Business Hours

Monday – Saturday
6 AM – 6 PM PDT
Local: 1:48 AM

Sign in

  1. Forgot your password?
Runs on Windows, Mac and mobile.
Two ways to pay
$78.33/mo or $879.95
The New International Commentary on the New Testament (NICNT) (21 vols.)
This image is for illustration only. The product is a download.

Overview

This collection includes all of the volumes from The New International Commentary on the New Testament to provide an exposition of Scripture that is thorough and abreast of modern scholarship, yet at the same time loyal to Scripture as the infallible Word of God. This conviction is shared by all contributors to The New International Commentary on the New Testament and defines the goal of this ambitious series.

This decades-long project has become recognized by scholars, pastors, and serious Bible students as critical yet orthodox commentary marked by solid biblical scholarship within the evangelical Protestant tradition. The New International Commentary on the New Testament serves as an authoritative guide to the text of Scripture, bridging the cultural gap between today’s world and the world of the Bible. Each volume in the NICNT aims to help us hear God’s word as clearly as possible.

Scholars, pastors, and serious Bible students will welcome the fresh light that this commentary series casts on ancient yet familiar biblical texts. The contributors apply their proven scholarly expertise and wide experience as teachers to illumine our understanding of the New Testament. As gifted writers, they present the results of the best recent research in an interesting, readable, and thought-provoking manner.

Each commentary opens with an introduction to the biblical book, looking especially at questions concerning its background, authorship, date, purpose, structure, and theology. A select bibliography also points readers to resources for their own study. The author’s own translation from the original Hebrew and Greek texts forms the basis of the commentary proper. Verse-by-verse comments nicely balance the in-depth discussions of technical matters—such as textual criticism and critical problems—with exposition of the biblical writer’s theology and its implications for the life of faith today.

With Logos, The New International Commentary on the New Testament will integrate into the Passage Guide. Whenever you enter your passage and click go, results from the NICNT will appear on the text you’re studying. This gives you instant access to exactly what you’re looking for in less time than it would take you to walk over to the bookshelf and begin flipping through a print volume.

Key Features

  • Verse-by-verse commentary
  • Links to original language texts and English Bible translations
  • In-depth discussion of textual and critical matters
  • Introductions to each book’s authorship, date, purpose, structure, and theology
  • Detailed bibliography
  • Links all words—English, Greek, Hebrew, and other original languages— to lexicons in your digital library

Praise for the Logos Edition

The NIC is an amazing scholarly, protestant, evangelical commentary series. It gives verse-by-verse commentary on almost every book of the Bible, including immensely helpful introductory information. The only thing better than the commentary series itself is being able to have the entire thing with you, on your laptop, wherever you go. The NIC for Logos is a great resource that every seminarian should consider.

—GoingtoSeminary.com review

Individual Titles

The Gospel of Matthew

  • Author: R. T. France
  • Publisher: Eerdmans
  • Publication Date: 2007
  • Pages: 1,223

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

“It is a special pleasure to introduce R. T. (Dick) France’s commentary to the pastoral and scholarly community, who should find it a truly exceptional—and helpful—volume.” So says Gordon Fee in his preface to this work. France’s masterful commentary on Matthew focuses on exegesis of Matthew’s text as it stands rather than on the prehistory of the material or details of Synoptic comparison. The exegesis of each section is part of a planned literary whole supplemented, rather than controlled, by verse-by-verse commentary, allowing the text as a complete story to come into brilliant focus.

Rather than being a “commentary on commentaries,” The Gospel of Matthew is concerned throughout with what Matthew himself meant to convey about Jesus and how he set about doing so within the cultural and historical context of first-century Palestine. France frequently draws attention to the distinctive nature of the province of Galilee and the social dynamics involved when a Galilean prophet presents himself in Jerusalem as the Messiah.

The English translation at the beginning of each section is France’s own, designed to provide the basis for the commentary. This adept translation uses contemporary idioms and, where necessary, gives priority to clarity over literary elegance.

Amid the wide array of Matthew commentaries available today, France’s world-class stature, his clear focus on Matthew and Jesus, his careful methodology, and his user-friendly style promise to make this volume an enduring standard for years to come.

R. T. France, long recognized as a Matthean scholar par excellence, now presents a crowning achievement in this superb full-length commentary. With the firm hand of a seasoned scholar, France offers a lively, insightful commentary marked above all by solid, no-nonsense exegesis. This is vintage France, and every student of Matthew will find great rewards here. I recommend this volume with the highest enthusiasm.

Donald A. Hagner, George Eldon Ladd Professor Emeritus of New Testament and senior professor of New Testament, Fuller Theological Seminary

This commentary will be of great benefit to scholars and exegetical preachers alike. Close analysis and sensible comments are the hallmarks of this book, and it will now stand appropriately alongside other recent major treatments of Matthew . . . while making its own significant contribution. This is a responsible, scholarly, and illuminating contribution to the study and interpretation of Matthew’s gospel.

Expository Times

R. T. France is a honorary research fellow in the department of theology and religious studies at the University of Wales in Bangor.

The Gospel of Mark

  • Author: William L. Lane
  • Publisher: Eerdmans
  • Publication Date: 1974
  • Pages: 678

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

The Gospel of Mark is significant in many ways. Not only was it the first Gospel to be written and an important literary source for Matthew and Luke, but it is also best characterized as a witness document, a proclamation of salvation through Jesus Christ, which received its creative impulse from the early apostolic preaching. Mark bears witness to the word of revelation that Jesus is the Messiah, the Son of God.

