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Reformed Expository Commentary (18 vols.)
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Overview

The Reformed Expository Commentary series is for people who want to experience the Word of God in all its power. Scholarly yet practical, its expositions are accessible to both pastors and lay readers. Each volume in the series provides exposition that gives careful attention to the biblical text, is doctrinally Reformed, focuses on Christ through the lens of redemptive history, and applies the Bible to our contemporary setting.

With Logos, you can use these volumes more efficiently for research and sermon preparation. Every word from every book has been indexed and catalogued to help you search the entire Reformed Expository Commentary series for a particular verse or topic. With Logos, this series will integrate into the passage guide. Whenever you enter your passage and click go, results from this commentary series will appear on the text you’re studying. This gives you instant access to exactly what you’re looking for in less time than it would take you to walk over to the bookshelf and begin flipping through a print volume.

Key Features

  • Provides biblical, doctrinal, redemptive-historical, and practical commentaries
  • Includes doctrinally Reformed expositions by pastor-scholars
  • Offers material well suited for pastors and students

Praise for the Print Edition

A rare combination of biblical insight, theological substance, and pastoral application.

R. Albert Mohler Jr., ninth president, Southern Baptist Theological Seminary

Some commentaries lose the forest for the trees, and others the trees for the forest. This series promises to be both exegetically sensitive and theologically faithful.

Mark Dever, senior pastor, Capitol Hill Baptist Church, Washington DC, MD

A rare blend of insightful exegesis and discerning application. What’s more, you’ll find the glories of Christ shining through texts that can otherwise appear obscure and irrelevant.

—C. J. Mahaney, president, Sovereign Grace Ministries

Those of us who regularly preach need commentaries that provide the best biblical scholarship and that also understand the challenges of today’s pastorate. This series ably speaks to both needs.

Bryan Chapell, distinguished professor of preaching, Knox Theological Seminary

Here is exposition modeled by pastors with scholarly gifts and by scholars with pastor’s hearts. Exegetical and theological reliability, redemptive-historical sensitivity, a Christ-centered focus, and contemporary practical application—these are promised hallmarks of the series. May it serve as a model to encourage and enthuse a new generation to love the Word of God and to rediscover the life-transforming power of expository preaching!

Sinclair Ferguson, senior minister, First Presbyterian Church, Columbia, SC

A canonical, Reformed expositional commentary has long been a desideratum, and we are now in debt to this gifted team of pastor-theologians for bringing it to pass.

—J. Ligon Duncan III, senior pastor, First Presbyterian Church, Jackson, MS

Individual Titles

1 Samuel

  • Author: Richard D. Phillips
  • Editors: Richard D. Phillips, Philip Graham Ryken, and Iain M. Duguid
  • Publisher: P&R Publishing
  • Publication Date: 2012
  • Pages: 576

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

David is more than a great hero, a man of faith, and a model for Christians to follow. He is one of the most important Old Testament types of Jesus Christ. It is as an anointed one—called and provided by God to lead Israel—that David plays his chief role in redemptive history and makes his distinctive contribution in preparing God’s people for the Anointed One, the Messiah who comes to rule and to save.

Two other significant figures—Samuel and Saul—appear in 1 Samuel. Samuel, an epochal figure whose significance equals that of Joshua, guides Israel out of the chaotic period of the judges and serves the coming of the Davidic kingdom. Saul, an alter ego first to Samuel and then to David, personifies idolatry and unbelief that plague Israel throughout the Old Testament. The ways in which he contrasts with Samuel and David provide valuable spiritual lessons.

The lesser characters in 1 Samuel are hardly incidental—Eli the corrupted priest, Hannah the tearful believer, and Jonathan the faithful friend, to name just three.

Faithful exposition of God’s Word instruct and transform, disturb and comfort—edifying us through godly exhortations and gospel proclamation. That is precisely what I have found in Richard Phillips’ commentary on 1 Samuel.

Michael S. Horton, J. Gresham Machen Professor, Westminster Seminary, CA

This commentary is an indispensable tool. Phillips addresses the memorable narratives of Samuel, Saul, and David carefully and pastorally, paying special attention to character development, historical background, sound doctrine, and practical application. All who love God’s Word will surely want to consult this essential volume and add it to their personal libraries.

Steven J. Lawson, senior pastor, Christ Fellowship Baptist Church, Mobile, AL

Phillips provides scripturally faithful, satisfyingly readable, and spiritually challenging expositions that will strengthen the believer’s soul. Like a diver, Phillips has gone deep down to uncover the pearls of heaven.

—Michael A. Milton, James M. Baird Jr. Chair of Pastoral Theology, Reformed Theological Seminary

This commentary is everything we’ve come to expect from Rick: painstaking exegesis, nuanced application, careful attention to relevance for today’s world, and a discernible and memorable structure. It is an outstanding model of Reformed expository preaching. A finer exposition of 1 Samuel you will not find.

