. It also shows God’s faithfulness to his people when they turned in repentance.

The story of Ruth is set in the times of the Judges. It shows the blessings that came upon a foreigner when she turned to Israel’s God at a time when Israel was turning away.

Stephen Dray is minister of Ferndale Baptist Church, Southend-on-Sea.

Ruth & Esther: God Behind the Seen

  • Authors: Barry C. Davis and A. Boyd Luter
  • Publisher: Christian Focus
  • Publication Date: 2003
  • Pages: 384

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Tragedy and triumph—the books of Ruth and Esther tell the stories of two women who achieve success against all odds. One woman overcomes a personal tragedy, the other a nationwide crisis. The roads they take to succeed, however, are quite different.

This fascinating study provides a practical commentary on the lives of two women as it shows readers the providential care of the unseen God for his people—not only in past history, but in our day as well. Even seemingly out-of-control crises are under his watchful care.

Teachers of Bible study groups as well as pastors will find this volume a rich source of insight into the text and a real inspiration for living.

They did an excellent job in presenting the facts and commenting on them rather than filling our ears with unnecessary personal interpretation. I came away completely satisfied . . .

—Tricia Bleu, Teens 4 Jesus Library

Barry C. Davis is associate professor of Bible and Hebrew at Multnomah Biblical Seminary in Portland, Oregon. He holds degrees from the University of Hawaii, Western Conservative Baptist Seminary, the University of Southern California, Talbot School of Theology, and Trinity International University.

A. Boyd Luter is professor of biblical and theological studies at the Criswell College.

1 Samuel: Looking on the Heart

  • Author: Dale Ralph Davis
  • Publisher: Christian Focus
  • Publication Date: 2007
  • Pages: 336

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Dale Ralph Davis brings cultural and historical color to the task of interpretation and adds a pastor’s heart for personal application. You will find a point of contact with the lives of Samuel, Saul, Jonathan, and David as Davis answers the question, “What does God seek when he looks on the heart?” Davis presents a simple exposition of the literary and theological character of the text in a bright and fascinating way.

. . . presents historical and theological material in a way that can only excite the expositor.

Warren Wiersbe, author, Be Series

A great feast of biblical truth made so digestible, garnished with so many apt illustrations.

Alec Motyer, former principal, Trinity College, Bristol, England

Dale Ralph Davis is pastor of Woodland Presbyterian Church, Hattiesburg, Mississippi. Previously he was professor of Old Testament at Reformed Theological Seminary, Jackson, Mississippi.

2 Samuel: Out of Every Adversity

  • Author: Dale Ralph Davis
  • Publisher: Christian Focus
  • Publication Date: 2007
  • Pages: 336

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Dale Ralph Davis brings cultural and historical color to the task of interpreting one of the most studied parts of the Bible. The lessons in 2 Samuel from the life of Israel, and David in particular, have obvious modern parallels. Davis writes with a pastor’s heart and the incisive brain of a respected theologian specializing in the Old Testament texts.

He combines the depth of understanding of a thorough-going Old Testament scholar with the breadth of insight of a biblical theologian and the perception of a preacher well-used to addressing contemporary audiences to provide us with a commentary that brings the preaching potential of these books to life.

—Mark Johnston, Banner of Truth Magazine

Such sensitivity to the biblical theology of the text is a crucial correction to much of modern exposition . . . Reading the commentary is itself a devotional exercise.

—John W. Hilder, Journal of the Evangelical Theological Society

Dale Ralph Davis is pastor of Woodland Presbyterian Church, Hattiesburg, Mississippi. Previously he was professor of Old Testament at Reformed Theological Seminary, Jackson, Mississippi.

1 Kings: The Wisdom and the Folly

  • Author: Dale Ralph Davis
  • Publisher: Christian Focus
  • Publication Date: 2008
  • Pages: 352

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

1 Kings is a continuation of a narrative of the history of Israel which begins in 1 Samuel and continues through into 1 & 2 Kings. While we so often struggle with the events and issues of the book of 1 Kings, Dale Ralph Davis helps us to see how it we can apply to the contemporary settings of the twenty-first century. As usual, Davis uses pastoral application and laces it with his own sense of humor. He is noted for tackling scholarship head on.

No preacher should be without them. No thoughtful Christian can fail to be excited and edified by them. Hence, I hurried to get a review copy of his work on 1 Kings. As with his other Old Testament commentaries, the author is able to mix page-turning writing skills which make for easy reading, with the most rigorous and orthodox scholarship.

Evangelicals Now

One of the reasons I enjoy Davis’ exposition so much is that I feel confident that he has done his exegetical homework, and so is not just delivering blessed, unhistorical thoughts on the text. Yet at the same time, he applies the text so well.

Simon Gathercole, lecturer in New Testament studies, University of Cambridge

Dale Ralph Davis is pastor of Woodland Presbyterian Church, Hattiesburg, Mississippi. Previously he was professor of Old Testament at Reformed Theological Seminary, Jackson, Mississippi.

2 Kings: The Power and the Fury

  • Author: Dale Ralph Davis
  • Publisher: Christian Focus
  • Publication Date: 2005
  • Pages: 352

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

2 Kings provides a fast-paced narrative of insight into the history of Israel under its monarchy. This book is a continuation of the narrative begun in 1 Samuel, and continued through 2 Samuel and 1 Kings. Dale Ralph Davis finishes it off with a captivating and rewarding journey through 2 Kings.

Written between 561 BC and 538 BC, 2 Kings gives us a warning about the consequences of sin, especially the catastrophic repercussions of Israel’s love affair with idolatry. Despite struggling with other problems, we see that the Jewish people learned from their experience. They never made a mistake of this enormity again.

Through prophets such as Elisha and Elijah, we see God’s compassion for his people and the opportunity for repentance. An opportunity spoiled by Judah, climaxing with the subjugation of the kingdom by the Babylonians.

Illuminating, accessible, and laced with his unique sense of humor, Davis’ practical devotional expository applies events to the contemporary reader providing parallels to alert us in the twenty-first century.

