Products>The Mass as Sacrifice: Theological Reflections on the Sacrificial Elements of the Mass

The Mass as Sacrifice: Theological Reflections on the Sacrificial Elements of the Mass

Format: Digital
Publisher:
, 2008
ISBN: 9780818912580

Overview

In modern times, the sacrificial nature of the Mass is often seriously down-played to the detriment of the faithful. Pope John Paul II lamented this in his encyclical, Ecclesia de Eucharistia that, “at times one encounters an extremely reductive understanding of the Eucharistic mystery. Stripped of its sacrificial meaning, it is celebrated as if it were simply a fraternal banquet.” Speaking about the impact on the ordained priesthood he went on to say, “Furthermore, the necessity of the ministerial priesthood, grounded in apostolic succession, is at times obscured and the sacramental nature of the Eucharist is reduced to its mere effectiveness as a form of proclamation.” A former FBI investigator-turned-priest, Father James B. Collins examines this whole question in depth. Leaning on insights from the New Testament, the Church Fathers, St. Thomas Aquinas, popes Leo XIII, Pius XII, and John Paul II, the Council of Trent, and Vatican II, Father Collins shows how the sacrificial nature of the Mass in the Roman Canon is emphasized and expressed as it always ought to be. This volume offers a foreword by Edward Cardinal Egan.

  • Title: The Mass as Sacrifice: Theological Reflections on the Sacrificial Elements of the Mass
  • Author: James B. Collins III
  • Publisher: St Pauls
  • Print Publication Date: 2008
  • Logos Release Date: 2019
  • Language: English
  • Resources: 1
  • Format: Digital › Logos Research Edition
  • Subjects: Lord’s Supper › Catholic Church--Meditations; Mass › Meditations; Sacrifice › Christianity--Meditations; Catholic Church › Doctrines
  • ISBNs: 9780818912580, 0818912588
  • Resource ID: LLS:MASSASSACRIFICE
  • Resource Type: Monograph
  • Metadata Last Updated: 2019-04-24T21:17:00Z

James B. Collins III was ordained to the Catholic priesthood in 2004 from St. Joseph’s Seminary at Dunwoodie, where he earned an MDiv and a master’s degree in dogmatic theology. Since then, he has served in the Archdiocese of New York at the Church of St. Teresa in Staten Island and in the Archdiocese for the Military Services in the chaplain corps of the United States Army Reserves and New York Army National Guard. Prior to entering the seminary, Father Collins worked as an investigator for the New York office of the Federal Bureau of Investigation.