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T&T Clark Studies in Apocryphal and Pseudepigraphal Writings (7 vols.)
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Overview

This collection of volumes from T&T Clark presents current research from world-renowned scholars on apocryphal and pseudepigraphal texts and their relevance for the study of Second-Temple Judaism, the New Testament, and early Christianity. Several volumes present the original-language texts and translations of these writings for primary source research and others offer in-depth analyses of their contents and relation to first-century Judaism and Christianity. Dig into the study of important texts like the Gospel of Thomas, the Parables of Enoch, the Testament of Job, and many more with these volumes.

These pioneering works are enhanced by the best in Bible software with the Logos editions. Scripture and ancient text citations link directly to English translations and original-language texts, and important terms link to dictionaries, encyclopedias, and a wealth of other resources in your digital library. Perform powerful searches with the topic guide where relevant biblical texts and resources are instantly gathered together and enable you to jump into the conversation with the foremost scholars on these issues. Tablet and mobile apps let you take the discussion with you. With Logos Bible Software, the most efficient and comprehensive research tools are in one place so you get the most out of your study.

Key Features

  • Original-language texts and English translations of ancient apocryphal and pseudepigraphal writings
  • Helpful essays on the relevance of non-canonical texts for the study of Judaism and the New Testament
  • In-depth analysis from world-class scholars

Individual Titles

The Text of the New Testament Apocrypha (100–400 CE)

  • Author: Thomas Wayment
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2013
  • Pages: 240

While a variety of editions of the New Testament Apocrypha exist in English, German, French, Spanish, and Italian, the actual Greek texts have remained difficult to access until now. This book brings together these Greek non-canonical Christian texts in an accurate and comprehensive collection. Including over 200 high quality images of the papyri and indicating where they are housed in the world today, this volume provides a highly valuable reference to facilitate the study of these important texts.

To have here a collection of Christianity’s non-canonical texts from its first four centuries, with photographic plates of the early papyri and with transcriptions, is very useful. Readers with an interest in these extant fragments of apocryphal books and samples of the writings of the Apostolic Fathers set out in this handy format are enabled to explore the influence and diversity of these early documents.

—J. K. Elliott, professor of New Testament textual criticism, University of Leeds

Thomas Wayment is professor of ancient Scripture at Brigham Young University and a founding member of the Ancient Textual Imaging Group. He is currently publishing the papyri in the Brigham Young University Collection. He is the author of A Reexamination of the Text of P.Oxy. 2949 in the Journal of Biblical Literature and A New Transcription of P.Oxy. 2383 (P69) in Novum Testamentum.

“Non-Canonical” Religious Texts in Early Judaism and Early Christianity

  • Editors: Lee Martin McDonald and James H. Charlesworth
  • Series: Jewish and Christian Text
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2012
  • Pages: 264

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6

This volume examines what are traditionally seen as “non-canonical” texts and the role they played in early Judaism and Christianity. The contributors discuss several important Jewish and Christian apocryphal and pseudepigraphal texts and describe their ancient functions and socio-cultural and religious context. The texts treated include the Oxyrhynchus papyri, the Enochic library of the author of the Epistle of Barnabas, the Coptic, Arabic, and Ethiopic versions of the Testament of Abraham, and the Testaments of Isaac and Jacob. It is argued that these texts show the fluidity of the notion of Scripture in the early centuries of the Church and in the Judaism of late antiquity. These studies demonstrate the value of examining the ancient religious texts that weren’t included in the Jewish or Christian biblical canons. Because ancient texts were not created in a vacuum, these non-canonical writings aid in our interpretation not only of many canonical writings, but also shed considerable light on the context of early Judaism and Christianity.

Lee M. McDonald is president emeritus and professor of New Testament studies emeritus of Acadia Divinity School in Nova Scotia and adjunct professor of New Testament at Fuller Theological Seminary. He serves as scholar in residence for the American Baptist Churches of Los Angeles and the American Baptist Congregations of the Southwest and Hawaii. He is also the author of The World of the New Testament: Cultural, Social, and Historical Contexts.

