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The Church History of the First Three Centuries, vol. 2
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The Church History of the First Three Centuries, vol. 2

by

Williams and Norgate 1879

Runs on Windows, Mac and mobile.
$9.99

Overview

The history of the development of Christianity dates of course form the departure of Jesus from the world. But in Paul, this history has a new beginning; from this point we are able to trace it not only in its external features, but also in its inner connection. F.C. Baur traces the rise and development of Christianity through the first three centuries.

Contents

  • Fourth Part: Christianity as Highest Principle of Revelation; and as Dogma
    • Transition to Dogma
    • Christology of the Synoptic Gospels and of Paul
    • The Johannine Logos-notion
    • The Apostolic Fathers and the Early Fathers
    • The Monarchians
    • The Further Development of Doctrine
    • Dogma in General
  • Fifth Part: Christianity as a Power Ruling the World: In Its Relation to the Heathen World and to the Roman State
    • The Relation of Christianity to the Heathen World and to the Roman State, on Its Inner Side
    • The Relation of Christianity to the Heathen World and to the Roman State, on Its Outer Side
  • Sixth Part: Christianity as a Moral Religious Principle in Its Absoluteness; and Its Limitation in Time
    • The Moral Religious Principle of Christianity
    • The Moral Attitude of the Christians on Its Bright Side
    • One-Sided and Narrow Elements of the Christian Morality
    • The Purer Moral Principles of Clement of Alexandria
    • Laxity of Moral Practice
    • The Christian Cultus

Product Details

  • Title: The Church History of the First Three Centuries, vol. 2
  • Author: F.C. Baur
  • Publisher: Williams and Norgate
  • Publication Date: 1879
  • Pages: 300

About F.C. Baur

Ferdinand Christian Baur (1792–1860) was educated at the University of Tübingen where he later taught as a professor of theology and is credited with founding the movement known as the “Tübingen School” of New Testament criticism. He applied Hegelian philosophy to Christian history in order to develop a new understanding about how Christianity developed.