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Gathering Interest
Journal of Northwest Semitic Languages Upgrade (29 issues)
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Overview

Drawn upon by top grammars, monographs, and commentaries, the Journal of Northwest Semitic Languages contains valuable articles dealing with linguistic, translational, literary, text-critical, historical, religious, and cultural issues related to Ancient Near Eastern texts and societies, as well as articles addressing theoretical issues underlying these fields. This collection includes 24 volumes in 29 issues of this important journal—nearly 4,500 pages and hundreds of articles! Contributors to the JNSL include the most advanced scholars in the field of Near Eastern studies, making this the preeminent journal for linguistic, interpretive, exegetical, and historical studies of Northwest Semitic languages and their importance for understanding the context and language of the Hebrew Bible.

Combined with a wealth of resources for Hebrew, Aramaic, Ugaritic, Akkadian, and other Semitic-language studies, the Logos edition of the JNSL is the academic standard for Ancient Near Eastern scholarship. The Logos edition of the JNSL is an essential addition to the libraries of anyone wanting to go deeper into Ancient Near Eastern studies, including biblical languages, comparative Semitics, Old Testament background, textual criticism, and more. Pastors and students looking to explore cutting-edge scholarship on the linguistic, literary, and interpretive issues in the Old Testament will find much value in these pages.

With the Logos edition of the JNSL, Scripture references link to both Hebrew and other ancient-language texts, as well as English translations. You can search by author, topic, and Scripture passage for instant results! Links within each volume of the journal allow you to move quickly from the table of contents to the bibliography to the articles you need, and back again. You can also cut and paste your citation into your word processor, and Logos will automatically create footnotes using your preferred style guide. Save yourself from turning pages, from cross-referencing citations, and from unnecessarily complex research projects.

This collection contains 24 volumes in 29 issues. Volumes with multiple issues are combined into a one-volume resource in your Logos library.

Be sure to also get volumes 21–33 of JNSL here.

Key Features

  • Contributions from top Ancient Near Eastern scholars on Old Testament linguistic, cultural, and interpretive issues
  • Nearly 4,500 pages of scholarly articles on important Old Testament topics

Individual Titles

Journal of Northwest Semitic Languages, vol. 1

  • Editor: Frank Charles Fensham
  • Publisher: Brill
  • Publication Date: 1971
  • Pages: 72

This issue contains the following articles:

  • “On a Recent Proposal as to a Distinction between Pi‘el and Hiph‘il” by W. T. Claassen
  • “Remarks on Certain Different Passages in Keret” by F. C. Fensham
  • “Die alttestamentiliche Ladeerzählung” by Georg Fohrer
  • “The Phonetic Shift of Sibilants in Northwestern Semitic in the First Millennium BC” by Giovanni Garbini
  • “Notes on the Ugaritic Month Names” by J. P. J. Olivier
  • “The Concepts of Obliteration in Ezek. 5:1–4” by E. J. Smit
  • “Akkadian Dullu(m) as a Loan-Word in West Semitic Languages” by A. van Selms
  • “A Possible Interpretation of Zech. 9:1 and the Function of ‘the Eye’ (‘Ayin) in Zechariah” by P. J. van Zijl
  • “A Note on shrtt in Ugaritic Text 51: VIII: 22” by F. E. Deist
  • “The Punishment of the Disobedient Zedekiah” by F. E. Deist

Frank Charles Fensham studied at the University of Pretoria (BA, MA cum laude, BD, and DD) and at John Hopkins University, where he obtained a second DD. He served as professor of Semitic languages at Stellenbosch University from 1962 to 1985, and was also appointed the dean of the faculty of humanities.

Journal of Northwest Semitic Languages, vol. 2

  • Editor: Frank Charles Fensham
  • Publisher: Brill
  • Publication Date: 1972
  • Pages: 87

This issue contains the following articles:

  • “W. F. Alrbight (24/5/1891–19/9/71)” by F. C. Fensham
  • “The Declarative-Estimative Hiph‘il” by W. T. Claassen
  • “Northwest Semitic Philology and Three Biblical Texts” by Mitchell Dahood
  • “The Root S–L in Hebrew Words” by I. H. Eybers
  • “Remarks, on Keret 26–43” by F. C. Fensham
  • “Notes on the Ugaritic Month Names II” by J. P. J. Oliver
  • “The Root prq in Targum Isaiah” by Jan van Zijl
  • “Translation and Discussion of Text 1001: 1–2 ” by P. J. van Zijl
  • “New Light from Ugaritica V on Ex. 32:17” by F. C. Fensham

Frank Charles Fensham studied at the University of Pretoria (BA, MA cum laude, BD, and DD) and at John Hopkins University, where he obtained a second DD. He served as professor of Semitic languages at Stellenbosch University from 1962 to 1985, and was also appointed the dean of the faculty of humanities.

Journal of Northwest Semitic Languages, vol. 3

  • Editor: Frank Charles Fensham
  • Publisher: Brill
  • Publication Date: 1974
  • Pages: 95

This issue contains the following articles:

  • “Linguistic Arguments and the Dating of Isaiah 1:4–9 ” by W. T. Claassen
  • “The Etymology of Hebrew Selem” by D. J. A. Clines
  • “Remarks on Keret 54–59” by F. C. Fensham
  • “Ugaritic mswn and Ugaritic maswatu” by Anton Jirku
  • “The Ugaritic Text RS 24.252 and King David” by Arvid S. Kapelrud
  • “The Aphel Causative: Does It Exist in Ugaritic?” by Eugene H. Merrill
  • “Amorite Married and Family Life according to the Mari Texts” by L. M. Muntingh
  • “Sun Mountains at Ugarit” by Matitiahu Tsevat
  • “The Etymology of yayin, ‘Wine’” by A. van Selms
  • “Translation and Dicussion of Text 1001:3–5a” by P. J. van Zijl
  • Reviews

Frank Charles Fensham studied at the University of Pretoria (BA, MA cum laude, BD, and DD) and at John Hopkins University, where he obtained a second DD. He served as professor of Semitic languages at Stellenbosch University from 1962 to 1985, and was also appointed the dean of the faculty of humanities.

Journal of Northwest Semitic Languages, vol. 4

  • Editor: Frank Charles Fensham
  • Publisher: University of Stellenbosch
  • Publication Date: 1975
  • Pages: 93

This issue contains the following articles:

  • “Über die Grundstruktur der Nominalbildungen vom Typus Qattal/Qattol im Althebräischen” by Kjell Aartun
  • “The Phonemic Status of the Ultrashort Vowels in Tiberian Hebrew” by Jack Fellman
  • “Remarks on Keret 58–72” by F. C. Fensham
  • “Das Nicht Substantivierte Partizip als Prädikat im Relativsatz Hebräischer Prosa” by Walter Gross
  • “Schools and Wisdom Literature” by J. P. J. Olivier
  • “Wolfgang Richter” by Verbvalenz und Verbalsatz
  • “A Note on the Dialect of Abi Tamim and Barth’s Law” by Michael B. Schub
  • “Translation and Discussion of Text 1001:5(b)–7” by P. J. van Zijl
  • “Gen. XXXIV and Mari” by F. C. Fensham
  • Reviews

Frank Charles Fensham studied at the University of Pretoria (BA, MA cum laude, BD, and DD) and at John Hopkins University, where he obtained a second DD. He served as professor of Semitic languages at Stellenbosch University from 1962 to 1985, and was also appointed the dean of the faculty of humanities.

