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CAPS Books: Christian Association for Psychological Studies (20 vols.)

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Overview

This group of books is published in partnership with the Christian Association for Psychological Studies. This joint publishing venture between IVP Academic and CAPS aims to promote the understanding of the relationship between Christianity and the behavioral sciences at both the clinical/counseling and theoretical/research levels. These books will be of particular value for students and practitioners, teachers and researchers.

CAPS is a vibrant Christian organization with a rich tradition. Founded in 1956 by a small group of Christian mental health professionals, chaplains and pastors, CAPS has grown to more than 2,100 members in the U.S., Canada and more than 25 other countries.

CAPS encourages in-depth consideration of therapeutic, research, theoretical and theological issues. The association is a forum for creative new ideas. In fact, their publications and conferences are the birthplace for many of the formative concepts in our field today.

CAPS members represent a variety of denominations, professional groups and theoretical orientations; yet all are united in their commitment to Christ and to professional excellence.

CAPS is a non-profit, member-supported organization. It is led by a fully functioning board of directors, and the membership has a voice in the direction of CAPS.

CAPS is more than a professional association. It is a fellowship, and in addition to national and international activities, the organization strongly encourages regional, local and area activities which provide networking and fellowship opportunities as well as professional enrichment.

  • Title: Christian Association for Psychological Studies (CAPS) (20 vols.)
  • Series: Christian Association for Psychological Studies (CAPS)
  • Publisher: IVP
  • Volumes: 20
  • Pages: 6,710
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In the Logos edition, these volumes are enhanced by amazing functionality. Important terms link to dictionaries, encyclopedias, and a wealth of other resources in your digital library. Perform powerful searches to find exactly what you’re looking for. Take the discussion with you using tablet and mobile apps. With Logos Bible Software, the most efficient and comprehensive research tools are in one place, so you get the most out of your study.

Assessment for Counseling in Christian Perspective

  • Author: Stephen P. Greggo
  • Series: Christian Association for Psychological Studies (CAPS)
  • Publisher: IVP
  • Publication Date: 2019
  • Pages: 345

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Assessment in counseling—like its biblical counterpart, discernment—is an ongoing and dynamic routine to encourage movement in a productive direction toward what is truly best. In Assessment for Counseling in Christian Perspective, Stephen P. Greggo equips counselors to put assessment techniques into practical use, particularly with clients who are looking to grow in their identity with Jesus Christ.

As a Christian perspective on assessment, this book is designed to supplement standard resources and help counselors navigate challenges at the intersection of psychotherapy and Christian ministry. Greggo charts a course for care that brings best practices of the profession together with practices of Christian discipleship.

Key topics include:

  • Does a Christian worldview offer distinguishing parameters for assessment practice?
  • Can clinical proficiency in assessment bring glory to God?
  • How can the crucial psychometric construct of validity be translated into our Christian faith?
  • In what ways can the inclusion of objective procedures be transformed into a message of hospitality and affirmation?
  • How can counselors maximize the benefits of a therapeutic alliance to attend to immediate concerns and foster spiritual formation?
  • How can formal personality measures add depth and substance to the counseling experience?
  • How can assessment contribute to client retention, treatment completion, and aftercare planning?

With Assessment for Counseling in Christian Perspective, clinical and pastoral counselors can bring the best of assessment into counseling that reflects the essence of the Christian faith.

Dr. Greggo has once again challenged us to think well about the work we do in Christian counseling and psychotherapy. A leading expert in the topic of assessment, he demonstrates both impressive breadth and depth in this important book. It is practical, current, well researched, and nicely written.

—Mark R. McMinn, professor of psychology, George Fox University, author of The Science of Virtue

Stephen P. Greggo (PsyD, State University of New York, Albany) is professor of counseling and chair of the counseling department at Trinity Evangelical Divinity School, training mental health professionals and clergy for a Christian ministry of soul care. He is author of Trekking Toward Wholeness, is a licensed psychologist and ordained minister, and maintains a long-standing association as partner and consultant with CCAHope in Delmar, New York.

Christianity and Psychoanalysis: A New Conversation

  • Editors: Earl D. Bland and Brad D. Strawn
  • Series: Christian Association for Psychological Studies (CAPS)
  • Publisher: IVP
  • Publication Date: 2014
  • Pages: 304

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Unsurprisingly, given Sigmund Freud’s understanding of religion, the conversation between Christianity and psychoanalysis has long been marked by mutual suspicion. Psychoanalysis originated within a naturalist, post-Enlightenment context and sought to understand human functioning and pathology--focusing on phenomena such as the unconscious and object representation--on a strictly empirical basis. Given certain accounts of divine agency and human uniqueness, psychoanalytic work was often seen as competitive with a Christian understanding of the human person.

The contributors to Christianity and Psychoanalysis seek to start a new conversation. Aided by the turn to relationality in theology, as well as by a noncompetitive conception of God’s transcendence and agency, this book presents a fresh integration of Christian thought and psychoanalytic theory. The immanent processes identified by psychoanalysis need not compete with Christian theology but can instead be the very means by which God is involved in human existence. The Christian study of psychoanalysis can thus serve the flourishing of God’s kingdom.

In Christianity and Psychoanalysis, Strawn and Bland provide us with fresh horizons for integrating psychology and theology while also reinvigorating ancient questions about healing and spiritual maturity. This book brings together many of the most seasoned and thoughtful integrators of psychoanalytic clinical practice and Christian theology. It is rare to find resources such as this, which are theoretically sophisticated, theologically nuanced and therapeutically relevant. The rich motif of ‘Christian traditioning’ represents an important contribution to relational approaches to integration, which moves us beyond the safe shores of general ideas and invites us to own our particular and formative commitments

—Steven J. Sandage, Boston University

Earl D. Bland (PsyD, Illinois School of Professional Psychology) is professor of psychology and chair of the department of behavioral sciences at MidAmerica Nazarene University in Olathe, Kansas. He is a practicing psychologist with certificates in psychoanalytic psychotherapy from the Greater Kansas City/Topeka Psychoanalytic Institute and from the Chicago Institute for Psychoanalysis. He is also a member of the American Psychological Association and the Christian Association for Psychological Studies. For the Journal of Psychology and Christianity and the Journal of Religion and Health, Bland has published on topics such as narcissism in marriage, accounts of rape in the Bible and the possibility of collaboration between the church and the psychological establishment.

