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Cornerstone Biblical Commentaries (20 vols.)
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Overview

The Cornerstone Biblical Commentary series provides up-to-date, evangelical scholarship on the Old and New Testaments. Each volume is designed to equip pastors and Christian leaders with exegetical and theological knowledge to better understand and apply God’s Word by presenting the message of each passage as well as an overview of other issues surrounding the text. The commentary series has been structured to help readers understand the meaning of Scripture, passage-by-passage, through the entire Bible.

Each book of the Bible is prefaced by a substantial introduction that offers historical background. Then readers are taken through the Bible text, passage-by-passage, starting with the text of the New Living Translation. This is followed by a section of notes on the Greek and Hebrew behind the English translation of the New Living Translation. This section also interacts with scholars on important interpretive issues, and points readers to significant textual and contextual matters. The commentary on the passage presents a lucid interpretation, giving special attention to context and major theological themes.

With the Logos edition of the Cornerstone Biblical Commentary Series, you can read the commentary on the text alongside the New Living Translation, as well as the Greek and Hebrew texts in your digital library! Perform powerful searches and word studies and click your way to Greek and Hebrew definitions.You can also link the Cornerstone Biblical Commentary to the other commentaries in your library for quick and accurate research for scholarly projects, sermon preparation, and personal study.

Key Features

  • Introductions to the historical and cultural context, the literary style, and the major themes and theological concerns
  • Exegetical and textual notes
  • Commentary pays special attention to context and major theological themes

Praise for the Print Edition

An enormously helpful series for the layperson and pastor alike because it centers on the theological message of each book and ties it directly to the text. This approach has been needed for some time and will be an invaluable supplement to other commentary series.

Grant Osborne, professor of New Testament, Trinity Evangelical Divinity School

A treasure house of insight into the biblical text. Written by some of the best scholars working today, it is an essential tool for pastors, students, church leaders, and lay people who want to understand the text and know how it relates to our lives today. Like the New Living Translation text it uses as its base, this commentary series is extremely readable.

Tremper Longman, Robert H. Gundry Professor of Biblical Studies, Westmont College

Individual Titles

Cornerstone Biblical Commentary: Genesis & Exodus

  • Authors: John N. Oswalt and Allen P. Ross
  • Editor: Philip W. Comfort
  • Series: Cornerstone Biblical Commentary
  • Publisher: Tyndale
  • Publication Date: 2008
  • Pages: 576

Genesis and Exodus lay the groundwork for the rest of the Bible—God’s creation, the Fall and the promise of salvation, the patriarchs, and journey out of Egypt and into the wilderness. In their commentary on Genesis and Exodus, John N. Oswalt and Allen P. Ross explore the central themes of these important books.

About the Authors

Allen P. Ross is professor of divinity at Beeson Divinity School, Stamford University. His articles have appeared in Biblical Viewpoint, Bibliotheca Sacra, and Kindred Spirit, and he has contributed to the Bible Knowledge Commentary, the Christian Life Bible, and the Biblical Hebrew Handbook. He is the author of numerous books, including Creation and Blessing: A Guide to the Study and Exposition of Genesis and Holiness to the Lord.

John N. Oswalt (Ph.D., Brandeis University) is research professor of Old Testament at Wesley Biblical Seminary in Jackson, Mississippi. He was the Old Testament editor of the Wesley Bible and also served as consulting editor for the New International Dictionary of Old Testament Theology and Exegesis. He has written six books, including a 2-volume commentary on Isaiah in the New International Commentary on the Old Testament series and commentary on Isaiah in the New International Version Application Commentary series. He has been a member of the translation teams for the New International Version and the New Living Translation.

Cornerstone Biblical Commentary: Leviticus, Numbers & Deuteronomy

  • Authors: David Baker, Dale Brueggemann, and Eugene H. Merrill
  • Editor: Philip W. Comfort
  • Series: Cornerstone Biblical Commentary
  • Publisher: Tyndale
  • Publication Date: 2008
  • Pages: 686

Studying the book of Leviticus is not something that many people do, but Baker, Brueggemann and Merrill mention that it is a necessary book to read for three reasons: theological, religious and historical. The theological aspect of Leviticus is important because it gives a history of the people of Israel and many of the concepts and terms that were common to Jesus were first mentioned in Leviticus. For example, in John 1:29 where it says Jesus is the “Lamb of God who takes away the sin of the world” would be unfathomable if Leviticus 4:32–35 was not kept in mind. Additionally, the story of the woman who was hemorrhaging in Mark 5:25–34 would not be as easily comprehended if we did not have Leviticus 15:25–27 as background.