Journal of Northwest Semitic Languages, vol. 5

  • Editor: Frank Charles Fensham
  • Publisher: University of Stellenbosch
  • Publication Date: 1977
  • Pages: 96

This issue contains the following articles:

  • “Prof. P. J. van Zijl” by F. C. Fensham
  • “Sibyl: ‘Oracle’” by Robert B. Coote
  • “The History of the Ark in the Books of Samuel” by P. R. Davis
  • “On the Phonemic Status of Gemination in Classical Hebrew” by Jack Fellman
  • “The Linguistic Status of Mishnaic Hebrew” by Jack Fellman
  • “Transgression and Penalty in the Book of the Covenant Code” by F. C. Fensham
  • “The Underworld Character of the God Dagan” by J. F. Healey
  • “The Concept ‘Father’ in the Wisdom Literature of the Ancient Near East” by Philip Nel
  • “Gemination in Punic” by Richard S. Tomback
  • “The Falcon Episode in the Aqhat Tale” by Wilfred G. E. Watson
  • “Israel’s Literary Neighbours in the 13th Century BC” by D. J. Wiseman
  • Reviews
  • Un Index Documantaire des Texts de Mari et d’El-Amarna et l’Ancient Testament

Frank Charles Fensham studied at the University of Pretoria (BA, MA cum laude, BD, and DD) and at John Hopkins University, where he obtained a second DD. He served as professor of Semitic languages at Stellenbosch University from 1962 to 1985, and was also appointed the dean of the faculty of humanities.

Journal of Northwest Semitic Languages, vol. 6

  • Editor: Frank Charles Fensham
  • Publisher: University of Stellenbosch
  • Publication Date: 1978
  • Pages: 113

This issue contains the following articles:

  • “Prov. 31:1: A Case of Constant Mistranslatoin” by F. E. Deist
  • “Sociolinguistic Notes on the History of the Hebrew Language” by Jack Fellman
  • “The Use of the Suffix Conjugation and the Prefix Conjugation in a Few Old Hebrew Poems” by F. C. Fensham
  • “Remarks on Keret 73–79” by F. C. Fensham
  • “A Suggested Reading for 4Q Florilegium 1:15” by F. Du T. Laubscher
  • “A proposed Method for Determining the Context of the Wisdom Admonitions” by Philip Nel
  • “Semitic Plant and Plant Quality Names” by Vera Quittner
  • “The Semantic Background of ‘Socii’ in Lat ‘Garum Sociorum’” by Vera Quittner
  • “Abraham” by Walther Zimmerli
  • “Bibliographic Problems and Possibilities in the Field of Semitics and Old Testament Studies” by W. T. Claassen
  • Reviews
  • Index of Vol I–V
  • OT/ANE Permucite Index
  • Modern Language of America International Bibliography

Frank Charles Fensham studied at the University of Pretoria (BA, MA cum laude, BD, and DD) and at John Hopkins University, where he obtained a second DD. He served as professor of Semitic languages at Stellenbosch University from 1962 to 1985, and was also appointed the dean of the faculty of humanities.

Journal of Northwest Semitic Languages, vol. 7

  • Editor: Frank Charles Fensham
  • Publisher: University of Stellenbosch
  • Publication Date: 1979
  • Pages: 102

This issue contains the following articles:

  • “More Philological Studies in Nahum” Kevin J. Cathcart
  • “Did Gemination Have Phonemic Status in Classical Hebrew?” by F. E. Deist
  • “Notes on Keret 79(b)–89 (CTA 14: 2:79(b)–89)” by F. C. Fensham
  • “The Semantic Field of kly in Ugaric” by F. C. Fensham
  • “Dimtu-gt-pyrgos (an Essay about the Nonetymological Sense of These Terms)” by M. Heltzer
  • “The Significance of the Rephaim, rm.aby.btk.rpim” by William J. Horwitz
  • “The Sceptre of Justice and Ps. 45:76” by J. P. J. Oliver
  • “The Phrases in a IGI DN and lipeny Yhwh in Treaty and Covenant Context” by D. C. T. Sheriffs
  • “The Struct Patterns of the Paronomastic and Co-ordinated Infinitives Absolute in Genesis” by S. J. P. K. Riekert
  • “The Relation between Anat and Baal in the Ugaritic Texts” by H. F. van Rooy
  • Reviews

Frank Charles Fensham studied at the University of Pretoria (BA, MA cum laude, BD, and DD) and at John Hopkins University, where he obtained a second DD. He served as professor of Semitic languages at Stellenbosch University from 1962 to 1985, and was also appointed the dean of the faculty of humanities.

Journal of Northwest Semitic Languages, vol. 8

  • Editor: Frank Charles Fensham
  • Publisher: University of Stellenbosch
  • Publication Date: 1980
  • Pages: 112

This issue contains the following articles:

  • “1 Sa. 3:19: A Case of Context and Semantics” by W. T. Claassen
  • “Linguistic Nationalism: The Case of Biblical Hebrew” by Jack Fellman
  • “Sociolinguistic Notes on the History of Aramaic ” by Jack Fellman
  • “Das Nicht-Haftbar-Sein im Bundesbuch im Lichte der Altorientalischen Rechtstexte” by F. C. Fensham
  • “Notes on Keret in CTA 14:90–103a” by F. C. Fensham
  • “Notes on the Literary Structure of 1QS 2:11–18 and Its Biblical Parallel in Deut. 29” by F. Du T. Laubscher
  • “Alliteration in Ugaritic Poetry: Its Role in Composition and Analysis (Part II)” by Baruch Margalit
  • “Hebrew ’sdt and Ugaritic isdym” by Gary Rendsburg
  • “The Pattern of the Pan-Tribal Assembly in the Old Testament” by Hanoch Reviv
  • “A Possible Interpretation of the Word siyya in Zeph. 2:13” by J. P. J. Olivier
  • “A Semotactical Approach to the Meaning of the Term ruah ’elohim in Genesis 1:2” by P. J. Smith
  • “Punica Miscellanea—1” by Richard S. Tomback
  • Reviews

Frank Charles Fensham studied at the University of Pretoria (BA, MA cum laude, BD, and DD) and at John Hopkins University, where he obtained a second DD. He served as professor of Semitic languages at Stellenbosch University from 1962 to 1985, and was also appointed the dean of the faculty of humanities.

