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Concordia Commentary (23 vols.)
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Overview

These volumes in the Concordia Commentary Series give a theological exposition of the sacred Scripture. These commentaries enable pastors and teachers of the Word to proclaim the Gospel with greater insight, clarity, and faithfulness to the divine intent of the biblical text. This 23 volume collection from Concordia interprets Scripture as a cohesive whole centered in the person and work of Jesus Christ. Every passage bears witness to the good news that God has reconciled the world to himself through our Lord’s life, death, and resurrection.

The authors are sensitive to Scripture’s rich treasury of language, imagery, and themes, including such dialectics as Law and Gospel, sin and grace, death and new life, and folly and wisdom. They pay careful attention to the original Hebrew and Greek and shed further light on the text from archaeology, history, and extra-biblical literature. Finally, they apply Scripture’s message to the ongoing life of the church in terms of ministry, worship, proclamation of the Word, baptism, the Lord’s Supper, and confession of the faith in the joyful anticipation of the life of the world to come.

The Logos Bible Software editions of these volumes from the Concordia Commentary Series are designed to encourage and stimulate your study and understanding of the canonical books of the Old and New Testaments. Scripture passages link directly to your English translations and original-language texts, and important theological concepts link to dictionaries, encyclopedias, and a wealth of other resources in your digital library. In addition, you can perform powerful searches by topic and find what other authors, scholars, and theologians have to say about Christ throughout all of the collection.

Key Features

  • Treats all the elements of traditional exegesis
  • Compares the original context and the contemporary context
  • Engages contemporary life and culture
  • Analyzes Scripture’s language, imagery, and themes
  • Pays special attention to the original Hebrew and Greek

Individual Titles

Leviticus

  • Author: John W. Kleinig
  • Publisher: Concordia
  • Publication Date: 2001
  • Pages: 610

This commentary explores how each chapter of Leviticus finds its fulfillment in Jesus Christ—his earthly life, atoning death, resurrection, and ongoing ministry in the heavenly sanctuary on behalf of his people on earth. Using the methods of ritual analysis, it examines the agents, enactment, and theological purpose of each of the instructions given in the divine speeches in Leviticus.

The commentary on each pericope closes with a section on that specific text’s “Fulfillment in Christ.” A hymn quotation sums up the theology of that pericope as it applies to the Christian faith and worship life of the church.

John W. Kleinig is emeritus professor of exegetical theology, Australian Lutheran College, Adelaide, Australia. He studied at Adelaide University (BA with Honors), Luther Seminary (MDiv), and the University of Cambridge, England (MPhil and PhD).

Joshua

  • Author: Adolph L. Harstad
  • Publisher: Concordia
  • Publication Date: 2001
  • Pages: 944

Joshua narrates Israel’s conquest and inheritance of the Promised Land in fulfillment of God’s gracious plan. Joshua prefigures Christ as he faithfully leads God’s people, like the church militant, through battle into triumph.

This commentary explores the history, culture, archaeology, and theology of the book to deepen faith in the victorious Savior of all peoples. It focuses on the faithfulness of God and how he kept his covenant promises, which are fulfilled in Christ. Throughout the commentary, the author’s intimate knowledge of the Holy Land and his experience as a missionary and pastor bring the biblical text to life.

Adolph L. Harstad is professor of Old Testament at Bethany Lutheran Theological Seminary in Mankato, Minnesota.

Ruth

  • Author: John R. Wilch
  • Publisher: Concordia
  • Publication Date: 2006
  • Pages: 464

The Book of Ruth tells the story of a destitute foreigner who came to believe in Israel’s God and was welcomed into God’s people. By grace she was privileged to become an ancestor of Jesus Christ, the Savior of all people.

The commentary focuses on the themes of God’s covenant; his loyalty, reflected in the lives of his faithful people; the theology of missions and evangelism; Boaz as a redeemer, prefiguring Jesus Christ; and the promise of eternal life. The commentary’s Christocentric hermeneutic elucidates the rich Gospel message of Ruth and its relevance for the church today. The author’s international perspective and decades of service as a pastor and professor have given him unique insights into the message of this neglected book.

John R. Wilch is professor emeritus of exegetical theology at Concordia Lutheran Theological Seminary in St. Catharines, Ontario, Canada.