The second reason to study Leviticus is that of religious reasons. In today’s church, the who, where, when, why and how of worship and whether or not it can be accomplished in a group and the possibility of it being something that can between a person and God, something that can achieved one on one is discussed. Cornerstone Biblical Commentary: Leviticus, Numbers, Deuteronomy gives the reader a greater understanding of worship and the importance it has in our lives.

Thirdly, Leviticus is discussed from a historical perspective. The information came from those who were part of history and the book gives background to how they had an impact on the ancient Near East.

The content covered in Numbers by Dale Brueggemann breathes new life into the book and gives us a new understanding of the content in Numbers. Eugene H. Merrill gives an in depth look to Deuteronomy and how it is pertinent to us today.

About the Authors

David Baker, Ph.D. is professor of Old Testament and Semitic languages at Ashland Theological Seminary in Ohio. He serves as editor for the Evangelical Theological Society's Dissertation series and Studies series. He has authored several articles/books, including the NIV Application Commentary on Joel, Obadiah, and Malachi and The Face of Old Testament Studies: A Survey of Contemporary Approaches. Dr. Baker served as a Leviticus reviewer for the New Living Translation.

Dale Brueggemann pastored in Idaho throughout the 1970s. He has taught at Valley Forge Christian College in Philadelphia, and at Central Bible College in Missouri.

Eugene H. Merrill is distinguished professor of Old Testament studies at Dallas Theological Seminary in Texas and distinguished professor of Old Testament interpretation at The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary in Kentucky. He is currently director of Eurasia education services for Assemblies of God World Missions, and he has been heavily involved in ministry in Europe, Asia, and the Middle East. He is the author of several articles/books, including a commentary on Deuteronomy in the New American Commentary series and the Deuteronomy study notes for the NLT Study Bible. He also served as a Deuteronomy reviewer for the New Living Translation.

Cornerstone Biblical Commentary: Joshua, Judges & Ruth

  • Authors: Joseph Coleson, Lawson G. Stone, and Jason Driesbach
  • Editor: Philip W. Comfort
  • Series: Cornerstone Biblical Commentary
  • Publisher: Tyndale
  • Publication Date: 2012
  • Pages: 568

The Cornerstone Biblical Commentary series provides up-to-date, evangelical scholarship on the Old and New Testaments. Each volume is designed to equip pastors and Christian leaders with exegetical and theological knowledge to better understand and apply God’s Word by presenting the message of each passage as well as an overview of other issues surrounding the text. The commentary series has been structured to help readers understand the meaning of Scripture, passage-by-passage, through the entire Bible.

About the Authors

Joseph Coleson is professor of Old Testament at Nazarene Theological Seminary. He has published numerous articles and books.

Lawson Stone has expertise in early Israelite history and religion and Old Testament Theology. He teaches at Asbury Theological Seminary and has written a host of books and articles.

Jason Driesbach is a coauthor of The Many Gospels of Jesus and a contributor to the Baker Illustrated Bible Dictionary. He is pursuing PhD studies in the field of Hebrew Bible.

Cornerstone Biblical Commentary: 1 Samuel & 2 Samuel

  • Author: J. Robert Vannoy
  • Editor: Philip W. Comfort
  • Series: Cornerstone Biblical Commentary
  • Publisher: Tyndale
  • Publication Date: 2009
  • Pages: 464

In Cornerstone Biblical Commentary: 1 & 2 Samuel, J. Robert Vannoy covers such topics as the reign of Saul, how his reign corresponds with David, Samuel and Israel. Also discussed are the famous stories of David and Goliath as well David and Jonathan.

About the Author

J. Robert Vannoy, Th.D. is professor emeritus and Allan A. MacRae Chair of Biblical Studies at Biblical Theological Seminary. He has over 40 years of experience in teaching and has served as a translation consultant for the NIV, TNIV, and NLT. He has also contributed articles to various publications including reference works (such as the Baker Encyclopedia of the Bible and the Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology), scholarly journals, and magazines. He and his wife are blessed with four children and over 10 grandchildren. Outside of Old Testament studies, Robert enjoys family, gardening, photography, hiking, and exploring islands on the Maine coast.

Cornerstone Biblical Commentary: 1 Kings & 2 Kings

  • Author: William Barnes
  • Editor: Philip W. Comfort
  • Series: Cornerstone Biblical Commentary
  • Publisher: Tyndale
  • Publication Date: 2012
  • Pages: 416

The Cornerstone Biblical Commentary series provides up-to-date, evangelical scholarship on the Old and New Testaments. Each volume is designed to equip pastors and Christian leaders with exegetical and theological knowledge to better understand and apply God’s Word by presenting the message of each passage as well as an overview of other issues surrounding the text. The commentary series has been structured to help readers understand the meaning of Scripture, passage-by-passage, through the entire Bible.