Journal of Northwest Semitic Languages, vol. 9

  • Editor: Frank Charles Fensham
  • Publisher: University of Stellenbosch
  • Publication Date: 1981
  • Pages: 163

This issue contains the following articles:

  • “Prof. T. C. Vriezen, a Tribute” by F. C. Fensham
  • “Text and Tradition: A Methodological Problem” by J. Cook
  • “A Bird’s Eye View of Trade in Ancient Ugarit” by I. Cornelius
  • “Lines on the Life and Work of Heinrich Friedrich Wilhelm Gesenius” by Jack Fellman
  • “Neh. 9 and Pss. 105, 106, 135, and 136” by F. C. Fensham
  • “Notes on Keret, CTA 14:103B–114a” by F. C. Fensham
  • “The Root b‘r in Ugaritic and in Isaiah in the Meaning ‘to Pillage’” by F. C. Fensham
  • “On the Meaning of the Term ubdit/updt in Ugarit” by Michael Heltzer
  • “Restorations and Reconstructions in the Epic of Aqht” by Baruch Margalit
  • “Ugarit and the History of Religions” by Patrick D. Miller Jr.
  • “The Genres of Biblical Wisdom Literature” by P. J. Nel
  • “The Day of Midian and Isaiah 9:3b” by J. P. J. Olivier
  • “The Role of Fortified Cities in the Northern Kingdom During the Reign of the Omride Dynasty” by D. N. Pienaar
  • Reviews

Frank Charles Fensham studied at the University of Pretoria (BA, MA cum laude, BD, and DD) and at John Hopkins University, where he obtained a second DD. He served as professor of Semitic languages at Stellenbosch University from 1962 to 1985, and was also appointed the dean of the faculty of humanities.

Journal of Northwest Semitic Languages, vol. 10

  • Editor: Frank Charles Fensham
  • Publisher: University of Stellenbosch
  • Publication Date: 1982
  • Pages: 109

This issue contains the following articles:

  • “Prof. Michell Dahood” by F. C. Fensham
  • “Some Ugaritic, Hebrew, and Arabic Parallels” by Joshua Blau
  • “The Development of the West Semtic Qal Perfect of the Double-Ayin Verb with Particular Reference to Its Transmission into Syriac” by Jesse L. Boyd III
  • “Genesis 1 in the Septuagint as Example of the Problem: Text and Tradition” by J. Cook
  • “Once Again on Some Ugaritic Administrative Texts and Wordings” by G. Del Olmo Lete
  • “Israel and Tyrus im Xeitalter Davids und Salomos” by H. Donner
  • “Nebukadnezzar in the Book of Jeremiah” by F. C. Fensham
  • “The Root QRB as a Legal Term” by Y. Hoffman
  • “From Oracle to Prophecy: The Growth, Crystallization, and Disintegration of a Biblical Gattung” by Y. Hoffman
  • “Exegetische Bemerkungen zum Tempelgebäude 1 Kön. 6:5–10” by M. J. Mulder
  • “Psalm 23:3 Rediscovered Errata” by Richard S. Tomback
  • Reviews

Frank Charles Fensham studied at the University of Pretoria (BA, MA cum laude, BD, and DD) and at John Hopkins University, where he obtained a second DD. He served as professor of Semitic languages at Stellenbosch University from 1962 to 1985, and was also appointed the dean of the faculty of humanities.

Journal of Northwest Semitic Languages, vol. 11

  • Editor: Frank Charles Fensham
  • Publisher: University of Stellenbosch
  • Publication Date: 1983
  • Pages: 193

This issue contains the following articles:

  • “Prof. Dennis J. McCarthy” by F. C. Fensham
  • Yom, ‘Time’ and Some Texts in Isaiah” by Robert Althann
  • “Unrecognized Poetic Fragments in Exodus” by Robert Althann
  • “Speaker-Oriented Functions of ki in Biblical Hebrew” by W. T. Claassen
  • “Anti-Heretical Traditions in Targum Pseudo-Jonathan” by J. Cook
  • “Some Theological and Religious Aspects in Ezra and Nehemiah” by F. C. Fensham
  • “Remarks on Keret 114b–136a” by F. C. Fensham
  • “A Semitic-Indo-European Semantic Parallel” by Louis Jay Herman
  • “Exodus 4:24–26 and Its Interpretation” by C. Houtman
  • “Israel, the Harlot (Hos. 2:4–9)” by P. A. Kruger
  • “In Search of a Capital for the Northern Kingdom” by J. P. J. Olivier
  • “The Construct Noun ’eset, in Ps. 58:9” by P. A. Kruger
  • “Archaic Features in the Iraqi Arabic Dialect” by Richard S. Tomback
  • “Random Notes on the Hebrew-Arabic Lexicon” by Richard S. Tomback
  • “Hebrew Grammar, Exegesis, and Commentaries” by C. H. J. van der Merwe
  • “The Character of Ugaritic Poetry” by Wilfred G. E. Watson
  • Reviews
  • Index on Vol. VI–X

Frank Charles Fensham studied at the University of Pretoria (BA, MA cum laude, BD, and DD) and at John Hopkins University, where he obtained a second DD. He served as professor of Semitic languages at Stellenbosch University from 1962 to 1985, and was also appointed the dean of the faculty of humanities.

Journal of Northwest Semitic Languages, vol. 12

  • Editor: Frank Charles Fensham
  • Publisher: University of Stellenbosch
  • Publication Date: 1984
  • Pages: 171

This issue contains the following articles:

  • “Prof. J. H. Kroeze” by F. C. Fensham
  • “Prof. Yigael Yadin” by F. C. Fensham
  • “Prof. Dr. Walther Zimmerli” by F. C. Fensham
  • “Northwest Semitic Notes on Some Texts in 1 Samuel” by R. Althann
  • Boset in Zephaniah 3:5” by Kevin J. Cathcart
  • “‘Ancient’ Readings in the Translations of the Old Testament” by J. Cook
  • “Genesis XXVI and Mari” by I. Cornelius
  • “The Ugaritic Root—tpt” by F. C. Fensham
  • “The Marriage Metaphor in Hosea for the Covenant Relationship between the Lord and His People (Hos. 1:2–9)” by F. C. Fensham
  • “The Hem of the Garment in Marriage. The Meaning of the Symbolic Gesture in Ruth 3:9 and Ezek. 16:8” by P. A. Kruger
  • “On the Structural Use of Numbers as a Composition Technique” by Casper J. Labuschagne
  • “The Text of Ex. 20:22–23” by J. P. Oberholzer
  • “The Effectiveness of the Old Babylonian Mesarum Decree” by Hannes Olivier
  • “A Matter to Be Put Right: The Yabneh-Yam Case Continued” by Victor Sasson
  • “An Unrecognized Maltese West-Semitic Gloss” by Richard S. Tomback
  • “Islam and the Religions of the Ancient Orient: A Reappraisal” by Richard S. Tomback
  • “Johann Cook: A Computerized Database for the Qumran Biblical Scrolls with an Appendix on the Samaritan Pentateuch” by E. Tov
  • “Dei Hirtenallegorie von Sacharja XI” by A. S. van der Woude
  • “1 Sam 1:2–2:11—A Life-World Lament of Affliction” by Albertus H. van Zyl
  • Reviews

Frank Charles Fensham studied at the University of Pretoria (BA, MA cum laude, BD, and DD) and at John Hopkins University, where he obtained a second DD. He served as professor of Semitic languages at Stellenbosch University from 1962 to 1985, and was also appointed the dean of the faculty of humanities.