Davis is a helpful guide, not least because he explains the issues with the needs of contemporary Christians in mind.

—Matthew Mason, The Churchman

Today there is a renewed emphasis on the preaching of Old Testament narrative in evangelical circles . . . The six volumes of Ralph Dale Davis of which 2 Kings: The Power and Fury is the culmination are excellent guides for contemporary expositor as he preaches from the ‘former prophets.’ Davis has laid an excellent foundation; may many expositors build upon his work as they preach Old Testament narrative.

—Keith Essex, assistant professor of Bible exposition, The Master’s Seminary

Dale Ralph Davis is pastor of Woodland Presbyterian Church, Hattiesburg, Mississippi. Previously he was professor of Old Testament at Reformed Theological Seminary, Jackson, Mississippi.

1 Chronicles: God’s Faithfulness to the People of Judah

  • Author: Cyril J. Barber
  • Publisher: Christian Focus
  • Publication Date: 2004
  • Pages: 256

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

The books of Chronicles have had a checkered past. Neglected for many years under the unfortunate name paraleipomenon or “things omitted,” meant that they occupied a subordinate position in the Scriptures until the fourth century AD when the title “A Chronicle of the whole of Sacred History” was suggested instead. This has since been shortened to Chronicles and the rest is, literally, history.

Probably penned by Ezra, Chronicles is a selective history of the Jews encouraging them to trust that God is intimately involved in their story. Written at a time when the Jews were newly out of captivity and with their capital city in ruins, Chronicles assures them of God’s faithfulness. If they would obey and serve him then his people would still enjoy his blessing.

This title is an invaluable addition to the commentary shelves, and yet reads like a good book.

—Tabernacle Bookshop

Cyril J. Barber has authored more than 30 books including eight on Old Testament books of the Bible. He taught for over 25 years at Trinity Evangelical Divinity School, Talbot Theological Seminary, and Trinity International University.

2 Chronicles: God’s Blessing of His Faith People

  • Author: Cyril J. Barber
  • Publisher: Christian Focus
  • Publication Date: 2004
  • Pages: 352

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

This volume continues Cyril J. Barber’s examination and exposition of the history of Israel as depicted in the Chronicles. Beginning with the life of Solomon, Barber outlines the ebb and flow of good and evil kings, the building—and subsequent desecration—of the temple, the split between Judah and the 10 tribes of Israel, and the disastrous consequences of sin and the agony of exile. In this accessible exposition, discover what we can learn from Israel’s history, and learn the nature of the God who speaks through prophets, who displays both justice and mercy, and who preserves his people.

Cyril J. Barber has authored more than 30 books including eight on Old Testament books of the Bible. He taught for over 25 years at Trinity Evangelical Divinity School, Talbot Theological Seminary, and Trinity International University.

Job: Will You Torment a Windblown Leaf?

  • Author: Bill Cotton
  • Publisher: Christian Focus
  • Publication Date: 2001
  • Pages: 176

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

The poet Alfred Lord Tennyson is reputed to have called the book of Job “the greatest poem of ancient or modern times.” It is, indeed, a poetic masterpiece—one of the most original poems in the history of mankind—and it is also is one of the most dramatic illustrations in the Bible of the interrelationship of God, mankind, and Satan.

There is much argument as to what is the basic theme of Job. There are many opinions—the patience of a good man under testing, the suffering of the innocent, the tragedy of life in a fallen world, justification by faith, the incomprehensibility of God’s dealings with people, and even a parable of the suffering of Israel—all have been suggested.

One reason why it may be difficult to find a unifying theme is that it really happened! This is not someone’s opinion about spiritual matters but an event that is reported in detail and then set in a different literary style.

Bill Cotton has put together a fascinating study of the book of Job. To aid the reader he has added highlight boxes throughout the commentary that discuss basic problems and the flow of thought.

Psalms 1–89: The Lord Saves

  • Author: Eric Lane
  • Publisher: Christian Focus
  • Publication Date: 2006
  • Pages: 416

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

A Psalm is basically a poem set to music and sung. This sets the book of Psalms apart from other Scripture. You will find other Psalms and songs scattered throughout Scripture—some are also used for worship—but they tend to be part of a narrative. Because people think of the Psalms purely as a songbook, they have tended to overlook them as a place to look for teaching, and many have even considered them as a less important part of the Bible.

Yet, for many centuries the Psalms would have been the most familiar part of Scripture to people who had no access to books. They are not only an integral part of the shared experience of the church but they also communicate God’s guidance to this world, unfurl his character, and encourage his people.

The range of subjects covered is staggering! They extol God’s greatness and invite repentance, express commitment to his covenants and adherence to his law—and look forward to the coming Messianic kingdom. The style is predominantly praise but includes prayers, complaints, and even curses! Many were composed as liturgy, to be sung by God’s people together, others are private and personal—yet have still found a place as shared worship in the church.

All of which makes them fascinating! This volume covers the first three books of the Psalms (Psalms 1–89). The second volume on the book of Psalms, also included in this collection, covers books four and five (Psalms 90–150) and includes an appendix with a suggested chronological order.

Without a doubt this commentary will be of great practical help to all students of the psalms.

New Life

Eric Lane trained to be a minister in the Church of England where he remained for seven years. He was then called to be the minister of an independent evangelical church where he pastored for 30 further years. Now retired, Eric’s special interest is in the wisdom books of the Old Testament.

Psalms 90–150: The Lord Reigns

  • Author: Eric Lane
  • Publisher: Christian Focus
  • Publication Date: 2006
  • Pages: 320

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

In his previous volume—also included in this collection—Eric Lane teaches about the first three books of the Psalms (Psalms 1–89). In it he introduces us to the staggering range of subjects covered in the Psalms.

This volume continues his exposition with the last two books of the Psalms, which include the earliest Psalm (Psalm 90—attributed to Moses), and the “Psalms of Ascent” (Psalms 120–134). Each of these two books ends with their own doxology.