Brad D. Strawn (PhD, Fuller Theological Seminary) is the Evelyn and Frank Freed Professor of the Integration of Psychology and Theology at Fuller Theological Seminary. He has post-doctoral training in psychoanalysis and is a licensed psychologist. He is coauthor (with Warren S. Brown) of The Physical Nature of Christian Life: Neuroscience, Psychology and the Church and coeditor of Christianity and Psychoanalysis: A New Conversation.

Contemplation and Counseling: An Integrative Model for Practitioners

  • Author: P. Gregg Blanton
  • Series: Christian Association for Psychological Studies (CAPS)
  • Publisher: IVP
  • Publication Date: 2019
  • Pages: 232

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Interest in mindfulness and contemplative thought is growing among Christians, and it’s time to consider the place of contemplative prayer within the field of counseling. Can contemplative prayer be integrated into therapeutic work? Can it in fact serve as a foundation on which to build a new approach to counseling?

In Contemplation and Counseling Gregg Blanton presents a new paradigm for integrating contemplative prayer with counseling practice. He contends that contemplative prayer can illuminate the purposes of counseling and suggest interventions that help us accomplish these goals. This paradigm builds an alliance between science, theology, and Christian contemplative thought to create a dynamic approach to counseling and balance various dimensions of the human person: emotion, cognition, and action. And by recognizing the power of both words and silence, it harmonizes their functions.

Based on this integrative foundation, Blanton offers eleven fundamental interventions to fit the needs of clients (including silence, empathy, and teaching contemplative prayer) and a practical four-stage process for helping clients change, using examples from his own counseling experience and from the Bible. Ultimately, contemplative prayer leads us to the healing power of love. How we view our clients, the ways that we relate with them, and the strategies that we use to help them change are all informed by our loving search for God in contemplative prayer.

Particular topics include

  • how Christian contemplation compares with therapeutic uses of mindfulness
  • insights from interpersonal neurobiology understood in light of Scripture
  • psychological and spiritual benefits of lectio divina and centering prayer
  • how practicing contemplative prayer can help counselors develop traits that correlate with positive client outcomes
  • when and how to teach contemplative practices to clients
  • the role of the body, emotions, conscious and unconscious mind, and behavior in contemplative practice and counseling

This book lays out the fascinating links between the tradition of Christian contemplation, mindfulness, and the process of change in psychotherapy. It puts all of these in the context of the vibrant literature that makes up these three fields. Christians everywhere will find it enthralling and practical.

—Sue Johnson, author of Created for Connection, developer of the emotionally focused model of couple and family therapy

P. Gregg Blanton (EdD, Texas A&M–Commerce) is professor of psychology and human services at Montreat College. He is founder of the Center for Contemplation and Marriage and is in private practice in Asheville, North Carolina, where he provides counseling and supervises counselors-in-training. He is the author of Mind Over Marriage: Transforming Your Relationship Using Centering Prayer and Neuroscience.

Counseling and Christianity: Five Approaches

  • Editors: Stephen P. Greggo and Timothy A. Sisemore
  • Series: Christian Association for Psychological Studies (CAPS)
  • Publisher: IVP
  • Publication Date: 2012
  • Pages: 256

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What does authentic Christian counseling look like in practice?

This volume explores how five major perspectives on the interface of Christianity and psychology would each actually be applied in a clinical setting. Respected experts associated with each of the perspectives depict how to assess, conceptualize, counsel and offer aftercare to Jake, a hypothetical client with a variety of complex issues. In each case the contributors seek to explain how theory can translate into real-life counseling scenarios.

This book builds on the framework of Eric L. Johnson’s Psychology Christianity: Five Views. These include the Levels-of-Explanation Approach, the Integration Approach, the Christian Psychology Approach, the Transformational Approach and the Biblical Counseling Approach. While Counseling and Christianity can be used independently of Johnson’s volume, the two can also function as useful companions.

Christians who counsel, both those in practice and those still in training, will be served by this volume as it strengthens the connections between theory and practice in relating our faith to the mental health disciplines. They will finally get an answer to their persistent but unanswered question: “What would that counseling view look like behind closed doors?”

Consideration on how to best integrate faith into counseling can (and perhaps should) be a life-long endeavor. This book offers an opportunity for both new and seasoned Christian psychologists to contemplate and appreciate diverse approaches to integrating Christian faith with counseling and psychotherapy.

—Bethany Claes, Journal of Psychology and Christianity, 36/1

Stephen P. Greggo (PsyD, State University of New York, Albany) is professor of counseling and chair of the counseling department at Trinity Evangelical Divinity School, training mental health professionals and clergy for a Christian ministry of soul care. He is author of Trekking Toward Wholeness, is a licensed psychologist and ordained minister, and maintains a long-standing association as partner and consultant with CCAHope in Delmar, New York.

Timothy A. Sisemore (PhD, Fuller Theological Seminary) is Director of Research and Professor of Psychology and Counseling at Richmont Graduate University in Chattanooga, Tennessee, and maintains a clinical practice at Richmont’s CBI Counseling Center. He is author of several books, the most recent being The Clinician’s Guide to Exposure Therapies for Anxiety Spectrum Disorders (New Harbinger).

Counseling Couples in Conflict: A Relational Restoration Model

  • Authors: James N. Sells and Mark A. Yarhouse
  • Series: Christian Association for Psychological Studies (CAPS)
  • Publisher: IVP
  • Publication Date: 2011
  • Pages: 300

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Most therapeutic approaches, especially those of a cognitive orientation, are not very effective in dealing with high conflict relationships--couples often heading toward divorce by the time they seek help.

Counseling Couples in Conflict is a resource for pastors and counselors who want to be ready for these uniquely difficult cases. Utilizing a relational conflict and restoration model Mark Yarhouse and James Sells point the way beyond the cycle of pain towards marital healing.

The major cause of divorce isn’t problems with finances, in-laws, parenting or sex. The major cause is that couples don’t know how to deal with conflict around those issues. This long-overdue integrative resource is an invaluable tool and should be in the hands of every counselor. If you want to help couples take their marriage from good to great then you must read this book. It will be required reading for all of my students.

