1. Last chance to save on the Logos March Madness deals. Get yours before April 17!

Business Hours

Monday – Saturday
6 AM – 6 PM PDT
Local: 6:44 PM

Sign in

  1. Forgot your password?
What's Community Pricing?
Roman Poetry Collection (24 vols.)
This image is for illustration only. The product is a download.

Place Your Bid!

Click on the highest price you'd pay. If the final price is lower, that's what you'll pay.
  • Projected price

Overview

The Roman Poetry Collection contains a wealth of history, culture, and lore presented with a vitality and descriptiveness only the freedom of poetry could create. The collection includes Epigrams by Martial, the creator of the poetic form of epigrams, who uses hundreds of brief, witty poems to give us snapshots of Roman life not found in history books. The collection also includes mimes written to playfully mock society, epic poems of famous tales like Jason and the golden fleece, heart-wrenching love poems written by people whose lives embody their writing, poems about the Roman spectacles, and many more forms, authors, and topics for you to examine Roman culture—including poems by Emperor Hadrian. With over 20 known poets and numerous poems whose authors remain unknown, the Roman Poetry Collection provides an authentic look into a flourishing Roman culture through one of the most beautiful languages ever written.

This collection contains the complete texts in their Loeb Classical Library editions. Each text is included in its original Latin, with an English translation for easy side-by-side comparison. Logos’ language tools help you go deeper into the Latin text and explore the poets’ elegant language. Use the dictionary lookup tool to examine difficult Latin words and find every appearance of the same word in your library. Students of ancient history, culture, literature, and Latin will enjoy these works and appreciate their significance.

Like Martial’s epigrams? Discover other ancient epigrams in W. R. Paton’s Greek Anthology (10 vols.).

Key Features

  • Poems by more than 20 great Latin poets
  • Artistic descriptions of Roman culture and society
  • Loeb Classical Library editions

Individual Titles

Catullus, Tibullus, and Pervigilium Veneris

  • Author: Catullus and Tibullus
  • Translators: Francis Warre Cornish, John Percival Postgate, and John William Mackail
  • Series: Loeb Classical Library
  • Publisher: G. P. Putnam’s Sons
  • Publication Date: 1913
  • Pages: 188

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

This volume contains Francis Warre Cornish’s English translation of Catullus’ poems, John Percival Postgate’s English translation of Tibullus’ three books of poems, and John William Mackail’s English translation of Pervigilium Veneris, which may have been written by Tiberianus.

  • The Poems of Gaius Valerius Catullus
  • Tibullus: Book I
  • Tibullus: Book II
  • Tibullus: Book III
  • Pervigilium Veneris
    • The Eve of St. Venus
    • Appendix

Gaius Valerius Catullus (c. 84–54 BC) was a Latin poet who lived in Rome. He was born into a wealthy equestrian family in Verona. His father was a friend of Julius Caesar. Most of his poems were devoted to his passionate relationship with a prominent woman named Clodia, famed for her infidelity.

Albius Tibullus (c. 55–19 BC) was a Latin poet and writer. Each of his books of poems focused on a different lover. His poems reflect the tenderness and self-sacrifice of love. The death of Tibullus is honored and mourned by Domitius Marsus and an elegy by Ovid.

Catullus, Tibullus, and Pervigilium Veneris: Latin Text

  • Author: Catullus and Tibullus
  • Translators: Francis Warre Cornish, John Percival Postgate, and John William Mackail
  • Series: Loeb Classical Library
  • Publisher: G. P. Putnam’s Sons
  • Publication Date: 1913
  • Pages: 188

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

This volume contains the Latin text of Catullus Tibullus’ poems, and the Latin text of Pervigilium Veneris, which may have been written by Tiberianus.

  • The Poems of Gaius Valerius Catullus
  • Tibullus: Book I
  • Tibullus: Book II
  • Tibullus: Book III
  • Pervigilium Veneris
    • The Eve of St. Venus
    • Appendix

Propertius

  • Author: Sextus Propertius
  • Translator: Harold Edgeworth Butler
  • Series: Loeb Classical Library
  • Publisher: G. P. Putnam’s Sons
  • Publication Date: 1912
  • Pages: 182

This volume contains Harold Edgeworth Butler’s English translation of Propertius’ poems.

  • The Elegies
    • Book I
    • Book II
    • Book III
    • Book IV
    • Index

Sextus Propertius (c. 50–15 BC) was a Latin elegiac poet during the reign of Augustus. He was friends with Gallus and Virgil.