This collection of Psalms is ancient—at least as old as the second or third century BC This volume also contains an appendix, giving a suggested chronological order for the Psalms. All of which makes this a fascinating book to seek guidance from, with the experienced help of Eric Lane.

A commentator of yesteryear once said that he never wrote a commentary on a Bible book before he had read the book through at least 50 times. Eric Lane shows the same extensive direct contact with the text and this gives his work an attractive and stimulating freshness. His views on the chronological order of the psalms are somewhat controversial but will likewise stimulate the reader.

Geoffrey Grogan, former principal emeritus, Glasgow Bible College

Eric Lane trained to be a minister in the Church of England where he remained for seven years. He was then called to be the minister of an independent evangelical church where he pastored for 30 further years. Now retired, Eric’s special interest is in the wisdom books of the Old Testament.

Proverbs: Everyday Wisdom for Everyone

  • Author: Eric Lane
  • Publisher: Christian Focus
  • Publication Date: 2007
  • Pages: 432

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Whatever the question, the answer is in Proverbs!

No book of the Bible gives Christians more practical advice than Proverbs. It covers personal problems like sex, ambition, anxiety, fear, money; family matters such as marriage, parenting, discipline and education; social questions like neighborliness, friendship, disputes and litigation; and even politics, both from the ruler’s and citizen’s viewpoint!

The revolutionary method employed in this commentary combines two different approaches. Firstly, the verse-by-verse approach and secondly, the thematic style. Most modern commentaries on Proverbs don’t cover every verse, as this one does. Most other commentaries also don’t show the thematic nature of the book of Proverbs.

Eric Lane shows his long investigation into the text by giving a comprehensive thematic index of topics covered. This means that whilst every verse is covered, each chapter is arranged topically, making it more reader-friendly.

Eric Lane succeeds brilliantly in bringing us a study of Proverbs that can be used as a devotional aid or Bible study companion. He reveals Proverbs as something more than a disconnected collection of inspired sayings!

Here is a book which is orthodox, evangelical, and reformed. It is characterized throughout by a profound sense of seriousness—manifestly written from a depth of personal experience and written not simply to inform the mind but to transform life . . . useful material for discussion and for study groups as well as for personal thought and meditation . . . I warmly commend this book.

Evangelicals Now

Eric Lane trained to be a minister in the Church of England where he remained for seven years. He was then called to be the minister of an independent evangelical church where he pastored for 30 further years. Now retired, Eric’s special interest is in the wisdom books of the Old Testament.

Song of Songs

  • Author: Richard Brooks
  • Publisher: Christian Focus
  • Publication Date: 1999
  • Pages: 224

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

The Song of Songs is a love poem attributable to Solomon and the first of the Hebrew Megilloth. Originally these scrolls were read in connection with the different feasts and fasts of the Jews, in the case of the Song of Songs, it was read at Passover time.

This commentary takes a stance. It was at one time the consistent evangelical stance but that has changed with many in recent years, taking the Song of Songs to be a book dealing with marriage and sexuality. This opinion appears to be gaining less favor of late, so it is time for a modern commentary which takes this viewpoint into account, but which reestablishes the line that the Song of Songs is primarily an exposition of the spiritual relationship between Christ and the believer.

Although it was written before the time of the incarnation, it is Jesus himself who explains that the Old Testament Scriptures are “they which testify of me” (John 5:39). It is not denied that we can learn from the Song at a human level, since Paul set the relationship between husband and wife in the context of the relationship between Christ and the church. At the heart of the Song is a beautiful relationship for us to explore.

Richard Brooks is the pastor of York Evangelical Church in England.

Isaiah: A Covenant to be Kept for the Sake of the Church

  • Author: Allan Harman
  • Publisher: Christian Focus
  • Publication Date: 2005
  • Pages: 480

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Isaiah has been called the “fifth gospel.” Why? Because in it, God speaks through his prophet of his people’s departure from truth, the need for repentance, and the redemption provided by a coming Savior. Isaiah’s imagery is some of the most beautiful, and terrifying, in the Bible.

It was written in the eight century BC at a time of material prosperity. This wealth had brought increased literacy and so God’s people could be brought back by a book of 66 chapters to understand a world that had spiritual, as well as physical, dimensions.

This is a key Old Testament book, as well as charting a key change in the life of God’s people it provides some of the most important prophecies fulfilled only in the life of Jesus of Nazareth. Its lessons for the contemporary church are particularly apt.

Too often modern commentaries become a discussion between commentators rather than an exploration of what the text has to say to contemporary readers. Allan Harman’s methods follow those of Leon Morris and Allan McRae in that he devotes most of his energy to discovering what God is saying through his prophet, rather than what we are saying amongst ourselves.

Outstanding. What I mean by that is that he has been able to do the work of a first class exegete, yet make it understandable to a wide audience. As I train my theological students in the prophets of the Bible I will send them to this book immediately.

John D. Currid, Carl McMurray Professor of Old Testament, Reformed Theological Seminary

With Allan Harman’s Isaiah before me, I know what the saying means that ‘even a cat can look at the queen!’ His work has made me wish wholeheartedly that I could start all over again. The detailed interpretative work is superb, and Harman’s defense of the unity of Isaiah is robust (to say the least), and, in my view, unanswerable. I thrill to a commentator whose prime aim is to understand and explain the Hebrew text, not just to distill the opinions of others. Thank God for this book—and its author.

Alec Motyer, former principal, Trinity College, Bristol, England

Allan Harman has recently retired from the posts of principal and professor of Old Testament at the Presbyterian Theological College in Melbourne Australia. He has taught graduate courses at Ontario Theological Seminary, Toronto and Reformed Theological Seminary, Jackson.

Daniel: Tale of Two Cities

  • Author: Bob Fyall
  • Publisher: Christian Focus
  • Publication Date: 2006
  • Pages: 208

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Frenetic scholarly activity has raged over differing interpretations of the book of Daniel. Many liberal scholars claim that it is full of fanciful accounts, some that the prophecies were written after the events occurred. Bob Fyall deals with such questions in his introduction before he goes on to explain the text. He shows us why it was written and when it was written.