Journal of Northwest Semitic Languages, vol. 13

  • Editor: Walter T. Claassen
  • Publisher: University of Stellenbosch
  • Publication Date: 1987
  • Pages: 227

This issue contains the following articles:

  • “Prof P. C. Craigie Passed Away” by F. C. Fensham
  • “Isaiah 42:10 anhd Krt 77–78 (KTU 1.14: II: 24–25)” by R. Althann
  • “A Research Unit for Computer Applications to the Language and Text of the Old Testament” by W. T. Claassen
  • “Ice and Ice-Houses in the Mari Texts” by I. Cornelius
  • “Ezra 4: Is Josephus Right after All?” by D. L. Emery
  • “Moses Stuart and Biblical Hebrew Grammar” by J. Fellman
  • “Where Hebrew Differed” by J. Fellman
  • “Remarks on Keret” by F. C. Fensham
  • “The Curse of the Dry Bones in Ezekiel 37:1–14 Changed to a Blessing of Resurrection” by F. C. Fensham
  • “Promiscuity or Marriage Fidelty? A Note on Prov 5:15–18” by P. A. Kruger
  • “The Usage of the Root Sapitum in Akkadian Documents” by T. J. Mafico
  • “An Authentic Hebrew Tradition Concerning the Origin of the Philistines” by G. A. Rendsburg
  • “The Co-ordinated Structs of the Infinitive Absolute in Jeremiah and Their Bearing on the Stylistics and Authenticity of the Jeremianic Corpus” by S. J. P. K. Riekert
  • “Narrativ-Langformen 2 und 3: Person von Zweiradikaligen Basen nach qalY im Biblischen Hebräisch” by H-J Stipp
  • “Some Sequence Differences between the MT and LXX and Their Ramifications for the Literary Criticism of the Bible” by E. Tov
  • “A Short Survey of Major Contributions to the Grammatical Description of Old Hebrew since 1800 AD” by C. H. J. van der Merwe
  • “From Partiarchs to Prophets: A Reappraisal of Charismatic Leadership in Ancient Israel” by K. van der Toorn
  • Reviews

Walter T. Claassen recieved his MA, DLitt, and BTh from the University of Stellenbosch and is professor and vice-rector for research of the University of Stellenbosch.

Journal of Northwest Semitic Languages, vol. 14

  • Editor: Walter T. Claassen
  • Publisher: University of Stellenbosch
  • Publication Date: 1988
  • Pages: 233

This issue contains the following articles:

  • Bere’sit Jer. 26:1, 27:1, 28:1, 49:34” by R. Althann
  • “Verse and Prose: Does the Distinction Apply to the Old Testament?” by W. T. W. Cloete
  • “The Fragmentary Ashurnasirpal II Inscription in Detroit” by A. F. Conradie
  • “The Qumran (Biblical Scrolls) Data Base” by J. Cook
  • “Paradise Motifs in the ‘Eschatology’ of the Minor Prophets and the Iconography of the Ancient Near East” by I. Cornelius
  • “Liability of Animals in Biblical and Ancient Near Eastern Law” by F. C. Fensham
  • “Notes on Keret 194–206 (CTA 14: 194b–206)” by F. C. Fensham
  • “Israel’s Hope for the Renewal of the State” by W. Gross
  • Hyh mwsl: An Exegetical Note on the Use of the Participle Active in 1 Kings 5:1” by Louis C. Jonker
  • “Prophetic Imagery: On Metaphors and Similes in the Book Hosea” by P. A. Kruger
  • “Towards a New Typology of the Syriac Manuscript Alphabet” by Garth I. Moller
  • “The Diachronic Study of Biblical Hebrew” by M. F. Rooker
  • “Deuteronomy 28, 29: Superscript or Subscript?” by H. F. van Rooy
  • Reviews

Walter T. Claassen recieved his MA, DLitt, and BTh from the University of Stellenbosch and is professor and vice-rector for research of the University of Stellenbosch.

Journal of Northwest Semitic Languages, vol. 15

  • Editor: Walter T. Claassen
  • Publisher: University of Stellenbosch
  • Publication Date: 1989
  • Pages: 244

This issue contains the following articles:

  • “Frank Charles Fensham—Making a Contribution to Semitic and Old Testament Scholarship” by W. T. Claassen
  • “The Inverse Construct Chain and Jer. 10:13, 51:16” by R. Althann
  • “The Colometry of Hebrew Verse” by W. T. W. Cloete
  • “The Calah Wall Inscriptions” by A. F. Conradie
  • “Recent Developments in Peshitta Research” by J. Cook
  • “The Lion in the Art of the Ancient Near East: A Study of Selected Motifs” by I. Cornelius
  • “The Term ‘dn in Keret (KTU 1.14:II:32–34) and a Few Other Occurrences in Ugaritic Reconsidered” by F. C. Fensham
  • “Remarks on Keret II: 15:1–8: A Poem on the Excellence of Hariya” by F. C. Fensham
  • “The Literary Composition of Theophany Passages in the Hebrew Psalm” by J. H. Hunter
  • “The Circumstantial Sentence—a Catch-Term—All Term? A Study in Sentence Relationships in 1 Samuel 1–12” by Robert J. Kotze
  • “Another Look at Isa. 9:7–20” by P. A. Kruger
  • “Recent Archaeological Exploration on the El-Kerak Plateau” by J. Maxwell Miller
  • “Structural and Conceptual Strategy in Zephaniah, Chapter 1” by P. J. Nel
  • “The El-Kerak District of Jordan (Ancient Moab) in Nineteenth Century Maps: A Few Preliminary Remarks” by J. P. J. Olivier
  • “Einige Orte und Strassen auf dem Gebiet des alten Moab bei Eusebius” by Stefan Timm
  • “Recent Trends in the Linguistic Description of Old Hebrew” by C. H. J. van der Merwe
  • Reviews

Walter T. Claassen recieved his MA, DLitt, and BTh from the University of Stellenbosch and is professor and vice-rector for research of the University of Stellenbosch.

Journal of Northwest Semitic Languages, vol. 16

  • Editor: Walter T. Claassen
  • Publisher: University of Stellenbosch
  • Publication Date: 1990
  • Pages: 237

This issue contains the following articles:

  • “Bible Information Systems” by W. T. Claassen
  • “The Standard Inscription of Ashurnasirpal II: Historical Document or Decoration?” by A. F. Conradie
  • “The Sun Epiphany in Job 38:12–15 and the Iconography of the Gods in the Ancient Near East—the Palestinian Connection” by I. Cornelius
  • “The ‘Prophetic Perfect’” by G. L. Klein
  • “Reading between the Sentences: Notes on the Sentences Relations in 1 Samuel 1:1–8” by R. J. Kotzé
  • “The Restoration of 1 QS 1:1A” by F. du T. Laubscher
  • “Hiskia und die Philister” by S. Mittmann
  • “1 Koningen 8:31 en 32” by M. J. Mulder
  • “A Syntactic Analysis of Dislocations in Biblical Hebrew” by J. A. Naudé
  • “The Dawn of Biblical Archaeology” by J. P. J. Olivier
  • “A Critical Evaluation of Certain Leading Concepts in Biblical Archaeology” by D. N. Pienaar
  • “Moreschet Gat und Libna: Mit einem Anhang: Zu Micha 1:10–16” by G. Schmitt
  • “Anthitheses in the Book of Malachi” by S. D. Snyman
  • “The Hebrew Vocabulary of Oppression: The State of Semantic Description” by I. Swart
  • “Niqmaddu and the Receiver of Tribute by Default: A New Interpretation of RS 17,227, 38–42” by P. J. J. Van Huÿssteen
  • “QUMAH YHWH” by J. T. Willis
  • Reviews

Walter T. Claassen recieved his MA, DLitt, and BTh from the University of Stellenbosch and is professor and vice-rector for research of the University of Stellenbosch.