Propertius: Latin Text

  • Author: Sextus Propertius
  • Translator: Harold Edgeworth Butler
  • Series: Loeb Classical Library
  • Publisher: G. P. Putnam’s Sons
  • Publication Date: 1912
  • Pages: 181

This volume contains the Latin text of Propertius’ poems.

  • The Elegies
    • Book I
    • Book II
    • Book III
    • Book IV
    • Index

Argonautica

  • Author: C. Valerius Flaccus
  • Translator: John Henry Mozley
  • Series: Loeb Classical Library
  • Publisher: Harvard University Press
  • Publication Date: 1934
  • Pages: 240

This volume contains John Henry Mozley’s English translation of C. Valerius Flaccus’ Argonautica, which retells the tale of Jason’s quest for the golden fleece.

The poem is typical of his age, being a free rehandling of the story already told by Apollonius Rhodius, to whom he is superior in arrangement, vividness, and description of character.

—Loeb Classical Library

Various estimates have been formed of the genius of Flaccus, and some critics have ranked him above his original, to whom he certainly is superior in liveliness of description and delineation of character. His diction is pure, his style correct, his versification smooth . . .

Encyclopedia Britannica

Gaius Valerius Flaccus (died c. 90 BC) was a Roman poet during the Silver Age of Roman literature. He is said to have been a friend of Martial, and was a member of the College of Fifteen, who were in charge of the Sibylline books. His death is lamented by Quintilian, who provides one of the only reference points for the extent of his life.

Argonautica: Latin Text

  • Author: C. Valerius Flaccus
  • Translator: John Henry Mozley
  • Series: Loeb Classical Library
  • Publisher: Harvard University Press
  • Publication Date: 1934
  • Pages: 240

This volume contains the Latin text of C. Valerius Flaccus’ Argonautica, which retells the tale of Jason’s quest for the golden fleece.

Punica, vol. 1: Books 1–8

  • Author: Silius Italicus
  • Translator: J. D. Duff
  • Series: Loeb Classical Library
  • Publisher: Harvard University Press
  • Publication Date: 1927
  • Pages: 222

This volume contains J. D. Duff’s English translation of books one through eight of Punica, which follows Scipio and Hannibal to provide a poetic narrative of the second war with Carthage. Factually, Punica primarily draws from Livy’s account of the war. With over 12,000 lines, Punica is the longest surviving poem in Latin.

[Silius’] poem is written in pure Latin and smooth verse filled throughout with echoes of Virgil.

—Loeb Classical Library

Tiberius Catius Asconius Silius Italicus (c. 28–103 BC) was a Latin epic poet, a Roman consul, and an orator. Silius had a reputation as a fantastic forensic orator, and he became a careful politician. He is said to have been an informer for Nero, prosecuting whomever Nero pleased. He retired, and it is largely believed that this is when he wrote Punica. After discovering an incurable tumor, he put into practice the Stoic theory of suicide, which book 11 of Punica praises. He remained cheerful as he starved himself to death. Most of what is known about Silius’ life is learned from Pliny the Younger, who wrote about the poet just after his suicide. Martial the poet provided several epigrams about Silius as well.

Punica, vol. 1: Books 1–8: Latin Text

  • Author: Silius Italicus
  • Translator: J. D. Duff
  • Series: Loeb Classical Library
  • Publisher: Harvard University Press
  • Publication Date: 1927
  • Pages: 221

This volume contains the Latin text of books one through eight of Punica, which follows Scipio and Hannibal to provide a poetic narrative of the second war with Carthage. Factually, Punica primarily draws from Livy’s account of the war. With over 12,000 lines, Punica is the longest surviving poem in Latin.

Punica, vol. 2: Books 9–17

  • Author: Silius Italicus
  • Translator: J. D. Duff
  • Series: Loeb Classical Library
  • Publisher: Harvard University Press
  • Publication Date: 1934
  • Pages: 250

This volume contains J. D. Duff’s English translation of books 9–17 of Punica, which follows Scipio and Hannibal to provide a poetic narrative of the second war with Carthage. Factually, Punica primarily draws from Livy’s account of the war. With over 12,000 lines, Punica is the longest surviving poem in Latin.