Daniel is an excellent example of Godly living, and there is a theme throughout the book of Daniel that God reigns sovereignly and that he will use those who know him to do his will in history.

The book of Daniel is also a book which contains prophecy and visions. Some of the prophecies are remarkably detailed and are fulfilled in history, while others concern the coming kingdom of the Messiah. Fyall provides guidelines for us to use in coming to a biblical understanding of God’s plan for the world.

In the face of many liberal and destructive attitudes towards this great Old Testament book, Fyall highlights the example of godly living which it brings to our attention, and shows that all of history is subject to the sovereign control of God.

Iain D. Campbell, The Monthly Record

Bob Fyall is senior tutor in ministry for the Cornhill Training Course (Scotland). Prior to that, he was the director of Rutherford House, Edinburgh. He is an experienced pastor, preacher, and Old Testament scholar, having formerly ministered in a parish church in Scotland. He also pastored a large student church in Durham, where he also taught Old Testament at Cranmer Hall, a training college for Anglican clergy. His passion is scholarship that genuinely feeds and equips the Bible teacher.

Hosea

  • Author: Michael Eaton
  • Publisher: Christian Focus
  • Publication Date: 2001
  • Pages: 208

The breakdown of family values is having a devastating effect on society. Older people are no longer respected by the young, lawlessness abounds, everyone does what they like with no thought for their neighbors, politicians, and the government is viewed as corrupt. The leaders of the church are out of touch, out of mind, and out to lunch.

This scenario is not taken from last week’s tabloid newspapers but from the troubled times of the prophet Hosea in the eighth century BC.

Hosea’s prophecy is a book of hope for us today as Michael Eaton shows that God can be trusted to win back the love of his people despite a less than promising outlook.

Viewed through the picture-window of his own disastrous marriage, Hosea shows that God’s constant love and perfect judgment, when put together, restores his relationship with his Church.

Michael Eaton holds degrees from the University of London, the University of Zambia, and the University of South Africa. In addition to this volume on Hosea, he published numerous books on the theology of Martyn Lloyd-Jones.

Amos: An Ordinary Man with an Extraordinary Message

  • Author: T. J. Betts
  • Publisher: Christian Focus
  • Publication Date: 2011
  • Pages: 206

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Amos had no claim to fame. He was not even a son of a prophet. Neither had he had any formal training to be a prophet. Yet God called him out from a career of being a herdsman. He was sent out from the south to bring the Lord’s message to Samaria in the Northern Kingdom. Amos was called to speak at the time of national disunity, military superiority, economic prosperity, and religious activity. Amos brings home the idea of a famine. However it is not food the people lack like we might expect, but there is a famine of the Word of God. Through this study you will be reminded of the importance of the Word of God in your lives.

Books on the Old Testament tend to be either technical and tedious or superficial and moralistic. Once in a while we discover one that breaks the mold. T. J. Betts has done it! He tells us not only what Amos means but also why it matters. He proves again that the expositor’s task is not to make the Bible relevant, but to simply show how relevant it is!

Alistair Begg, senior pastor, Parkside Church, Chagrin Falls, OH

What a wonderful gift to the pastor who wants to allow the text of Scripture to drive his sermon. T. J. Betts’ commentary will be ready at hand when I prepare to teach from the prophet Amos. It is a treasure trove for the serious expositor.

—Daniel L. Atkin, president, Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary

T. J. Betts comes to the text of Amos with a scholarly mind and a pastoral heart. His judgments about the text are carefully considered and sound, and his prose is warm and direct. Pastors who have found the task of preaching from the prophets daunting will discover in this volume helpful material for historical background, theological interpretation, and homiletical application.

Duane Garrett, John R. Sampey Professor of Old Testament Interpretation, Southern Baptist Theological Seminary

I have known T. J. Betts for a number of years. He was raised in a pastor’s home, and he is a pastor/scholar who writes for the local church. Using personal illustrations and practical applications in this commentary, he shows how the writings of an eighth-century BC prophet still speak to the twenty-first century church.

—Chuck Lawless, vice-president for Global Theological Advance, International Mission Board, Southern Baptist Convention

T. J. Betts serves as associate professor of Old Testament interpretation at The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, Louisville, Kentucky.

Jonah, Micah, Nahum, Habakkuk, and Zephaniah: God’s Just Demands

  • Author: John L MacKay
  • Publisher: Christian Focus
  • Publication Date: 2008
  • Pages: 420

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

These prophets were writing during the seventh and eighth century BC. The major prophetic themes of the destruction of Israel’s enemies, the judgment of God upon Israel when she turns from him, and the peace that would result from living in harmony with God, are all here. There are also Messianic and future prophetic themes, such as the eternal reign of a king from the line of David (Micah) and the destruction of Jerusalem (Zephaniah). This fascinating period of Bible history is full of drama, wisdom and insight.

John L. Mackay is internationally known as an Old Testament scholar and is also in demand for church retreats where his skill in the practical exposition and application of doctrine are well respected.

Haggai, Zechariah, and Malachi: God’s Restored People

  • Author: John L MacKay
  • Publisher: Christian Focus
  • Publication Date: 2003
  • Pages: 368

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

The ministry of Haggai, Zechariah, and Malachi is a record of how God deals with people he has restored as they try to translate their basic loyalty to him into practical action. Restoring their temple and the physical trappings of their ravaged kingdom was not an end in itself. God was, and is, primarily interested in obedient minds and wills in people who have a heart for God.

The term ‘minor prophets’ may suggest they are unimportant, which is anything but true. This exposition is really first-class. John Mackay focuses on the text’s meaning and the books’ New Testament fulfillment in Christ. While his Old Testament scholarship is very evident, he avoids technical language. Many of the study questions provide valuable projects for the reader.