About the Author

William Barnes has worked extensively in the historical books of the Old Testament, published several commentaries and scholarly articles, and is a contributor to Biblica: The Bible Atlas. His interests include Old Testament history and chronology as well as narrative and poetic structure and sequencing in the Hebrew Bible and the New Testament. He served as a member of the NLT translation team for 1–2 Kings.

Cornerstone Biblical Commentary: 1 Chronicles & 2 Chronicles

  • Author: Mark J. Boda
  • Editor: Philip W. Comfort
  • Series: Cornerstone Biblical Commentary
  • Publisher: Tyndale
  • Publication Date: 2010
  • Pages: 456

Mark J. Boda makes reference to the point that from a literary and historical standpoint, the books of Chronicles have been ignored and even criticized in Biblical studies. Boda argues that even though Chronicles covers the “whole of sacred history,” the greatest part of its history is included in 1 Chronicles 1–9, although those chapters are filled with genealogical lists where 1 Chronicles 10 through 2 Chronicles 9 deals with David and Solomon’s narratives.

Another reason that Chronicles has not been paid much attention is the incorrect thought that it does not have historical merit. When studying 1 & 2 Chronicles, the Cornerstone Biblical Commentary is beneficial for those wanting to learn more about the history of the book.

About the Author

Gary V. Smith, Ph.D. was a member of the translation teams for both the NLT and HCSB Bible translation projects and has written numerous articles, reviews, and books on the Old Testament. These include Hosea, Amos, and Micah for the NIV Application Commentary series and Isaiah in the New American Commentary series. He has taught Old Testament at Bethel Theological Seminary in Minnesota and was Professor of Old Testament and Hebrew at Midwestern Baptist Theological Seminary in Missouri. In 2004 he began teaching at Union University, where he is currently Professor of Christian Studies.

Cornerstone Biblical Commentary: Ezra, Nehemiah & Esther

  • Author: Gary V. Smith
  • Editors: Philip W. Comfort
  • Series: Cornerstone Biblical Commentary
  • Publisher: Tyndale
  • Publication Date: 2010
  • Pages: 400

Ezra focuses on the sacrifice that we all have to make at one point in our lives and how to deal with the choices that must be made when faced with with this difficult situation.

When reading the book of Nehemiah, the reader sees three ideas emerging. First, when reading the word of God, we must pay careful attention to what is being said, so that the content is not misunderstood. Second, there is a recurring theme of enemy opposition and thirdly, in spite of challenging situations, Nehemiah was still obdedient.

In the book of Esther, such topics as death, danger, social rejection as well as many others are covered and referencing the in Cornerstone Biblical Commentary: Ezra, Nehemiah, Esther helps you deal with these when faced with them in our lives.

About the Author

Gary V. Smith, Ph.D. was a member of the translation teams for both the NLT and HCSB Bible translation projects and has written numerous articles, reviews, and books on the Old Testament. These include Hosea, Amos, and Micah for the NIV Application Commentary series and Isaiah in the New American Commentary series. He has taught Old Testament at Bethel Theological Seminary in Minnesota and was professor of Old Testament and Hebrew at Midwestern Baptist Theological Seminary in Missouri. In 2004 he began teaching at Union University, where he is currently professor of Christian Studies.

Cornerstone Biblical Commentary: Job, Ecclesiastes & Song of Songs

  • Authors: August H. Konkel and Tremper Longman III
  • Editor: Philip W. Comfort
  • Series: Cornerstone Biblical Commentary
  • Publisher: Tyndale
  • Publication Date: 2006
  • Pages: 416

The books of Job, Ecclesiastes, and Song of Songs belong to the category of writings typically termed “wisdom literature.” Biblical wisdom may be defined as the exposition of a fundamental order within the universe, and wisdom is to know and follow this order. The reality of life is that the affirmations of traditional wisdom often contradict the experience of the faithful. Bad things happen to good people; and, conversely, good things often happen to bad people. August H. Konkel confronts the tension in the book of Job between the idea that virtue has its own reward and the reality that the virtuous often suffer. In his commentary on Ecclesiastes and Song of Songs, Tremper Longman III explores the meaning of life and love.

About the Authors

August H. Konkel (Ph.D., Westminster Theological Seminary) has been professor of Old Testament at Providence Seminary since 1984 and president of the College and Seminary since 2001. A contributor to the New International Dictionary of Old Testament Theology and Exegesis, he has forthcoming commentaries on Chronicles (Herald Press) and on Kings (Zondervan).