Tiberius Catius Asconius Silius Italicus (c. 28–103 BC) was a Latin epic poet, a Roman consul, and an orator. Silius had a reputation as a fantastic forensic orator, and he became a careful politician. He is said to have been an informer for Nero, prosecuting whomever Nero pleased. He retired, and it is largely believed that this is when he wrote Punica. After discovering an incurable tumour, he put into practice the Stoic theory of suicide, which book 11 of Punica praises. He remained cheerful as he starved himself to death. Most of what is known about Silius’ life is learned from Pliny the Younger, who wrote about the poet just after his suicide. Martial the poet provided several epigrams about Silius as well.

Punica, vol. 2: Books 9–17: Latin Text

  • Author: Silius Italicus
  • Translator: J. D. Duff
  • Series: Loeb Classical Library
  • Publisher: Harvard University Press
  • Publication Date: 1934
  • Pages: 249

This volume contains the Latin text of books 9–17 of Punica, which follows Scipio and Hannibal to provide a poetic narrative of the second war with Carthage. Factually, Punica primarily draws from Livy’s account of the war. With over 12,000 lines, Punica is the longest surviving poem in Latin.

Lucan: The Civil War: Books 1-10 (Pharsalia)

  • Author: Lucan
  • Translator: J. D. Duff
  • Series: Loeb Classical Library
  • Publisher: Harvard University Press
  • Publication Date: 1928
  • Pages: 319

This volume contains J. D. Duff’s English translation of Lucan’s The Civil War. The poem spans Caesar’s crossing of the Rubicon, the Battle of Pharsalus and death of Pompey, and Caesar’s victory in Egypt. The text also includes an index.

[Lucan is] full of fire and energy and a master of brilliant phrases.

Quintilian

Marcus Annaeus Lucanus (AD 39–65) was born into a wealthy family in Spain and brought to Rome as an infant. He grew up learning under his uncle, Seneca. At a festival when he was about 20 years old, Lucan praised Emperor Nero in a panegyric and was promoted to the office of augurate. In the years to follow, Lucan and Nero’s friendship eroded into resentment, but scholars are uncertain how the conflict began. Nero forbid Lucan to publish or recite his poems, and in AD 65, Lucan joined a conspiracy to overthrow Nero led by Piso. When Nero learned of his treason, he ordered Lucan to commit suicide by cutting open a vein. Tacitus writes of Lucan’s death, “[he] recalled some poetry he had composed in which he had told the story of a wounded soldier dying a similar kind of death, and he recited the very lines. These were his last words.” Lucan is considered one of the outstanding poets of the Imperial Latin period, especially noted for his youth and fast composition.

Lucan: The Civil War: Books 1-10 (Pharsalia): Latin Text

  • Author: Lucan
  • Translator: J. D. Duff
  • Series: Loeb Classical Library
  • Publisher: Harvard University Press
  • Publication Date: 1928
  • Pages: 319

This volume contains the Latin text of Lucan’s The Civil War. The poem spans Caesar’s crossing of the Rubicon, the Battle of Pharsalus and death of Pompey, and Caesar’s victory in Egypt. The text also includes an index.

Epigrams, vol. 1

  • Author: Martial
  • Translator: Walter C. A. Ker
  • Series: Loeb Classical Library
  • Publisher: G. P. Putnam’s Sons
  • Publication Date: 1919
  • Pages: 246

This volume contains Walter C. A. Ker’s English translation of the first five books of Martial’s Epigrams. Epigrams today still follow Martial’s form. These particular epigrams illuminate the people, acts, games, banquets, and culture of Roman spectacles in the arena, as well as the eruption of Mt. Vesuvius. This volume also includes “On the Spectacles.”

[Martial] had as much good-nature as wit and pungency in his writings.

Pliny the Younger

Marcus Valerius Martialis (AD 40–c. 103) was a Latin poet from Hispania who created the poetic form of epigrams with 1,561 witty and satirical poems. He wrote during the time of several other significant Latin writers, namely Seneca the Younger, Seneca the Elder, Lucan, and Quintilian. He is noted for his often crude, yet witty satires of Roman life and culture.