Geoffrey Grogan, former principal emeritus, Glasgow Bible College

Professor Mackay has done it again! This is an excellent piece of work on three ‘minor’ prophets that are not well known in the church today. Mackay’s commentary is a must read for pastors and serious Bible students who want to become familiar with what these three prophets have to say to the church today . . . this is a fine work.

John Currid, Reformed Theological Seminary, Jackson, MS

John L. Mackay is internationally known as an Old Testament scholar and is also in demand for church retreats where his skill in the practical exposition and application of doctrine are well respected.

Matthew: Can Anything Good Come Out of Nazareth?

  • Author: Charles Price
  • Publisher: Christian Focus
  • Publication Date: 2005
  • Pages: 304

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Matthew’s Gospel was written to show that Jesus is the Messiah foretold in the Old Testament. It is carefully arranged by subject matter as a clear explanation to the Jewish people, and to the world, of who Jesus is. Here you will meet Jesus the great teacher, the storyteller, the prophet, the atoning sacrifice and much, much more.

Charles Price’s commentary on Matthew puts the Gospel into context and helps us to see Jesus through the eyes and ears of Matthew.

Charles Price has set a standard that challenges us. There is something that happens in biblical proclamation: a moment in which the Spirit of God invades our minds and wills. Few do it as well as Charles.

Brian C. Stiller, president, Tyndale University College and Seminary

Charles Price has been the senior pastor of The Peoples Church, Toronto since September 2001. For 25 years prior to this he was on the staff of the Capernwray Missionary Fellowship of Torchbearers in England, latterly as principal of Capernwray Bible School. During that period he was also involved in an extensive conference and evangelistic ministry in many parts of the world, including Western and Eastern Europe, Africa, India, the Far East, the Middle East, the Caribbean, Australia, New Zealand, Canada, and the United States.

Mark: Good News from Jerusalem

  • Author: Geoffrey Grogan
  • Publisher: Christian Focus
  • Publication Date: 2003
  • Pages: 304

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Mark’s Gospel is a book for today’s people in today’s world. It is vivid, appealing powerfully to the eye of the imagination.

This is an age of new interest in the supernatural, with so many possibilities of deception. Here is Jesus, the true God and perfect man, working the supernatural works of God. Today harrowing pictures of suffering bombards us all and we ask ‘Why?’ Here is God’s great suffering servant, showing us that God cares. Most of all, today’s people are fascinated by Jesus himself. Who was this man? Indeed, if, as Mark believed, he really did rise from the dead, we should re-phrase the question: Who is this man? Who did he claim to be? All this and much more, Mark’s dynamic book brings to us.

. . . Written in simple, non-technical language for ordinary church members . . . the reader will be amply rewarded by the author’s explanation of the text and its application to modern life.

Michael Bentley, Evangelical Times

Geoffrey W. Grogan was principal emeritus of Glasgow Bible College before it became International Christian College, Glasgow. His theological studies were undertaken there and at the London Bible College. He served the College as a full-time lecturer for 14 years before going south in 1965 to teach at LBC. In 1969 he returned to Glasgow as principal. He has served on four missionary councils, on the Strathclyde Education Committee and the Management Committee for the Cambridge University Diploma in Religious Studies. He has written books on the trinity, the person of Christ, Paul, the Psalms, and commentaries on Isaiah, Mark, and 2 Corinthians. He is now retired and has been a part-time pastor in a Baptist Church.

Acts: Witnesses to Him

  • Author: Bruce Milne
  • Publisher: Christian Focus
  • Publication Date: 2009
  • Pages: 544

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6

Acts is an exciting story of church growth despite inner problems and outward conflict. The book of Acts describes the spread of the gospel throughout the known world of the first century and the establishment of Christian churches in many different places. As the gospel entered new places, its preachers often faced opposition from followers of other religions, and sometimes this opposition extended to include political persecution. Nevertheless, within a generation, the gospel had spread from Jerusalem to Rome and beyond. While Luke, the writer of Acts was an historian, Acts is not merely historical, but also provides principles and lessons for contemporary churches to imitate as they continue to spread the apostolic gospel today.

Bruce Milne is a well-respected pastor and theologian who pastored of First Baptist Church, Vancouver, Canada, for 18 years until he retired in 2001.

Romans: Revelation of God’s Righteousness

  • Author: Paul Barnett
  • Publisher: Christian Focus
  • Publication Date: 2007
  • Pages: 384

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Dale Leschert has written, “Paul’s epistle to the Romans may possibly be the most influential letter ever written. Apart from its immediate impact upon the first century, it has indirectly altered the direction of the church and secular history through its instrumentality in the conversion of several of Christianity’s most outstanding leaders.” Augustine, Luther and Wesley are among those who relate their trust in Christ to this book.

Romans is all about the revelation of God’s righteousness in freely offering salvation to all people through faith. Written about AD 56 or 57 in Corinth while Paul was on his way to Jerusalem, Romans historically fits into the book of Acts near the end of Paul’s third missionary journey.

Paul Barnett’s commentary on Romans . . . is a good readable, theological exposition which will be very helpful in sermon preparation. He also has a brief summary of the ‘New Perspective on Paul’ which is helpful.

Ray Van Neste, Preaching.com Bible Survey Review

Distinguished New Testament historian and pastor, bishop Paul Barnett, has given us a clearly written commentary on Romans which, while critically conversant with the present debate over the new perspective, is clear and accessible to preachers and Bible teachers. The deft hand of a scholar preacher is everywhere evident in the neat organization, precision, lucid explanative and warmth of this most helpful work.

R. Kent Hughes, retired senior pastor, College Church, Wheaton, IL

The commentary is easy to read, interacts in a popular but sound way with wider scholarship on Romans, and contains helpful pastoral applications throughout.

Reformed Theological Review

Paul Barnett is retired bishop of North Sydney, visiting fellow in history at Macquarie University, senior fellow in the ancient history documentary research centre, Macquarie University, teaching fellow at Regent College, Vancouver and faculty member Moore Theological College Sydney. He was also head of Robert Menzies College, Macquarie University.