Ezrah and Nehemiah

  • Author: Andrew E. Steinmann
  • Publisher: Concordia
  • Publication Date: 2010
  • Pages: 736

God raised up extraordinary individuals of faith to rebuild the Jerusalem temple and prepare for the Messiah’s coming. Ezra and Nehemiah offer hope and comfort by showing us what God accomplishes through his people’s faithful labors—and, more importantly, through Jesus Christ, who fully accomplished our salvation through his perfect life, atoning death, and glorious resurrection. God continues to show his gracious mercy in Christ to his people despite their faults and failures, their self-centeredness, and their fickle love for righteousness. These themes give the books of Ezra and Nehemiah their power as part of God’s sacred Scriptures.

Andrew E. Steinmann is the university marshall and a professor of theology and Hebrew at Concordia University in River Forest, Illinois. He received his BS from the University of Cincinnati, his MDiv from Concordia Theological Seminary, and his PhD in Near Eastern studies from the University of Michigan.

Proverbs

  • Author: Andrew E. Steinmann
  • Publisher: Concordia
  • Publication Date: 2009
  • Pages: 719

This commentary expounds Proverbs as an Old Testament wisdom book that reveals Jesus Christ, who is the agent of creation and the wisdom of God incarnate. Proverbs inculcates God’s wisdom through didactic sayings that teach prudence and discretion for the life of faith, which is contrasted to the ways of the world. This commentary explains both the larger features of the book and the individual proverbs that comprise this treasury of divine wisdom.

Andrew E. Steinmann is the university marshall and a professor of theology and Hebrew at Concordia University in River Forest, Illinois. He received his BS from the University of Cincinnati, his MDiv from Concordia Theological Seminary, and his PhD in Near Eastern studies from the University of Michigan.

Ecclesiastes

  • Author: James Bollhagen
  • Publisher: Concordia
  • Publication Date: 2011
  • Pages: 504

The key to understanding this difficult book is God’s wisdom in Jesus Christ. Solomon realistically appraises many human endeavors and finds them to be futile. The things of this world are temporary, and life is fleeting. Yet the Gospel endows our lives with eternal significance. Divine wisdom instills fear and faith in God. This knowledge enables us to serve meaningfully in our vocations and pass through the coming eschatological judgment into eternal life.

This commentary is perfect for the pastor seeking to study, preach, and teach Ecclesiastes. It provides insightful wisdom and mature theological reflection on this enigmatic book of Holy Scripture. Dr. Bollhagen draws on his lifetime of faithful service as a seminary professor and parish pastor as he writes with practical wisdom for daily living.

James G. Bollhagen was a professor of exegetical theology at Concordia Theological Seminary in Fort Wayne, Indiana. He currently serves as pastor of Grace Lutheran Church in St. Cloud, Florida. He received his MDiv, STM, and PhD from Concordia Seminary in St. Louis.

Song of Songs

  • Author: Christopher Mitchell
  • Publisher: Concordia
  • Publication Date: 2003
  • Pages: 1344

This commentary interprets the Song with reference to the holy estate of human marriage and the great mystery of Christ’s union with his betrothed bride, the church. Solomon’s most beautiful poem contains a profound message of divine love, eschatological yearning, consummation, and eternal delights, with rich applications for the life of the church and all Christians. A major portion of this commentary is devoted to hermeneutics and the development of a method of Old Testament interpretation that is Christological, ecclesiological, sacramental, and eschatological. This work also incorporates insights from early church fathers and the few Orthodox Lutheran theologians from previous centuries who have expounded the Song so as to proclaim the Gospel of Jesus Christ.

Christopher Mitchell serves at Concordia Publishing House in St. Louis, Missouri, as editor of the Concordia Commentary series. He studied at the University of Wisconsin–Madison (BS, MA, PhD in Hebrew and Semitic studies) and Concordia Seminary in St. Louis, Missouri (MDiv).

Isaiah 40–55

  • Author: R. Reed Lessing
  • Publisher: Concordia
  • Publication Date: 2011
  • Pages: 792

“Isaiah 40–55 contains some of the best-known, most-cherished, and theologically significant texts in the Bible . . . Isaiah 40–55 provides us with the vocabulary and conceptual framework to understand the nature and purpose of the Father’s mission in and through his Son, Jesus, with the Spirit” (from the introduction).