In this widely praised commentary by William L. Lane, Mark is revealed as a theologian whose primary intention was the strengthening of the people of God in a time of fiery persecution by Nero. Using redaction criticism as a hermeneutical approach for understanding the text and the intention of the evangelist, Lane considers the Gospel of Mark as a total literary work and describes Mark’s creative role in shaping the Gospel tradition and in exercising a conscious theological purpose. By taking care to indicate how the text was heard by Mark’s contemporaries while also placing the study of Mark within the frame of reference offered by modern Gospel research, Lane has constructed a thorough going work that is at once useful to scholars and highly intelligible to nonspecialists.

Lane is to be commended for his splendid work. It is the best English commentary on Mark . . . a standard.

Bibliotheca Sacra

The exposition is full and perceptive, and never loses sight of the objective of bringing the whole thrust of Mark’s Gospel to the attention of the reader.

Reformed Theological Review

From the opening sentence this commentary is clear, creative, well written, and extremely well informed. All in all, a great commentary.

Restoration Quarterly

William L. Lane was a Paul T. Walls Chair in Wesleyan and Biblical Studies at Seattle Pacific University in Seattle, WA.

The Gospel of Luke

  • Author: Joel B. Green
  • Publisher: Eerdmans
  • Publication Date: 1997
  • Pages: 1,020

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

This highly original commentary on the Gospel of Luke is unique for the way it combines concerns with first-century culture in the Roman world with understanding the text of Luke as a wholistic, historical narrative. Focusing primarily on how each episode functions within Luke’s narrative development, Joel B. Green provides countless fresh perspectives on and new insights into the Third Gospel. His extended examination of Luke’s literary art and Luke’s narrative theology allows the Evangelist to address clearly and convincingly both ancient and contemporary readers.

Insisting on the narrative unity of Luke-Acts, Green highlights in this volume the centrality of God’s purpose to bring salvation to all people. Against the backdrop of the conflicted first-century world of the Mediterranean, Green proposes that the purpose of Luke-Acts would have been to strengthen the early Christians in the face of opposition by assuring them in their interpretation and experience of the redemptive purpose and faithfulness of God and by calling them to continued faithfulness and witness in God’s salvific project.

In a market flooded with commentaries, Green’s stands out as exceptional. He is a discerning and reliable guide to Luke’s Gospel: with clarity and verve he points readers to the subtleties of the narrative and to the power of its theological vision. His commentary demonstrates the considerable potential of a reading informed by knowledge of Luke’s cultural world and by the best of current scholarly methods. Erudite yet passionate, sophisticated yet lucid—this is rich fare indeed.

John T. Carroll, Harriet Robertson Fitts Memorial Professor of New Testament, Union Presbyterian Seminary

This commentary makes the Gospel of Luke come alive for contemporary readers. Greek accomplishes in an admirable fashion the challenging task of interpreting Luke as persuasive narrative (utilizing and contributing to social-scientific and literary insights into Luke-Acts) and composing a verse-by-verse commentary with careful attention to linguistic, historical-critical, and theological data.

Edgar V. McKnight, research professor, Furman University

My shelf is filled with solid exegetical commentaries on Luke. This one exceeds them all in one respect—its vivid presentation of the good news this Gospel reveals.

—Mark Allan Powell, Robert and Phyllis Leatherman Professor of New Testament, Trinity Lutheran Seminary

Joel B. Green is a professor of New Testament interpretation at Fuller Theological Seminary in Pasadena, CA.

The Gospel According to John, Revised Edition

  • Author: Leon Morris
  • Publisher: Eerdmans
  • Publication Date: 1971
  • Pages: 888

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Hailed as perhaps “the best commentary on any book of the Bible by an evangelical in recent decades” by Christianity Today when it was first published in 1971, Leon Morris’ Gospel According to John has become one of the enduring standard commentaries on John’s Gospel.

Recognizing the central importance of the Fourth Gospel in any series on the New Testament, Morris devoted more than 10 years to preparing this volume. Written with considerable acumen and a thorough knowledge of the previous scholarly work on the Johannine text, The Gospel According to John is one of the largest and most comprehensive commentaries ever to come out of the evangelical community.

This revised edition includes significant modifications and additions made in the light of more recent writings on John’s Gospel. While maintaining substantially the same stance as in his original work, Morris here references important secondary sources and studies that have appeared over the last two decades. The commentary is now also based on the New International Version.

Preachers will find Morris’ exegetical hints helpful inasmuch as they will lead to greater accuracy in expounding the text. The text of the exposition can be read with profit by the average layperson. In the footnotes students of the Word will find the most amazing and delightful array of material. It is a pleasure to recommend this perceptive and valuable treatment.

Journal of the Evangelical Theological Society

Scholarly yet eminently readable and useful to anyone who is studying the Fourth Gospel seriously.

Eternity

A masterpiece of scholarship and readability.

United Evangelical

Certainly this is the best extended treatment of the Fourth Gospel.

Criswell Theological Review

Leon Morris (1914–2006) retired as a principal of Ridley College in Melbourne, Australia in 1979. He was the author of more than 40 books, including The Apostolic Preaching of the Cross and the volumes on Matthew and Romans in The Pillar New Testament Commentary.

