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McMaster New Testament Studies Series (4 vols.)

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Gathering interest

Overview

This series is designed to address particular themes in the New Testament that are of concern to Christians today. Written in a style easily accessible to ministers, students, and laypeople by contributors who are proven experts in their fields of study, these volumes reflect the best of current biblical scholarship while also speaking directly to the pastoral needs of people in today’s church.

  • Provides a full spectrum of what the Bible has to say about social justice
  • Explores the crucial role of Romans within the church today
  • Examines how linguistic methods can contribute to the interpretation of the biblical texts

In the Logos edition, these volumes are enhanced by amazing functionality. Important terms link to dictionaries, encyclopedias, and a wealth of other resources in your digital library. Perform powerful searches to find exactly what you’re looking for. Take the discussion with you using tablet and mobile apps. With Logos Bible Software, the most efficient and comprehensive research tools are in one place, so you get the most out of your study.

Is the Gospel Good News?

  • Editors: Stanley E. Porter and Hughson T. Ong
  • Series: McMaster New Testament Studies
  • Publisher: Wipf & Stock
  • Publication Date: 2019
  • Pages: 392

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Is the Gospel Good News? was the theme of the 2015 H. H. Bingham Colloquium at McMaster Divinity College in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada, held on June 4–5. The fourteen participants in this colloquium presented their own individual perspectives on the theme from three broad vantage points—Bible, theology, and crucial topics. The “good news” that Jesus proclaimed concerning the kingdom of God became the “gospel” proclaimed by his followers throughout church history. This gospel is about the coming of Jesus Christ in fulfillment of God’s will for humanity.

This volume presents some accounts of how this good news has been understood through the ages and continues to be understood in relation to some of the major topics and issues of our contemporary world. The papers in the Bible section discuss this good news from both Old and New Testament passages and themes. The papers in the Theology section address theological topics in light of the question of what constitutes the good news. Finally, the papers in the Crucial Topics section explore new and different perspectives on ways in which the gospel is good news. This volume highlights diverse perspectives and proposals by scholars from various locations in different stages of their academic careers, resulting in a stimulating discussion of the topic of the gospel as good news.

Can any ‘good news’ offset the fact that we live in such a bad-news world? Decidedly ‘yes’ answer the scholars and ministry practitioners contributing to this volume. Advanced students, pastors, and scholars alike will glean fresh vantage points and truths from interaction with these wide-ranging but skillfully focused studies, all arguing for the continuing validity and viability of the central Christian message. Think ‘the gospel’ is a yesteryear slogan? Read this for a valuable refresher course.

—Robert W. Yarbrough, Professor of New Testament, Covenant Theological Seminary

Stanley E. Porter is President, Dean, and Professor of New Testament, McMaster Divinity College, Hamilton, Ontario. He also holds the Roy A. Hope Chair in Christian Worldview. He is the author of nearly thirty volumes, and has edited over eighty others. One of his latest books is When Paul Met Jesus: How an Idea Got Lost in History.

Hughson T. Ong is Assistant Academic Dean and Registrar, and Associate Professor of Biblical Studies at Emmanuel Bible College, Kitchener, Ontario. He is the author of The Multilingual Jesus and the Sociolinguistic World of the New Testament, and of a number of articles and essays on various New Testament topics that use sociolinguistic theories.

Linguistics and the Bible: Retrospects and Prospects

  • Editors: Stanley E. Porter, Christopher D. Land and Francis G. H. Pang
  • Series: McMaster New Testament Studies
  • Publisher: Wipf & Stock
  • Publication Date: 2019
  • Pages: 272

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

In 2016, the Centre for Biblical Linguistics, Translation, and Exegesis (CBLTE), a research center located at McMaster Divinity College, hosted the annual Bingham Colloquium. Scholars from around North America were invited to participate in a collegial and collaborative dialogue on what is currently happening (or could happen) at the intersection of linguistics and biblical studies, particularly in regards to the linguistic study of biblical languages, their translation, and the way that linguistic methods can contribute to the interpretation of the biblical texts. This volume of essays publishes many of the presentations that took place at the Colloquium.

Stanley Porter has been a leader in the field of application of linguistic theory to the interpretation of the New Testament and study of Greek grammar. In this collection of essays, he assembles an impressive group of scholars who address a wide range of issues related to the application of linguistics to interpreting the Greek text. More specifically, this volume focuses on the application of Systemic Functional Linguistics in the tradition of M. A. K. Halliday. This volume will provide a solid and up-to-date introduction and discussion of the importance and usage of Systemic Functional Linguistics for New Testament students. This book is a must-read for anyone unfamiliar with linguistic approaches to the New Testament, or anyone who wants to explore further the value and implications of Systemic Functional Linguistics for interpreting the New Testament. I highly recommend it.