Tremper Longman III (Ph.D. Yale University) is the Robert H. Gundry Professor of Biblical Studies at Westmont College. Tremper has authored or coauthored seventeen books, including A Biblical History of Israel. He was also one of the main translators of the New Living Translation and has served as a consultant for other well-known Bible translations as well.

Cornerstone Biblical Commentary: The Book of Psalms & The Book of Proverbs

  • Authors: Mark D. Futato and George M. Schwabb, Sr.
  • Editor: Philip W. Comfort
  • Series: Cornerstone Biblical Commentary
  • Publisher: Tyndale
  • Publication Date: 2009
  • Pages: 684

Psalms has often been thought of as a book of praise, but it also contains mourning, bewilderment, and confusion. In fact, the amount of “negative psalms” outnumbers the psalms of praise. Futato shows us the difference between the negative aspects and the psalms of praise and that praise is part of the concluding phrase in the book. Not only that, but praise is large part of the negative psalms. To think of oneself as a fool is not something that most people want to do and reading Schwab’s book on Proverbs gives the reader a greater understanding of its content. Schwab makes the point that no fool would seek out God’s wisdom, and by persisting in the reading of Proverbs, we are reminded that even though we can behave unwisely at certain points in our lives, by keeping the thoughts and ideas in Proverbs in the forefront of our minds that we can grow in wisdom and knowledge.

About the Authors

Mark D. Futato, Ph.D.  is professor of Old Testament and academic dean at Reformed Theological Seminary in Florida. He is the author of several books and articles, including Beginning Biblical Hebrew and Interpreting the Psalms: An Exegetical Handbook. He has also contributed to The Spirit of the Reformation Study Bible and The New International Dictionary of Old Testament Theology and Exegesis. Dr. Futato is an ordained minister and served on the translation team for the book of Psalms in the New Living Translation.

George M. Schwabb, Sr., Ph.D.  is associate professor of Old Testament at Erskine Theological Seminary in South Carolina. He is ordained in the Second Presbytery of the Associate Reformed Presbyterian Church and is a member of the Society of Biblical Literature and the Evangelical Theological Society. He has authored numerous scholarly publications, including Hope in the Midst of a Hostile World: The Gospel According to Daniel. He served as a reviewer for Psalms and the wisdom books for the New Century Version.

Cornerstone Biblical Commentary: Isaiah, Jeremiah & Lamentations

  • Authors: Larry L. Walker and Elmer A. Martens
  • Editor: Philip W. Comfort
  • Series: Cornerstone Biblical Commentary
  • Publisher: Tyndale
  • Publication Date: 2005
  • Pages: 608

These beautiful and eloquent books contain some of the most striking poetry and prophecy in the entire Old Testament. The book of Isaiah has been remarkably influential on art, music, political theory, missions, and evangelism over a long period of time, and many who are unfamiliar with Scripture can still recognize phrases and concepts from this great book. Likewise, the books of Jeremiah and Lamentation reveal God’s unfailing love in the middle of struggle, God’s faithfulness in times of transition, and God’s warnings against sinful excess. Larry L. Walker’s commentary on Isaiah, and Elmer A. Martens’ commentary on Jeremiah and Lamentations bring the vivid imagery and poignant prophecy to life.

About the Authors

Elmer A. Martens is professor emeritus of Old Testament and president emeritus at Mennonite Brethren Biblical Seminary in Fresno, California, where he has taught for over 30 years. He is the author of God's Design, A Focus on Old Testament Theology, and the volume on Jeremiah in the Believers Church Bible Commentary (19 Vols.). He was co-editor of The Flowering of Old Testament Theology and served for several years as the editor of Direction.

Larry L. Walker held a professional teaching career with time split between Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary and Mid-America Baptist Seminary. Since his retirement in 1998, he has held adjunct teaching positions at several seminaries. He authored a commentary on Zephaniah for the Expositor's Bible Commentary and is also a contributor to the New International Dictionary of Old Testament Theology and Exegesis.

Cornerstone Biblical Commentary: Ezekiel & Daniel

  • Authors: David L. Thompson and Eugene Carpenter
  • Editor: Philip W. Comfort
  • Series: Cornerstone Biblical Commentary
  • Publisher: Tyndale
  • Publication Date: 2010
  • Pages: 488

The Cornerstone Biblical Commentary series provides up-to-date, evangelical scholarship on the Old and New Testaments. Each volume is designed to equip pastors and Christian leaders with exegetical and theological knowledge to better understand and apply God’s Word by presenting the message of each passage as well as an overview of other issues surrounding the text. In this volume, Thompson and Carpenter take you passage-by-passage through Ezekiel and Daniel, offering fresh expositions to help you grasp the literary issues and theological message of each book.