The Gospel of John

  • Author: J. Ramsey Michaels
  • Publisher: Eerdmans
  • Publication Date: 2010
  • Pages: 1,132

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

In this detailed, elegantly written commentary J. Ramsey Michaels gives primary attention to the Gospel of John in its present form rather than to the sources or traditions behind it. Michaels examines both the Gospel’s literary character and its theological significance for the Christian community in its own time and through the ages. This landmark commentary—17 years in the making, reflecting 50 years of classroom teaching, and packed with fresh insights—will prove highly useful to scholars, students, and, especially, pastors.

This is a commentary for which it was well worth waiting. The fruit of a lifetime’s engagement with John’s Gospel, it manages to be both conservative and original. Above all, it does superbly what the best commentaries do—immerse readers in the text itself. Michaels takes us with him deep into this Gospel’s story of Jesus, expertly probing the narrative, asking questions about it that we may not have thought of, and pointing out details, nuances, and connections we may have missed, all the while ensuring we do not avoid the text’s larger, sometimes uncomfortable, truth claims. Readers will emerge invigorated, enlightened, and inspired. The excellence of Michaels’ substantial and intriguing close reading makes his commentary one to which readers will return again and again for continuing stimulus in their own study of John.

Andrew T. Lincoln, Portland professor of New Testament studies, University of Gloucestershire

A senior Johannine scholar here weaves together fresh thinking on John’s Gospel with his years of engagement with the Gospel and its earlier scholarly interpreters. This new commentary is attentive to the details of the text, to structural clues, and to the cohesiveness of John’s narrative as a whole; while clearly sensitive to the Greek text, it is written to be intelligible for English readers.

Craig S. Keener, professor of New Testament, Asbury Theological Seminary

J. Ramsey Michaels has produced a masterful commentary, the fruit of well over half a century of careful study of John’s Gospel. He draws upon a wealth of resources, ancient and modern, as he engages both the larger historical, literary, and theological dimensions of the text, as well as fine details of grammar and textual variants. His analysis is marked by many original insights that are grounded in careful attention to the text itself, and his clear, engaging style makes this commentary a page-turner.

Rodney A. Whitacre, professor of Biblical studies, Trinity School for Ministry

This new commentary—part of Eerdmans’ acclaimed NICNT series—gives primary attention to John’s gospel in its present form rather than the sources or traditions behind it. J. Ramsey Michaels assumes that the John who authored the book is someone very close to Jesus and, therefore, that the gospel is a testimony to events that actually happened in the life of Jesus. Yet Michaels does not ignore the literary character of the gospel of John or its theological contribution to the larger Christian community from its own time to the present day. Through a detailed verse-by-verse commentary, Michaels reveals how the gospel of “the disciple whom Jesus loved” is a unified composition, intertwined with the synoptics, yet drawing on material none of them cover.

D. A. Carson, research professor of New Testament, Trinity Evangelical Divinity School

J. Ramsey Michaels is a professor emeritus of religious studies at Missouri State University in Springfield, Missouri, and an adjunct professor of New Testament at Bangor Theological Seminary in Portland, Maine. He is the author of several commentaries and over two hundred articles on the New Testament.

The Book of Acts

  • Author: F. F. Bruce
  • Publisher: Eerdmans
  • Publication Date: 1988
  • Pages: 564

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

First published in 1954, F. F. Bruce’s volume on the Book of Acts in the NICNT series has stood for more than 50 years as a standard commentary on Acts. In keeping with the effort to be faithful to the description “new” in the series title, however, Bruce undertook a thorough revision of this commentary before his death in 1990.

Expanded and fully updated, this volume now reflects the best elements of recent notable contributions to the study of Luke-Acts as well as the author’s own deepened understanding gained from years of further reflection on the text. Whereas the first edition used the text of the American Standard Version of 1901, this revision is based on Bruce’s own fresh translation of the Greek text. The result is a work that makes transparent the walls between the first and the twentieth centuries and enables readers to hear not only the voice of Luke but the Word of God.

This is a learned, informative, critical, and eminently readable commentary which no one should overlook.

C. K. Barrett, in The Journal of Theological Studies

Like the forty or so books that have previously come from Bruce’s pen, this is a definitive work which even those who already own the first edition would do well to acquire.

Bruce M. Metzger

Marked by meticulous scholarship, lucidity of expression, and a sound historical sense. This [revised] commentary looks set to serve a new generation of readers . . . as the first edition did in its time.

Evangel

F. F. Bruce was a Rylands Professor of Biblical Criticism and Exegesis at the University of Manchester, England. During his distinguished career he wrote numerous commentaries and books and served as general editor of the New International Commentary on the New Testament series from 1962 to 1990.

The Epistle to the Romans

  • Author: Douglas J. Moo
  • Publisher: Eerdmans
  • Publication Date: 1996
  • Pages: 1,037

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Paul’s letter to the Romans has been called “the quintessence and perfection of saving doctrine.” Perhaps the most challenging and thoroughly doctrinal book of the entire New Testament, Romans deals with many issues that are basic to Christian theology and practice. In this volume respected New Testament scholar Douglas J. Moo provides a superb study of Paul’s letter to the Roman Christians and restates the enduring message of Romans for Christians today.