1 Corinthians: Holiness and Hope of a Rescued People

  • Author: Paul Barnett
  • Publisher: Christian Focus
  • Publication Date: 2004
  • Pages: 320

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

First Corinthians is Paul’s masterly pastoral letter to a church, which he founded five years earlier, but which in the meantime has lost its way. In Ephesus, Paul was visited by various groups from Corinth bringing disturbing reports of recent developments, but also a list of questions. A little sleuthing helps us recover an idea of the problems in Corinth as well as the questions to which they wanted answers. A less imaginative person may have simply addressed the problems and replied to the questions, but not Paul. Paul discerned in the problems and the questions five underlying issues:

  • True wisdom
  • Sexual holiness
  • Temple attendance
  • Behavior at church meetings
  • Resurrection hope

This letter is both timely and timeless. It was, doubtless, piercingly relevant for the Corinthians as they sat transfixed listening as it was read to them. But the letter continues to challenge readers today as they apply its principles to life in an increasingly unstable and hostile world—as Corinth was.

A scholar’s eye for background detail, a preacher’s careful attention to meaning, a pastor’s application to the challenges of our contemporary context. All three combine in this clear-minded and warm-hearted exposition of First Corinthians, to make Paul’s great letter come alive with sparkling insights and pressing relevance.

David Jackman, former president, The Proclamation Trust

Paul Barnett is retired bishop of North Sydney, visiting fellow in history at Macquarie University, senior fellow in the ancient history documentary research centre, Macquarie University, teaching fellow at Regent College, Vancouver and faculty member Moore Theological College Sydney. He was also head of Robert Menzies College, Macquarie University.

2 Corinthians: The Glories and Responsibilities of Christian Service

  • Author: Geoffrey Grogan
  • Publisher: Christian Focus
  • Publication Date: 2007
  • Pages: 336

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The second letter to the Corinthians is Paul’s personal appeal to the church he founded in Corinth, a church influenced against Paul by false prophets. In describing the type of church leader that is pleasing to God, Paul reveals more about himself than in any other of his writings. It is as if we can see into his soul as he lovingly points out the faulty attitudes of the church at Corinth.

In addition to guidance on leadership and on other subjects, he also wrote about Christian giving. Paul was eager for the church to participate in the relief fund he was putting together for poor believers in Jerusalem. His rulings on these matters need to be applied to today’s church.

[This commentary] provides food for thought and action.

—Olie Bullock, Note Bene

Geoffrey W. Grogan was principal emeritus of Glasgow Bible College before it became International Christian College, Glasgow. His theological studies were undertaken there and at the London Bible College. He served the College as a full-time lecturer for 14 years before going south in 1965 to teach at LBC. In 1969 he returned to Glasgow as principal. He has served on four missionary councils, on the Strathclyde Education Committee and the Management Committee for the Cambridge University Diploma in Religious Studies. He has written books on the trinity, the person of Christ, Paul, the Psalms, and commentaries on Isaiah, Mark, and 2 Corinthians. He is now retired and has been a part-time pastor in a Baptist Church.

Galatians: God’s Proclamation of Liberty

  • Author: Joseph A. Pipa Jr.
  • Publisher: Christian Focus
  • Publication Date: 2011
  • Pages: 272

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The glorious doctrine of justification by faith far exceeds even the great charters of freedom and liberty which we have seen throughout history. This doctrine is expounded by the apostle Paul in Galatians, and in it we see the key themes of his theology expounded. Joseph Pipa, an able biblical expositor committed to the inerrancy of Scripture, brings us this important letter with practical lessons for the church.

Here is a clear, succinct, and powerful exposition of a key Pauline letter. Pipa writes pastorally, an apt reflection of Paul’s own desire to inform and edify. He writes learnedly, aware of challenges to Paul’s gospel from Federal Vision and New Perspective quarters.

Robert W. Yarbrough, professor of New Testament, Covenant Theological Seminary

Martin Luther once called the Epistle to the Galatians ‘my Katie von Bora’—this letter was as dear to the reformer as his own wife. In Galatians, Joseph Pipa has given the church a clear, stirring, and accessible exposition of this beloved letter.

—Guy Waters, associate professor of New Testament, Reformed Theological Seminary

Joseph A. Pipa Jr. has been both a church pastor and theological professor. He is president and professor of historical and systematic theology at Greenville Presbyterian Theological Seminary in South Carolina and exercises a worldwide expositional ministry.

Ephesians: Encouragement and Joy in Christ

  • Author: Paul Gardner
  • Publisher: Christian Focus
  • Publication Date: 2007
  • Pages: 192

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Ephesians is a letter to a church very much like yours. Paul is obviously commended that this young church gets its foundations right. It is intriguing that later, when writing to Timothy, he says that there are some in the church promoting “false doctrines.” The leadership was in revolt! Yet in the revelation given to John, Jesus commends the Ephesian church that they have thrown out the false teachers and are a congregation who has staying power despite their setbacks. The church of Ephesus had been through the mill but back out the other side! What was their secret? You will find out as you explore this letter to the church, ably expounded by Paul Gardner.

. . . handles the text soundly and carefully and also provides applications at the end of most sections.

Steve Wilmshurst, Evangelical Now

Paul Gardner was previously a lecturer in New Testament at Oak Hill Theological College in London and rural dean in the church of England. After serving as archdeacon of Exeter for three years, in 2005 Gardner moved to Atlanta, Georgia and currently serves as the senior minister at Christ Church Presbyterian, Atlanta.

Philippians

  • Author: Hywel R. Jones
  • Publisher: Christian Focus
  • Publication Date: 1993
  • Pages: 160

The church at Philippi evidently had a lot going for it. Paul was full of joy because of what was happening there; they were energetic in evangelism and demonstrated the power of the gospel through their lives. However, like all churches and indeed all Christians, it was not perfect—needing among other things to be challenged, warned, and prayed for. For Christians today, there is a lot to be learned from the people in Philippi, particularly with regard to the enjoyment they had in living and proclaiming their faith. The challenges set them by Paul and the encouragement he gave them are both areas where Christians today can and should learn from.