Epigrams, vol. 1: Latin Text

  • Author: Martial
  • Translator: Walter C. A. Ker
  • Series: Loeb Classical Library
  • Publisher: G. P. Putnam’s Sons
  • Publication Date: 1919
  • Pages: 246

This volume contains the Latin text of the first five books of Martial’s Epigrams. Epigrams today still follow Martial’s form. These particular epigrams illuminate the people, acts, games, banquets, and culture of Roman spectacles in the arena, as well as the eruption of Mt. Vesuvius. This volume also includes “On the Spectacles.“

Epigrams, vol. 2

  • Author: Martial
  • Translator: Walter C. A. Ker
  • Series: Loeb Classical Library
  • Publisher: G. P. Putnam’s Sons
  • Publication Date: 1920
  • Pages: 284

This volume contains Walter C. A. Ker’s English translation of books 6–9 of Martial’s Epigrams, as well as “Epigrams Ascribed to Martial” and two indexes.

Marcus Valerius Martialis (AD 40–c. 103) was a Latin poet from Hispania who created the poetic form of epigrams with 1,561 witty and satirical poems. He wrote during the time of several other significant Latin writers, namely Seneca the Younger, Seneca the Elder, Lucan, and Quintilian. He is noted for his often crude, yet witty satires of Roman life and culture.

Epigrams, vol. 2: Latin Text

  • Author: Martial
  • Translator: Walter C. A. Ker
  • Series: Loeb Classical Library
  • Publisher: G. P. Putnam’s Sons
  • Publication Date: 1920
  • Pages: 284

This volume contains the Latin text of books 6–9 of Martial’s Epigrams, as well as “Epigrams Ascribed to Martial” and two indexes.

Statius, vol. 1: Silvae. Thebaid 1–4

  • Author: P. Papinius Statius
  • Translator: John Henry Mozley
  • Series: Loeb Classical Library
  • Publisher: G. P. Putnam’s Sons
  • Publication Date: 1928
  • Pages: 236

This volume contains John Henry Mozley’s English translation of Silvae and books 1–4 of Thebaid.

  • Silvae
    • Book I
      • Statius to His friend Stella
      • The Statue of Domitian
      • Epithalamium in Honor of Stella and Violntilla
      • The Villa of Manlius Vopiscus
      • To Rutilius Gallicus
      • The Baths of Claudius Etruscus
      • The Kalends of December
    • Book II
      • Statius to His Friend Melior
      • Glaucias
      • The Villa of Pollius Felix
      • The Tree of Atedius Melior
      • Melior’s Parrot
      • The Tame Lion
      • To Flavius Ursus
      • To Polla on Lucan’s Birthday
    • Book III
      • Statius to His Friend Pollius
      • The Temple of Hercules at Surrentum
      • To Maecius Celer
      • To Claudius Etruscus
      • The Tresses of Flavius Earinus
      • To His Wife Claudia
    • Book IV
      • Statius to His Friend Marcellus
      • The Seventeenth Consulship of Domitian
      • To the Emperor Domitian
      • The Domitian Road
      • To Vitorius Marcellus
      • To Septimius Severus
      • The Hercules Statuette
      • To Vibius Maximus
      • To Julius Menecrates
      • To Plotius Grypus
    • Book V
      • Statius to His Friend Abascantus
      • On the Death of Priscilla
      • The Praises of Crispinus
      • A Lament for His Father
      • To Sleep
      • A Lament for His Adopted Son
      • Fragment of a Poem on the German War
  • Thebaid
    • Book I
    • Book II
    • Book III
    • Book IV

Publius Papinius Statius (c. AD 45–96) was a first century Roman poet. Statius wrote the Thebaid, the Silvae, and the unfinished epic, the Achilleid. He also appears as a guide in Dante’s The Divine Comedy. From an early age, Statius had success in poetry contests, winning many in Naples and three times at the Alban Festival, where Emperor Domitian awarded Statius the golden crown.

Statius, vol. 1: Silvae. Thebaid 1–4: Latin Text

  • Author: P. Papinius Statius
  • Translator: John Henry Mozley
  • Series: Loeb Classical Library
  • Publisher: G. P. Putnam’s Sons
  • Publication Date: 1928
  • Pages: 235

This volume contains the Latin text of Silvae and books 1–4 of Thebaid.