—Gary J. Oliver, Th.M., Ph.D., executive director of The Center for Relationship Enrichment and professor of psychology and practical theology at John Brown University

James N. Sells (PhD, University of Southern California) is professor of counseling and director of the PhD program in counselor education and supervision at Regent University in Virginia Beach, Virginia, where he has taught since 2005. He has served on the faculties of Northern Illinois University and West Texas A&M University, and he is also a licensed psychologist. He is the coauthor of Counseling Couples in Conflict and Family Therapies.

Mark A. Yarhouse (PsyD, Wheaton College) is the Dr. Arthur P. Rech & Mrs. Jean May Rech Endowed Chair and professor of psychology at Wheaton College where he runs the Sexual & Gender Identity Institute and is a core faculty member in the doctoral program in clinical psychology. He is a licensed clinical psychologist.

Couple Therapy: A New Hope-Focused Approach

  • Authors: Jennifer S. Ripley and Everett L. Worthington Jr.
  • Series: Christian Association for Psychological Studies (CAPS)
  • Publisher: IVP
  • Publication Date: 2014
  • Pages: 399

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Following the successful Hope-Focused Marriage Counseling, Jennifer Ripley and Everett Worthington Jr. have written a new book that expands upon their previous theoretical approach while describing in detail new practical interventions for couple counseling and enrichment.

Weaving together classic cases outlined in Hope-Focused Marriage Counseling and over 75 brand new practical interventions, Ripley and Worthington root their practical examples in an even deeper theoretical framework and research in attachment and intimate bonds. Written with the couple counselor in mind, this book occupies a rare niche that is accessible not only to therapists and counselors but also to pastors and married couples alike.

Both licensed clinical psychologists and experienced counselors, the authors base this follow-up work on the pillars of their Hope-Focused Couples Approach. The assessment tools included help facilitate improved marriages in many settings, and the combination of theory and real-life case studies easily integrates into the practices of professional counselors and researchers as well as into the lives of couples.

Instructor Resources for classroom use include activities, video demonstrations of the authors in couples therapy, audio lectures, testbank, chapter summaries and a sample syllabus.

This book is a clear, organized, integrative and extremely pragmatic approach to couples counseling that helps therapists carefully tailor their treatments to couples’ specific needs. Everyone from the novice to the experienced therapist can find something of great value in what these authors have to offer. Their attention to framing therapeutic tasks around couple strengths in order to better address deficits and, perhaps more importantly, give couples hope is particularly novel and thought-provoking. I found several appealing new strategies that I am looking forward to integrating into my own couples work; I am sure the reader will find many useful ideas as well.

—Kristina Coop Gordon, professor of psychology and associate director of clinical training, University of Tennessee-Knoxville

Jennifer Ripley, PhD is a licensed clinical psychologist in the state of Virginia, where she is a professor of psychology and the Director of Clinical Research at the Marriage and Ministry Assessment Training and Empowerment Center at Regent University. She has sat on the board for the Christian Association for Psychological Studies and has served as program chair for the Psychology of Religion division of the American Psychological Association.

Everett L. Worthington Jr. (PhD, University of Missouri) is professor of psychology at Virginia Commonwealth University. He is a licensed clinical psychologist and former executive director of the Templeton Foundation’s A Campaign for Forgiveness Research. Worthington has studied forgiveness since the 1980s and has published more than two hundred articles and papers on forgiveness, marriage and family, psychotherapy, and virtue in a wide variety of journals and magazines. He was the founding editor of Marriage and Family: A Christian Journal and sits on the editorial boards of several professional journals. He has appeared on Good Morning America, CNN, and The 700 Club, and been featured in award-winning documentary movies on forgiveness such as The Power of Forgiveness and The Big Question. He is the author of seventeen books including Handbook of Forgiveness, Hope-Focused Marriage Counseling, and Forgiving and Reconciling.

Developing Clinicians of Character: A Christian Integrative Approach to Clinical Supervision

  • Author: Terri S. Watson
  • Series: Christian Association for Psychological Studies (CAPS)
  • Publisher: IVP
  • Publication Date: 2018
  • Pages: 240

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Is there more to clinical supervision than our current theories and methods can provide? Whether we intend them to be or not, our mentoring practices are personally formative for supervisees and supervisors alike. Developing Clinicians of Character grounds our thinking in the historic and contemporary wisdom of virtue ethics and grows out of a love for the practice of clinical supervision. It aims to identify and strengthen supervision’s important role for character formation in the classroom, in continuing education for practitioners, and in clinical settings.

After an overview of the role of character formation in clinical supervision, Developing Clinicians of Character examines each classical Christian virtue in turn, its corresponding professional ethical aspiration, and how we can use the practices of clinical supervision and spiritual formation together to foster character formation for Christian maturity and Christlikeness.

Dr. Terri S. Watson welcomes and equips you to excel in “the helping profession within a helping profession” as you provide clinical supervision for other mental health workers in counseling, psychology, and marriage and family therapy. This book will shape your own character through spiritual disciplines in the classical virtues—and outward in expanding circles of encouragement, formation, and healing.

This fantastic new textbook on supervision is a huge, transforming step forward in supervisory practice. Going beyond core competencies in counseling, care for the client, and conscientious monitoring of counseling, Terri Watson adds character formation to the supervision mix. The result is a thoughtful, scholarly, creative, innovative, practical, and completely Christian integrative model of virtues in counseling. If you supervise or teach psychotherapy or MFT, read this book and catch the transformation of the field.

—Everett L. Worthington Jr., coauthor of Couple Therapy: A New Hope-Focused Approach

Terri S. Watson (PsyD, ABPP) is dean and professor of the School of Psychology, Counseling, and Family Therapy at Wheaton College. She is also a board-certified clinical psychologist, an approved clinical supervisor with the Center for Credentialing and Education, and an approved supervisor with the American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy. She maintains a private practice and also provides supervision and clinical consultation for community and private organizations.

Evidence-Based Practices for Christian Counseling and Psychotherapy

  • Editors: Everett L. Worthington Jr., Eric L. Johnson, Joshua N. Hook, and Jamie D. Aten
  • Series: Christian Association for Psychological Studies (CAPS)
  • Publisher: IVP
  • Publication Date: 2013
  • Pages: 352

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Are Christian treatments as effective as secular treatments? What is the evidence to support its success?