Journal of Northwest Semitic Languages, vol. 17

  • Editor: Walter T. Claassen
  • Publisher: University of Stellenbosch
  • Publication Date: 1991
  • Pages: 231

This issue contains the following articles:

  • “Strophic Hebrew Verse as Free Verse” by R. L. Giese
  • “The Evildoer in Hosea 6:8–9” by P. A. Kruger
  • “Law in the Narrative: A Study of the Expressions הִכִּירו andוַיִּיטַב בּ‍ְעֵינֵיהֶם  in 2 Sam. 3:26” by M. Malul
  • Ugebul—‘Gebiet’ oder ‘Grenze’” by S. Mittmann
  • “On the Syntax of dy—Phrases in the Aramaic of 11QtgJob” by J. A. Naudé
  • “Alms and the Man: the Merits of Charity” by L. J. Prockter
  • “The Strata of Biblical Hebrew” by G. A. Rendsburg
  • “The Pronominally Suffixed Object Marker as Demonstrative in Mishnaic Hebrew and Late Aramaic” by B. Rosenstock
  • “Offene Fragen zu Übersetzungskritik des Antiken Griechischen Jeremiabuches” by H-J Stipp
  • “The Function of Word Order in Old Hebrew—With Special Reference to Cases Where a Syntagmeme Precedes a Verb in Joshua” by C. H. J. van der Merwe
  • “A Few Remarks on the Aramaic Treaties from Sefire” by H. F. Van Rooy
  • “Death and Cosmology in Ancient Egypt” by S. J. Watson
  • “The Negative Adverbs L and LM + L in Ugaritic” by W. G. E. Watson
  • Reviews

Walter T. Claassen recieved his MA, DLitt, and BTh from the University of Stellenbosch and is professor and vice-rector for research of the University of Stellenbosch.

Journal of Northwest Semitic Languages, vol. 18

  • Editor: Ferdinand Etienne Deist
  • Publisher: University of Stellenbosch
  • Publication Date: 1992
  • Pages: 231

This issue contains the following articles:

    • “Samson in Double Vision: Judges 13–16 from Historical-Critical and Narratve Perspectives” by L. C. Jonker
  • “The Onomasticon of the Aramaic Inscriptions of Syria-Palestine During the Persian Period” by G. A. Klingbeil
  • “Syro-Palestinian Stamp Seals from the Persian Period: The Iconographic Evidence” by M. G. Klingbeil
  • “The King’s Humbleness in Zechariah 9:9. A Paradox?” by F. du T. Laubscher
  • “Parallelism and Recurrence in Biblical Hebrew Poetry: A Theoretical Proposal” by P. J. Nel
  • “Narrative Analysis of the Old Testament—Some Challenges and Prospects” by M. J. Oosthuizen
  • “Psalm 114: It is Yahweh Who Transforms the Rock into a Fountain” by W. S. Prinsloo
  • “Is There Any Difference between ירא מנ ,ירא מפני and את ירא” by C. H. J. van der Merwe
  • “Western Peripheral Akkadian Features and Assyrianisms in the Emar Letters” by P. J. J. Van Huÿssteen
  • Reviews

Ferdinand Etienne Deist completed his academic training at Stellenbosch University and served in several academic posts before becoming the head of the Department of Ancient Near Eastern Studies at Stellenbosch University from 1992 to 1997. He was also very involved in Bible translation and established a center for Bible translation in the Department of Ancient Near Eastern Studies at Stellenbosch University.

Journal of Northwest Semitic Languages, vol. 19

  • Editor: Ferdinand Etienne Deist
  • Publisher: University of Stellenbosch
  • Publication Date: 1993
  • Pages: 189

This issue contains the following articles:

  • “United Bible Societies’ Policies for the New Edition of the Hebrew Bible” by A. Van der Kooij
  • “Presuppostions and Contextual Bible Translation” by F. E. Deist
  • “The Septuagint as Contextual Bible Translation—Alexandrial or Jerusalem as Context for Proverbs?” by J. Cook
  • “Training Tomorrow’s Translators: Some Theoretical Pointers” by C. H. J. van der Merwe and W. K. Winckler
  • “Aspects of Contextual Bible Illustrations” by I. Cornelius
  • “As Seeing the Invisible: Ideologies in Bible Translation” by R. P. Carroll
  • “Two New Lexica of the Septuagint and Related Remarks” by J. Lust
  • “Some Reflections on the Hebrew Texts from Which the Septuagint Was Translated” by E. Tov
  • “The Building of the Tabernacle” by J. W. Wevers
  • “Origen’s Corrections and the Text of P. Bodmer XXIV” by A. Pietersma
  • “Variation in Citations from the Old Testament in the Latin Version of Acts” by J. H. Petzer
  • “Micha 7 Verse 6 in the Ancient Old Testament Versions” by D. L. Büchner
  • “Target Audience and Bible Translation” by B. C. Lategan
  • Reviews

Ferdinand Etienne Deist completed his academic training at Stellenbosch University and served in several academic posts before becoming the head of the Department of Ancient Near Eastern Studies at Stellenbosch University from 1992 to 1997. He was also very involved in Bible translation and established a center for Bible translation in the Department of Ancient Near Eastern Studies at Stellenbosch University.

Journal of Northwest Semitic Languages, vol. 20/1

  • Editors: Ferdinand Etienne Deist, Paul A. Kruger, Johann Cook, and Izak Cornelius
  • Publisher: University of Stellenbosch
  • Publication Date: 1994
  • Pages: 185

This issue contains the following articles:

  • “A New Approach to Basic Hebrew Colour Terms” by K. Massey-Gillespie
  • תַּלְפִּיּוֹת by G. A. Rendsburg
  • “The Talion Principle in Old Testament Narratives” by P. J. Nel
  • “The Diverse Text Forms of Jeremiah and History Writing with Jer. 33 as a Test Case” by J. Lust
  • “A Comparison of Proverbs and Jeremiah in the Septuagint” by J. Cook
  • “Jeremiah 27:5–15: How to MT and LXX Relate to Each Other?” by A. Van der Kooij
  • “David: Historische Gestalt und Idealisiertes Vorbild. Überlegunger zu Entstehung und Theologie von 2 Sam. 6” by W. Zwickel
  • “Epiphany and Sun Mythology in Zechariah” by F. du T. Laubscher
  • “The Asymmetry of Subject Pronouns and Subject Nouns in Qumran Hebrew and Cognates” by J. A. Naudé
  • “Der Rufende im Feuer (Amos 7:4)” by S. Mittmann
  • Reviews

Ferdinand Etienne Deist completed his academic training at Stellenbosch University and served in several academic posts before becoming the head of the Department of Ancient Near Eastern Studies at Stellenbosch University from 1992 to 1997. He was also very involved in Bible translation and established a center for Bible translation in the Department of Ancient Near Eastern Studies at Stellenbosch University.