  • Silvae
    • Book I
      • Statius to Gis friend Stella
      • The Statue of Domitian
      • Epithalamium in Honor of Stella and Violntilla
      • The Villa of Manlius Vopiscus
      • To Rutilius Gallicus
      • The Baths of Claudius Etruscus
      • The Kalends of December
    • Book II
      • Statius to His Friend Melior
      • Glaucias
      • The Villa of Pollius Felix
      • The Tree of Atedius Melior
      • Melior’s Parrot
      • The Tame Lion
      • To Flavius Ursus
      • To Polla on Lucan’s Birthday
    • Book III
      • Statius to His Friend Pollius
      • The Temple of Hercules at Surrentum
      • To Maecius Celer
      • To Claudius Etruscus
      • The Tresses of Flavius Earinus
      • To His Wife Claudia
    • Book IV
      • Statius to His Friend Marcellus
      • The Seventeenth Consulship of Domitian
      • To the Emperor Domitian
      • The Domitian Road
      • To Vitorius Marcellus
      • To Septimius Severus
      • The Hercules Statuette
      • To Vibius Maximus
      • To Julius Menecrates
      • To Plotius Grypus
    • Book V
      • Statius to His Friend Abascantus
      • On the Death of Priscilla
      • The Praises of Crispinus
      • A Lament for His Father
      • To Sleep
      • A Lament for His Adopted Son
      • Fragment of a Poem on the German War
  • Thebaid
    • Book I
    • Book II
    • Book III
    • Book IV

Statius, vol. 2: Thebaid 5–7. Achilleid

  • Author: P. Papinius Statius
  • Translator: John Henry Mozley
  • Series: Loeb Classical Library
  • Publisher: G. P. Putnam’s Sons
  • Publication Date: 1928
  • Pages: 298

This volume contains John Henry Mozley’s English translation of books 5–12 of Thebaid and Achilleid.

  • Thebaid
    • Book V
    • Book VI
    • Book VII
    • Book VIII
    • Book IX
    • Book X
    • Book XI
    • Book XII
  • Achilleid
    • Book I
    • Book II

Publius Papinius Statius (c. AD 45–96) was a first century Roman poet. Statius wrote the Thebaid, the Silvae, and the unfinished epic, the Achilleid. He also appears as a guide in Dante’s The Divine Comedy. From an early age, Statius had success in poetry contests, winning many in Naples and three times at the Alban Festival, where Emperor Domitian awarded Statius the golden crown.

Statius, vol. 2: Thebaid 5–7. Achilleid: Latin Text

  • Author: P. Papinius Statius
  • Translator: John Henry Mozley
  • Series: Loeb Classical Library
  • Publisher: G. P. Putnam’s Sons
  • Publication Date: 1928
  • Pages: 298

This volume contains the Latin text of books 5–12 of Thebaid and Achilleid.

  • Thebaid
    • Book V
    • Book VI
    • Book VII
    • Book VIII
    • Book IX
    • Book X
    • Book XI
    • Book XII
  • Achilleid
    • Book I
    • Book II

Juvenal and Persius

  • Authors: Juvenal and Persius
  • Translator: G. G. Ramsay
  • Series: Loeb Classical Library
  • Publisher: G. P. Putnam’s Sons
  • Publication Date: 1918
  • Pages: 208

This volume contains G. G. Ramsay’s English translation of the 16 satires of Juvenal, the six satires of Persius with a prologue, and an index for each author’s works.

. . . a unique master of style, a splendid versifier, the greatest satirist, and one of the greatest moralists, of the world.

—G. G. Ramsay on Juvenal

Decimus Iunius Iuvenalis, also known as Juvenal, was a Roman poet in the late first and early second centuries. The date of his birth and his death are unknown. He is believed to have been a pupil of Quintilian. Scholars can only guess the greater details of Juvenal’s life, as even the biographies that include him appear to be based off of his own writings about his life.

Aulus Persius Flaccus (c. 34–62 BC) was a Roman poet and satirist. Born in the city of Volterra, he moved to Rome at the age of 12 after losing his father and stepfather. His works were published after his death by his friend and mentor Lucius Annaeus Cornutus, and were very popular in the Middle Ages.

Juvenal and Persius: Latin Text

  • Authors: Juvenal and Persius
  • Translator: G. G. Ramsay
  • Series: Loeb Classical Library
  • Publisher: G. P. Putnam’s Sons
  • Publication Date: 1918
  • Pages: 208

This volume contains the Latin text of the 16 satires of Juvenal, the six satires of Persius with a prologue, and an index for each author’s works.