James H. Charlesworth is the George L. Collord Professor of New Testament Language and Literature at Princeton Theological Seminary and director of the seminary’s Dead Sea Scrolls Project. He is also the author of Old Testament Pseudepigrapha (2 vols.) and the editor of the Princeton Symposium on the Dead Sea Scrolls Series (3 vols.).

The Fifth Gospel: The Gospel of Thomas Comes of Age

  • Authors: Stephen J. Patterson, Hans-Gebhard Bethge, and James M. Robinson
  • Edition: New
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2011
  • Pages: 144

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5

In December 1945, at the base of cliffs that run along the Nile River near the modern-day town of Nag Hammadi, an Egyptian farmer discovered a sealed jar containing the ancient text of the Gospel of Thomas. At the time, this discovery represented arguably the most significant manuscript discovery of the twentieth century for the study of the New Testament and Christian origins. The Gospel of Thomas is among the most controversial writings related to early Christianity. Some scholars argue that it attests to a lost Christianity, while others argue that it is a later Gnostic offshoot. This debate directly impacts the doctrine of inspiration, canon formation, and the very essence of the message of Jesus.

This classic book presents the best text and the best translation of Thomas in user-friendly form. Additional chapters provide a general introduction to the Gospel of Thomas and tell the fascinating story of that discovery itself by one who was directly involved in bringing this new text to light. This new edition features updated material which takes account of recent research on the Gospel of Thomas. The translation has been refined at points, and the bibliographical material updated. This new edition also includes an annotated bibliography for further reading to provide readers with a guide to the most important current research on this important document.

Professor Patterson offers in this new edition the best general introduction to the Gospel of Thomas I have ever read: his is a well-balanced, academically solid, and yet accessible, synthesis, effectively placing the core of this Gospel into an intellectual milieu of the late first century, colored by Middle Platonism and Jewish wisdom traditions.

Ismo Dunderberg, professor of New Testament, University of Helsinki

The perfect introduction to the Gospel of Thomas. The Fifth Gospel includes a definitive discussion of Thomas’ literary features, theology, and historical significance; a thrilling account of the text’s discovery and publication; and what is probably the best, clearest, and most accessible translation of this ancient, non-canonical account of Jesus’ words. A wonderful resource for those approaching Thomas for the first time, but a valuable tool for scholars as well.

William Arnal, associate professor of religious studies, University of Regina, Canada

This is an excellent new presentation of the Gospel of Thomas for a general audience, and it will be a very useful textbook.

Religious Studies Review

I hardly thought there was need for a new translation of the Gospel of Thomas until I read this one . . . this translation . . . advances the grace and ease of translation more than any previous one. . . . This translation also distinguishes itself by clarifying some of the more obscure and difficult readings of the Gospel of Thomas. Although scholars may disagree with the readings, the general reading public will find them more accessible. . . . In all, this is an excellent translation.

Review of Biblical Literature

Stephen J. Patterson is George H. Atkinson Professor of Religious and Ethical Studies at Williamette University in Salem Oregon. He was formerly professor of New Testament at Eden Theological Seminary in St. Louis.

Hans-Gebhard Bethge is professor of New Testament at the Humboldt University in Berlin and author of The Gospel According to Thomas (4 vols.).

James M. Robinson is the editor of The Nag Hammadi Library in English, 4th rev. ed..

The Son of Man in the Parables of Enoch and in Matthew

  • Author: Leslie W. Walck
  • Series: Jewish and Christian Texts
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2011
  • Pages: 288

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6

This book examines all the relevant passages containing the term “Son of Man” in both Matthew and the Parables of Enoch. Depictions of the Son of Man in the Gospel of Matthew and in the Parables of Enoch raise questions about their relationship. The meaning and origin of the term “Son of Man” is discussed and its use by Matthew and the Parable of Enoch is thoroughly examined. Introductory questions of date, provenance, and social setting are addressed for both Matthew and the Parables of Enoch. Based on dating considerations and a comparison of the Son of Man’s characteristics in each, it is argued that the author of the Matthew could have been aware of and influenced by the Parables of Enoch. Walck utilizes literary, redaction, sociological, and narrative criticism to explore the relationship between these two important texts of antiquity.

