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A Map Showing the Order and Causes of Salvation and Damnation
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A Map Showing the Order and Causes of Salvation and Damnation

by

Faithlife 2006

Runs on Windows, Mac and mobile.
$2.99

Overview

According to the author’s intent, this map should be used to place oneself on the road to salvation or damnation, according to their current state. Following along the paths of the map, the Christian traces their steps toward heaven, with knowledge of where they have been along with foresight to the challenges that await them. The same follows for the damned. An amazing theological and artistic work, this map makes for quite an interesting study of Bunyan’s theology of judgment.

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Product Details

  • Title: A Map Showing the Order and Causes of Salvation and Damnation
  • Author: John Bunyan
  • Christian Group: Baptist

About John Bunyan

John Bunyan, of Elstow and Bedford, is important to the Reformed tradition, since his famous allegory is one of the chief avenues by which the Puritan spirit entered the mainstream of the English Reformation. With Calvinism as foundational, Bunyan’s prolific writings and fervent preaching embodied a vibrant awareness of Reformed theological thought and its implication for Christian living. The author of more than sixty books, he gained a unique place in history through Grace Abounding (1666), The Pilgrim’s Progress (pt. 1, 1678; pt. 2, 1684), The Life and Death of Mr. Badman (1680), and The Holy War (1682). Other works were primarily expository, doctrinal, and practical.

Bunyan joined the Bedford Baptist Church (1654) and soon began preaching in nearby villages. Prosecuted under an Elizabethan act against nonconformity, he was imprisoned for three months, which was extended to twelve years, with a brief respite during the sixth year.

Bunyan emphasized the centrality of the Bible as the foundation for belief and conduct, stressing the grace of God as the basis of predestination, the focal point of eternal salvation. Initiative in the salvation of sinners belonged to God, since God elected, within God’s purpose and framework of grace, certain individuals to eternal life. Subscribing to the doctrine of “effectual calling,” Bunyan believed it was impossible to resist the call because of the power with which the Holy Spirit accompanied and illuminated the sinner’s understanding. None of the elect could fall from grace.

Though Bunyan was primarily an adherent of the Calvinist tradition, his view of God as Savior, providing salvation from divine wrath rather than God as sovereign ruler, and his belief in the necessity of justification through grace alone showed influence of Luther. The separatist tradition shaped his view of the sacraments. He strongly opposed teachings of the Quakers and the Arminians.

—taken from The Encyclopedia of Reformed Faith