Based on the English text but bringing into the discussion the underlying Greek at every point, this commentary focuses both on theological meaning and on contemporary significance. Moo contributes to the continuing debate regarding Paul’s teaching on such issues as Jewish law and the relationship between Jews and Gentiles in the people of God. He also critically interacts with “the new perspective on Paul,” highlights Romans’ emphasis on “practical divinity,” and traces the theme of gospel throughout the epistle.

Twelve years in the making and a steady seller during its first decade in print, Moo’s Epistle to the Romans will continue to serve as a standard exposition of Romans.

This is a monumental work that can be placed among the best commentaries on Romans. If one wants to know the content of Romans, this commentary needs to be consulted. Helpful to teachers, pastors, and students.

Bibliotheca Sacra

If a student could own but one commentary on Romans, this should be it—now and for a long time to come.

Craig L. Blomberg, distinguished professor of New Testament, Denver Seminary

In The Epistle to the Romans, Douglas Moo provides a very good, detailed analysis of Paul’s most important letter.

Catholic Biblical Quarterly

This commentary displays marks of fine scholarship and practical interest. Douglas Moo shows himself to be keenly aware of theological subtleties and issues, and his work is informed by a strong sense of the history of interpretation of Romans.

Journal of Theological Studies

Douglas J. Moo is a Blanchard Professor of New Testament at Wheaton College.

The First Epistle to the Corinthians

  • Author: Gordon D. Fee
  • Publisher: Eerdmans
  • Publication Date: 1987
  • Pages: 904

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

This award-winning commentary on 1 Corinthians by Gordon D. Fee has been lauded as the best study now available on Paul’s exciting and theologically rich first letter to the Corinthians.

Fee offers a readable exposition of 1 Corinthians that clearly describes the meaning of Paul’s ideas and their larger theological relevance. The more scholarly dimension of the work, including Fee’s considerable interaction with other commentators, is found in the footnotes.

Several features make this commentary unique. First, Fee takes great care to establish the all-important historical/literary context of this letter by including numerous sectional introductions that reconstruct the historical background and trace the flow of Paul’s argument. Fee is also concerned to exegete the whole book from a consistent perspective as to the historical situation. Second, Fee’s expertise in textual criticism has led him to discuss every exegetically significant variant, some at considerable length. Third, Fee concludes almost every paragraph with some observations about application—illustrating his deep concern that the Word of God be a living word for today.

This is an excellent commentary. Writing in the best tradition of evangelical scholarship, Fee has produced the most thorough interpretation of 1 Corinthians to have appeared in English in this generation.

Journal of Biblical Literature

A masterpiece. The finest and most comprehensive scholarly effort on 1 Corinthians in print today.

Criswell Theological Review

This commentary is a full and thorough reading of the text, reliable in its discussions of the scholarly debates, cautious in its exegetical judgments, sensitive in its handling of Paul, and constructive in its theological content. It offers more substance than any other available commentary.

Studies in Religion

This is an excellent commentary! If the reviewer could own only one commentary on 1 Corinthians, this would be it.

Southwestern Journal of Theology

Gordon D. Fee is a professor emeritus of New Testament studies at Regent College in Vancouver, British Columbia. In addition to his many highly respected commentaries and biblical studies, he is also the author of Paul, the Spirit, and the People of God; Gospel and Spirit; and How to Read the Bible for All Its Worth.

The Second Epistle to the Corinthians

  • Author: Paul Barnett
  • Publisher: Eerdmans
  • Publication Date: 1997
  • Pages: 692

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

This excellent commentary on 2 Corinthians by Paul Barnett illumines the historical background of the church at Corinth and clarifies the meaning of Paul’s passionate letter both for those first-century Christians and for the church today.

Assuming the unity of the letter, for which extensive argument is offered, Barnett takes the view that Paul is, in particular, addressing the issue of triumphalism in Corinth. This triumphalism is expressed by the newly arrived missionaries who portray Paul as “inferior” to themselves; it is also endemic among the Corinthians. According to Barnett, the recurring theme of the letter is “power-in-weakness,” based on the motif of the Resurrection of the Crucified, which lies at the heart of the Gospel of Christ. Also fundamental to the letter is the theme of fulfillment of the “promises of God” by Christ and the Spirit under the New Covenant.

Written for scholars, pastors, and laypeople alike, this commentary on 2 Corinthians will be a lasting reference work for those interested in this important section of Scripture.

This Pauline letter is rightly regarded by Paul Barnett as a favorite with scholars, having generated a wealth of literary studies in recent times. It also remains an epistle full of problems—historical, textual, and interpretive—for modern readers, especially those who use 2 Corinthians for preaching. Yet it is a rich mine of Gospel truths and a valuable resource for understanding Paul’s teaching on proclamation, ministry, and the Christian life. Barnett is well qualified to handle all these complexities with a sure touch, a scholar’s expertise, and a pastor’s concerns. Above all, he does so with a deft style that makes this new volume accessible to all. A warm welcome awaits this commentary.

Ralph P. Martin

Barnett has lived with Paul and the Corinthians for a number of years. His well-known expertise as a New Testament historian comes to the fore in his insightful illumination of the historical background to this Pauline epistle. His detailed exegesis in the commentary is clear, rigorous, and sane, and I found his tracing of the rhetorical movement of the arguments through the letter to be invaluable. Readers will also appreciate the helpful distinctions drawn between what was uniquely Pauline and what of Paul stands as a model for pastors, missionaries, and Christians.