Christians engaged in the fields of psychology, psychotherapy and counseling are living in a unique moment. Over the last couple decades, these fields have grown more and more open to religious belief and religion-accommodative therapies. At the same time, Christian counselors and psychotherapists encounter pressure (for example, from insurance companies) to demonstrate that their accommodative therapies are as beneficial as secular therapies. This raises the need for evidence to support Christian practices and treatments.

The essays gathered in this volume explore evidence-based Christian treatments, practices, factors and principles. The authors mine the relevant research and literature to update practicing psychotherapists, clinical researchers, students, teachers and educated laypersons about the efficacy of certain Christian-accommodative therapies. Topics covered in the book include:

  • devotional meditation
  • cognitive-behavior therapy
  • psychodynamic and process-experiential therapies
  • couples, marriage and family therapy
  • group intervention

The book concludes with a review of the evidence for the various treatments discussed in the chapters, a guide for conducting clinical trials that is essential reading for current or aspiring researchers, and reflections by the editors about the future of evidence-based Christian practices. As the editors say, “more research is necessary.” To that end, this volume is a major contribution to a field of inquiry that, while still in its infancy, promises to have enormous implications for future work in Christian counseling and psychotherapy.

The concept of evidence-based practice is continually evolving and needs to be applied more systematically to a Christian context. In this volume, top researcher-clinicians come together to provide the state of the art of evidence-based practices for Christian counseling and psychotherapy. It is both broad and deep, and represents a significant advancement in the field of Christian counseling. I highly recommend it for lay counselors, graduate students and seasoned clinicians alike.

—Todd W. Hall, Biola University

Everett L. Worthington Jr. (PhD, University of Missouri) is professor of psychology at Virginia Commonwealth University. He is a licensed clinical psychologist and former executive director of the Templeton Foundation’s A Campaign for Forgiveness Research. Worthington has studied forgiveness since the 1980s and has published more than two hundred articles and papers on forgiveness, marriage and family, psychotherapy, and virtue in a wide variety of journals and magazines. He was the founding editor of Marriage and Family: A Christian Journal and sits on the editorial boards of several professional journals. He has appeared on Good Morning America, CNN, and The 700 Club, and been featured in award-winning documentary movies on forgiveness such as The Power of Forgiveness and The Big Question. He is the author of seventeen books including Handbook of Forgiveness, Hope-Focused Marriage Counseling, and Forgiving and Reconciling.

Eric L. Johnson (PhD, Michigan State University) trained as an academic psychologist and is Lawrence and Charlotte Hoover Professor of Pastoral Care at The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary in Louisville, Kentucky. He is the author of Foundations for Soul Care and the coeditor of God Under Fire and Christianity and Psychology: Four Views. An associate editor of the Journal of Psychology and Theology, he is the director of the Society for Christian Psychology and the Institute for Christian Psychology.

Joshua N. Hook (Ph.D., Virginia Commonwealth University) is assistant professor of psychology at the University of North Texas. He is a licensed clinical psychologist, and has written several journal articles and book chapters, mainly on the topics of humility, forgiveness, spirituality and religion.

Jamie D. Aten (PhD, Indiana State University) is the founder and codirector of the Humanitarian Disaster Institute, and Dr. Arthur P. Rech and Mrs. Jean May Rech Associate Professor of Psychology at Wheaton College (Wheaton, Illinois). Previously he served as the assistant director of the Katrina Research Center and as assistant professor of psychology at the University of Southern Mississippi. Aten has been awarded close to $2 million in external funding by numerous state, federal, and nonprofit organizations for psychology of religion and disaster research. He has published numerous peer-reviewed articles and book chapters and co-edited several books, including two American Psychological Association Books bestsellers. He is also an American Psychological Association’s Division 36 (Psychology of Religion) Margaret Gorman Early Career Award winner and Mutual of America Merit Finalist Award winner.

Family Therapies: A Comprehensive Christian Appraisal, 2nd ed.

  • Authors: Mark A. Yarhouse and James N. Sells
  • Edition: 2nd Edition
  • Series: Christian Association for Psychological Studies (CAPS)
  • Publisher: IVP
  • Publication Date: 2017
  • Pages: 512

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In Family Therapies, Mark A. Yarhouse and James N. Sells survey the major approaches to family therapy and treat significant psychotherapeutic issues within a Christian framework. A landmark work, this volume was written for those studying counseling, social work, psychology, or marriage and family therapy.

Fully updated and revised, this second edition includes new chapters on cohabitation, LGBT+ marriage, and family formation.

Other issues covered include

  • crisis and trauma
  • marital conflict
  • separation, divorce, and blended families
  • substance abuse and addictions
  • gender, culture, economic class, and race
  • sexual identity

Yarhouse and Sells conclude by casting a vision for an integrative Christian family therapy and offer timely wisdom for therapeutic practice in the midst of a diverse and rapidly changing global context.

Family Therapies is an indispensable resource for those in the mental health professions, including counselors, psychologists, family therapists, social workers, and pastors.

Yarhouse and Sells have created a masterpiece work analyzing approaches to family therapies. This is going to be a new classic, matching the accomplishment of Jones and Butman’s analysis of psychotherapies in their book, Modern Psychotherapies.

—Everett L. Worthington Jr., professor of psychology, Virginia Commonwealth University

Mark A. Yarhouse (PsyD, Wheaton College) is the Dr. Arthur P. Rech & Mrs. Jean May Rech Endowed Chair and professor of psychology at Wheaton College where he runs the Sexual & Gender Identity Institute and is a core faculty member in the doctoral program in clinical psychology. He is a licensed clinical psychologist.

James N. Sells (PhD, University of Southern California) is professor of counseling and director of the PhD program in counselor education and supervision at Regent University in Virginia Beach, Virginia, where he has taught since 2005. He has served on the faculties of Northern Illinois University and West Texas A&M University, and he is also a licensed psychologist. He is the coauthor of Counseling Couples in Conflict and Family Therapies.

Integrating Faith and Psychology: Twelve Psychologists Tell Their Stories

  • Editor: Glendon L. Moriarty
  • Series: Christian Association for Psychological Studies (CAPS)
  • Publisher: IVP
  • Publication Date: 2010
  • Pages: 272

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The tensions often cited between psychology and Christianity are well known. Much worthwhile work has been done to construct theories and frameworks for integrating the two. But how do Christians in psychology actually weave together these strands of their lives and their work. What are their stories?