Derek W. H. Thomas, professor of systematic and historical theology, Reformed Theological Seminary

Richard D. Phillips is the senior minister of Second Presbyterian Church in Greenville, SC. He is a council member of the Alliance of Confessing Evangelicals and chairman of the Philadelphia Conference on Reformed Theology.

1 Kings

  • Author: Philip Graham Ryken
  • Editors: Richard D. Phillips, Philip Graham Ryken, and Iain M. Duguid
  • Publisher: P&R Publishing
  • Publication Date: 2011
  • Pages: 619

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Dynasties, fractured kingdoms, prophecies of coming hardships—the book of 1 Kings is a grand, sweeping narrative of the beginning of the downfall of God’s people. Its size and scope may seem intimidating, but Phil Ryken shows us in this biblical, doctrinal, practical, and Christological commentary how this imposing book can be divided into three key sections.

First, the stories of Solomon focus on the themes of money, sex, and power, inviting us to learn from Solomon’s example. Will we use these things wisely for kingdom purposes, or foolishly abuse them for selfish gain? Then the middle of the story, on the divided kingdom, shows the destructive consequences of sin among the people of God—especially the sin of idolatry. The final section demonstrates the power of prayer to the true and living God, as exemplified in the life and ministry of God’s prophet Elijah.

Phil Ryken brings out the key themes of these three sections and illustrates how they come together in their focus on the gospel of Jesus Christ, especially his kingly and prophetic offices. This is an excellent resource for those who want a devotional aid and will help Bible expositors reliably teach a redemptive-historical view of this important Old Testament book.

Sadly for many North American Christians the Old Testament is a dead book, often treated merely as a foil against which to interpret the New Testament. Phil Ryken’s work goes much work goes much farther. . . . This volume is a model of exposition, combining thorough and responsible exegesis with a passion to communicate the life-giving power of Old Testament Scriptures for the church.

Daniel I. Block, Gunther H. Knoedler Professor of Old Testament, Wheaton College

Ryken finds himself on the short list of highly-gifted expositors in this generation. . . . Dr. Ryken has done the church an enormous service by providing this excellent resource for pastors and teachers to aid in their sermon and lesson preparation. . . . clear, compelling, scholarly, pastoral, challenging, heart-searching, and life-changing. I, myself, cannot imagine preaching through 1 Kings without first consulting this important work.

Steven J. Lawson, senior pastor, Christ Fellowship Baptist Church, Mobile, AL

With his usual deft touch, Ryken makes the narrative live; and with rare pastoral skill, he applies its truth with vigor. Be prepared to find yourself troubled by the perversity of human nature and frustrated by the cycles of human foolishness. But be prepared, also, to find yourself amazed by the grace of God who in every age and stage leaves a witness to himself.

—Liam Goligher, senior minister, Tenth Presbyterian Church, Philadelphia, PA

Ryken’s historical, literary, theological, and pastoral gifts combine to make him an excellent guide to the riches of 1 Kings. This lively and reverent treatment of this book will aid pastors and small group leaders who wish to share this neglected book in engaging ways.

Paul R. House, professor of divinity, Beeson Divinity School, Samford University

Philip Graham Ryken is eighth and current president of Wheaton College and was previously senior minister at Tenth Presbyterian Church, Philadelphia. He has written or edited more than 30 books, including, in this series, Galatians, 1 Timothy, and Luke.

Esther and Ruth

  • Author: Iain M. Duguid
  • Editors: Richard D. Phillips, Philip Graham Ryken, and Iain M. Duguid
  • Publisher: P&R Publishing
  • Publication Date: 2005
  • Pages: 200

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6

Does God help those who help themselves? That may seem to be the message of the books of Esther and Ruth. Some think that Ruth’s attractiveness won over Naomi and Boaz, or that Esther’s bold faithfulness saved her people. But a closer reading shows an embittered Naomi to have abandoned the Promised Land and God’s people, and Esther to have become thoroughly assimilated to the culture and values of Persian society.

In Esther, God works in invisible ways to save his people. In Ruth, God’s grace comes to Naomi unexpectedly, and with it, a depiction of redemption for her people. In both books, a gracious and sovereign God works through flawed individuals—unable even to help themselves—to rescue his people and prepare for the coming of Christ.

An amazing commentary! Rarely does an expositor demonstrate such virtuosity. But Iain Duguid brings it all together: a specialist’s knowledge of the Hebrew text and culture, a preacher’s eye for theme and structure, a pastor’s skill in nuanced application, a theologian’s grasp of Christ-centered theology (that would make Geerhard Vos smile), and a wordsmith’s attention to language and lingering metaphor. Duguid’s Esther and Ruth will elevate and inspire generations of readers and preachers.

R. Kent Hughes, pastor, College Church, Wheaton, IL

This exposition of Esther and Ruth is a ‘honeycomb, sweet to the soul and healing to the bones.’ The author gives us a good dose of healing theology in a most relevant manner. From now on I will require my students to read this engaging commentary for their edification and delight.