Dr. Lessing’s scholarly expertise and decades of service as a seminary professor and pastor are evident as he meticulously expounds the text, historical setting, theology, Christology, and pastoral applications of “the fifth Gospel.” He explains why the prophet’s saving message, soaring language, and unforgettable imagery are so tightly woven into the fabric of Christian hymnody, liturgy, and prayer. Pericopes from chapters 40–55, which include the Suffering Servant Songs, permeate the lectionary throughout the church year.

R. Reed Lessing was ordained into the Office of the Holy Ministry on June 29, 1986 at Christ the Servant Lutheran Church in West Monroe, Los Angeles. Reed served as the church’s pastor until March of 1990. From March, 1990 to August, 1999 he was the pastor of Trinity Lutheran Church in Broken Arrow, Oklahoma. In September of 1999 he was installed as assistant professor of exegetical theology at Concordia Seminary. In May of 2005 he was advanced to the rank of associate professor. In August of 2007 he became the director of the seminary’s Graduate School.

Ezekiel 1–20

  • Author: Horace D. Hummel
  • Publisher: Concordia
  • Publication Date: 2005
  • Pages: 752

Ezekiel contains some of Scripture’s most mysterious visions and oracles. The Lord gave this priestly prophet a powerful message of Law and Gospel. The searing indictment of God’s unfaithful people for their idolatry warns of impending judgment. Ezekiel sees a vision of God’s glory, which departs from the temple in preparation for its destruction. Yet God also promises to be a sanctuary for his repentant people during their exile, and to restore them, together with Gentiles who will be brought to saving faith. This book explains the first 20 chapters in light of its fulfillment in Christ for the benefit of the church.

Horace D. Hummel is professor emeritus at Concordia Seminary in St. Louis, Missouri, where he has taught exegetical theology for over 20 years. He has authored The Word Becoming Flesh, an isagogical and theological introduction to the Old Testament, as well as many articles and book reviews.

Ezekiel 21–48

  • Author: Horace D. Hummel
  • Publisher: Concordia
  • Publication Date: 2007
  • Pages: 600

This commentary expounds the later chapters of Ezekiel according to the book’s classic prophetic outline. After judgement falls on Israel, oracles against the Gentile nations bring them under God’s judgement too. But God’s purpose is to lead all peoples to repentance and salvation through faith. God promises forgiveness, restoration, and resurrection through a new David, the Shepherd who will unite all believers. The book ends with an extended vision of the new temple and rejuvenated land in the new earth, where God’s redeemed people shall dwell under their Prince forever.

Horace D. Hummel is professor emeritus at Concordia Seminary in St. Louis, Missouri, where he has taught exegetical theology for over 20 years. He has authored The Word Becoming Flesh, an isagogical and theological introduction to the Old Testament, as well as many articles and book reviews.

Daniel

  • Author: Andrew E. Steinmann
  • Publisher: Concordia
  • Publication Date: 2008
  • Pages: 628

The Gospel of the kingdom of God finds its most consistent Old Testament treatment in Daniel. This biblical book is much more than a combination of miraculous stories and fantastic visions; it presents the Gospel of the promised Messiah and his eternal kingdom. However, interpreting Daniel is no easy task. While the narratives about Daniel and his fellow Judeans appear simple (belying a rich theological complexity), the visions at the end of the book seem extraordinarily complicated. Thus, the challenge for any commentator is to understand the book as a whole and to explain its rich and variegated view of the Gospel and the Savior.

Since at least the first century before Christ, Daniel has been the subject of intense scrutiny by religious zealots seeking to view it as an eschatological roadmap for determining all sorts of harmful theologies of triumphalism. In our day this is often manifested in millennial speculation. This commentary shows that Daniel isn’t an adjunct to such theories, an oracle to be bent in service to eschatological speculation about an earthly messianic kingdom. Instead, it is a book about Christ, the salvation he accomplished by his cross, and the eternal glory he promises his redeemed people. Christ preserved his people throughout the Babylonian captivity and pointed them forward to the coming of his kingdom at his first advent, and the consummation at his second advent. Through his book Christ preserves us in faith until he returns in glory to bring us into the fullness of eternal life.