Here Glendon Moriarty brings together twelve of the foremost clinicians and academics in the field of Christian integration to share their stories. Coming from different perspectives and experiences, reflecting gender and ethnic diversity, these prominent psychologists tell about their spiritual, personal and professional journeys of interrelating their faith and profession.

In this book we hear about the developmental issues, the sense of calling and the early career insights that shaped their paths. They recount the importance that significant relationships had on their understanding of Christian integration, especially noting the influence of mentors. Struggles and doubts are common human experiences, and the contributors openly share the stresses they encountered to encourage others with similar issues. On a day-to-day basis, we see how spiritual disciplines and the Christian community assist them in their work and in their understanding. Finally, each writer offers a personal note with lessons learned and hard-won wisdom gained.

Randall Sorenson once said, “The integration of psychology and Christianity is caught, not taught.” In these stories is a unique opportunity to catch sight of twelve who have already traveled that challenging path.

Glendon L. Moriarty is a licensed psychologist and an associate professor in the School of Psychology and Counseling at Regent University. He is the author of Pastoral Care of Depression: Helping Clients Heal Their Relationship with God and the coeditor of God Image Handbook for Spiritual Counseling and Psychotherapy.

Integrative Psychotherapy: Toward a Comprehensive Christian Approach

  • Authors: Mark R. McMinn and Clark D. Campbell
  • Series: Christian Association for Psychological Studies (CAPS)
  • Publisher: IVP
  • Publication Date: 2017
  • Pages: 405

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Mark McMinn and Clark Campbell present an integrative model of psychotherapy that is grounded in Christian biblical and theological teaching and in a critical and constructive engagement with contemporary psychology.

Now in paperback, this foundational work integrates behavioral, cognitive, and interpersonal models of therapy within a Christian theological framework. Not only do the authors integrate Christian faith and spirituality with the latest thinking in behavioral science at a theoretical level, they also integrate the theoretical and academic with the pastoral and clinical, offering a practical guide for the practitioner.

Inviting and inspiring, Integrative Psychotherapy is a must-read for thoughtful Christian therapists. McMinn and Campbell offer a theoretically rich and theologically grounded model. It reflects the combined wisdom of their decades of listening to real people, digesting psychological science, studying theology and living out the Christian faith. Rich in theory and practice, this book will positively and powerfully reshape our approach to integrative psychotherapy.

—Charlotte vanOyen Witvliet, Ph.D., Professor of Psychology, Hope College

Mark R. McMinn (PhD, Vanderbilt University) is professor of psychology at George Fox University, where he serves as the director of faith integration in the Graduate Department of Clinical Psychology. His books include Integrative Psychotherapy, Sin and Grace in Christian Counseling, Care for the Soul, and Psychology, Theology, and Spirituality in Christian Counseling.

Clark D. Campbell (PhD, Western Seminary) is professor and dean of the Rosemead School of Psychology at Biola University. Previously he was professor of psychology and director of clinical training at the Graduate School of Clinical Psychology at George Fox University. He is the coauthor of Integrative Psychotherapy with Mark R. McMinn.

Listening to Sexual Minorities: A Study of Faith and Sexual Identity on Christian College Campuses

  • Authors: Mark A. Yarhouse, Janet B. Dean, Michael Lastoria, and Stephen P. Stratton
  • Series: Christian Association for Psychological Studies (CAPS)
  • Publisher: IVP
  • Publication Date: 2018
  • Pages: 326

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Students arrive on campus with various boxes of belongings to unpack, some heavy, some tidy, some more valuable, some more private. For many students, two of these boxes could be labeled “My Faith” and “My Sexuality”—and these two can be among the most cumbersome to handle. How to balance the two without having to set one down? How to hold them both closely, both securely, but still move forward to settle in with new friends in a new environment? How to keep from dropping one or the other, spilling its embarrassing contents for all to see?

Such can be the struggle for any student, but especially for any sexual minority who identifies or struggles with an LGB+ identity or same-sex attraction on a Christian college campus. For these students their faith and their sexuality often feel both tender and in acute tension. Who is God making them to be? What do they need to grow in to develop faithfully, and what might they need to leave behind? How can they truly flourish?

The research team of Yarhouse, Dean, Stratton, and Lastoria draw on their decades of experience both in the psychology of sexual identity and in campus counseling to bring us the results of an original longitudinal study into what sexual minorities themselves experience, hope for, and benefit from. Rich with both quantitative and qualitative data, their book gives an unprecedented opportunity to listen to sexual minorities in their own words, as well as to observe patterns and often surprising revelations about life and personal development both on campus and after graduation.

Listening to Sexual Minorities will be an indispensable resource not only for counselors and psychologists but also for faculty, student-development leaders, and administrators in higher education as well as leaders in the church and wider Christian community who want to create an intentional environment to hear from and contribute to the spiritual flourishing of all.

The last chapter alone titled ‘Summary, Recommendations, and Conclusions’ will be invaluable for educators, counselors, pastors, youth workers, and the secular public who want to understand LGB+ emerging adults who deeply value and live out their faith. This book gives a framework to understand that Christian LGB+ men and women are navigating their sexual identity and lives differently than the prevailing cultural narrative, and Christian leaders and mentors should want to know how that is going for them. This book allows us to listen in to the actual voices and stories of students on Christian college campuses. We find out how much they value their faith. We find out that having people to walk with them who are willing to listen, understand, and guide is invaluable. Good guides find out about the people they shepherd. And this book is an essential guidebook for the men and women who guide and mentor students.

—Shirley Hoogstra, president of the Council for Christian Colleges & Universities

Mark A. Yarhouse (PsyD, Wheaton College) is the Dr. Arthur P. Rech & Mrs. Jean May Rech Endowed Chair and professor of psychology at Wheaton College where he runs the Sexual & Gender Identity Institute and is a core faculty member in the doctoral program in clinical psychology. He is a licensed clinical psychologist.

Janet B. Dean (PhD, Ohio State University) is a licensed psychologist and associate professor of psychology at Asbury University. In addition to teaching a number of undergraduate courses in psychology, she mentors students interested in research, advises the local chapter of the Psi Chi Honor Society in psychology, and cofacilitates Asbury’s annual undergraduate research symposium SEARCH.

Michael Lastoria (EdD, Loyola University Chicago) is professor of family studies and a senior counselor at Houghton College. He previously served as the director of counseling services at Houghton and is also a licensed marriage and family therapist in the state of New York.