Bruce K. Waltke, professor of Old Testament, Reformed Theological Seminary

Iain M. Duguid is professor of Old Testament at Westminster Seminary, California. He has written a number of books on Christ-centered exposition, including Living in the Gap between Promise and Reality: The Gospel According to Abraham, and Living in the Grip of Relentless Grace: The Gospel in the Lives of Isaac and Jacob in the Gospel According to the Old Testament series.

Daniel

  • Author: Iain M. Duguid
  • Editors: Richard D. Phillips, Philip Graham Ryken, and Iain M. Duguid
  • Publisher: P&R Publishing
  • Publication Date: 2008
  • Pages: 236

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

The book of Daniel is both familiar and unfamiliar to many Christians. The stories of the fiery furnace and Daniel in the lion’s den are the staples of children’s Bible story books and Sunday school classes. Yet the latter chapters of Daniel’s vision are more unfamiliar and daunting to most believers, who may have been exposed to a variety of end-times speculations constructed from an amalgam of these texts and others drawn from elsewhere in the Bible.

Iain M. Duguid reminds Christians that Daniel gives us more than moral lessons or a prophetic timetable. The whole of the book points us to Christ, whether as the one greater than Daniel who has perfectly lived an exilic life of service and separation for us or as the exalted heavenly Son of Man who took flesh amongst us.

I’m a pastor, not a scholar. When you read Iain Duguid, it is clear he is both. Like his other works, this commentary is a rare blend of insightful exegesis and discerning application. What’s more, with Iain’s guidance you’ll find the glories of Christ shining through texts that can otherwise appear obscure and irrelevant. This book will educate pastors, edify Christians, and advance the proclamation of the gospel.

—C. J. Mahaney, president, Sovereign Grace Ministries

It is rare to find a technical scholar who is also a master homiletician and preacher. But these things Dr. Iain Duguid clearly is. Here, rigorous expository methodology, nuanced biblical theology, and pastoral passion combine to expound the Gospel of Jesus Christ in the ravishing narrative and exotic apocalyptic of the book of Daniel. Readers will be grateful for the reverence and care given to the sacred text, plus the wise application to today’s church midst her Babylons. This is a must-read for anyone desiring to understand and live in the dazzling light of Daniel. Warmly commended.

R. Kent Hughes, pastor, College Church, Wheaton, IL

Iain M. Duguid is professor of Old Testament at Westminster Seminary, California. He has written a number of books on Christ-centered exposition, including Living in the Gap between Promise and Reality: The Gospel According to Abraham, and Living in the Grip of Relentless Grace: The Gospel in the Lives of Isaac and Jacob in the Gospel According to the Old Testament series.

Jonah and Micah

  • Author: Richard D. Phillips
  • Editors: Richard D. Phillips, Philip Graham Ryken, and Iain M. Duguid
  • Publisher: P&R Publishing
  • Publication Date: 2010
  • Pages: 381

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Jonah is a figure of such contemporary features that he could walk out of one of our churches. Moreover, Jonah reminds us that the chief characteristic of redeemed people is not that they never sin, for sadly we still do, but that they are ready to repent of their sin when reminded of God’s grace.

The prophet Micah lived several generations later than Jonah. Whereas God called Jonah to cry out to the wicked idolaters in Nineveh, he called Micah to cry out against the wicked sinners of Jerusalem. Unlike the earlier prophet, who wrestled against God’s gospel message for pagan unbelievers, Micah was brokenhearted in his fervent desire for Jerusalem to repent and believe.

A study of Jonah will connect us with our mission to the world. A study of Micah will inform us to face our challenges within today’s church.

Rick Phillips is a uniquely gifted expositor, blessed with an astute mind for opening the biblical text. His skills are obvious in explaining the God-intended meaning of Scripture and showing its life-changing relevance. Distinctly reformed and exegetically sound, this commentary is an invaluable treasure house of what you need to understand the biblical passages of the prophets Jonah and Micah. If you are a preacher, teacher, or an interested reader of Scripture, this book is a must read.

Steven J. Lawson, senior pastor, Christ Fellowship Baptist Church, Mobile, AL

Richard Phillips integrates sound exegesis, theological orthodoxy, and practical application in this volume. Focusing on grace, without losing a sense of God’s righteousness, he illuminates the familiar story of Jonah and the lesser-known message of Micah. Expositors of Micah will be particularly pleased to find this sadly neglected prophet expounded in depth.

Paul R. House, professor of divinity, Beeson Divinity School, Samford University

Much more than just insightful comments on the Scripture, these are true expositions of the prophetic words speaking with prophetic power. Each of these expositions takes us into the very heart of grace. In Jonah, Phillips shows that the great challenge is not simply to believe the gospel of grace, but to live it in reaching out to the lost. In Micah, we are presented with the mystery of great divine judgment against his people’s sin and the astounding grace of a God who pardons our sins and casts them into the depth of the sea.