Andrew E. Steinmann is the university marshall and a professor of theology and Hebrew at Concordia University in River Forest, Illinois. He received his BS from the University of Cincinnati, his MDiv from Concordia Theological Seminary, and his PhD in Near Eastern studies from the University of Michigan.

Amos

  • Author: R. Reed Lessing
  • Publisher: Concordia
  • Publication Date: 2009
  • Pages: 512

This volume focuses on the book of Amos and the judgments and Amos’ visions as well as the reason for its inclusion as a part of the Minor Prophets. The author also covers the historical setting of the Book of Amos as well as the various methods that were used to interpret the prophecy in Amos. The Concordia Commentary: Amos is an invaluable addition to anyone who wants to learn more about Amos, its history and how it is pertinent to us today.

R. Reed Lessing was ordained into the Office of the Holy Ministry on June 29, 1986 at Christ the Servant Lutheran Church in West Monroe, Los Angeles. Reed served as the church’s pastor until March of 1990. From March, 1990 to August, 1999 he was the pastor of Trinity Lutheran Church in Broken Arrow, Oklahoma. In September of 1999 he was installed as assistant professor of exegetical theology at Concordia Seminary. In May of 2005 he was advanced to the rank of associate professor. In August of 2007 he became the director of the seminary’s Graduate School.

Jonah

  • Author: R. Reed Lessing
  • Publisher: Concordia
  • Publication Date: 2007
  • Pages: 496

This commentary interprets the narrative of Jonah as true history that reveals the God of Israel as gracious toward all who repent and believe in him. The introduction discusses the historical setting, archaeological evidence, and themes in the book. An original translation is based on the textual notes, which explain all the grammatical features of the Hebrew, revealing the literary artistry of Jonah’s author. The commentary clearly expounds the book’s message in harmony with the rest of the Scriptures. Ironically, Jonah the Israelite begrudges God’s abundant grace, while Gentiles are converted to saving faith through the power of the preached Word. Excursuses cover evangelism in the Old Testament, “The Sign of Jonah” in the Gospels, death and resurrection motifs from Jonah 2 in Christian Baptism, and God changing his verdict from judgment to salvation. The commentary’s focus is on the “one greater than Jonah”: Jesus Christ, the Savior of all peoples.

R. Reed Lessing was ordained into the Office of the Holy Ministry on June 29, 1986 at Christ the Servant Lutheran Church in West Monroe, Los Angeles. Reed served as the church’s pastor until March of 1990. From March, 1990 to August, 1999 he was the pastor of Trinity Lutheran Church in Broken Arrow, Oklahoma. In September of 1999 he was installed as assistant professor of exegetical theology at Concordia Seminary. In May of 2005 he was advanced to the rank of associate professor. In August of 2007 he became the director of the seminary’s Graduate School.

Matthew 1:1–11:1

  • Author: Jeffrey A. Gibbs
  • Publisher: Concordia
  • Publication Date: 2006
  • Pages: 584

Matthew’s Gospel presents Jesus of Nazareth as the Christ long promised in the Old Testament. To interpret it, author Jeffrey Gibbs employs a narrative approach that examines the literary structure of Matthew’s unfolding message and interprets individual texts with a careful eye to their relationship to that overall structure.

Jeffrey A. Gibbs is a professor of exegetical theology at Concordia Seminary in St. Louis, Missouri. He received his BA from Rice University, his MDiv and STM from Concordia Theological Seminary, and his PhD from Union Theological Seminary.

Matthew 11:2–20:34

  • Author: Jeffrey A. Gibbs
  • Publisher: Concordia
  • Publication Date: 2010
  • Pages: 584

This commentary carefully expounds the original Greek text and theology of the book of Matthew. Jeffrey A. Gibbs employs a narrative approach that carefully attends to the literary structure of Matthew’s Gospel. He interprets the text in light of the original cultural and religious context in which Matthew wrote, as well as the audience for whom he wrote. Gibbs focuses on two themes throughout the commentary: Jesus’ identity and the people’s varied response to his identity.