—Peter O’Brien

Paul Barnett is a visiting fellow in ancient history at Macquarie University, and teaches at Moore College in Sydney and Regent College in Vancouver. His many other books include The Second Epistle to the Corinthians (NICNT) and The Birth of Christianity: The First Twenty Years (both Eerdmans).

The Epistle to the Galatians

  • Author: Ronald Y. K. Fung
  • Publisher: Eerdmans
  • Publication Date: 1988
  • Pages: 375

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

This commentary by Ronald Y. K. Fung has been added to the NICNT series to address significant new questions regarding the study of Galatians that have arisen since the publication of Herman N. Ridderbos’ commentary—the original NICNT volume on Galatians—in 1953.

Begun under the mentorship of F. F. Bruce at the University of Manchester, England, Fung’s work on Galatians offers solid, reliable exposition of the text while also providing a fresh assessment of the large number of interpretive questions—past and present—raised by Paul’s letter. This work also examines Galatians specifically as Paul’s most direct defense and exposition of justification by faith, which Fung says is the central motif of Paul’s understanding of the Gospel.

Here is a rare exegetical feast, combining careful grammatical analysis, balanced judgment on debatable issues, and full notes that reflect acquaintance with a wide range of scholarly literature. It is exciting to have from the pen of an outstanding Chinese New Testament scholar such a splendid commentary that will deservedly take its place alongside the standard commentaries in English by Lightfoot, Burton, Betz, and Bruce.

—Murray J. Harris

Dr. Fung writes in a beautifully clear and simple style with careful attention to detail. Here is sound scholarship and reverent exegesis which will greatly enhanced the distinguished series in which it appears.

—I. Howard Marshall

This expert and lucid commentary on Galatians will be a very valuable resource to all students grappling with the interpretation of Galatians and with recent scholarly discussion of Paul and Pauline theology.

—David Wenham

Ronald Y. K. Fung is a professor of Biblical studies and resident scholar at the China Graduate School of Theology in Hong Kong. He has written several commentaries in Chinese and contributed articles to such volumes as Dictionary of Paul and His Letters.

Paul’s Letter to the Philippians

  • Author: Gordon D. Fee
  • Publisher: Eerdmans
  • Publication Date: 1995
  • Pages: 543

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

This commentary by respected New Testament scholar Gordon D. Fee is a scholarly yet thoroughly readable study of Paul’s letter to the suffering community of believers in Philippi.

Working directly from the Greek text but basing his comments on the New International Version, Fee sets Paul’s letter to the Philippians squarely within the context of first-century “friendship” and “moral exhortation” to a church facing opposition because of its loyalty to Jesus Christ. At the same time Fee gives equal concern to the letter’s theological and spiritual relevance.

Important features of this commentary include a remarkable comparison of Philippians to two well-known types of letters in the Greco-Roman world: the letter of friendship and the letter of moral exhortation; an introduction that discusses the occasion, authenticity, and theological contributions of Philippians; and scholarly insights that resolve many of the formal and structural issues that have long puzzled New Testament scholars.

This is truly a massive commentary on Philippians—massive in its detailed consideration of introductory matters, massive in its detailed examination of the Greek text, and massive in its exposition of theological matters. Word by word and phrase by phrase, Fee analyzes the argument and distills the theology from what he takes to be Paul’s letter from his Roman imprisonment. He avoids no problem, is guilty of no oversimplifications, is unwilling to impose false clarity where ambiguity is unavoidable, yet through it all he finds the theology of this little gem from the mind of Paul. This is a first-rate commentary, and much will be learned from a careful reading of it.

—Paul J. Achtemeier

This is an exceedingly important contribution. Fee has become one of the premier commentators on the Pauline letters. Precious few scholars can claim comparable mastery of the whole range of exegetical studies, from the technical details of textual criticism to the broad challenges of theological reflection. Moreover, he combines readable exposition in the text with thorough documentation in the footnotes. A real treasure.

—Moises Silva

Gordon D. Fee is a professor emeritus of New Testament studies at Regent College in Vancouver, British Columbia. In addition to his many highly respected commentaries and biblical studies, he is also the author of Paul, the Spirit, and the People of God; Gospel and Spirit; and How to Read the Bible for All Its Worth.

The Epistles to the Colossians, to Philemon, and to the Ephesians

  • Author: F. F. Bruce
  • Publisher: Eerdmans
  • Publication Date: 1984
  • Pages: 470

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

This collection of three commentaries in one volume completes F. F. Bruce’s lifelong study of Paul’s writings. With the publication of this volume, Bruce—one of the most respected New Testament scholars in the world—finished writing commentaries on all the Pauline epistles except the Pastorals.

According to Bruce, there are important reasons for linking Colossians, Philemon, and Ephesians together in one work. The study of both Ephesians and Colossians, says Bruce, confirms his belief that Ephesians continues the line of thought followed in Colossians—in particular because it draws out the implications of Christ’s cosmic role (set forth in Colossians) for the church, which is his body. At the same time Ephesians constitutes the crown of Paulinism, gathering up the main themes of the apostle’s teaching into a unified presentation sub specie aeternitatis. The letter to Philemon, too, has a close association to Colossians, and is appropriately included in this volume.

Here is [F. F. Bruce’s] massive learning, thorough acquaintance with the ancient world, careful and cautious assessment of theories, love of Paul, and straightforward exposition of what Paul was saying. The student who works carefully through this volume will not only learn the main outlines of scholarly debate but will come to an understanding of the theological message of these letters.