Paul A. Kruger is an associate professor at the University of Stellenbosch. He researches and lectures in comparative Near Eastern literature, the history of Near Eastern religion, prophetic literature, and the application of social scientific insights on ancient cultures.

Johann Cook is an associate professor at the University of Stellenbosch. He received his MA in Semitic languages and Greek and his DLitt in Semitic languages from Stellenbosch, and specializes in Hebrew language studies, Aramaic, Syriac and Coptic, textual criticism of the Hebrew Bible, the Dead Sea Scrolls, and aspects of the cultures of the Ancient Near East. He is a member of the executive committee of the International Organization for Septuagint and Cognate Studies.

Izak Cornelius is a professor at the University of Stellenbosch. He specializes in Ancient Near Eastern culture, religion, and mythology.

Journal of Northwest Semitic Languages, vol. 20/2

  • Editors: Ferdinand Etienne Deist, Paul A. Kruger, Johann Cook, and Izak Cornelius
  • Publisher: University of Stellenbosch
  • Publication Date: 1994
  • Pages: 227

This issue contains the following articles:

  • “On Representation in the Bible: An Ideologiekritik Approach” by R. P. Carroll
  • “Das Ugaritische Konsonanteninventar” by J. Tropper
  • “Towards a Typology of Qumran Hebrew” by J. A. Naudé
  • “Training Tomorrow’s Translators in the Context of Today’s Translations” by C. H. J. van der Merwe and W. K. Winckler
  • “Methodology for Using the Versions in the Textual Criticism of the Old Testament” by J. A. Adair
  • “Orality and Literariness: The Interface of Values” by C. Swanepoel
  • “Orature, ‘Editure,’ Literature—Reflections on Orality, Literariness, and First Testament Literature” by F. E. Deist
  • “Zur Frage der Filiation des Gottest Ba‘al in Ugarit” by H. Niehr
  • “Approaches to Prepositions in Northwest Semitic Studies” by R. Althann
  • “The Visual Representation of the World in the Ancient Near East and the Bible” by I. Cornelius
  • Reviews

Ferdinand Etienne Deist completed his academic training at Stellenbosch University and served in several academic posts before becoming the head of the Department of Ancient Near Eastern Studies at Stellenbosch University from 1992 to 1997. He was also very involved in Bible translation and established a center for Bible translation in the Department of Ancient Near Eastern Studies at Stellenbosch University.

Paul A. Kruger is an associate professor at the University of Stellenbosch. He researches and lectures in comparative Near Eastern literature, the history of Near Eastern religion, prophetic literature, and the application of social scientific insights on ancient cultures.

Johann Cook is an associate professor at the University of Stellenbosch. He received his MA in Semitic languages and Greek and his DLitt in Semitic languages from Stellenbosch, and specializes in Hebrew language studies, Aramaic, Syriac and Coptic, textual criticism of the Hebrew Bible, the Dead Sea Scrolls, and aspects of the cultures of the Ancient Near East. He is a member of the executive committee of the International Organization for Septuagint and Cognate Studies.

Izak Cornelius is a professor at the University of Stellenbosch. He specializes in Ancient Near Eastern culture, religion, and mythology.

Journal of Northwest Semitic Languages, vol. 34/1

  • Editors: Paul A. Kruger, Johann Cook, Izak Cornelius, and Christo van der Merwe
  • Publisher: University of Stellenbosch
  • Publication Date: 2008
  • Pages: 133

This issue contains the following articles:

  • “The Hebrew Participle and Stative in Typological Perspective” by John Cook
  • “Suffering from Formlessness—the Prohibition of Images in Exilic Times” by Matthias Köckert
  • “Prospective Weqatal in Biblical Hebrew: Dubious Cases or Unidentified Category?” by Tania Notarius
  • “Etymothesis and Fallacy: On Carrots and the Liver” by Ephraim Nissan
  • “Hebrew Verb Forms in Prose and in Some Poetic and Prophetic Passages: Aspect, Sequentiality, Mood and Cognitive Proximity” by Lénart de Regt
  • “Bibliography of the Nominal Clause in the Semitic Languages with Special Attention to All Levels of Hebrew” by Tamar Zewi and Emily Lev
  • Reviews

Paul A. Kruger is an associate professor at the University of Stellenbosch. He researches and lectures in comparative Near Eastern literature, the history of Near Eastern religion, prophetic literature, and the application of social scientific insights on ancient cultures.

Johann Cook is an associate professor at the University of Stellenbosch. He received his MA in Semitic languages and Greek, and his DLitt in Semitic languages from Stellenbosch, and specializes in Hebrew language studies, Aramaic, Syriac, and Coptic, textual criticism of the Hebrew Bible, the Dead Sea Scrolls, and aspects of the cultures of the Ancient Near East. He is a member of the executive committee of the International Organization for Septuagint and Cognate Studies.

Izak Cornelius is a professor at the University of Stellenbosch. He specializes in Ancient Near Eastern culture, religion, and mythology.

Christo van der Merwe received his MA in Semitic languages, his MTh in Old Testament, his MPhil in technology-enhanced language teaching, and his DLitt in Semitic languages—all from the University of Stellenbosch. He specializes in Bible translation as intercultural communication, cognitive linguistics, biblical Hebrew lexical semantics, biblical Hebrew structural markers, and the information structure of biblical Hebrew texts.

Journal of Northwest Semitic Languages, vol. 34/2

  • Editors: Paul A. Kruger, Johann Cook, Izak Cornelius, and Christo van der Merwe
  • Publisher: University of Stellenbosch
  • Publication Date: 2008
  • Pages: 137

This issue contains the following articles:

  • “The Relative Clause in Canaanite Epigraphic Texts” by Robert Holmstedt
  • “Der Ort des Mose nach Deuteronomium 1:1” by Detlef Jericke
  • “The Rebuilding of the Wall of Jerusalem: Neh. 2:1–9 and the Use of Zoroastrian Principles” by Joseph Fleishman
  • “The Distinction between Story and Discourse in the Analysis of Biblical Narrative” by Ronald van der Bergh
  • “Stress and Syntax; Music and Meaning: The Purpose and Function of the Masoretic Accentuation System” by Raymond de Hoop
  • “Two Peculiarities of Niphal Participles in Biblical Hebrew” by Aaron Rubin
  • Reviews

Paul A. Kruger is an associate professor at the University of Stellenbosch. He researches and lectures in comparative Near Eastern literature, the history of Near Eastern religion, prophetic literature, and the application of social scientific insights on ancient cultures.