Hywel R. Jones (PhD, Greenwich University School of Theology) is professor of practical theology at Westminster Seminary, California. Prior to that he was editorial director of the Banner of Truth Trust and principal of London Theological Seminary from 1985–1996. He was a pastor at Grove Chapel, London, and Borras Park in Wrexham.

Colossians and Philemon: So Walk in Him

  • Author: John Woodhouse
  • Publisher: Christian Focus
  • Publication Date: 2011
  • Pages: 320

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Come and hear a wonderful story of evangelism, church planting, and Christian growth. Colossians was a letter which would have first been read by Tychicus in Philemon’s house in Colossae. The people who were to read that letter had been converted as a result of Paul’s teaching in Ephesus (Acts 19). As they read they were are about to better understand better the reality of life in Christ, and reading it years later we can understand better too.

You will see the power of fellowship at work as a formerly useless slave and his master are brought together to work together as brothers in the Lord.

Honest readers will be challenged by the gospel of God’s gracious saving plan for the world, the place of the Lord Jesus within it, and how those who have been united with Christ are to live. May the God who is the author of these two powerful letters use John’s rich exposition to challenge and encourage us in the twenty-first century.

Peter O’Brien, emeritus faculty member, Moore Theological College

This commentary by John Woodhouse is a rich source of biblical insight on the texts of Colossians and Philemon. This volume is a great resource for the pastor as he prepares to feed his flock, but it is equally helpful for students of the Bible who desire to understand better these magnificent letters. Maybe even more importantly, the text reflects the author’s own love for the Savior. I can gladly commend it.

—Bill Cook, professor of New Testament interpretation, The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary

John Woodhouse is the principal of Moore College, Australia, and lectures there in doctrine and Old Testament. As well as writing a commentary on 1 Samuel, he has written various articles based on the New and Old Testament.

1 & 2 Thessalonians: Triumphs and Trials of a Consecrated Church

  • Author: Richard Mayhue
  • Series: Focus on the Bible Commentaries
  • Publisher: Christian Focus
  • Publication Date: 2005
  • Pages: 224

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

The Thessalonian epistles give us relevant glimpses of the church’s earliest times. When looking at the early church many contemporary questions arise such as:

  • What is true gospel?
  • How do you plant a church?

These are questions that exercise our modern church just as much as the historic Thessalonian one.

Paul’s first letter was written to encourage and reassure the Christians in Thessolonica. He gives thanks for their faith and love, he reminds them of his example on godly living, and he answers questions about the return of Christ. In his second letter we find Paul still dealing with confusion over the return of Christ, especially with those who believed the Lord’s coming had already arrived. He also shows that evil and wickedness will reach a crescendo under the leadership of a mysterious figure called “the wicked one.” He tells them to remain steady in all that they have learned.

Richard Mayhue’s skill in interpreting the text accurately but with humor and modern parallels comes through in this fascinating commentary. These timeless letters provide up-to-date answers from a consecrated church, shepherded by godly men devoted to God and to his word.

[This commentary] is loaded with Scripture cross-references. The addition of 33 ‘overviews’ represents a wonderful listing of pertinent key biblical subjects and their references, along with succinct comments.

—Joan Osborne

Richard Mayhue joined the faculty of The Master’s Seminary, Sun Valley, California in 1989 and was appointed dean of the Seminary in 1990. In 2000 he also assumed the role of senior vice-president and provost of The Master’s College. He has an international speaking and teaching ministry and has authored many books.

1 & 2 Timothy, Titus

  • Author: Douglas Milne
  • Publisher: Christian Focus
  • Publication Date: 2001
  • Pages: 240

Paul’s letters to Timothy and Titus, commonly called the Pastoral Epistles, are Paul’s last letters before his martyrdom. Although written in the first century, they are very relevant for church life today. Contemporary issues such as the inspiration and authority of scripture, the characteristics of church leaders, the role of women, and the nature of holiness were high on Paul’s priority list to be passed on to his “sons in the faith,”: Timothy and Titus.

This is a valuable resource that will promote better understanding of these much neglected epistles and their message.

Anthony E. Bird, Reformed Theological Review

Undoubtedly the author’s wide experience of different cultures (in Scotland, America, South Africa, and Australia) have helped him to face up to and deal with questions which are being raised by newly-converted people today.

Michael Bentley, Evangelical Times

Douglas J. W. Milne was born in Dundee, Scotland. After completing arts and divinity degrees at Aberdeen University he did post-graduate work in America and later in South Africa. He teaches New Testament in the Presbyterian Theological College, Melbourne where he also lectures in theology, ethics and philosophy. He also pastors an inner-city congregation in Melbourne.

Hebrews

  • Author: Walter Riggans
  • Publisher: Christian Focus
  • Publication Date: 1998
  • Pages: 192

Hebrews was written to challenge and encourage professing Jewish believers who were considering abandoning the Christian faith and returning to the Jewish religion. Throughout his work, the unknown author shows how Christ is superior to all that the Old Testament offered, including the prophets, high priest, Levitical sacrificial system and old covenant. In Christ, all believers have Jesus to be the ultimate prophet, priest, and king, who gives to them all the blessing of the new covenant. At the same time as showing that Christ is superior to the Old Testament system, the author also shows that, in fact, the prophets and other men of faith in the Old Testament are actually united to Christians and not to followers of the Jewish faith.

Walter Riggans served as minister and as warden of the hospice at the Church of Scotland in Tiberias.

James

  • Author: Derek Prime
  • Publisher: Christian Focus
  • Publication Date: 1995
  • Pages: 175

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

It’s one thing to talk the talk. It’s another to walk the walk. The book of James clearly addresses what the Christian walk entails and challenges believers to apply the principles taught by Christ to their lives. It’s not an easy walk, but it’s highly rewarding.

Derek Prime has served churches in the UK for 30 years (first at Lansdowne Evangelical Free Church, West Norwood, in London, and then at Charlotte Chapel in Edinburgh) and since 1987 he has devoted his time to itinerant ministry and writing.