Expository Times

This is a fine commentary and is all that we have come to expect from the pen of Bruce, the doyen of evangelical scholars: clear, accurate, easy to read, and giving evidence of the author’s breadth of learning and charity when disagreeing with the viewpoints of others.

Journal of the Evangelical Theological Society

Bruce is now summing up a lifetime of productive study of these materials.

Themelios

F. F. Bruce was a Rylands Professor of Biblical Criticism and Exegesis at the University of Manchester, England. During his distinguished career he wrote numerous widely used commentaries and books and served as the general editor of the New International Commentary on the New Testament series from 1962 to 1990.

The First and Second Letters to the Thessalonians

  • Author: Gordon D. Fee
  • Publisher: Eerdmans
  • Publication Date: 2009
  • Pages: 400

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

In this commentary Gordon Fee aims first and foremost to offer a fresh exposition of the text of 1 and 2 Thessalonians. He shows the reader what is in the biblical text, what the text meant in the first century, and what it means now. Fee reveals the logic of each argument or narrative before moving on to the details of each verse, and he concludes each section with a theological-practical reflection on the meaning of the text today. Among other things, Fee explores the occasion for writing for each epistle, restoring 2 Thessalonians to the place it deserves as a full companion to the first letter, rather than merely a tagalong to 1 Thessalonians.

Gordon Fee brings his exceptional skill as an exegete together with his pastor’s heart in this very helpful commentary on Paul’s two Thessalonian letters. Fee delivers his depth of insight into the text in prose that is a model of clarity and readability. Everyone will appreciate his concise and challenging applications at the end of each section.

—Clinton E. Arnold

Fee could not be boring even if he tried. The zest of his prose makes him exciting to read, and his scholarship is always rigorous.

—D. A. Carson

Gordon D. Fee is a professor emeritus of New Testament studies at Regent College in Vancouver, British Columbia. In addition to his many highly respected commentaries and biblical studies, he is also the author of Paul, the Spirit, and the People of God; Gospel and Spirit; and How to Read the Bible for All Its Worth.

The Letters to Timothy and Titus

  • Author: Philip H. Towner
  • Publisher: Eerdmans
  • Publication Date: 2006
  • Pages: 934

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

The most accessible, most broadly pitched full-length commentary on Timothy and Titus, this NICNT volume explores Paul’s three letters to Timothy and Titus within their historical, religious, and cultural settings.

In his introduction, Towner sets out the rationale for his historical approach, questions certain assumptions of recent critical scholarship, and establishes the uniqueness and individuality of each letter. Significantly, Towner’s work displays unprecedented interaction with four recent major commentaries on these Pauline letters. Centered on an outstanding translation of the Greek text and including thorough footnotes, bibliographical citations, and indexes, Towner’s commentary on Timothy and Titus is sure to become a standard reference for busy pastors, students, and scholars.

Few if any scholars could be more qualified to give birth to this volume. Towner’s newest work fills an important gap—an up-to-date, exegetically solid, mid-range commentary on the English text, fully informed by the Greek and wholly abreast of current scholarship. Rejecting the unproven theory of non-Pauline authorship and ably highlighting the individual distinctives of each letter, often obscured by the homogenizing label “Pastoral Epistles,” Towner has produced what may wind up being the most useful commentary among the broadest range of English-language readers for many years to come.

—Craig L. Blomberg

When reading this commentary, I felt as if I were sitting in a room listening to Paul and his associates explain the Gospel in ever fresh ways for a new day. Phil Towner’s readable, exciting exposition of these wonderful letters will usher many into a new age of studies on the Pastorals.

—Scot McKnight

The mature work of a scholar who has had a love affair with the letters to Timothy and Titus over a quarter century, this is arguably the finest and most useful commentary based on the English text of the letters (with adequate discussion of matters Greek in the footnotes). Student and preacher alike will treasure this user-friendly treatment for its careful summarizing of essential data and also for its numerous shafts of fresh light from a scholar who knows all the contemporary discussion but is not beholden to any authority except that of the text itself.

—I. Howard Marshall

Philip H. Towner is a dean of Nida Institute for Biblical Scholarship at the American Bible Society in New York, New York.

The Epistle to the Hebrews

  • Author: Gareth Lee Cockerill
  • Publisher: Eerdmans
  • Publication Date: 2012
  • Pages: 792

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Gareth Lee Cockerill’s commentary offers sound insight into Hebrews as a well-constructed sermon encouraging its readers to persevere despite persecution and hardships in light of Christ’s unique sufficiency as Savior.

Cockerill analyzes the book’s rhetorical, chiastic shape and interprets each passage in light of this overarching structure. He also offers a new analysis of how Hebrews uses the Old Testament—continuity and fulfillment, rather than continuity and discontinuity—and shows how this consistent usage is relevant for contemporary biblical interpretation. Written in a clear, engaging, and accessible style, this commentary will benefit pastors, laypeople, students, and scholars alike.

Gareth Lee Cockerill is a professor of New Testament and biblical theology at Wesley Biblical Seminary in Jackson, Mississippi. He has written Hebrews in the Wesleyan Bible Commentary and Guidebook for Pilgrims to the Heavenly City.