Jeffrey A. Gibbs is a professor of exegetical theology at Concordia Seminary in St. Louis, Missouri. He received his BA from Rice University, his MDiv and STM from Concordia Theological Seminary, and his PhD from Union Theological Seminary.

Luke 1–9:50

  • Author: Arthur A. Just Jr.
  • Publisher: Concordia
  • Publication Date: 1997
  • Pages: 416

This is the first of two volumes that look at the Book of Luke. In these two volumes, the author explores the third Gospel in light of four central themes: Christology, sacramentology, ecclesiology, and eschatology.

The author recognizes and unfolds Luke’s catechetical purpose in the story of Jesus and helps modern readers to appreciate the rich tapestry of the Gospel of Luke.

Arthur A. Just Jr. is dean of graduate studies and a professor of exegetical theology at Concordia Seminary in Fort Wayne, Indiana. He is also the author of a two-volume exegetical commentary on Luke.

Luke 9:51–24:53

  • Author: Arthur A. Just Jr.
  • Publisher: Concordia
  • Publication Date: 1997
  • Pages: 688

This is the second of two volumes that look at the book of Luke. In these two volumes, the author explores the third Gospel in light of four central themes: Christology, sacramentology, ecclesiology, and eschatology. The author recognizes and unfolds Luke’s catechetical purpose in the story of Jesus and helps modern readers to appreciate the rich tapestry of the Gospel of Luke.

Arthur A. Just Jr. is dean of graduate studies and a professor of exegetical theology at Concordia Seminary in Fort Wayne, Indiana. He is also the author of a two-volume exegetical commentary on Luke.

1 Corinthians

  • Author: Gregory J. Lockwood
  • Publisher: Concordia
  • Publication Date: 2011
  • Pages: 648

Beginning with a literal translation and textual notes on the original Greek text, this commentary on 1 Corinthians expounds on the theology of the epistle for the benefit of the church today.

The central theme of this commentary is that “the word of the cross” (1:18) is the basis for the church’s unity (ch. 1–4), holiness (ch. 5–7), freedom (ch. 8–10), worship (ch. 11–14), and resurrection hope (ch. 15–16). It’s particularly strong in its exegetical treatment of key passages that involve doctrines and practices that have been items of contention among modern Christian denominations.

Gregory J. Lockwood was associate professor of exegetical theology at Concordia Theological Seminary in Fort Wayne, Indiana, before returning to his native Australia, where he serves as a professor and parish pastor. He studied at the University of Adelaide in Australia (BA), the University of Melbourne, Australia (BEd), and Concordia Seminary in St. Louis, Missouri (STM, ThD). He also served as a missionary in Papua New Guinea.

Colossians

  • Author: Paul E. Deterding
  • Publisher: Concordia
  • Publication Date: 2003
  • Pages: 200

The letter to the Colossians is rich in Christology, to which all the articles of faith are intimately connected. One might even argue that Colossians possesses the most profound Christology in all the New Testament. A true, biblical Christology, centered in the cross and the empty tomb, gives life and meaning to all theology.

Colossians has much to say about the doctrine of creation. Moreover, the letter relates its teaching on creation directly to its Christology. In this way Colossians unites the presupposition of all theology (creation) with the heart and center of all theology (Christology).

Colossians is also strongly eschatological. The eschatology of the letter extends beyond those verses that speak of the life to come, for its message is constantly given with an eye on eternity. The true doctrine of Christ, who is the exalted Lord over the entire creation, refutes the false christologies that were circulating in Colossae, variations of which continue to compete against the true Gospel in the world today.

For all of those reasons, Colossians is a rich source of Christian theology that contributes a number of unique insights to the church’s faith and life.

Paul E. Deterding is pastor of Bethlehem Lutheran Church and School in Carson City, Nevada, a position he has held since March of 2000. He has served as pastor of Our Savior Lutheran Church of Satellite Beach, Florida (now Risen Savior Lutheran Church of Palm Bay, Florida), from 1981 to 1994 and as pastor of Christ Lutheran Church in Jackson, Mississippi, from 1994 to 2000. He has also served as a guest lecturer at both Concordia Theological Seminary in Fort Wayne, Indiana, and Concordia Seminary in St. Louis, Missouri.