Stephen P. Stratton (PhD, Auburn University) is professor of counseling and pastoral care at Asbury Theological Seminary. A licensed psychologist, he previously served as an adjunct professor at Asbury University, where he was the director of the Center for Counseling for eighteen years. Stratton has special interest and training in the areas of human relational attachments, contemplative prayer, and the integration of counseling and Christianity.

Modern Psychopathologies: A Comprehensive Christian Appraisal, 2nd ed.

  • Authors: Barrett W. McRay, Mark A. Yarhouse, and Richard E. Butman
  • Edition: 2nd Edition
  • Series: Christian Association for Psychological Studies (CAPS)
  • Publisher: IVP
  • Publication Date: 2016
  • Pages: 486

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Modern Psychopathologies is addressed to students and mental health professionals who want to sort through contemporary secular understandings of psychopathology in relation to a Christian worldview.

Written by well-known and respected scholars, this book provides an introduction to a set of disorders along with overviews of current research on etiology, treatment and prevention. Prior chapters explore the classification of disorders in historic pastoral care and contemporary mental health care. The authors explain the biological and sociocultural foundations of mental illness, and reflect on the relation between psychopathology and the Christian understanding of sin. Modern Psychopathologies is a unique and valuable resource for Christians studying psychology and counseling or providing counseling services, pastoral care, Christian healing ministries or spiritual direction.

The revised second edition is fully updated according to DSM-5 and ICD-10. The authors have expanded the analysis to include problems associated with trauma, gender, addiction and more.

Though fully capable of standing on its own, the book is a useful companion volume to Modern Psychotherapies by Stanton L. Jones and Richard E. Butman.

This revised edition of Modern Psychopathologies will be a very useful text for courses in diagnosis and psychopathology in Christian institutions as well as an excellent resource for Christian students enrolled in secular schools. I appreciate the care the authors have taken to place contemporary conceptualizations of psychopathology within the historical context of pastoral care and current church ministry, as well as to incorporate discussion of theological concepts such as the role of sin and suffering. Their organization of the material around DSM-5 categories will help students better understand this diagnostic system, while their critiques of DSM-5 will help enable students to understand both its benefits and limitations.

—Heather Davediuk Gingrich, professor of counseling, Denver Seminary

Barrett W. McRay (Psy.D., Wheaton College) is associate professor of Christian formation and ministry at Wheaton College. A licensed clinical psychologist, he is the clinical director at Alliance Clinical Associates in Wheaton, Illinois. He has cowritten articles published in Journal of Psychology and Theology, Journal of Psychology and Christianity and Counseling and Values, and he is a co-writer of the article Maintaining Personal Resiliency: Lessons Learned from Evangelical Protestant Clergy.

Mark A. Yarhouse (PsyD, Wheaton College) is the Dr. Arthur P. Rech & Mrs. Jean May Rech Endowed Chair and professor of psychology at Wheaton College where he runs the Sexual & Gender Identity Institute and is a core faculty member in the doctoral program in clinical psychology. He is a licensed clinical psychologist.

Richard E. Butman (Ph.D., Fuller Graduate School of Psychology) is a licensed clinical psychologist and professor of psychology at Wheaton College. He also maintains a part-time private practice in Wheaton, Illinois. He has contributed articles to various reference works, including The Baker Encyclopedia of Psychology (Baker), Dictionary of Pastoral Care and Counseling (Abingdon) and Christian Counseling Ethics (IVP). He has also published articles in many professional journals, including Journal of Psychology and Christianity, Christian Counseling Today Journal of Behavioral Counseling.

Psychology and Spiritual Formation in Dialogue: Moral and Spiritual Change in Christian Perspective

  • Editors: Thomas M. Crisp, Steven L. Porter, and Gregg A. Ten Elshof
  • Series: Christian Association for Psychological Studies (CAPS)
  • Publisher: IVP
  • Publication Date: 2019
  • Pages: 288

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Research into the nature of moral and spiritual change has revived in recent years in the worlds of psychology on one hand and theology and philosophy on the other. But psychology and spiritual formation draw upon distinct bodies of research and theory grounded in different methodologies, resulting in conversation that has suffered from a lack of interdisciplinary cross-pollination.

Rooted in a year-long discussion held by Biola University’s Center for Christian Thought (CCT), this volume bridges the gaps caused by professional specialization among psychology, theology, and philosophy. Each essay was forged out of an integrative discussion among theologians, psychologists, philosophers, New Testament scholars, educators, and pastors around the CCT seminar table. Topics that emerged included relational and developmental spirituality, moral virtue and judgment, and suffering and trauma.

Psychology and Spiritual Formation in Dialogue speaks across disciplinary divides, fostering fruitful conversation for fresh insights into the nature and dynamics of personal spiritual change.

The dialogue between the discipline of psychology and the practice of spiritual formation is a timely and important discussion for our day, but it also remains one where too much misunderstanding remains. Very often folks from different disciplines fail to listen and learn from one another. Thankfully, this blended volume is another important step toward a healthier conversation that aims to push us toward more faithful reflections.

—Kelly M. Kapic, professor of theological studies at Covenant College, author of Embodied Hope

Thomas M. Crisp (PhD, University of Notre Dame) is professor of philosophy at Biola University. His areas of interest include metaphysics, epistemology, philosophical theology, and social ethics. He has published articles in Noûs, Philosophy and Phenomenological Research, Oxford Studies in Metaphysics, The Oxford Handbook of Metaphysics, Analysis, Synthese, and The American Philosophical Quarterly, and is coeditor of Knowledge and Reality: Essays in Honor of Alvin Plantinga.

Steven L. Porter (PhD, University of Southern California) is professor of theology and philosophy at Talbot School of Theology and at Rosemead School of Psychology (Biola University). His areas of interest include spiritual formation, theological methodology, and philosophical theology. He is also scholar in residence at Biola’s Center for Christian Thought.

Gregg A. Ten Elshof (PhD, University of Southern California) is professor of philosophy at Biola University. His areas of interest include metaphysics, epistemology, modern philosophy, and Confucianism. His book, I Told Me So: Self-Deception and the Christian Life won the Christianity Today 2009 Book Award for Christian Living. He is also author of Confucius for Christians.