The Epistle to the Hebrews

  • Author: F. F. Bruce
  • Publisher: Eerdmans
  • Publication Date: 1997
  • Pages: 448

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

For many readers the Epistle to the Hebrews is among the most difficult books of the New Testament. Understanding its message calls for a great familiarity with its Old Testament background and a good knowledge of certain phases of first-century biblical exegesis. When first published in 1964, this commentary on Hebrews by F. F. Bruce received critical praise for providing the expertise needed on both these fronts.

The last volume on which Bruce was able to complete revisions before his death in 1990, this edition of The Epistle to the Hebrews evidences 25 years of further study on Bruce’s part—especially through thoroughly updated and embellished footnotes that take into account the numerous publications on Hebrews that have appeared in the intervening years. Bruce also replaced the commentary’s use of the American Standard Version of 1901 with his own translation of the original Greek text to make his verse-by-verse exposition as clear as possible.

The original edition was still arguably the best English commentary on Hebrews for general use. The update of this standard commentary is unreservedly welcomed.

The Bible Translator

Solid, sound, and scholarly. Its usefulness to students, pastors, clergy, and for many details, to scholars, will be immense.

Novum Testamentum

Here is an excellent commentary on the Epistle to the Hebrews.

Review and Expositor

Every preacher and New Testament scholar should have a commentary by F. F. Bruce on Hebrews in his or her library.

Calvin Theological Journal

F. F. Bruce was a Rylands Professor of Biblical Criticism and Exegesis at the University of Manchester, England. During his distinguished career he wrote numerous widely used commentaries and books and served as the general editor of the New International Commentary on the New Testament series from 1962 to 1990.

The Letter of James

  • Author: Scot McKnight
  • Publisher: Eerdmans
  • Publication Date: 2011
  • Pages: 532

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Pastors and scholars have often found the letter of James particularly vexing both to interpret and to apply. Scot McKnight’s commentary expounds James both in its own context and in the context of ancient Judaism, the Greco-Roman world, and the emerging Christian faith. Though interacting with the best available scholarly work on James, McKnight first connects deeply with the text of the letter itself, striving to interpret James’ teaching rigorously in light of what he says elsewhere in his letter rather than smothering the epistle in extrinsic debates and theories. Shaped from beginning to end for pastors, preachers, and teachers, this accessible commentary—full of insight, good sense, and wit—will shed fresh light for those who want to explain James and its significance to their congregations and classes.

Scot McKnight has written a very readable, evangelical commentary on James. While covering the traditional bases and literature, he also includes a number of new readings of the data that make his work fresh and intriguing. This book will be viewed as a standard evangelical work that needs to be consulted in any future work on this letter.

Peter H. Davids, professor of biblical theology, St. Stephen’s University

This commentary is scholarly, interesting, and timely—three things not often said about the same book! McKnight’s reading of James sees the first-century Jewish-Christian community battling over issues of personal equity and social justice and struggling to find godly and workable solutions. With today’s church struggling to find biblical solutions to the same kinds of problems, McKnight’s explanation of James is a welcomed voice in the conversation.

—Douglas S. Huffman, professor of biblical and theological studies, Talbot School of Theology

McKnight has produced a readable and carefully organized commentary packed full of concrete insights. He brilliantly blends the best thoughts of earlier scholarship with innovative thinking, and remains sensitive throughout to both ancient context and his modern audience.

Craig S. Keener, professor of New Testament, Asbury Theological Seminary

Scot McKnight is a Karl A. Olsson Professor in Religious Studies at North Park University in Chicago, Illinois. His many other books include The Jesus Creed: Loving God, Loving Others; A Community Called Atonement; NIV Application Commentary volumes on Galatians and 1 Peter; and (co-edited with James D. G. Dunn) The Historical Jesus in Recent Research.

The Epistle of James

  • Author: James B. Adamson
  • Publisher: Eerdmans
  • Publication Date: 1976
  • Pages: 227

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

The author of the Epistle of James, a letter distinguished for its passionate commitment to Jewish Christianity, has been dubbed “the Amos of the new covenant.” As a guide to Christian behavior, the letter deals with themes of universal importance, among which are the nature of God and man, the evils of lust and pride, the virtues of faith and hope, and the fruits of faith and love.

James B. Adamson, in contrast to many scholars, is convinced that James was a master writer whose knowledge and choice of Greek bestow on his epistle a sustained unity of style and content that bears a close affinity with the Synoptic Gospels and the sayings of Jesus. The substance and authoritative tone of this epistle follow in the tradition of Elijah and Moses, and the style and diction resemble some of the outstanding qualities of the Psalms the prophets.

In this thorough exegesis of his own working translation, Adamson combats some prevalent notions and corrects misunderstandings of the nature of this unique epistle, which, he says, cannot really be understood apart from the whole context of the New Testament.

A noteworthy publishing event! If it leads to a rediscovery of the Epistle of James and its message by twentieth-century Christians, it will have performed a noble service. I take pleasure in warmly commending it to all students and preachers of the New Testament and its message.

—W. Ward Gasque

James B. Adamson was a senior pastor of the First Presbyterian Church in Santa Rosa, California. He studied at the University of Edinburgh and in 1954 was awarded a PhD from Cambridge University for a thesis on the Epistle of James.

The First Epistle of Peter

  • Author: Peter H. Davids
  • Publisher: Eerdmans
  • Publication Date: 1990
  • Pages: 288

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

The First Epistle of Peter constitutes an important work of New Testament theology and pastoral care, serves as an example of how the early church applied Jesus’ sayings and the Old Testament writings to contemporary concerns, and presents some extremely useful perspectives on living the Christian life today. This commentary by Peter Davids does an excellent job of mining the rich wealth of instruction to be found in this very significant section of Scripture.

