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Early Judaism Collection (5 vols.)
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Overview

This collection from an all-star team of scholars presents the latest research on Judaism. This collection includes E. P. Sanders’ seminal Jesus and Judaism, which began the revolution in biblical studies that issued in the New Perspectives on Paul and profoundly influenced the work of notable scholars, such as N. T. Wright and James D. G. Dunn. In Ancient Judaism and Christian Origins: Diversity, Continuity, and Transformation, senior scholar George W. E. Nickelsburg assembles leading experts to present an accessible synthesis of the last half century of research born out of the New Perspective view of Second Temple Judaism. 4 Ezra and 2 Baruch: Translations, Introductions, and Notes presents fresh translations of primary texts for a firsthand look at the life and literature of early Judaism at one of its most turbulent times—the end of the Judean War and the destruction of the Temple. Explore these important issues in early Judaism and more with these academic works.

In the Logos editions, these valuable volumes are enhanced by amazing functionality. Scripture and ancient-text citations link directly to English translations and original-language texts, and important terms link to dictionaries, encyclopedias, and a wealth of other resources in your digital library. Perform powerful searches with the Topic Guide to instantly gather relevant biblical texts and resources, enabling you to jump into the conversation with the foremost scholars on issues within early Judaism. Tablet and mobile apps let you take the discussion with you. With Logos Bible Software, the most efficient and comprehensive research tools are in one place, so you get the most out of your study.

Jesus and Judaism was winner of the 1990 Louisville Grawemeyer Award in Religion. For more resources on Judaism, check out the T&T Clark Jewish Studies Collection (6 vols.).

Key Features

  • Cutting-edge research on early Judaism
  • E. P. Sanders’ seminal work on Second Temple Judaism
  • Synthesis of the past 50 years of research on Second Temple Judaism
  • Fresh translations of primary early-Jewish texts

Individual Titles

4 Ezra and 2 Baruch: Translations, Introductions, and Notes

  • Authors: Matthias Henze and Michael Edward Stone
  • Publisher: Fortress Press
  • Publication Date: 2013
  • Pages: 160

Matthias Henze and Michael Edward Stone present fresh translations of the important early Jewish texts 4 Ezra and 2 Baruch written in the decades after the Judean War, which saw Jerusalem conquered, the temple destroyed, and Judaism changed forever. This handy volume makes these two important texts accessible to students, provides expert introductions, and illuminates the interrelationship of the texts through parallel columns. Peer through the window of these texts into one of the most turbulent and significant times in Jewish history.

Matthias Henze holds the Watt J. and Lilly G. Jackson Chair in Biblical Studies at Rice University. He has written numerous books and scholarly articles on early Jewish and biblical studies. He edited Biblical Interpretation at Qumran and authored The Syriac Apocalypse of Daniel. He also wrote Jewish Apocalypticism in Late First-Century Israel, and is preparing the Hermeneia on 2 Baruch.

Michael Edward Stone is professor of Armenian studies and Gail Levin de Nur Professor of Religious Studies at The Hebrew University of Jerusalem. He is the author of numerous books and scholarly articles in biblical, early Jewish, and Armenian studies. He is the author of Ancient Judaism: New Visions and Views and 4 Ezra in the Hermeneia and Continental Commentaries.

Early Judaism: Texts and Documents on Faith and Piety

  • Editors: George W. E. Nickelsburg and Michael Edward Stone
  • Edition: Revised
  • Publisher: Fortress Press
  • Publication Date: 2009
  • Pages: 256

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5

Jewish writings from the period of Second Temple present a rich and potentially overwhelming variety of first-hand materials. George W. E. Nickelsburg and Michael E. Stone, experts on this formative period, have updated their classic sourcebook on Jewish beliefs and practices to take into account current thinking about the sources and to include new documents—including texts from Qumran not available in the first edition—in a brilliantly organized synthesis. This new edition also includes chapters on Jewish sects and parties, the Temple and worship, ideals of piety and conduct, expectations concerning deliverance, judgment, and vindication, different conceptions of the agents of God’s activity, and the figure of Lady Wisdom in relationship to Israel.

George W. E. Nickelsburg is Emeritus Professor of Religion at the University of Iowa, where he taught for more than three decades. He is the author of 70 articles and several hundred dictionary and encyclopedia entries. Among his many works are Jewish Literature between the Bible and the Mishnah and 1 Enoch 2: A Commentary on the Book of Enoch, Chapters 37–82 in the Hermeneia and Continental Commentaries.

Michael Edward Stone is professor of Armenian studies and Gail Levin de Nur Professor of Religious Studies at The Hebrew University of Jerusalem. He is the author of numerous books and scholarly articles in biblical, early Jewish, and Armenian studies. He is the author of Ancient Judaism: New Visions and Views and 4 Ezra in the Hermeneia and Continental Commentaries.

Ancient Judaism and Christian Origins: Diversity, Continuity, and Transformation

  • Editor: George W. E. Nickelsburg
  • Publisher: Fortress Press
  • Publication Date: 2003
  • Pages: 288

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6

In the nineteenth and the early twentieth century, Christian scholars portrayed Judaism as the dark religious backdrop to the liberating events of Jesus’ life and the rise of the early church. Since the 1950s, however, a dramatic shift has occurred in the study of Judaism, driven by new manuscript and archaeological discoveries and new methods and tools for analyzing sources. George Nickelsburg here provides a broad and synthesizing picture of the results of the past fifty years of scholarship on early Judaism and Christianity. He organizes his discussion around a number of traditional topics: scripture and tradition, Torah and the righteous life, God’s activity on humanity’s behalf, agents of God’s activity, eschatology, historical circumstances, and social settings. Each of the chapters discusses the findings of contemporary research on early Judaism, and then sketches the implications of this research for a possible reinterpretation of Christianity. Still, in the author’s view, there remains a major Jewish-Christian agenda yet to be developed and implemented.