James: Wisdom for the Community

  • Author: B. Dale Ellenburg and Christopher W. Morgan
  • Publisher: Christian Focus
  • Publication Date: 2008
  • Pages: 272

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

The epistle of James is one of the most controversial included in the canon of the New Testament. Why the controversy? James (almost certainly Jesus’ brother) sets out in his letter to deal with the problem of a church that does church—yet really does nothing! James is forthright in spelling out some home truths to his readers.

. . . this is a solid and useful commentary written by two pastor-scholars to help the church be the church as God intended.

Robert A. Peterson, professor of systematic theology, Covenant Theological Seminary

Dr. Dale Ellenburg and Dr. Chris Morgan are a lot like James. They are wonderful theologians and serve as pastors. They do not merely study in a cloistered setting, but also are involved in the lives of church members and the people in the communities where they serve. Both are godly men, excellent scholars . . . live what they believe. That’s what James is calling all of us to do. You will learn that as you study the book of James, verse by verse, in this wonderful commentary written by my dear friends.

Steve Gaines, pastor, Bellevue Baptist Church, Memphis, TN

B. Dale Ellenburg was associate pastor at Kirby Woods Baptist Church and vice-president of academics at Mid-America Baptist Seminary and is now pastor of Dotson Memorial Baptist Church in Maryville, Tennessee.

Christopher W. Morgan is professor of theology at California Baptist University and senior pastor of First Baptist Church of Barstow, California.

1 Peter

  • Author: Derek Cleave
  • Publisher: Christian Focus
  • Publication Date: 1999
  • Pages: 176

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1 Peter was written by the Apostle Peter to encourage believers for whom the storm clouds of persecution were gathering, just because they were Christians. To encourage them he first reminds them that suffering is temporary, and that faithful living in times of suffering will produce eternal benefits. He develops this theme to show that such a lifestyle, lived out in difficult and dangerous circumstances, is an effective witness to unbelievers, and will result in church growth—the very opposite effect intended by those who persecuted them.

1 Peter, written by the apostle Peter to encourage believers during times of suffering and persecution, is systematically discussed in such a way as to meet the need for serious engagement with the text and issues. It contains modern quotations and illustrations which bring the teaching to life, and combines substance with simplicity. A very helpful tool for personal Bible study.

CLC Book Reviews

. . . Totally relevant to the many questions which our society wrestles with.

Bill Cotton, author, Job: Will You Torment a Windblown Leaf

. . . An indispensable research source for pastors, teachers, and bible students.

Richard Mayhue, professor of theology and pastoral ministries, The Master’s Seminary

. . . Ambitious, competent, and well-presented . . .

Derek Prime, former president, Fellowship of Independent Evangelical Churches

Derek Cleave works for God’s Word for Today’s World, an international organization dedicated to preaching the gospel and teaching the church.

2 Peter & Jude

  • Author: Paul Gardner
  • Publisher: Christian Focus
  • Publication Date: 1999
  • Pages: 240

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

2 Peter was widely circulated throughout the early church to warn people to watch out for the false teachers that were appearing in the church, who were leading the church to immorality and the loss of its witness. Peter was very concerned that those who say that Christ will not return should not make the church feel that Christ has abandoned them. Jude’s theme is similar and also points the church towards the evidence of believers who heard Jesus issuing the call “to fight on for the faith which once and for all God has given to his people.”

. . . Not only does he begin the exposition of each book by giving an excellent outline, but he also ends each section with tremendously apt and relevant application, under the heading ‘Special Lessons for Today.’ Altogether, this is warmly recommended for individuals or groups.

—Norris Wilson, Evangelical Times

. . . All that one could hope for—accessible, clear, exegetically reliable and devotionally warm-hearted. The book is a gem—buy it and read it.

—Wallace Benn, bishop of Lewes

Paul Gardner was previously a lecturer in New Testament at Oak Hill Theological College in London and a rural dean in the Church of England. After serving as archdeacon of Exeter for three years, in 2005 Gardner moved to Atlanta in the United States and now serves as the senior minister at Christ Church Presbyterian, Atlanta.

1, 2, & 3 John

  • Author: Michael Eaton
  • Publisher: Christian Focus
  • Publication Date: 2001
  • Pages: 240

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Michael Eaton believes that John’s epistles were written to counteract false teachers who were influencing Christians in the church. An exposition of these epistles could not be timelier, as often people who come to Christ today have little or no church background—they can be easily influenced by false teaching.

John showed in his letters that the most secure way to avoid being deceived was the importance of having a present experience of knowing the Father and the Son. Michael Eaton brings out this balanced approach to help give us healthy and fruitful church members.

Michael Eaton holds degrees from the University of London, the University of Zambia, and the University of South Africa. In addition to his volume on Hosea, he published numerous books on the theology of Martyn Lloyd-Jones.

Revelation: The Compassion and Protection of Christ

  • Author: Paul Gardner
  • Publisher: Christian Focus
  • Publication Date: 2008
  • Pages: 320

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

It is ironic that a book called Revelation remains probably the most obscure of all the books of the Bible. Many Christians have never ventured further than the first three chapters and others have studied its intricacies and the split churches that resulted wished that they hadn’t! For those who already love the book of Revelation this commentary will take you a little deeper and stimulate thinking about how the teaching should be applied to the modern church.

Paul Gardner has given us an in-depth, but clear, approach . . . His insights into the meaning of this book will touch every dimension of the Christian life.

Richard L. Pratt, Reformed Theological Seminary, Orlando

Paul Gardner was previously a lecturer in New Testament at Oak Hill Theological College in London and a rural dean in the Church of England. After serving as archdeacon of Exeter for three years, in 2005 Gardner moved to Atlanta in the United States and now serves as the senior minister at Christ Church Presbyterian, Atlanta.

Product Details

  • Title: Focus on the Bible Commentaries
  • Series: Focus on the Bible Commentaries
  • Publisher: Christian Focus
  • Volumes: 41
  • Pages: 11,826