—Mark E. Ross, associate professor of systematic theology, Erskine Theological Seminary

Richard D. Phillips is the senior minister of Second Presbyterian Church in Greenville, SC. He is a council member of the Alliance of Confessing Evangelicals and chairman of the Philadelphia Conference on Reformed Theology.

Zechariah

  • Author: Richard D. Phillips
  • Editors: Richard D. Phillips, Philip Graham Ryken, and Iain M. Duguid
  • Publisher: P&R Publishing
  • Publication Date: 2007
  • Pages: 351

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4

The Book of Zechariah records the prophetic message of Zechariah to the community that had returned to Jerusalem after the Babylonian exile and was charged with rebuilding the temple and city. The physical return was meant to prompt a spiritual and theological return to faith in the Lord.

Zechariah called the people to such a true return and reassured them of the Lord’s willingness to receive them and restore to them the promised blessings. It is a book whose eschatological perspective is of special value to Christians today who labor for reformation and long for revival.

Rick Phillips has produced a gem of a book on the prophet Zechariah! It is popular in its presentation but reflects a wide reading in Puritan theology, critical commentaries, and conservative Reformed writers. In a word, it has all the hallmarks of an edifying commentary: it is historically sensitive, and it is robustly theological, Christological, and appropriately practical. Phillips reminds us in his methodology that what God has done and will do for the people of God always precedes what God expects of his people. I wholeheartedly commend this work for pastors and lay people.

—Bryan Estelle, associate professor of Old Testament, Westminster Seminary California

Richard D. Phillips is the senior minister of Second Presbyterian Church in Greenville, SC. He is a council member of the Alliance of Confessing Evangelicals and chairman of the Philadelphia Conference on Reformed Theology.

The Incarnation in the Gospels

  • Authors: Daniel M. Doriani, Philip Graham Ryken, and Richard D. Phillips
  • Editors: Richard D. Phillips, Philip Graham Ryken, and Daniel M. Doriani
  • Publisher: P&R Publishing
  • Publication Date: 2008
  • Pages: 227

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

This seasonal addition to the Reformed Expository Commentary series presents 12 biblically and theologically grounded Christmas messages, as the authors explore the canonical teaching on the birth of Jesus Christ in the Gospels of Matthew, Luke, and John. The volume includes four special appendices of Advent material and worship aids useful in the planning of a Christ-centered Christmas service. With five new carols, essays, and reflections on the Advent season, and a program of lessons and carols, this material is valuable to any pastor or worship leader seeking meaningful ways to celebrate the coming of Christ during the season commemorating his birth.

The Incarnation in the Gospels brings together in one delightful volume the teaching of the Gospels on the incarnation of Christ. All who read this book should experience a deeper devotion to our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ.

Jerry Bridges, staff member, The Navigators Collegiate Ministry

The authors are Reformed in their theology, reliable in their understanding of the passages, and all fascinating writers. This book will be a great help to pastors preparing series of Christmas sermons and to lay believers trying to distinguish the real biblical teaching from all the Christmas fluff.

John M. Frame, J. D. Trimble Chair of Systematic Theology and Philosophy, Reformed Theological Seminary

Daniel M. Doriani is senior pastor of Central Presbyterian Church, Clayton, MO. He previously was dean of faculty and professor of New Testament at Covenant Theological Seminary.

Philip Graham Ryken is eighth and current president of Wheaton College and was previously senior minister at Tenth Presbyterian Church, Philadelphia. He has written or edited more than 30 books, including, in this series, Galatians, 1 Timothy, and Luke.

Richard D. Phillips is the senior minister of Second Presbyterian Church in Greenville, SC. He is a council member of the Alliance of Confessing Evangelicals and chairman of the Philadelphia Conference on Reformed Theology.

Matthew, vol. 1: Chapters 1–13

  • Author: Daniel M. Doriani
  • Editors: Richard D. Phillips, Philip Graham Ryken, and Daniel M. Doriani
  • Publisher: P&R Publishing
  • Publication Date: 2008
  • Pages: 590

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5

With its rich teaching on discipleship, the Gospel of Matthew is a wellspring of instruction on Christian living. Its use of the Old Testament also shows how old covenant promises are fulfilled in the new and how the law of Moses exercises its authority today.

Daniel Doriani, a pastor and scholar recognized for his works on biblical interpretation, pays careful attention to the structure, backgrounds, and grammar of Matthew in order to furnish pastors and students of the Word with the Christ-centered commentary and the personal and corporate applications they need. Each chapter of this two-volume work seeks to express Matthew’s original intent in ways that evoke his distinct voice and thereby fulfill the goal of Matthew’s Gospel—making disciples by forming the mind, heart, and hands of believers.

Oh, the joy of reading a commentary with the roots of an informed mind and the wings of an enflamed heart! Dan Doriani’s two-volume exposition of Matthew is as refreshing as it is well researched. but that is just what I would expect from one of the finest pastor-scholars in the evangelical world. What a great gift for pastor and parishioner alike!

