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Products>The Anchor Yale Bible Reference Library | AYBRL (4 vols.)

The Anchor Yale Bible Reference Library | AYBRL (4 vols.)

  • Format:Digital

$99.99

Dynamic collection value: $159.96
Regular price: $154.99
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Overview

The Anchor Yale Bible Reference Library is a project of international and interfaith scope in which Protestant, Catholic, and Jewish scholars from many countries contribute individual volumes. The project is not sponsored by any ecclesiastical organization and is not intended to reflect any particular theological doctrine.

The series is committed to producing volumes in the tradition established half a century ago by the founders of the Anchor Bible, William Foxwell Albright and David Noel Freedman. It aims to present the best contemporary scholarship in a way that is accessible not only to scholars but also to the educated non-specialist. It is committed to work of sound philological and historical scholarship, supplemented by insight from modern methods, such as sociological and literary criticism.

  • Examines Jewish and Christian attitudes toward the Temple in the first century
  • Provides an integrated approach to the relation between literary theory and biblical interpretation
  • Explores the story of the earliest Jewish diaspora in Egypt
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In the Logos edition, this volume is enhanced by amazing functionality. Important terms link to dictionaries, encyclopedias, and a wealth of other resources in your digital library. Perform powerful searches to find exactly what you’re looking for. Take the discussion with you using Overview tablet and mobile apps. With Logos Bible Software, the most efficient and comprehensive research tools are in one place, so you get the most out of your study.

Becoming Diaspora Jews: Behind the Story of Elephantine

  • Author: Karel van der Toorn
  • Series: The Anchor Yale Bible Reference Library
  • Publisher: Yale University Press
  • Publication Date: 2019
  • Pages: 288

Based on a previously unexplored source, this book transforms the way we think about the formation of Jewish identity.

This book tells the story of the earliest Jewish diaspora in Egypt in a way it has never been told before. In the fifth century BCE there was a Jewish community on Elephantine Island. Why they spoke Aramaic, venerated Aramean gods besides Yaho, and identified as Arameans is a mystery, but a previously little explored papyrus from Egypt sheds new light on their history.

The papyrus shows that the ancestors of the Elephantine Jews came originally from Samaria. Due to political circumstances, they left Israel and lived for a century in an Aramean environment. Around 600 BCE, they moved to Egypt. These migrants to Egypt did not claim a Jewish identity when they arrived, but after the destruction of their temple on the island they chose to deploy their Jewish identity to raise sympathy for their cause. Their story—a typical diaspora tale—is not about remaining Jews in the diaspora, but rather about becoming Jews through the diaspora.

In this major contribution, Karel van der Toorn offers a brilliant analysis of the military colony of Elephantine and its integration into a ‘Jewish nation.’ This book offers a new translation and interpretation of Papyrus Amherst 63, which provides new insights into the life of this Diaspora community. It is a must-read for students and scholars of the Hebrew Bible and early Judaism.

—Thomas Römer, Collège de France and University of Lausanne

Karel van der Toorn is professor of religion and society at the University of Amsterdam. He is the author of the prizewinning Scribal Culture and the Making of the Hebrew Bible, among other publications.

Literary Theory and the New Testament

  • Author: Michal Beth Dinkler
  • Series: The Anchor Yale Bible Reference Library
  • Publisher: Yale University Press
  • Publication Date: 2019
  • Pages: 296

A comprehensive case for a fresh literary approach to the New Testament.

For at least a half century, scholars have been adopting literary approaches to the New Testament inspired by certain branches of literary criticism and theory. In this important and illuminating work, Michal Beth Dinkler uses contemporary literary theory to enhance our understanding and interpretation of the New Testament texts.

Dinkler provides an integrated approach to the relation between literary theory and biblical interpretation, employing a wide range of practical theories and methods. This indispensable work engages foundational concepts and figures, the historical contexts of various theoretical approaches, and ongoing literary scholarship into the twenty-first century. In Literary Theory and the New Testament, Dinkler assesses previous literary treatments of the New Testament and calls for a new phase of nuanced thinking about New Testament texts as both ancient and literary.

Michal Beth Dinkler’s astute and lucid account of literary theories offers New Testament scholars unparalleled means of conceptualizing the possibilities of interdisciplinary interactions. This book establishes Dinkler as the premier guide to new venues for uses of literary criticism.

—L. L. Welborn, Fordham University

Michal Beth Dinkler is associate professor of New Testament at Yale Divinity School. Her previous book is Silent Statements: Narrative Representations of Speech and Silence in the Gospel of Luke.

Matthew within Sectarian Judaism

  • Author: John Kampen
  • Series: The Anchor Yale Bible Reference Library
  • Publisher: Yale University Press
  • Publication Date: 2019
  • Pages: 344

A renowned scholar of the Dead Sea Scrolls argues for reading the Gospel of Matthew as the product of a Jewish sect.

In this masterful study of what has long been considered the “most Jewish” gospel, John Kampen deftly argues that the gospel of Matthew advocates for a distinctive Jewish sectarianism, rooted in the Jesus movement. He maintains that the writer of Matthew produced the work within an early Jewish sect, and its narrative contains a biography of Jesus which can be used as a model for the development of a sectarian Judaism in Lower Syria, perhaps Galilee, toward the conclusion of the first century CE.

Rather than viewing the gospel of Matthew as a Jewish-Christian hybrid, Kampen considers it a Jewish composition that originated among the later followers of Jesus a generation or so after the disciples. This method of viewing the work allows readers to understand what it might have meant for members of a Jesus movement to promote their understanding of Jewish history and law that would sustain Jewish life at the end of the first century.

In this highly original and perceptive book, John Kampen sheds new light on Matthew’s Gospel, especially with regard to the Sermon on the Mount, the Gospel’s conception of community, and its undeniable polemical aspects. Anyone interested in understanding Matthew within its original social historical context will want to read this book and engage its arguments carefully.

—Mark Allan Powell, Trinity Lutheran Seminary

John Kampen is an eminent scholar of the Dead Sea Scrolls, the New Testament, and Jewish history of the Greco-Roman period. He is the Van Bogard Dunn Professor of Biblical Interpretation at the Methodist Theological School in Ohio.

The Temple in Early Christianity: Experiencing the Sacred

  • Author: Eyal Regev
  • Series: The Anchor Yale Bible Reference Library
  • Publisher: Yale University Press
  • Publication Date: 2019
  • Pages: 496

A comprehensive treatment of the early Christian approaches to the Temple and its role in shaping Jewish and Christian identity.

The first scholarly work to trace the Temple throughout the entire New Testament, this study examines Jewish and Christian attitudes toward the Temple in the first century and provides both Jews and Christians with a better understanding of their respective faiths and how they grow out of this ancient institution. The centrality of the Temple in New Testament writing reveals the authors’ negotiations with the institutional and symbolic center of Judaism as they worked to form their own religion.

In this stimulating book, Eyal Regev rightly places the Jewish temple at the center of the new messianic movement that will eventually become known as Christianity. The Temple in Early Christianity makes a fresh and original contribution to a very important topic.

—Craig A. Evans, Houston Baptist University

Eyal Regev is professor of Jewish studies in the department of land of Israel studies and archaeology at Bar-Ilan University. His books include The Sadducees and their Halakhah, Sectarianism in Qumran, and The Hasmoneans: Ideology, Archaeology, Identity.

$99.99

Dynamic collection value: $159.96
Regular price: $154.99
Save $59.97 (37%)

Gathering interest