Davids’ commentary contains several notable features: a unique grasp of 1 Peter’s structure, a systematically arranged introduction that summarizes the commentary proper, a perceptive excursus on suffering in 1 Peter and the New Testament, Davids’ own study translation, thorough and incisive comments on each verse of the text, frequent parallels to ancient literature, an exceptionally clear and lively writing style, and one of the most comprehensive bibliographies on 1 Peter available anywhere.

Davids’ commentary is well researched, conversationally written, and exegetically helpful. It is particularly perceptive in its treatment of “the spirits in prison” (3:19), the preaching to those who have died (4:6), and the role of Silas as Peter’s secretary (5:12). Especially useful for seminary students and intelligent laity, this book is a worthy addition to a distinguished series.

—E. Earle Ellis

A comprehensive, up-to-date, and well-balanced presentation. This commentary adopts a moderate but enlightened approach to the interpretation of 1 Peter and will be a boon to all students of the New Testament, to teachers, and to pastors.

—Joseph A. Fitzmyer

Not often will a biblical commentary offer both scholarly discussion and easy accessibility for nonspecialists, but Peter Davids on 1 Peter does just that. Scholars will profit much from his commentary. Pastors and serious-minded laypeople will profit equally much.

—Robert H. Gundry

Peter H. Davids is a professor of biblical theology at St. Stephen’s University, St. Stephen, New Brunswick. He is also the co-editor of Dictionary of the Later New Testament and Its Developments.

The Epistles of John

  • Author: I. Howard Marshall
  • Publisher: Eerdmans
  • Publication Date: 1978
  • Pages: 291

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

The three Epistles of John, according to I. Howard Marshall, are concerned with the fundamentals of Christian belief and life—faith and love. The reader who grasps the message of these short but essential letters will have a sound basis in Christian doctrine. This group of Epistles, says Marshall, is also a good starting point for the study of the Gospel of John. This important commentary was written not only so that students of the Bible might master the content of John’s Epistles, but that they might come to a proper understanding of Johannine theology as a whole.

This volume includes an “invitation” to general readers and an “introduction” addressed to students and specialists. Another fresh feature is a rearrangement of the traditional order of the three letters: 2 John and 3 John are studied before 1 John. This structure assures that the two shorter letters are not relegated to the position of appendices but are treated as important documents of early Christianity in their own right.

The choice of Howard Marshall to write the volume on the Johannine Epistles is exceedingly fortunate. There is good balance between the technical and the practical, thus making the commentary useful to both the scholar and the Bible preacher and teacher. An outstanding commentary, probably the best which is available in English.

Southwestern Journal of Theology

A clear and well-organized commentary. Dr. Marshall has provided a complete and up-to-date bibliography and has demonstrated his thorough acquaintance with all the various opinions of those current scholars of note who have worked in this area.

Journal of Biblical Literature

I. Howard Marshall is a professor emeritus of New Testament exegesis at the University of Aberdeen in Scotland. He is an editor of The New International Greek Testament Commentary.

Revelation

  • Author: Robert H. Mounce
  • Publisher: Eerdmans
  • Publication Date: 1997
  • Pages: 475

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

No New Testament book has caused as much confusion and been subjected to as many varied interpretations as Revelation. Today we continue to witness a surge of popular interest in Bible prophecy and questions concerning such matters as the “last days” and the second coming of Christ. Scholarly debates continue as well, especially regarding the occurrence, timing, and theological significance of the “tribulation” and the “millennium.” It is therefore the special task of the commentator on Revelation to address such difficult questions in a scholarly and responsible manner while also remaining accessible to pastors, students, and general readers.

When first published, this volume on Revelation by Robert H. Mounce was widely praised as a standard commentary on the Apocalypse. In this new edition, now based on the NIV and NA27, Mounce has revised and expanded his work to reflect more than 20 additional years of mature thought on Revelation and to bring his work up to date with the latest scholarship. As in the original edition, Mounce here engages seriously with the various approaches to interpretation and with the conventions common to apocalyptic literature. In affirming more directly his own reading of the Apocalypse, Mounce steers a middle course between an extreme literalism and a highly imaginative subjectivism, believing this to be the way the ancient text spoke to the first-century churches to whom it was addressed—and the way it still speaks to us today.

Mounce’s work attempts to break out of the straightjacket of traditional categories. An important work by an evangelical scholar representing a moderating viewpoint.

Southwestern Journal of Theology

A model of a good critical commentary. Mounce has brought together in a masterly fashion the best of recent discussions. The standard evangelical commentary on the Apocalypse.

Christianity Today

An important contribution to the literature on the last book of the Bible. It is comprehensive, the style is lucid, and the research thorough.

Bibliotheca Sacra

Robert H. Mounce is a president emeritus of Whitworth College in Spokane, Washington, and a noted New Testament Greek scholar. The author of many articles and books, including a popular commentary on Revelation titled What Are We Waiting For? and the New International Biblical Commentary volume on Matthew, he also helped produce the NIV, NIrV, NLT, ESV, and HCSB translations.

Product Details

  • Title: The New International Commentary on the New Testament (NICNT)
  • Publisher: Eerdmans
  • Volumes: 21
  • Pages: 13,913