—Scotty Smith, founding pastor, Christ Community Church, Franklin, TN

Here is Matthew taught vividly as God’s Word. Doriani offers the fruit of wide reading, lively imagination, pastoral savvy, deep learning, native wit, and personal commitment. He draws us into the history of Matthew’s day and draws out the teaching, commands, wisdom, and saving work of Jesus the Son of God. If more preaching were like this, Christian faith and life in congregations of all backgrounds and sizes would benefit greatly, and more of the lost would join the ranks of Jesus’ disciples—the great goal of this great Gospel.

Robert W. Yarbrough, associate professor of New Testament, Trinity Evangelical Divinity School

This volume bears the mature fruit produced through years of ministry in the academy and the church. Readers will surely harvest an abundance of exegetical, theological, and practical insights for Christian life and ministry. This commentary is a must read for all who study the Gospel of Matthew.

Mark Futato, Robert L. Maclellan professor of Old Testament, Reformed Theological Seminary, Orlando

Daniel M. Doriani is senior pastor of Central Presbyterian Church, Clayton, MO. He previously was dean of faculty and professor of New Testament at Covenant Theological Seminary.

Matthew, vol. 2: Chapters 14–28

  • Author: Daniel M. Doriani
  • Editors: Richard D. Phillips, Philip Graham Ryken, and Daniel M. Doriani
  • Publisher: P&R Publishing
  • Publication Date: 2008
  • Pages: 586

With its rich teaching on discipleship, the Gospel of Matthew is a wellspring of instruction on Christian living. Its use of the Old Testament also shows how old covenant promises are fulfilled in the new and how the law of Moses exercises its authority today.

Daniel Doriani, a pastor and scholar recognized for his works on biblical interpretation, pays careful attention to the structure, backgrounds, and grammar of Matthew in order to furnish pastors and students of the Word with the Christ-centered commentary and the personal and corporate applications they need. Each chapter of this two-volume work seeks to express Matthew’s original intent in ways that evoke his distinct voice and thereby fulfill the goal of Matthew’s Gospel—making disciples by forming the mind, heart, and hands of believers.

Oh, the joy of reading a commentary with the roots of an informed mind and the wings of an enflamed heart! Dan Doriani’s two-volume exposition of Matthew is as refreshing as it is well researched. but that is just what I would expect from one of the finest pastor-scholars in the evangelical world. What a great gift for pastor and parishioner alike!

—Scotty Smith, founding pastor, Christ Community Church, Franklin, TN

Daniel M. Doriani is senior pastor of Central Presbyterian Church, Clayton, MO. He previously was dean of faculty and professor of New Testament at Covenant Theological Seminary.

Luke, vol. 1: Chapters 1–12

  • Author: Philip Graham Ryken
  • Editors: Richard D. Phillips, Philip Graham Ryken, and Daniel M. Doriani
  • Publisher: P&R Publishing
  • Publication Date: 2009
  • Pages: 704

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Written after Jesus’ earthly ministry had come to an end, when word of his teachings and actions had spread to those who had never seen him firsthand, Luke is “the Gospel of knowing for sure.” Luke tells us that he wanted to provide an orderly account of the life of Jesus that would help people be more certain of the good news of his death and resurrection.

The purpose of this commentary is to make Luke’s message clear for a contemporary audience by explaining, illustrating, and applying its truth to everyday life, with the hope that readers will understand the Gospel and come to full assurance of salvation, as Luke intended. If an account of Jesus’ life was needed in Luke’s time, how much more acutely is it needed in ours—and Luke’s Gospel stands as ready as ever to fill this need.

Philip Ryken has provided the serious Bible student, the learning preacher, and the growing Christian with an invaluable asset through his commentary on Luke. His customary clarity and scholarship is presented in a style of communication that is informative, inspiring, and inviting. What a blessing for the Kingdom: a faithful commentary which is also an absorbing page-turner.

—Harry L. Reeder III, senior pastor, Briarwood Presbyterian Church, Birmingham, AL

Simply the finest expository commentary I have read in 20 years. Combining keen biblical insight, doctrinal depth, and beautiful exposition, Ryken’s Luke is a commentary of enduring value for the church.

Richard D. Phillips, senior minister, Second Presbyterian Church, Birmingham, AL

Philip Graham Ryken is eighth and current president of Wheaton College and was previously senior minister at Tenth Presbyterian Church, Philadelphia. He has written or edited more than 30 books, including, in this series, 1 Kings, Galatians, and 1 Timothy.

Luke, vol. 2: Chapters 13–24

  • Author: Philip Graham Ryken
  • Editors: Richard D. Phillips, Philip Graham Ryken, and Daniel M. Doriani
  • Publisher: P&R Publishing
  • Publication Date: 2009
  • Pages: 757

Written after Jesus’ earthly ministry had come to an end, when word of his teachings and actions had spread to those who had never seen him firsthand, Luke is “the Gospel of knowing for sure.” Luke tells us that he wanted to provide an orderly account of the life of Jesus that would help people be more certain of the good news of his death and resurrection.