Johann Cook is an associate professor at the University of Stellenbosch. He received his MA in Semitic languages and Greek, and his DLitt in Semitic languages from Stellenbosch, and specializes in Hebrew language studies, Aramaic, Syriac, and Coptic, textual criticism of the Hebrew Bible, the Dead Sea Scrolls, and aspects of the cultures of the Ancient Near East. He is a member of the executive committee of the International Organization for Septuagint and Cognate Studies.

Izak Cornelius is a professor at the University of Stellenbosch. He specializes in Ancient Near Eastern culture, religion, and mythology.

Christo van der Merwe received his MA in Semitic languages, his MTh in Old Testament, his MPhil in technology-enhanced language teaching, and his DLitt in Semitic languages—all from the University of Stellenbosch. He specializes in Bible translation as intercultural communication, cognitive linguistics, biblical Hebrew lexical semantics, biblical Hebrew structural markers, and the information structure of biblical Hebrew texts.

Journal of Northwest Semitic Languages, vol. 35/1

  • Editors: Paul A. Kruger, Johann Cook, Izak Cornelius, and Christo van der Merwe
  • Publisher: University of Stellenbosch
  • Publication Date: 2009
  • Pages: 135

This issue contains the following articles:

  • “Die Perikope vom ‘Neuen Bund’ (Jer. 31:31–34) im Masoretischen und Alexandrinischen Jeremiabuch. Zu Adrian Schenkers These von der ‘Theologie der drei Bundesschlüsse’” by H-J Stipp
  • “Traces of Deuteronomic Influence in the Septuagint: A Text-Critical Analysis of Exodus 33:1–6” by Hans Ausloos
  • “Toward an LXX Hermeneutic” by Randall X. Gauthier
  • “Interactive Network Graphs of Biblical Hebrew Data” by Jan H. Kroeze, et al.
  • “The Divine Title ‘Fisherman’ in Jer. 16:16” by Sang Youl Cho
  • Reviews

Paul A. Kruger is an associate professor at the University of Stellenbosch. He researches and lectures in comparative Near Eastern literature, the history of Near Eastern religion, prophetic literature, and the application of social scientific insights on ancient cultures.

Johann Cook is an associate professor at the University of Stellenbosch. He received his MA in Semitic languages and Greek, and his DLitt in Semitic languages from Stellenbosch, and specializes in Hebrew language studies, Aramaic, Syriac, and Coptic, textual criticism of the Hebrew Bible, the Dead Sea Scrolls, and aspects of the cultures of the Ancient Near East. He is a member of the executive committee of the International Organization for Septuagint and Cognate Studies.

Izak Cornelius is a professor at the University of Stellenbosch. He specializes in Ancient Near Eastern culture, religion, and mythology.

Christo van der Merwe received his MA in Semitic languages, his MTh in Old Testament, his MPhil in technology-enhanced language teaching, and his DLitt in Semitic languages—all from the University of Stellenbosch. He specializes in Bible translation as intercultural communication, cognitive linguistics, biblical Hebrew lexical semantics, biblical Hebrew structural markers, and the information structure of biblical Hebrew texts.

Journal of Northwest Semitic Languages, vol. 35/2

  • Editors: Paul A. Kruger, Johann Cook, Izak Cornelius, and Christo van der Merwe
  • Publisher: University of Stellenbosch
  • Publication Date: 2009
  • Pages: 133

This issue contains the following articles:

  • “Twisting Traditions: Programmatic Absence-Theology for the Northern Kingdom in 1 Kgs. 12:26–33 (the ‘Sin of Jeroboam’)” by Angelika Berlejung
  • “Diachronic Aspects of Narrative Wayhi in Biblical Hebrew” by Jan Joosten
  • “Recognition of Children in Ancient Near Eastern Law” by Joseph Fleishman
  • “The Divorcée—A Liminal Entity in Israelite Society in the Biblical Period” by Nachum Avraham
  • “Love, Hate, and Self-Identity in Malachi: A New Perspective to Mal. 1:1–5 and 2:10–16” by Elie Assis
  • Reviews

Paul A. Kruger is an associate professor at the University of Stellenbosch. He researches and lectures in comparative Near Eastern literature, the history of Near Eastern religion, prophetic literature, and the application of social scientific insights on ancient cultures.

Johann Cook is an associate professor at the University of Stellenbosch. He received his MA in Semitic languages and Greek, and his DLitt in Semitic languages from Stellenbosch, and specializes in Hebrew language studies, Aramaic, Syriac, and Coptic, textual criticism of the Hebrew Bible, the Dead Sea Scrolls, and aspects of the cultures of the Ancient Near East. He is a member of the executive committee of the International Organization for Septuagint and Cognate Studies.

Izak Cornelius is a professor at the University of Stellenbosch. He specializes in Ancient Near Eastern culture, religion, and mythology.

Christo van der Merwe received his MA in Semitic languages, his MTh in Old Testament, his MPhil in technology-enhanced language teaching, and his DLitt in Semitic languages—all from the University of Stellenbosch. He specializes in Bible translation as intercultural communication, cognitive linguistics, biblical Hebrew lexical semantics, biblical Hebrew structural markers, and the information structure of biblical Hebrew texts.

Journal of Northwest Semitic Languages, vol. 36/1

  • Editors: Paul A. Kruger, Johann Cook, Izak Cornelius, and Christo van der Merwe
  • Publisher: University of Stellenbosch
  • Publication Date: 2010
  • Pages: 129

This issue contains the following articles:

  • “There Is Nothing Better Than More! Texts and Images on Amulet 1 from Arslan Tash” by Angelika Berlejung
  • “Definiteness and the Vocative in Biblical Hebrew” by Cynthia L. Miller
  • “‘Is That Your Voice, My Son David?’ Conducive Questions in Biblical Hebrew” by Adina Moshavi
  • “A Pluralist Approach to the Philosophical Analysis of the Concept of Generic אל-hood  in the Hebrew Bible” by Jaco Gericke
  • “Recognition of Children in Ancient Near Eastern Law (Part Two)” by Joseph Fleishman
  • “Welche Argumente Wiegen Schwerer auf der Waagschale? Zwei Weisen, die Textunterschiede in Jer. 31:32–33 zu Erklären” by Adrian Schenker
  • Reviews

Paul A. Kruger is an associate professor at the University of Stellenbosch. He researches and lectures in comparative Near Eastern literature, the history of Near Eastern religion, prophetic literature, and the application of social scientific insights on ancient cultures.

Johann Cook is an associate professor at the University of Stellenbosch. He received his MA in Semitic languages and Greek, and his DLitt in Semitic languages from Stellenbosch, and specializes in Hebrew language studies, Aramaic, Syriac, and Coptic, textual criticism of the Hebrew Bible, the Dead Sea Scrolls, and aspects of the cultures of the Ancient Near East. He is a member of the executive committee of the International Organization for Septuagint and Cognate Studies.

Izak Cornelius is a professor at the University of Stellenbosch. He specializes in Ancient Near Eastern culture, religion, and mythology.