Sexuality and Sex Therapy: A Comprehensive Christian Appraisal

  • Authors: Mark A. Yarhouse and Erica S. N. Tan
  • Series: Christian Association for Psychological Studies (CAPS)
  • Publisher: IVP
  • Publication Date: 2014
  • Pages: 365

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

The field of human sexuality is one of ever-increasing complexity, particularly for Christian therapists and psychologists seeking to be faithful to Scripture, informed by science and sensitive to culture. In Sexuality and Sex Therapy, Mark Yarhouse and Erica Tan offer a survey and appraisal of this field from a Christian perspective, which grounds sex therapy in the biblical affirmation of physicality and the redemptive purposes of human life. Integrating the latest research within a Christian worldview, the authors explore sexual dysfunctions as well as various clinical issues and treatments.

Not only have Yarhouse and Tan written a standard resource for Christian therapists and counselors, but they also challenge the church to talk more honestly and openly about the blessing of human sexuality.

I am delighted to recommend Sexuality and Sex Therapy. As a retired graduate professor and licensed psychologist who has taught and provided psychotherapy for over thirty-five years, I have personally experienced the need for such a book for my graduate students, for help with my clients, and to recommend to pastors and youth leaders. knowing previously of only one written from a Christian perspective, which has been a lone voice regarding sexuality and sex therapy issues for many years. I have also had the opportunity to read and appreciate previous work from Yarhouse and Tan for a number of years, and find that the present volume extends the significant contributions of these authors to the Christian community in the vital area of human sexuality.

—Gary H. Strauss, emeritus professor of psychology, Rosemead School of Psychology, Biola University

Mark A. Yarhouse (PsyD, Wheaton College) is the Dr. Arthur P. Rech & Mrs. Jean May Rech Endowed Chair and professor of psychology at Wheaton College where he runs the Sexual & Gender Identity Institute and is a core faculty member in the doctoral program in clinical psychology. He is a licensed clinical psychologist.

Sin and Grace in Christian Counseling: An Integrative Paradigm

  • Author: Mark R. McMinn
  • Series: Christian Association for Psychological Studies (CAPS)
  • Publisher: IVP
  • Publication Date: 2008
  • Pages: 176

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Sin. Grace. Christian Counseling.

How do these fit together?

In Christian theology sin and grace are intrinsically interconnected. Teacher and counselor Mark McMinn believes that Christian counseling, then, must also take account of both human sin and God’s grace. For both sin and grace are distorted whenever one is emphasized without the other.

McMinn, noting his own tendencies and the temptation to stereotype different Christian approaches to counseling along this theological divide, aims to help all those preparing for or currently serving in the helping professions. Expounding the proper relationship of sin and grace, McMinn shows how the full truth of the Christian gospel works itself out in the functional, structural and relational domains of an integrative model of psychotherapy.

It is always a pleasure to read what Mark McMinn has recently written. In Sin and Grace in Christian Counseling Mark engages his readers in a conversation about these concepts, as well as the practical applications for clinical practice. He also opens up a dialogue between biblical counselors and integrationists by opening up a dialogue within himself about sin and grace.

—Mark A. Yarhouse, Psy.D., licensed clinical psychologist, professor of psychology, Regent University, and coauthor of Modern Psychopathologies: A Comprehensive Christian Appraisal

Mark R. McMinn (PhD, Vanderbilt University) is professor of psychology at George Fox University, where he serves as the director of faith integration in the Graduate Department of Clinical Psychology. His books include Integrative Psychotherapy, Sin and Grace in Christian Counseling, Care for the Soul, and Psychology, Theology, and Spirituality in Christian Counseling.

Skills for Effective Counseling: A Faith-Based Integration

  • Authors: Elisabeth A. Nesbit Sbanotto, Heather Davediuk Gingrich, and Fred C. Gingrich
  • Series: Christian Association for Psychological Studies (CAPS)
  • Publisher: IVP
  • Publication Date: 2016
  • Pages: 486

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Anyone in a helping profession—including professional counselors, spiritual directors, pastoral counselors, chaplains and others—needs to develop effective communication skills. But learning these skills is like learning a new language: it takes time and practice to communicate effectively, and lack of practice can lead to the loss of one’s ability to use this new language.

Suitable for both beginning students and seasoned practitioners, Skills for Effective Counseling provides a biblically integrated approach to foundational counseling skills that trains the reader to use specific microskills. These skills include perceiving, attending, validating emotion and empathic connection.

Chapters include textbook features such as sample session dialogues, role plays and a variety of both in-class and out-of-class exercises and reflection activities that will engage various learning styles. Strategically interwoven throughout the chapters are special topics related to:

  • multicultural counseling
  • biblical/theological applications
  • current and seminal research related to microskills
  • diagnostic and theoretical implications
  • clinical tips for using skills in “real world” counseling settings
  • the relevance of specific microskills to interpersonal relationships and broader ministry settings

This textbook and the accompanying IVP Instructor Resources include all of the activities and assignments that an instructor might need to execute a graduate, undergraduate or lay course in foundational counseling skills. Professors teaching within CACREP-accredited professional counseling programs will be able to connect specific material in the textbook to the latest CACREP Standards.

Professionals often zero in on disciplinary differences in approach, but in this excellent text Elisabeth Nesbit Sbanotto, Heather Davediuk Gingrich, and Fred C. Gingrich transcend disciplinary differences and get to the heart of being a better people-helper—the interpersonal helping skills shared across people-helping disciplines. This is a comprehensive, readable text that is a fully integrated Christian and psychological model for being an effective helper. Regardless of your discipline or theoretical approach you’ll love it.

—Everett L. Worthington Jr., coauthor of Couple Therapy

Elisabeth A. Nesbit Sbanotto (PhD, University of Arkansas) is a consultant, speaker, writer, counselor, and educator. She is assistant professor of counseling at Denver Seminary and the coauthor with Craig Blomberg of Effective Generational Ministry. A national certified counselor and registered psychotherapist, she maintains a private practice in Littleton, Colorado.

Heather Davediuk Gingrich is a counselor, scholar, teacher, and former missionary. She is professor of counseling at Denver Seminary and maintains a small private practice working with complex trauma survivors. She is the author of Restoring the Shattered Self and coauthor of Skills for Effective Counseling.