The purpose of this commentary is to make Luke’s message clear for a contemporary audience by explaining, illustrating, and applying its truth to everyday life, with the hope that readers will understand the gospel and come to full assurance of salvation, as Luke intended. If an account of Jesus’ life was needed in Luke’s time, how much more acutely is it needed in ours—and Luke’s Gospel stands as ready as ever to fill this need.

. . . His customary clarity and scholarship is presented in a style of communication that is informative, inspiring, and inviting. What a blessing for the Kingdom: a faithful commentary which is also an absorbing page-turner.

—Harry L. Reeder III, senior pastor, Briarwood Presbyterian Church, Birmingham, AL

Simply the finest expository commentary I have read in 20 years. Combining keen biblical insight, doctrinal depth, and beautiful exposition, Ryken’s Luke is a commentary of enduring value for the church.

Richard D. Phillips, senior minister, Second Presbyterian Church, Birmingham, AL

Philip Graham Ryken is eighth and current president of Wheaton College and was previously senior minister at Tenth Presbyterian Church, Philadelphia. He has written or edited more than 30 books, including, in this series, 1 Kings, Galatians, and 1 Timothy.

Acts

  • Author: Derek W. H. Thomas
  • Editors: Richard D. Phillips, Philip Graham Ryken, and Daniel M. Doriani
  • Publisher: P&R Publishing
  • Publication Date: 2011
  • Pages: 784

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

The church in our time easily loses sight of her mission to witness to the resurrected Christ. Studying Acts identifies us with the early church and the way the gospel shaped her as she began witnessing in Judea and continuing, in concentric circles, “to the end of the earth.” Acts reminds us that the story of the church remains incomplete—that there continues to this day an “Acts 29.”

We face relentless opposition as our postmodern world mirrors the world of the apostles. Planting and growing churches in such an environment poses particular challenges. Nevertheless, Acts clearly demonstrates that no obstacles can withstand the power of the Holy Spirit. As he did in the early church, the Holy Spirit teaches us in Acts to “expect great things.”

Somewhere along the way the idea developed that commentaries are supposed to be a resource, but are not supposed to be all that readable. Derek Thomas and his treatment of Acts defies convention. Here you have a tremendous resource for pastors and students. And here you have a most readable, insightful, and enjoyable book for all. . . . a great gift for the church.

—Stephen J. Nichols, research professor of Christianity and culture, Lancaster Bible College

Biblically thorough, theologically accurate, pastorally sensitive—here is a rich feast set before God’s people. As Derek Thomas feeds us from the book of Acts, not only do we find ourselves satisfied, we are compelled to love Jesus more today than we did yesterday. And isn’t that the goal of all biblical preaching, writing, and living?

—Sean Michael Lucas, senior minister, First Presbyterian Church, Hattiesburg, MS

The church of the twenty-first century desperately needs to know her first-century history. With pastoral care and thoughtful scholarship, Thomas gets to the very heart of Acts. . . . A much-needed resource for believers of all ages who desire to more fully know God’s sovereign history in the early church.

Burk Parsons, editor, Tabletalk Magazine

Acts is such an important book in so many ways. . . . In this work, Derek Thomas opens up the book for readers in a way that only a preacher can, and as a result, all Christians—from the finest preacher to the humblest student of the Bible—will find that they have a veritable gold mine in their hands.

—Carl R. Trueman, professor of historical theology and church history, Westminster Theological Seminary, Philadelphia

Derek. W. H. Thomas is professor of systematic and historical theology at Reformed Theological Seminary and the minister of teaching at First Presbyterian Church, Jackson, MS.

Galatians

  • Author: Philip Graham Ryken
  • Editors: Richard D. Phillips, Philip Graham Ryken, and Daniel M. Doriani
  • Publisher: P&R Publishing
  • Publication Date: 2005
  • Pages: 290

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3

The book of Galatians was written for recovering Pharisees. By trying to base their standing with God on their spiritual performance, the Galatians were in danger of denying the gospel. They needed to hear again the liberating message that we are justified not by observing the law, but by faith in Jesus Christ.

The church today needs to embrace that same gospel message. “We are legalists by nature,” Philip Ryken writes, and Galatians “challenges many of our preconceptions about what it means to have a right relationship with God.”

In an age when scholars write commentaries the size of encyclopedias so that exposition is often drowned in an ocean of background technical details, Dr. Ryken’s Galatians—the first volume in this series—appears as a welcome sign of springtime and the firstfruits of the harvest to come.

Sinclair Ferguson, senior minister, First Presbyterian Church, Columbia, SC

Phil Ryken is a living refutation of the argument that great expository preaching just can’t be found today. He brings to his pulpit a rare combination of biblical insight, theological substance, and pastoral application. In Galatians, Ryken takes us right into the mind of the apostle Paul and into the heart of this great letter. A richly rewarding and faithful commentary.