About the Authors

David L. Thompson (Ph.D., The Johns Hopkins University) has written scores of popular and professional articles. His books include Bible Study That Works and God’s Healing for Hurting Families. Dr. Thompson, an ordained elder in The Wesleyan Church, has pastored several churches.

Eugene Carpenter (Ph.D., Fuller Theological Seminary) is scholar in residence and professor of Old Testament, Hebrew, and biblical theology at Bethel College, Mishawaka, IN. He has authored and contributed to several books including commentaries on Exodus and Deuteronomy.

Cornerstone Biblical Commentary: Minor Prophets, Hosea-Malachi

  • Authors: Richard D. Patterson and Andrew E. Hill
  • Editor: Philip W. Comfort
  • Series: Cornerstone Biblical Commentary
  • Publisher: Tyndale
  • Publication Date: 2008
  • Pages: 672

The Minor Prophets speak the words of God during the most historically and theologically significant moments in Israel’s history. From warnings of destruction to words of hope during despair, from plagues and peril to promises of a Messiah, the Minor Prophets capture the full range of God’s relationship with Israel and Judah during a tumultuous and shifting history. In their commentary, Richard D. Patterson and Andrew E. Hill help modern readers navigate the complex terrain of the Minor Prophets.

About the Authors

Richard D. Patterson (A.B., Wheaton College; M.Div., Northwest Baptist Theological Seminary; Th.M. Talbot Theological Seminary; M.A., Ph.D., University of California Angeles) was chairman of the department of biblical studies and professor of Semitic-languages and literatures at Liberty University, Lynchburg, Virginia. He contributed to The Expositor's Bible Commentary and has written articles for Grace Theological Journal, the Journal of the Evangelical Theological Society, and other scholarly journals.

Andrew E. Hill (Ph.D. University of Michigan) is professor of Old Testament studies at Wheaton College. His current research interests include the Old Testament, worship studies, Ancient-Future models for biblical interpretation, and pedagogy for biblical studies. He is a contributor to The Complete Library of Christian Worship, and is author of the commentary on Malachi in the Anchor Yale Bible.

Cornerstone Biblical Commentary: Matthew & Mark

  • Authors: Darrell L. Bock and David L. Turner
  • Editor: Philip W. Comfort
  • Series: Cornerstone Biblical Commentary
  • Publisher: Tyndale
  • Publication Date: 2006
  • Pages: 576

As the first Gospel in the Christian canon and the first book of the New Testament, Matthew has attracted significant attention. It contains the Sermon on the Mount, the Lord’s Prayer, the Beatitudes and End Times parables and prophecies. It describes the nature of the kingdom of heaven, and reveals the Messiah to a Jewish audience. In his accessible commentary, David L. Turner explores the central themes of the Gospel of Matthew, along with interpretive challenges, and the relationship between Matthew and the other Synoptic Gospels. This commentary also includes a detailed outline of the Gospel and an extensive bibliography.

The Gospel of Mark contains the shortest and most succinct account of the life of Jesus. In fact, says Darrell L. Bock in the introduction to his commentary, “Mark is more a Gospel of action than of teaching.” Jesus and his disciples move from city to city, and the stories are punctuated by little more than the favorite Markan transition: “Immediately.” Yet Mark, more than any other Gospel, highlights Jesus as the suffering Son of Man, and provides rich parallels to Old Testament themes. And the end of the Gospel shows that the experience of rejection and suffering challenged even the apostle’s commitment to discipleship. Both the original and modern readers have much to learn from the Gospel of Mark and Darrell L. Bock's commentary and exposition.

About the Authors

David L. Turner is a graduate of Cedarville University, Grace Theological Seminary, and Hebrew Union College—Jewish Institute of Religion, Cincinnati. He has been professor of New Testament at Grand Rapids Theological Seminary since 1986 and has previously published several articles on the Gospel of Matthew.

Darrell L. Bock (Ph.D., University of Aberdeen) is research professor of New Testament studies at Dallas Theological Seminary. He is the author or editor of many books, including the volumes on Luke in the Baker Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament (8 Vols.) and the IVP New Testament Commentary Series (18 Vols.). He is also author of the bestselling Breaking the Da Vinci Code.

Cornerstone Biblical Commentary: Luke & Acts

  • Authors: William J. Larkin and Allison A. Trites
  • Editor: Philip W. Comfort
  • Series: Cornerstone Biblical Commentary
  • Publisher: Tyndale
  • Publication Date: 2005
  • Pages: 688

The Gospel of Luke, which has been described by Ernest Renan as “the most beautiful book in the world,” is the first part of a two-volume work devoted to the life of Jesus and the opening years of the Christian church. In Luke’s Gospel, we are introduced to “everything Jesus began to do and teach” prior to his ascension. In the second volume, the book of Acts, Luke picks up the story of the years following the Ascension, showing the growth of the Christian movement and noting the stages of its expansion from Jerusalem to Rome. Luke’s perspective on the life of Jesus and the early Christian movement is vitally important for gaining a grasp of the overall message of the New Testament, and the commentary by William J. Larking and Allison A. Trites guides readers through.