Philemon

  • Author: John G. Nordling
  • Publisher: Concordia
  • Publication Date: 2004
  • Pages: 380

This commentary expounds Philemon in light of its setting in the Greco-Roman world and its theological purpose. It probes the specific circumstances under which Paul wrote the letter, and who Philemon was and his position within the Christian community. In this Epistle, the apostle addresses a crisis in the church. He speaks to the relationship between a congregation and its pastor through all the problems, sorrows, adventures and joys that attend pastoral ministry.

John G. Nordling has served on the faculty of Valparaiso University and Baylor University, and currently is professor of exegetical theology at Concordia Theological Seminary in Fort. Wayne, Indiana. He studied at Valparaiso University (BA), Concordia Seminary (MDiv), Washington University (MA), and the University of Wisconsin–Madison (PhD).

2 Peter & Jude

  • Author: Curtis P. Giese
  • Publisher: Concordia
  • Publication Date: 2012
  • Pages: 442

These two concise epistles confess a rich theology of the end times. They warn against libertine heretics who condone promiscuity as an acceptable expression of the Christian life, and who scoff at Christ’s second coming because of his apparent delay. These inspired books of Scripture recall Old Testament events such as the fallen angels’ rebellion, the sexual abomination and destruction of Sodom and Gomorrah, and Balaam’s seduction of Israel. God’s earlier acts of judgment and salvation guarantee that he will indeed act again. Christ will return, destroy the present corrupted world, raise all baptized believers, and bring them into the new creation characterized by righteousness. The final day is also the time of severe judgement against the false teachers. This message about the downfall of evildoers provides Gospel comfort to the church, which will be vindicated.

Curtis P. Giese is a professor in the theology division at Concordia University Texas in Austin, where he teaches Greek and New Testament. He received his BA at Concordia University St. Paul and then went on to Concordia Seminary in St. Louis, Missouri for his MDiv and STM. He then continued his studies at Lutherische Theologische Hochschule in Oberursel, Germany, and then at Hebrew Union College at the Jewish Institute of Religion in Cincinnati, Ohio where his emphasis was Judaism in the Greco-Roman period while receiving his MPhil and PhD.

1–3 John

  • Author: Bruce G. Schuchard
  • Publisher: Concordia
  • Publication Date: 2012
  • Pages: 800

These epistles represent the singular voice of an extraordinary theologian. John, the last living apostle, writes to his “children.” For decades he has served as the elder father of the house churches of Asia Minor, but during his exile, false teaching has persuaded some to abandon the faith and the life in the community of the beloved. At least one church’s leader has presumed to advance his own teaching at the expense of the apostle’s instruction. Knowing that his days are numbered, John sends a general epistle, 1 John, together with its introductory cover letter, 2 John. In order to address the errant leader’s conduct, he also sends a situation-specific, personal, and pastoral addendum, 3 John. Rallying the faithful so that none would be lost to the ongoing threat of deception, John urges his children to confess by the Spirit in this last hour the man Jesus as the Son of the Father, come in the flesh in truth and love. The fulfillment of God’s historic dealings with his people of old is Jesus’ atoning sacrifice of himself. Through his shed blood, a cleansing flood, God confers the life of the age to come.

Bruce G. Schuchard received his BS at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, Michigan and his MDiv and STM at Concordia Theological Seminary in Fort Wayne, Indiana. His PhD in biblical studies is from Union Theological Seminary in Richmond, Virginia.

Revelation

  • Author: Louis A. Brighton
  • Publisher: Concordia
  • Publication Date: 1999
  • Pages: 712

This volume on Revelation explores the last and perhaps the most perplexing book in the Bible as the church’s final witness to the exalted Christ. The author sees Ascension Christology as the heart of the prophetic and visionary message and relates the imagery, events, and liturgical portions of Revelation to the church’s life and worship.

Louis A. Brighton is professor emeritus at Concordia Seminary, St. Louis, Missouri. He studied at Concordia Seminary (BA, MDiv, STM) and Saint Louis University (PhD). He also taught at Westfield House of the University of Cambridge, England.

Product Details

  • Title: Concordia Commentary
  • Publisher: Concordia
  • Volumes: 23
  • Pages: 14,555