Leslie W. Walck received an MDiv from Luther Seminary in St. Paul, MN, an MA from Oxford, and a PhD from the University of Notre Dame. He participated in the 2005 Enoch Seminar in Camaldoli, Italy and is currently the pastor of Colfax Lutheran Church in Colfax, WI.

Parables of Enoch: A Paradigm Shift

  • Editors: Darrell Bock and James H. Charlesworth
  • Series: Jewish and Christian Texts
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2013
  • Pages: 448

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6

Parables of Enoch is an interdisciplinary study of the state of the current debate surrounding the Parables of Enoch with regard to their dating as well as their Jewish character and potential contribution to aspects of early Christian thought. The role of 1 Enoch in the context of Christian origins is much discussed amongst Second Temple and New Testament scholars, with the former often attaching more importance to them than the latter. The contributors to the present volume stem from both areas, and together explore the relative significance of the Parables of Enoch. The important issues discussed include the significance of the parables for a deeper understanding of Second Temple thought, Jesus’ message, the development of the kerygma, and the traditions embodied and edited in canonical texts, especially the Gospels. The extremely impressive list of contributors includes Geza Vermes, Richard Bauckham, James Dunn, Larry Schiffman, James VanderKam, Francis Moloney, and Loren Stuckenbruck.

Darrell L. Bock is research professor of New Testament studies and professor of spiritual development and culture at Dallas Theological Seminary and is an internationally recognized author of many works.

James H. Charlesworth is the George L. Collord Professor of New Testament Language and Literature at Princeton Theological Seminary and director of the seminary’s Dead Sea Scrolls Project. He is also the author of Old Testament Pseudepigrapha (2 vols.) and the editor of the Princeton Symposium on the Dead Sea Scrolls Series (3 vols.).

The “Whole Truth”: Rethinking Retribution in the Book of Tobit

  • Author: Micah D. Kiel
  • Series: The Library of Second Temple Studies
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2012
  • Pages: 200

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6

Micah Kiel discusses the overly simplistic designation of “deuteronomistic” given to Tobit’s perspective on retribution. By coordinated analysis with Sirach and parts of 1 Enoch, Kiel contends that Tobit’s view is much more complex than is normally asserted. He argues that the return of Tobit’s sight is a catalyst that ushers in new theological insight, specifically, that the world does not run to the tightly mechanized scheme of act and consequence. Kiel’s close comparison between Tobit and selected contemporaneous literature provides context and support for such narrative observations. Sirach and parts of 1 Enoch demonstrate how authors at the time of Tobit were expressing their views of retribution in the realm of creation theology. The created order in Tobit is unruly and rises up in opposition to God’s righteous characters. By way of this quirky tale, the author of Tobit suggests that God doesn’t function strictly according to old formulae. Instead, a divine incursion into human reality is necessary for the reversal of suffering.

Micah D. Kiel is an assistant professor of theology with a specialization in biblical studies at St. Ambrose University

The Testament of Job: Text, Narrative, and Reception History

  • Author: Maria Haralambakis
  • Series: The Library of Second Temple Studies
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2012
  • Pages: 224

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6

Maria Haralambakis provides a wide-ranging study of the pseudepigraphal Testament of Job. She begins with textual issues, considering the recent publication of a 4th century Coptic codex of the text, as well as the more well-known Byzantine Greek manuscripts and a much larger number of Slavonic manuscripts. Rather than working backwards from the most recent manuscripts to a hypothetical original text, Haralambakis presents the manuscripts from earliest to latest as a succession of witnesses to the text of the Testament of Job, each valuable as evidence of its contemporary world.

Haralambakis moves on to examine the structure of the Testament as a remarkable literary work, employing narrative theory to demonstrate how the composition works as a well-crafted story. Gleaning insights from the text’s widespread presence in Byzantine and Slavonic Christian churches, Haralambakis examines its reception history, asserting that, in these contexts, the story came to be viewed as something akin to the life of a saint.

Maria Haralambakis earned a PhD from the University of Manchester. She is a postdoctoral fellow at the University of Manchester doing research in Jewish studies through funding from the Rothschild Foundation.

Product Details

  • Title: T&T Clark Studies in Apocryphal and Pseudepigraphal Writings
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Volumes: 7
  • Pages: 1,848