R. Albert Mohler Jr., ninth president, Southern Baptist Theological Seminary

Marvelously exhibits the model of the pastor-scholar. Laypeople will discover a wealth of sound teaching. Even pastors who want to stay abreast of more academic trends in biblical scholarship will appreciate Ryken’s godly common sense and theological wisdom. I warmly recommend this work to pastors and to those who hear them preach.

Michael S. Horton, J. Gresham Machen Professor, Westminster Seminary, CA

It is uniquely appropriate that this commentary series commences with an exposition of a Pauline letter at the center of recent discussions. Because Ryken rightly understands that Galatians is about justification, and that the problem vexing the Galatians was no mere exclusivism but legalism, his exposition will help many a preacher set forth the gospel of grace.

—J. Ligon Duncan III, senior pastor, First Presbyterian Church, Jackson, MS

Philip Graham Ryken is eighth and current president of Wheaton College and was previously senior minister at Tenth Presbyterian Church, Philadelphia. He has written or edited more than 30 books, including, in this series, 1 Kings, Luke, and 1 Timothy.

Ephesians

  • Author: Bryan Chapell
  • Editors: Richard D. Phillips, Philip Graham Ryken, and Daniel M. Doriani
  • Publisher: P&R Publishing
  • Publication Date: 2009
  • Pages: 383

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

The apostle Paul wrote to the house churches of the ancient metropolis of Ephesus with this amazing truth: through such as you the purposes of Christ will fill the world; he is transforming all things for you and through you. For this collection of churches in a culture antagonistic to the gospel, the apostle Paul pens themes so grand they can still take our breath away, and they often move the apostle to doxology and prayer.

Bryan Chapell, noted preacher and teacher of preaching, unfolds Paul’s glorious description of how the triumph of the church will occur and what our roles are in Christ’s ultimate victory. When we lift our eyes beyond personal borders to share even a glimpse of Paul’s expansive vision, then we, too, will join his doxology for God’s amazing grace that saves individuals, empowers the church, and through both, transforms the world.

Bryan Chapell is one of the outstanding expositors of our day, and this new commentary on Ephesians reflects his love for Scripture and his pastoral mind and heart. Chapell approaches the text from the perspective of the preacher-teacher, yet his treatment is thoroughly grounded in the finest New Testament scholarship. Any pastor planning to preach or teach in Ephesians should consider this new volume a must-have resource for study.

Michael Duduit, editor, Preaching

Over the last several years, Bryan Chapell has helped to shape a generation of preachers who are committed to the gospel and to the art and craft of preaching sermons that set forth the Word of God with power and practical application. All this is on display in this fine commentary and I greet this publication with enthusiasm.

R. Albert Mohler Jr., ninth president, Southern Baptist Theological Seminary

Bryan Chapell has done an outstanding job of making Paul’s letter to the Ephesians both clear and compelling. He handles both difficult doctrines and difficult points of application with both conviction and love. This book will be profitable for both lay people and clergy. I highly recommend it.

Jerry Bridges, staff member, The Navigators Collegiate Ministry

With a sharp mind and a soft pastoral heart, Bryan Chapell shows how Paul’s letter to the Ephesians was written with the hope that Christians would become individuals full of the knowledge of God so that we would become a community full of the knowledge of God. . . . It is only when the weightiness of God rests on the church and spills out from the church that the world is changed. Chapell’s commentary on Paul’s letter is a great reminder that the ultimate factor in the church’s engagement with society is the church’s engagement with God.

—Tullian Tchividjian, senior pastor, Coral Ridge Presbyterian Church, Fort Lauderdale, FL

Bryan Chapell is distinguished professor of preaching at Knox Theological Seminary. He is the author of several books, including Christ-Centered Preaching, Holiness by Grace, Praying Backwards, and Why Do We Baptize Infants?

Philippians

  • Author: Dennis E. Johnson
  • Editors: Richard D. Phillips, Philip Graham Ryken, and Daniel M. Doriani
  • Publisher: P & R Publishing
  • Publication Date: 2013
  • Pages: 384

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

The truth revealed behind the phrase “for me to live is Christ” transforms our responses to present imperfections and future hope. Dennis Johnson’s commentary—grounded in pastoral application—is ideal for sermon preparation and devotional reading.

Wonderful piece of work: sure-footed, technically competent, instructive, warm, and practical.

—David F. Wells, distinguished research professor, Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary

Dennis Johnson’s Philippians is a treasured contribution to P & R’s Reformed Expository Commentary series. Not only does Johnson’s experience as a preacher and teacher of preachers make these messages wonderful models of exposition, but also his expertise in biblical theology permeates every page. The Christ-centered focus is beautifully and powerfully interwoven throughout.

Bryan Chapell, chancellor, Covenant Theological Seminary

1 Timothy

  • Author: Philip Graham Ryken
  • Editors: Richard D. Phillips, Philip Graham Ryken, and Daniel M. Doriani
  • Publisher: P&R Publishing
  • Publication Date: 2007
  • Pages: 312

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From worship and prayer to family and the use of money, the book of 1 Timothy is full of implications for life in the local church. But beyond these practical truths for all believers, Ryken writes, “Paul’s purpose in 1 Timothy is to help his spiritual sons remain true.” Thus the book has special application to those in gospel ministry.