About the Authors

William J. Larkin is an ordained minister in the Presbyterian Church in America and has an active ministry in adult Christian education, particularly Bible teaching. He holds a B.A. from Wheaton College, a B.D. from Princeton Theological Seminary, and a Ph.D. from the University of Durham, England, and has served in various pastorates as well as being on faculty at Columbia Biblical Seminary and School of Missions since 1975. He also served on the Bible Translation Committee for the NLT. He is also the author of the commentary on Acts in the IVP New Testament Commentary Series.

Allison A. Trites served as professor of Greek and New Testament at the Acadia Divinity College in Wolfville, Nova Scotia, for thirty-seven years. He has also provided leadership beyond the walls of the college, having served as president of the United Baptist Convention of the Atlantic Provinces, chair of the Deacon's Board of the Wolfville Baptist Church, Baptist representative on the Canadian Council for Theological Education, as well as countless other volunteer positions.

Cornerstone Biblical Commentary: John, 1 John, 2 John & 3 John

  • Authors: Wendell C. Hawley, Grant R. Osborne, and Philip W. Comfort
  • Editor: Philip W. Comfort
  • Series: Cornerstone Biblical Commentary
  • Publisher: Tyndale
  • Publication Date: 2007
  • Pages: 432

The Gospel of John is so simple that it is often the first biblical book given to recent converts to help them understand Christian truth, and yet it is so difficult that only experienced scholars attempt to study it. It is paradoxically the most accessible and yet the most complex of the four Gospels. In his accessible commentary, Grant Osborne explains the core themes of the Gospel of John. After reading and studying John’s Gospel, a person might wonder how the great truths presented in it were lived out in the church. Readers might also wonder how they themselves can better understand and experience the truths revealed by Jesus—ideas such as “walking in the light,” “remaining in Christ,” and “loving one another.” The epistles of John tell how Christians in the late first century were practicing (or not practicing) the profound truths proclaimed by Jesus. In their commentary, Philip W. Comfort and Wendell C. Hawley show how the epistles of John provide key insights into how we today can live in the Spirit of Jesus to experience spiritual transformation and love for the members of Christ’s community, the church.

About the Authors

Philip W. Comfort has studied English Literature, Greek, and New Testament at the Ohio State University and the University of South Africa. He has taught at Wheaton College, Trinity Episcopal Seminary, and Columbia International University. He currently teaches at Coastal Carolina University and is a senior editor of Bible reference at Tyndale House Publishers. Comfort is co-editor of the Life Application Bible Commentary New Testament, The Text of the Earliest New Testament Greek Manuscripts, and the Holman Treasury of Key Bible Words, available from Logos as part of the Holman Reference Collection (11 Vols.).

Wendell C. Hawley graduated from the University of Oregon and from Western Baptist Seminary. He was awarded the L.L.D. from California Graduate School of Theology and the D.D. degree from Western Baptist Seminary, Portland, Oregon.

Grant R. Osborne is professor of New Testament at Trinity Evangelical Divinity School. Prior to his work at Trinity, he served as a pastor for over four years and taught at Winnipeg Theological Seminary and the University of Aberdeen. He received his MA in New Testament from Trinity Evangelical Divinity School, and the Doctor of Philosophy in New Testament from the University of Aberdeen, Scotland. He is author of The Hermeneutical Spiral, the commentary on Romans in the IVP New Testament Commentary, and co-editor of the Life Application Bible Commentary New Testament.

Cornerstone Biblical Commentary: Romans & Galatians

  • Authors: Gerald Borchert and Roger Mohrlang
  • Editor: Philip W. Comfort
  • Series: Cornerstone Biblical Commentary
  • Publisher: Tyndale
  • Publication Date: 2007
  • Pages: 356

Paul’s letter to the Romans is one of the most significant writings ever to come from the hand of a Christian. Theologically, it is certainly the most important of all of Paul’s letters, and many would say it is the single most important document in the entire New Testament. Of all the New Testament writings, it is Romans that gives us the most comprehensive exposition and analysis of the Christian Gospel, and it is Romans which has been among the most influential letters in the church and the western world. In his commentary on Romans, Roger Mohrlang unveils the history, the literary significance, and the power of Paul’s most important epistle.