Minor Latin Poets

  • Authors: Publilius Syrus, Grattius, Calpurnius Siculus, Nemesianus, Lucius Annaeus Florus, P. Aelius Hadrianus, Reposianus, Modestinus, Pentadius, Tiberianus, Servasius, Avianus, and Rutilius Namatianus
  • Translator: J. Wight Duff and Arnold M. Duff
  • Series: Loeb Classical Library
  • Publisher: Harvard University Press
  • Publication Date: 1934
  • Pages: 420

This volume contains J. Wight Duff and Arnold M. Duff’s translations of 13 Latin poets and a number of poems with unknown authors. The text includes introductions to each of the poets and individual poems provided by the translators, and an index.

  • Publilius Syrus—Sententiae
  • “Elegiae in Maecenatem”
  • Grattius—Cynegetica
  • Calpurnius Siculus—Bucolica
  • “Laus Pisonis”
  • Einsiedeld Eclogues
  • “Precatio Terrae” and “Precatio Omnium Herbarum”
  • “Aetna”
  • Florus
  • Hadrian
  • Nemesianus—Bucolica and Cynegetica
    • Two Fragments of Bird-Catching
  • Reposianus, Modestinus, “Cupido Amans,” Pentadius
  • Tiberianus
  • “Dicta Catonis”
  • “Phoenix”
  • Avianus—Fabulae
  • Rutilius Namatianus—De Reditu Suo
  • Index

Publilius Syrus was a master of writing mimes who lived during the first century BC. He was brought as a slave to Italy, where his wit and talent earned his master’s favor, resulting in his freedom and education. His mimes, which mocked various aspects of social life, were adored by the public and the elite. In 46 BC, Caesar awarded Publilius a prize for defeating every competitor in a contest of wit, including the famous Decimus Laberius.

Marcus Aurelius Olympius Nemesianus was a popular poet who lived around AD 283. His poems on fishing, aquatics, and hunting were appreciated by Emperor Carus and were often recited in his court. Cynegetica was used as a school textbook in the ninth century.

Publius Annius Florus, who some scholars believe was also the historian Lucius Annaeus Florus, was a Roman poet and rhetorician from Africa. From an early age he competed in literary contests put on by Domitian. After not receiving a prize because of the prejudice against Africans, he left Rome for the city of Tarraco, where he taught rhetoric. He was a personal friend of Emperor Hadrian.

Publius Aelius Traianus Hadrianus Augustus (AD 76–138), better known as Hadrian, was a Roman emperor from AD 117–138. He built Hadrian’s Wall, the Temple of Venus and Roma, and rebuilt the Pantheon. He engaged with the greatest teachers of his time, both deferring to and challenging them when he saw fit. In literature, he had a taste for more archaic writers such as Cato, Ennius, and Coelius Antipater. He is remembered for his accomplishments as emperor of Rome, but throughout his life he dabbled in various poetic forms.

Rutilius Claudius Namatianus was a Roman imperial poet who lived during the fifth century. He is the author of De Reditu Suo, a beaufitully written poem describing a voyage from Rome to Gaul in AD 416. In 2004, a film entitled “De Reditu” was produced based on his poem.

Minor Latin Poets: Latin Text

  • Authors: Publilius Syrus, Grattius, Calpurnius Siculus, Nemesianus, Lucius Annaeus Florus, P. Aelius Hadrianus, Reposianus, Modestinus, Pentadius, Tiberianus, Servasius, Avianus, and Rutilius Namatianus
  • Translator: J. Wight Duff and Arnold M. Duff
  • Series: Loeb Classical Library
  • Publisher: Harvard University Press
  • Publication Date: 1934
  • Pages: 418

This volume contains the Latin text of 13 Latin poets and a number of poems with unknown authors.

  • Publilius Syrus—Sententiae/li>
  • “Elegiae in Maecenatem”
  • Grattius—Cynegetica
  • Calpurnius Siculus—Bucolica
  • “Laus Pisonis”
  • Einsiedeld Eclogues
  • “Precatio Terrae” and “Precatio Omnium Herbarum”
  • “Aetna”
  • Florus
  • Hadrian
  • Nemesianus—Bucolica and Cynegetica
    • Two Fragments of Bird-Catching
  • Reposianus, Modestinus, “Cupido Amans,” Pentadius
  • Tiberianus
  • “Dicta Catonis”
  • “Phoenix”
  • Avianus—Fabulae
  • Rutilius Namatianus—De Reditu Suo
  • Index

Product Details

  • Title: Roman Poetry Collection
  • Series: Loeb Classical Library
  • Publisher: G. P. Putnam’s Sons and Harvard University Press
  • Volumes: 24
  • Pages: 6,177