Fred C. Gingrich is professor of counseling at Denver Seminary and served as division chair from 2007 to 2015. He practiced and taught in Ontario for fourteen years prior to directing MA and EdD degrees in counseling at seminaries in the Philippines. He is the coauthor of Skills for Effective Counseling.

Social Psychology in Christian Perspective: Exploring the Human Condition

  • Author: Angela M. Sabates
  • Series: Christian Association for Psychological Studies (CAPS)
  • Publisher: IVP
  • Publication Date: 2013
  • Pages: 567

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Human social interaction is varied, complex and always changing. How we perceive each other and ourselves, how individuals interact within groups, and how groups are structured—all these are the domain of social psychology.

Many have doubted, however, that a full-fledged social psychology textbook can successfully be written from a Christian perspective. Inevitably, some say, when attempting to integrate theology and social psychology, one discipline must suffer at the expense of the other.

Angela Sabates counters that thinking by demonstrating how these two disciplines can indeed be brought together in a fruitful way. She crisply covers key topics in social psychology, utilizing research that is well grounded in the empirical and theoretical literature, while demonstrating how a distinctively Christian approach can offer fresh ideas and understandings.

  • Why doesn’t our behavior always match what we say we believe?
  • How and when are we most likely to be persuaded?
  • What is the social psychology of violence?
  • How reliable are eyewitness testimonies?
  • Are racism and prejudice on the decline or are we just better at hiding them?
  • Sabates draws out the implications of a Christian view of human persons on these and other central subjects within the well-established framework of social psychological study.

This volume is for those looking for a core text that makes use of a Christian theological perspective to explore what the science of psychology suggests to us about the nature of human social interaction.

Finally (!), a social psychology textbook written from a solidly Christian perspective that rivals the best in an otherwise secular market. Utilizing the broad theological tenets of creation, fall and redemption, Angela Sabates skillfully demonstrates how thinking Christianly about social psychology can offer a bold alternative, yet without damaging the field’s empirical goods. Cogent, well-written and comprehensive, this text will allow the student to use their Christian lenses without sacrificing a solid grounding in social psychology.

—Peter Hill, Biola University

Angela M. Sabates is associate professor of psychology at Bethel University in St. Paul, Minnesota. She previously taught at Palm Beach Atlantic University in West Palm Beach, Florida, and she has worked professionally at Cornerstone Family Counseling Center (Fairfax, Virginia), Minirth-Meier and Byrd Clinic (Arlington, Virginia) and Reston Psychological Center and Lab School of Washington (Fairfax, Virginia, and Washington, D.C.). She earned her Ph.D. in clinical psychology at Northwestern University in Evanston, Illinois. Her article, “The Child Patient” appears in Christian Counseling Ethics (IVP), and other articles have appeared in issues of Christian Counseling Today.

Theology for Better Counseling: Trinitarian Reflections for Healing and Formation

  • Author: Virginia Todd Holeman
  • Series: Christian Association for Psychological Studies (CAPS)
  • Publisher: IVP
  • Publication Date: 2012
  • Pages: 208

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

At one time, Virginia Todd Holeman “Toddy” thought being biblically literate was all she needed and had little interest in what real theologians talked about. But in her counseling she found that clients pressed her for more.

They didn’t just want what she had gained through training in the best theories and practices available for counseling. They asked hard theological questions often related to their suffering. As she describes it, they experienced a kind of “theological disequilibrium . . . which left them discouraged, disoriented and often distraught.”

Holeman shows how deep and clear theological reflection can make a major difference in counseling practice. Not only can it shape who we are, it can also bring into greater alignment our theological commitments, our therapeutic practices and our professional ethics. All the while it can have the most practical effect on our counseling sessions.

In this volume Holeman guides counseling students, pastoral counselors and licensed mental health professionals into becoming as well-formed theologically as they are trained clinically.

Holeman has written a unique book in the integration literature. Her theologically reflective practice model is neither treatment-model-specific nor is it generically thin Christianity. It is not psychology with a ‘side of Jesus’ but is a genuine and successful attempt to allow theology (specific, thick and strong) to have a real impact. This book will be very useful for Christian clinical graduate training as well as pastoral care and counseling.

—Brad D. Strawn, Perspectives on Science and Christian Faith, March 2014

Virginia Todd Holeman is professor of counseling at Asbury Theological Seminary in Wilmore, Kentucky. She previously taught at Ashland Theological Seminary and Kent State University and worked at New Life Family Ministries in Akron, Ohio. Holeman is a licensed psychologist in Ohio and a licensed marriage and family therapist in Kentucky. As a member of the American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy, she leads workshops and seminars around the country. She contributes to professional journals and speaks at churches, conferences, and universities on the topics of forgiveness and family.

Understanding Gender Dysphoria: Navigating Transgender Issues in a Changing Culture

  • Author: Mark A. Yarhouse
  • Series: Christian Association for Psychological Studies (CAPS)
  • Publisher: IVP
  • Publication Date: 2015
  • Pages: 191

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Few topics are more contested today than gender identity. In the fog of the culture war, complex issues like gender dysphoria are reduced to slogans and sound bites. And while the war rages over language, institutions and political allegiances, transgender individuals are the ones who end up being the casualties.

Mark Yarhouse, an expert in sexual identity and therapy, challenges the church to rise above the political hostilities and listen to people’s stories. In Understanding Gender Dysphoria, Yarhouse offers a Christian perspective on transgender issues that eschews simplistic answers and appreciates the psychological and theological complexity. The result is a book that engages the latest research while remaining pastorally sensitive to the experiences of each person.

In the midst of a tense political climate, Yarhouse calls Christians to come alongside those on the margins and stand with them as they resolve their questions and concerns about gender identity. Understanding Gender Dysphoria is the book we need to navigate these stormy cultural waters.

This work is a tour de force. With his unique combination of Christian evangelical theological sophistication, clinical sensitivity and compassion, and scientific acumen and mastery, Yarhouse establishes in this compelling book why he is the most important voice reflecting on the complex challenges of sexuality today.

—Stanton L. Jones, provost and professor of psychology, Wheaton College

Mark A. Yarhouse (PsyD, Wheaton College) is the Dr. Arthur P. Rech & Mrs. Jean May Rech Endowed Chair and professor of psychology at Wheaton College where he runs the Sexual & Gender Identity Institute and is a core faculty member in the doctoral program in clinical psychology. He is a licensed clinical psychologist.

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