These truths that helped Timothy in his day are just as applicable to church leaders in ours—both for personal godliness and for the collective life of the church. Whether for personal study or sermon preparation, Ryken’s exposition is a sure guide to all who are interested in this pastoral epistle.

Following on from his Galatians volume, Phil Ryken provides us with another cornucopia of insight and knowledge. Few portions of the Scripture affect the way we understand what the church in the twenty-first century should look like more than does 1 Timothy, and few contemporary guides could better guide us through these issues than Phil Ryken. This volume signals preaching and teaching at its very best, a model for all preachers in our time.

Derek W. H. Thomas, professor of systematic and historical theology, Reformed Theological Seminary

Philip Graham Ryken is eighth and current president of Wheaton College and was previously senior minister at Tenth Presbyterian Church, Philadelphia. He has written or edited more than 30 books, including, in this series, 1 Kings, Galatians, and Luke.

Hebrews

  • Author: Richard D. Phillips
  • Editors: Richard D. Phillips, Philip Graham Ryken, and Daniel M. Doriani
  • Publisher: P&R Publishing
  • Publication Date: 2006
  • Pages: 656

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6

“Few studies can be more profitable to Christians today than that of the Epistle to the Hebrews,” says Richard Phillips. “Written . . . to a group of Jewish Christians facing persecution in the mid-first century AD, the words of this book speak to Christians everywhere about standing firm in Jesus Christ.”

Hebrews captures the challenges and pitfalls of people throughout the ages and shows both why and how to press on in the faith. Its message of warning and hope centers on the surpassing supremacy of Jesus, seen often from the vantage point of the Old Testament.

Richard Phillips’ Hebrews is faithful to the text, cordially committed to confessional Reformed orthodoxy, and alert to practical implications for the life of the church. Phillips keeps the focus where it is for the writer of Hebrews: on God’s ‘last days’ speaking ‘in his Son.’ This volume, which can be read with profit by a wide audience, should serve to remedy the relative neglect of this important New Testament book in the proclamation and life of the churches of the Reformation. Along with the other volumes in this series, this commentary should contribute to preaching and teaching that more fully echo the whole counsel of God.

Richard B. Gaffin Jr., professor of biblical and systematic theology, Westminster Theological Seminary, Philadelphia

The first liturgical reform of the Protestant Reformation was the implementation of lectio continua expository preaching in Zurich in 1519. Sequential Bible exposition has been a hallmark of Reformed Protestantism ever since. . . . Richard D. Phillips is among the most gifted young preachers of our day. In his hands, Hebrews receives the kind of careful, scholarly, contemporary, and practical exposition that is so desperately needed today.

—Terry Johnson, pastor, Independent Presbyterian Church, Savannah, GA

Hebrews emphasizes that God still speaks about Christ and his people through his written Word. Phillips’ expository addresses ring with that authenticity, whether by way of admonition or assurance.

Hywel R. Jones, professor of practical theology, Westminster Seminary, California

Richard D. Phillips is the senior minister of Second Presbyterian Church in Greenville, SC. He is a council member of the Alliance of Confessing Evangelicals and chairman of the Philadelphia Conference on Reformed Theology.

James

  • Author: Daniel M. Doriani
  • Editors: Richard D. Phillips, Philip Graham Ryken, and Daniel M. Doriani
  • Publisher: P&R Publishing
  • Publication Date: 2006
  • Pages: 220

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The book of James is both beloved for its practical wisdom and debated as to its relationship to Paul’s Gospel. It offers concrete counsel on trials, poverty and riches, favoritism, social justice, the tongue, worldliness, boasting, planning, prayer, illness, and more. But in doing so, it exposes our inability to measure up to God’s standard.

Daniel Doriani, a pastor and scholar recognized for his works on biblical interpretation and application, resolves the tension between the wide-ranging practical commands of James and the centrality of faith in the Christian life. While James may not articulate the doctrine of atonement through the death and resurrection of Jesus, James does present Christ in his own way. Here Doriani shows us how. He thus helps us to apply the wisdom of James in a way that is rooted in grace.

Well researched and well reasoned, practical and pastoral, shrewd, solid, and searching, this is a truly Jamesish exposition of James’ letter, top-class in every way.

J. I. Packer, professor of theology, Regent College

Daniel M. Doriani is senior pastor of Central Presbyterian Church, Clayton, MO. He previously was dean of faculty and professor of New Testament at Covenant Theological Seminary.

Product Details

  • Title: Reformed Expository Commentary
  • Editors: Richard D. Phillips, Philip Graham Ryken, Iain M. Duguid, and Daniel M. Doriani
  • Publisher: P&R Publishing
  • Volumes: 18
  • Pages: 7,872