Christo van der Merwe received his MA in Semitic languages, his MTh in Old Testament, his MPhil in technology-enhanced language teaching, and his DLitt in Semitic languages—all from the University of Stellenbosch. He specializes in Bible translation as intercultural communication, cognitive linguistics, biblical Hebrew lexical semantics, biblical Hebrew structural markers, and the information structure of biblical Hebrew texts.

Journal of Northwest Semitic Languages, vol. 36/2

  • Editors: Paul A. Kruger, Johann Cook, Izak Cornelius, and Christo van der Merwe
  • Publisher: University of Stellenbosch
  • Publication Date: 2010
  • Pages: 133

This issue contains the following articles:

  • “Linguistic Dating of Biblical Hebrew Texts: The Chronology and Typology Debate” by J. A. Naudé
  • “Albright’s Legacy? Homogeneity in the Introduction of the Dead Sea Scrolls to the Public” by Jaqueline S. du Toit and Jason Kalman
  • “The Prefixed Perfective in the Construction אָז יִקְטֹל and Its Later Replacement by the Long Prefixed Verbal Form: A Syntactic and Text-Critical Analysis” by Yigal Bloch
  • “Short Notes on the Value of the Septuagint and Vulgate for the Interpretation of Lamentations 1:1” by Gideon Kotzé
  • “Hebrew Acrostic Poems and Their Vocabulary Stock” by Michael B. Shepherd
  • “Marked Word Order in the Book of Joel” by C. H. J. van der Merwe and Ernst R. Wendland

Paul A. Kruger is an associate professor at the University of Stellenbosch. He researches and lectures in comparative Near Eastern literature, the history of Near Eastern religion, prophetic literature, and the application of social scientific insights on ancient cultures.

Johann Cook is an associate professor at the University of Stellenbosch. He received his MA in Semitic languages and Greek, and his DLitt in Semitic languages from Stellenbosch, and specializes in Hebrew language studies, Aramaic, Syriac, and Coptic, textual criticism of the Hebrew Bible, the Dead Sea Scrolls, and aspects of the cultures of the Ancient Near East. He is a member of the executive committee of the International Organization for Septuagint and Cognate Studies.

Izak Cornelius is a professor at the University of Stellenbosch. He specializes in Ancient Near Eastern culture, religion, and mythology.

Christo van der Merwe received his MA in Semitic languages, his MTh in Old Testament, his MPhil in technology-enhanced language teaching, and his DLitt in Semitic languages—all from the University of Stellenbosch. He specializes in Bible translation as intercultural communication, cognitive linguistics, biblical Hebrew lexical semantics, biblical Hebrew structural markers, and the information structure of biblical Hebrew texts.

Journal of Northwest Semitic Languages, vol. 37/1

  • Editors: Paul A. Kruger, Johann Cook, Izak Cornelius, and Christo van der Merwe
  • Publisher: University of Stellenbosch
  • Publication Date: 2011
  • Pages: 127

This issue contains the following articles:

  • “More Transformations in Biblical Studies: Changing Tendencies in Reading the Book of Qohelet” by Hans Debel
  • “Manie van den Heever, and Bertus van Rooy, Just How Literal Is the King James Version? ” by Jan Kroeze
  • “Jewish Necromancy by Means of Human Skulls and Bones and the Biblical (ידעוני ,אבו(ות, and תרפים”  Meir Malul
  • “Mal. 2:16A, Hebrew כִּי, and the Proper Condemnation of Divorce” by John Elwolde
  • “‘A Message from the King . . .’ Some Remarks on an Edomite Ostracon from Horvat ‘Uza” by Bob Becking and Meindert Dijkstra

Paul A. Kruger is an associate professor at the University of Stellenbosch. He researches and lectures in comparative Near Eastern literature, the history of Near Eastern religion, prophetic literature, and the application of social scientific insights on ancient cultures.

Johann Cook is an associate professor at the University of Stellenbosch. He received his MA in Semitic languages and Greek, and his DLitt in Semitic languages from Stellenbosch, and specializes in Hebrew language studies, Aramaic, Syriac, and Coptic, textual criticism of the Hebrew Bible, the Dead Sea Scrolls, and aspects of the cultures of the Ancient Near East. He is a member of the executive committee of the International Organization for Septuagint and Cognate Studies.

Izak Cornelius is a professor at the University of Stellenbosch. He specializes in Ancient Near Eastern culture, religion, and mythology.

Christo van der Merwe received his MA in Semitic languages, his MTh in Old Testament, his MPhil in technology-enhanced language teaching, and his DLitt in Semitic languages—all from the University of Stellenbosch. He specializes in Bible translation as intercultural communication, cognitive linguistics, biblical Hebrew lexical semantics, biblical Hebrew structural markers, and the information structure of biblical Hebrew texts.

Journal of Northwest Semitic Languages, vol. 37/2

  • Editors: Paul A. Kruger, Johann Cook, Izak Cornelius, and Christo van der Merwe
  • Publisher: University of Stellenbosch
  • Publication Date: 2011
  • Pages: 109

This issue contains the following articles:

  • “The BH Weqatal. A Homogenous Form with No Haphazard Functions (Part One)” by Alexander Andrason
  • “Total or Partial Assimilation of Derivational-*T (ת) in the Biblical Hebrew Hitpa‘el?” by Jeremy M. Hutton
  • “The Social Pragmatics of Two Forms of Directive Speech in Biblical Hebrew” by Perry Oakes
  • “On Partitative מן and -ב in Biblical Hebrew” by Mikhal Oren
  • “What Does Maktîr Allude to in Habakkuk 1:4?” by Aron Pinker
  • Reviews

Paul A. Kruger is an associate professor at the University of Stellenbosch. He researches and lectures in comparative Near Eastern literature, the history of Near Eastern religion, prophetic literature, and the application of social scientific insights on ancient cultures.

Johann Cook is an associate professor at the University of Stellenbosch. He received his MA in Semitic languages and Greek, and his DLitt in Semitic languages from Stellenbosch, and specializes in Hebrew language studies, Aramaic, Syriac, and Coptic, textual criticism of the Hebrew Bible, the Dead Sea Scrolls, and aspects of the cultures of the Ancient Near East. He is a member of the executive committee of the International Organization for Septuagint and Cognate Studies.

Izak Cornelius is a professor at the University of Stellenbosch. He specializes in Ancient Near Eastern culture, religion, and mythology.

Christo van der Merwe received his MA in Semitic languages, his MTh in Old Testament, his MPhil in technology-enhanced language teaching, and his DLitt in Semitic languages—all from the University of Stellenbosch. He specializes in Bible translation as intercultural communication, cognitive linguistics, biblical Hebrew lexical semantics, biblical Hebrew structural markers, and the information structure of biblical Hebrew texts.

Product Details

  • Title: Journal of Northwest Semitic Languages Upgrade
  • Editors: Charles F. Fensham, Walter T. Claassen, Ferdinand E. Deist, Johann Cook, Paul A. Kruger, Izak Cornelius, and C. H. J. van der Merwe
  • Series: Journal of Northwest Semitic Languages (JNSL)
  • Publisher: University of Stellenbosch
  • Issues: 29
  • Pages: 4,446