Galatians revolves around the issue of gaining acceptance or status with God. Does a person work for it, or is it acceptance as a gift? If it is a gift, what is its relationship to responsible, moral living? The difference between what is acquired by human effort and what is a gift from God is basic to Paul’s understanding of the nature of authentic Christian freedom, authentic Christianity, and even the Gospel message itself. Gerald Borchert’s commentary on Galatians describes the nature of the churches in Galatia as they explored these tensions.

About the Authors

Gerald Borchert is retired professor of New Testament from both Southern Baptist Theological Seminary and Northern Baptist Theological Seminary. He is currently thesis director at the Institute for Worship Studies, Jacksonville, Florida, and part-time professor of New Testament at Carson Newman College. He earned his B.A. from the University of Alberta, an LL.B., from University of Alberta Law School, an M.Div. from Eastern Baptist Theological Seminary, his Th.M. at Princeton Theological Seminary and his Ph.D. from Princeton Theological Seminary and Princeton University (1967). He has also done post-doctoral work at numerous schools and has served as a pastor and interim pastor variously throughout his career. He is the author of the commentary on John 1–11 in the New American Commentary.

Roger Mohrlang earned a B.S. from Carnegie Institute of Technology, an M.A. from Fuller Theological Seminary, and D.Phil. in New Testament from University of Oxford. He served as a Bible translator and translation consultant in Africa for over seven years, has served as a visiting professor at various colleges, and is currently professor of biblical studies at Whitworth College, where he has been since 1988. His areas of expertise include Paul's letters and New Testament ethics.

Cornerstone Biblical Commentary: 1 Corinthians & 2 Corinthians

  • Authors: William R. Baker, Ralph P. Martin and Carl N. Toneyt
  • Editor: Philip W. Comfort
  • Series: Cornerstone Biblical Commentary
  • Publisher: Tyndale
  • Publication Date: 2009
  • Pages: 400

In the time of Paul, Corinth was a very diverse place. There were a large amount of people drawn to Corinth with the hope of creating better lives for themselves. The Corinthian marketplace was constantly growing because of the people who were migrating to the city. This influx of people caused the town to grow to 100,000 inhabitants in less than 100 years. When Paul wrote Corinthians, the church was a gathering of only a few believers and was only a few years old. By keeping this in mind, we can relate the information written by Paul for when issues arrive in today’s church as what was written then is still pertinent to us today.

About the Authors

William R. Baker, Ph. D. is Professor of New Testament at Cincinnati Bible Seminary in Cincinnati, Ohio. He is the general editor of Stone-Campbell Journal and the author and editor of several books and articles, including Evangelicalism and the Stone-Campbell Movement and Sticks and Stones: The Biblical Ethics of Talk. He has also written a commentary on 2 Corinthians for the College Press NIV Commentary Series.

Ralph P. Martin, Ph. D. is in his fifth decade as a teacher, scholar, and mentor. He is distinguished scholar in residence at Fuller Theological Seminary, at the Graduate School of Theology of Azusa Pacific University, and at Logos Evangelical Seminary in Pasadena, California. He is the author of numerous studies and commentaries on the New Testament, including Worship in the Early Church, Philippians in The Tyndale New Testament Commentary series, and James in the Word Biblical Commentary for which he also serves as New Testament editor. He also co-edited the Dictionary of Paul and His Letters and the Dictionary of the Later New Testament and Its Developments. Ordained to the Baptist ministry in 1949, Dr. Martin has pastored churches in Dunstable, Southport, and Gloucester, England.

Carl N. Toney, Ph. D. is adjunct assistant professor of New Testament at Fuller Theological Seminary in Pasadena, California. He edited and contributed to the revised edition of 2 Corinthians in the Word Biblical Commentary series and is the author of Paul's Inclusive Ethic: Resolving Community Conflicts and Promoting Mission in Romans 14-15. A licensed minister in the American Baptist Convention, Dr. Toney is also a member of the Society of Biblical Literature.

Cornerstone Biblical Commentary: Ephesians, Philippians, Colossians, 1-2 Thessalonians & Philemon

  • Authors: Harold W. Hoehner, Peter H. Davids, and Philip W. Comfort
  • Editor: Philip W. Comfort
  • Series: Cornerstone Biblical Commentary
  • Publisher: Tyndale
  • Publication Date: 2008
  • Pages: 456

The Pauline epistles represent perhaps the most influential and powerfully-written body of literature in the Christian tradition. In them, we witness Paul’s correspondence, his pastoral heart, his theological musings, and his affirmation of the grace of God. While some are autobiographical and others are devoted to strictly theological themes, all have profoundly shaped the emergence of Christianity and the development of theology. The commentaries by Harold W. Hoehner (Ephesians), Phil W. Comfort (Philippians, 1 & 2 Thessalonians) and Peter H. Davids (Colossians, Philemon) help modern readers understand the nature and purpose of these Pauline epistles.