—David Mathewson, Associate Professor of New Testament, Denver Seminary

Stanley E. Porter is President, Dean, and Professor of New Testament, as well as holder of the Roy A. Hope Chair in Christian Worldview, at McMaster Divinity College, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. He is a prolific writer and editor in the area of Greek linguistics and the Founder of the Centre for Biblical Linguistics, Translation, and Exegesis.

Christopher D. Land is Assistant Professor of New Testament and Linguistics at McMaster Divinity College, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. He is the Director of the Centre for Biblical Linguistics, Translation, and Exegesis.

Francis G. H. Pang is Assistant Professor of New Testament at McMaster Divinity College, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. He is the Associate Director of the Centre for Biblical Linguistics, Translation, and Exegesis.

The Bible and Social Justice: Old Testament and New Testament Foundations for the Church’s Urgent Call

  • Editors: Cynthia Long Westfall and Bryan R. Dyer
  • Series: McMaster New Testament Studies
  • Publisher: Wipf & Stock
  • Publication Date: 2016
  • Pages: 240

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Although the cry for justice in human society is an important theme in the Bible, in many church and academic circles action for and discourse about social justice is carried on without a thorough exploration of this theme in Scripture. This volume brings together chapters by experts in the various sections of the Old and New Testaments to give a full spectrum of what the Bible has to say about social justice, and to point to ways forward for Christians seeking to think and act in harmony with God in pursuing social justice in the world today.

This book is unique: in it, noted biblical scholars weigh in on what the Bible says about social justice, a topical domain typically populated by sociologists, ethicists, and activists. The volume is remarkably comprehensive, sampling texts from across the biblical canon, and its discussions are robust and insightful. The volume introduces devout, learned evangelical voices into a conversation of great import both for the church and the poor and powerless in our world. Hear them well!

—Robert L. Hubbard, Jr. Professor (Emeritus) of Biblical Literature, North Park Theological Seminary, Chicago

Cynthia Long Westfall is Assistant Professor of New Testament at McMaster Divinity College. Along with her academic work, she has ministered to those who are at risk for homelessness in Denver, Colorado, and Hamilton, Ontario.

Bryan R. Dyer is the coeditor of Paul and Ancient Rhetoric (2015), and currently works for Baker Academic as an Acquisitions Editor.

The Letter to the Romans: Exegesis and Application

  • Editors: Stanley E. Porter and Francis G. H. Pang
  • Series: McMaster New Testament Studies
  • Publisher: Wipf & Stock
  • Publication Date: 2018
  • Pages: 188

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Written at a time when his ideas and practices were provoking opposition even from fellow Christians, the Apostle Paul articulates in his Letter to the Romans his understanding of God’s plan for humanity and discusses the implications of this plan for different groups of people. Romans is considered by many as the most theologically significant and sophisticated book of the Bible. This volume is designed to bridge the gap between studying Romans as an academic enterprise and experiencing how Romans can speak today in the life of the church. All of the chapters in this volume—especially those devoted to the content of Romans—were written with both exegesis and application in mind. All of the contributors to this volume believe that Romans has a crucial voice within the church today and that those who preach, teach, and study the book need to be attentive to its witness and to its timeliness.

It seems that there is always more to say about Romans because Romans always has more to say to us. Stanley Porter has assembled a fine collection of scholars for the task, and here we find helpful essays on historical background, how linguistics shapes our understanding of the letter, the use of the Old Testament, along with essays that survey the letter. We are treated here to stimulating exegesis and application to everyday life and are reminded afresh that Romans speaks to both the mind and heart.

—Tom Schreiner, The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary

Stanley E. Porter is President, Dean, and Professor of New Testament, McMaster Divinity College, Hamilton, Ontario. He also holds the Roy A. Hope Chair in Christian Worldview. He is a prolific writer and editor in the area of New Testament studies.

Francis G. H. Pang is Assistant Professor of New Testament, McMaster Divinity College, Hamilton, Ontario. He is the Associate Director of the Centre for Biblical Linguistics, Translation, and Exegesis.

$49.99

Save $30.00 (37%)
Reg:$79.99

Gathering interest