It is a great thing when a meticulous scholar, who has come to master all the intricacies of his field, designs to tell a wider public what difference it all makes—in this case to the very understanding of Christianity. This book is a most welcome case in point.

Krister Stendahl, Anderew W. Mellon Professor of Divinity, Emeritus, Harvard University Divinity School

Theologically sensitive and historically precise, Nickelsburg’s lucid study situates Jesus and his earliest followers within the vibrancy of formative Judaism. His insightful presentations of Judaism’s compelling consciousness of grace, inspirational stories of martyrs, exuberant delight in following the Torah, and profound teachings on justice and mercy not only explicitly correct earlier scholarship’s tendentious descriptions of Jewish practice and belief, but also provide the groundwork for Jewish-Christian dialogue today.

—Amy-Jill Levine, Carpenter Professor of New Testament Studies, Vanderbilt Divinity School

One of the innovative leaders in this revolutionary rethinking of esoteric apocalypses, testaments, and legends, Nickelsburg presents in concise form a broad synthetic picture of the results of the last generation of burgeoning scholarship on the way we read and understand the wide variety of ancient Jewish literature. As one of the few scholars who commands a thorough knowledge of these important Jewish texts, he pulls together a rich range of references relevant to the main traditional topics of investigation and explores their implications for serious reinterpretation of the variety of movements that developed into early Christianity.

Richard A. Horsley, distinguished professor of liberal arts and the study of religion, University of Massachusetts, Boston

George W. E. Nickelsburg is Emeritus Professor of Religion at the University of Iowa, where he taught for more than three decades. He is the author of 70 articles and several hundred dictionary and encyclopedia entries. Among his many works are Jewish Literature between the Bible and the Mishnah and 1 Enoch 2: A Commentary on the Book of Enoch, Chapters 37–82 in the Hermeneia and Continental Commentaries.

The Messiah: Developments in Earliest Judaism and Christianity

  • Editor: James H. Charlesworth
  • Publisher: Fortress Press
  • Publication Date: 2009
  • Pages: 632

How did the Jews from 250 BC to AD 200 conceive and express their beliefs in the coming of God’s Messiah? Why did the Jews closely associated with Jesus of Nazareth claim within 10 years of his crucifixion in AD 30 that he indeed was the promised Messiah? An international team of prominent Jewish and Christian scholars discuss these and related questions in this volume that stems from the First Princeton Symposium on Judaism and Christian Origins.

The book focuses on the historical and theological importance of the presence or absence of the term “Messiah” and messianic ideas in the Hebrew Scriptures, the New Testament, Philo, the Apocrypha, the Pseudepigrapha, Josephus, and the Dead Sea Scrolls. It clarifies the key issues to be discussed, illustrates the appropriate methodology shared by international experts, and concentrates on the perplexing questions regarding messianic beliefs in Judaism and Christianity before the close of the New Testament and the editing of the Mishnah.

James H. Charlesworth is the George L. Collord Professor of New Testament Language and Literature at Princeton Theological Seminary where he is the editor and director of the Dead Sea Scrolls Project. He also edited the Princeton Symposium on the Dead Sea Scrolls Series and Old Testament Pseudepigrapha. His specialties are the Apocrypha and Pseudepigrapha of the Old and New Testaments, the Dead Sea Scrolls, Josephus, Jesus research, and the Gospel of John.

Jesus and Judaism

  • Editors: E. P. Sanders
  • Publisher: Fortress Press
  • Publication Date: 1985
  • Pages: 448

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6

This work takes up two related questions with regard to Jesus: his intention and his relationship to his contemporaries in Judaism. These questions immediately lead to two others: the reason for his death (did his intention involve an opposition to Judaism which led to death?) and the motivating force behind the rise of Christianity (did the split between the Christian movement and Judaism originate in opposition during Jesus’ lifetime?). Sanders’ earlier book Paul and Palestinian Judaism argued that Paul’s polemical writings were against the ecclesiology, not the soteriology, of Second Temple Judaism. This work follows in the same vein and argues that, while Jesus inaugurated an eschatological Jewish movement, he was not fundamentally at odds with first-century pharisaical Judaism.

I would be surprised if Jesus and Judaism does not turn out to be the most significant book of the decade in its field.

John Koenig, minister, Lutheran Church in America

What Sanders offers is good history—clearly stated hypotheses, expressed presuppositions, critically considered evidence, prudent and plausible conclusions . . . Jesus and Judaism is a milestone study.

—Paula Fredriksen, William Goodwin Aurelio Professor of the Appreciation of Scripture Emeritus, Boston University

The greatest value of Jesus and Judaism is that it embodies a generation’s desire to avoid exaggerations from right or left, to stop portraying Jesus as a predecessor of Martin Heidegger or Nicaragua’s president, Daniel Ortega, and to try to understand what he meant to say and accomplish.

John P. Meier, professor of New Testament, University of Notre Dame

E. P. Sanders is emeritus arts and sciences professor of religion at Duke University. His Jesus and Judaism was winner of the 1990 Louisville Grawemeyer Award in Religion. His volume Paul and Palestinian Judaism received the 1978 National Religious Book Award, Scholarly Book Category, from the Religious Book Review. He is also the author of Paul, the Law, and the Jewish People.

Product Details

  • Title: Early Judaism Collection
  • Publisher: Fortress Press
  • Volumes: 5
  • Pages: 1,784