About the Authors

Harold W. Hoehner is professor of New Testament at Dallas Theological Seminary and is well known for his work on biblical chronology in the first century. He is also the author of a commentary on Ephesians in the Baker Exegetical Commentary series.

Peter H. Davids is a professor of biblical theology at Stephen's University. He served as a missionary educator in Europe, training Christian leaders in the German-speaking world, and has written commentaries on James and 1 Peter, and authored The Letters of 2 Peter and Jude in the Pillar New Testament Commentary. He is also co-editor (with Ralph Martin) of The Dictionary of the Later New Testament and Its Development.

Philip W. Comfort has studied English literature, Greek, and New Testament at the Ohio State University and the University of South Africa. He has taught at Wheaton College, Trinity Episcopal Seminary, and Columbia International University. He currently teaches at Coastal Carolina University and is a senior editor of Bible reference at Tyndale House Publishers. Comfort is co-editor of the Life Application Bible Commentary New Testament, The Text of the Earliest New Testament Greek Manuscripts, and the Holman Treasury of Key Bible Words, available from Logos as part of the Holman Reference Collection (11 Vols.).

Cornerstone Biblical Commentary: 1-2 Timothy, Titus & Hebrews

  • Authors: Linda L. Belleville Jon Laansma and J. Ramsey Michaels
  • Editor: Philip W. Comfort
  • Series: Cornerstone Biblical Commentary
  • Publisher: Tyndale
  • Publication Date: 2009
  • Pages: 792

The books of First Timothy, Second Timothy and Titus are frequently referred to as the Pastoral Epistles. The reason for this title is that the letters that Paul wrote in these three books were written to Timothy and Titus, two of his previous colleagues and apprentices as they had questions about many issues that they were facing and how to deal with them.

The issues facing Timothy and Titus are not that different than the ones that today’s pastor faces in the course of their ministry. Such issues they faced were how to train church leaders, being good stewards of material resources, how men and women are to interact with one another in the church, how to exercise discipline within the church, creating a support system for widows, how to counteract false teaching, and the way in which the believer is supposed to act in regards to society and government.

About the Authors

Linda L. Belleville, Ph.D. is professor of Greek and New Testament at Bethel College in Mishawaka Indiana. She has published commentaries on 1 and 2 Corinthians and various articles and essays on 1 Timothy. She has been a member of the translation team for the New Living Translation since its inception.

Jon Laansma, Ph.D.  is associate professor of ancient languages and New Testament at Wheaton College in Wheaton, Illinois. He is the author of several articles and of "I Will Give You Rest": The "Rest" Motif in the New Testament with Special Reference to Matthew 11 and Hebrews 3–4. He contributed the introductions and notes for 1 & 2 Timothy and Titus for the NLT Study Bible.

J. Ramsey Michaels, Th.D.  is professor of religious studies emeritus at Missouri State University in Springfield, Missouri. He has published commentaries on the Gospel of John, 1 Peter, and the book of Revelation. He has been a member of the translation teams for the New International Version and the New Living Translation and has been a consultant for the American Bible Society.

Cornerstone Biblical Commentary: James, 1 - 2 Peter, Jude & Revelation

  • Authors: M. Robert Mulholland Jr. and Grant R. Osborne
  • Editor: Philip W. Comfort
  • Series: Cornerstone Biblical Commentary
  • Publisher: Tyndale
  • Publication Date: 2011
  • Pages: 624

The Cornerstone Biblical Commentary series provides up-to-date, evangelical scholarship on the Old and New Testaments. Each volume is designed to equip pastors and Christian leaders with exegetical and theological knowledge to better understand and apply God’s Word by presenting the message of each passage as well as an overview of other issues surrounding the text. The commentary series has been structured to help readers understand the meaning of Scripture, passage-by-passage, through the entire Bible.

About the Authors

Grant R. Osborne is professor of New Testament at Trinity Evangelical Divinity School. He has authored and edited numerous books, including The Hermeneutical Spiral and many commentaries on the New Testament.

M. Robert Mulholland Jr. is vice president of Asbury Seminary and an expert in New Testament and Christian origins and spiritual formation. His several books include The Deeper Journey and contributions to the Dictionary of Jesus and the Gospels. He is also a frequent speaker at Bible and spiritual renewal conferences.

Product Details

  • Title: Cornerstone Biblical Commentaries (20 vols.)
  • Series: Cornerstone Biblical Commentary
  • Publisher: Tyndale
  • Volumes: 20
  • Pages: 10,758