Logos Bible Software
Products>WJK Old Testament Studies Collection (7 vols.)

WJK Old Testament Studies Collection (7 vols.)

$91.99

Collection value: $115.93
Save $23.94 (20%)

Overview

The Westminster John Knox Old Testament Studies Collection provides a multi-faceted selection of volumes addressing Old Testament theology. Explore Genesis, Exodus, the prophetic books, and more through this assortment of books in biblical studies. Examine themes including creation, the Fall, interpretation, biblical characters, and attributes of God. These titles will help readers investigate specific theological elements as well as the bigger story of the Old Testament.

Resource Experts
  • Connects the storyline of the Old Testament to the rest of Scripture
  • Demonstrates the centrality of our dependence upon God
  • Examines the theological significance of the doctrine of creation
  • Title: WJK Old Testament Studies Collection (7 vols.)
  • Publisher: Westminster John Knox
  • Volumes: 7
  • Pages: 1,885
Value if sold separately
||Partially included
Value if sold separately
Total value if sold separately:

In the Logos edition, Logos Bible Software gives you the tools you need to use these digital volumes effectively and efficiently. With your digital library, you can search for verses, find Scripture references and citations instantly, and perform word studies. Additionally, important terms link to dictionaries, encyclopedias, commentaries, theology texts, and other resources in your library. Perform powerful searches to find exactly what you’re looking for. Take the discussion with you using tablet and mobile apps. With Logos Bible Software, the most efficient and comprehensive research tools are in one place, so you get the most out of your study.

A Handbook to Old Testament Exegesis

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Designed for both Hebrew and non-Hebrew students, A Handbook to Old Testament Exegesis offers a fresh, hands-on introduction to exegesis of the Old Testament. William P. Brown begins not with the biblical text itself but with the reader, helping students to identify their own interpretive lenses before engaging the biblical text. Brown guides the student through a wide variety of interpretive approaches, including modern methodologies—feminist, womanist, Latino/a, queer, postcolonial, disability, and ecological approaches—alongside more traditional methods. This allows students to critically reflect on themselves as bona fide interpreters. While covering a wide range of biblical passages, Brown also highlights two common biblical texts throughout the work to help show how each interpretive approach highlights different dimensions of the same texts. Students will appreciate the value of an empathetic inquiry of Scripture that is both inclusive of others and textually in-depth.

Bill Brown brings both his vast erudition and his meticulous attentiveness to the art and craft of Bible reading. The outcome of his prodigious work is a book that has no parallel among our current resources. Brown walks us through the conventional modes of critical reading with impressive textual specificity. Beyond that he offers access to his signature scholarship concerning science, evolution, and ecology with immense learning and acute artistic sensitivity. Potential readers should not be misled by the ordinariness of the book's title. In addition to being an introduction for new students, it will be a welcome resource for those trapped in so-called 'objective' criticism and for those who have been at it so long that they think they know ahead of time what texts will say. Brown brings his own wonder and capacity for surprise that will be contagious for his readers. It may be that the book will evoke a new epidemic of excitement and engagement for Bible readers; it is in any case an enormous gift to us all!

—Walter Brueggemann, William Marcellus McPheeters Professor Emeritus of Old Testament, Columbia Theological Seminary

William P. Brown is William Marcellus McPheeters Professor of Old Testament at Columbia Theological Seminary. He has published numerous works, including Seeing the Psalms: A Theology of Metaphor and Ecclesiastes in the Interpretation series. He also serves on the editorial board for the esteemed Old Testament Library series, published by Westminster John Knox Press.

From Nothing: A Theology of Creation

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Too often the doctrine of creation has been made to serve limited or pointless ends, like the well-worn arguments between science and faith over the question of human and cosmic origins. Given this history, some might be tempted to ignore the theology of creation, thinking it has nothing new or substantive to say. They would be wrong.

In this stimulating volume, Ian A. McFarland shows that at the heart of the doctrine of creation lies an essential truth about humanity: we are completely dependent on God. Apart from this realization, little else about us makes sense.

McFarland demonstrates that this radical dependence is a consequence of the doctrine of creatio ex nihilo, creation from nothing. Taking up the theological consequences of creation-theodicy and Providence-the author provides a detailed and innovative constructive theology of creation. Drawing on the biblical text, classical sources, and contemporary thought, From Nothing proves that a robust theology of creation is a necessary correlate to the Christian confession of redemption in Jesus Christ.

Ian McFarland’s From Nothing engages the fundamental importance of the idea of creation for faithful living and thinking. God creates from nothing; Ian McFarland constructs theology of creation out of a rich mix of conversations with Scripture, the history of Christian thought, debates about science and theology, and an ecumenical chorus of theological voices. McFarland's superb theological craftsmanship always keeps the book clear, engaging, and wonderfully illuminating.

—David H. Kelsey, Luther Weigle Professor Emeritus of Theology, Yale Divinity School

Ian A. McFarland is Associate Dean of Faculty and Academic Affairs and Professor of Theology at Candler School of Theology, Emory University. He is the author of several books, including In Adam's Fall: A Meditation on the Christian Doctrine of Original Sin and The Divine Image: Envisioning the Invisible God.

Preaching the Women of the Old Testament: Who They Were and Why They Matter

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Take an in-depth look at over forty fierce, faithful, and strong women featured in the Old Testament with Preaching the Women of the Old Testament. Inside this unique resource author Lynn Japinga interprets the stories of various biblical women, including Eve, Rebekah, Dinah, Tamar, Miriam, Deborah, Jael, Abigail, Bathsheba, and Vashti. Along with providing an interpretation, Japinga demonstrates how the character’s story has been read in Christian tradition and offers sermon ideas that connect contemporary issues to each story. This book is ideal for pastors who want to know more about the many women of the Old Testament and learn how to better incorporate them into their sermons.

Telling the stories of the untold is a proclamatory act. The women of the Old Testament gain new life in Japinga’s imagination and give us new life in how we view and interpret the Bible as the Word of the Lord. This book is indispensable for the preacher who is committed to discovering how God acts in those persons and stories that most would choose to overlook.

—Karoline M. Lewis, The Marbury E. Anderson Chair of Biblical Preaching, Luther Seminary

Lynn Japinga is Professor of Religion at Hope College in Holland, Michigan. An ordained minister in the Reformed Church in America (RCA), she has served as a pastor and interim pastor of a number of RCA congregations. Japinga is the author of several books and articles, including Feminism and Christianity: An Essential Guide.

The Character of God in the Book of Genesis: A Narrative Appraisal

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

By using recent developments in literary theory, W. Lee Humphreys uses Genesis to show how God functions as a character in the Genesis narrative. Very creatively, Humphreys explores the coherence and consistency of God as a character, the way in which God’s character changes and develops throughout the narrative, and how giving attention to the character of God enriches our experience of reading Genesis.

W. Lee Humphreys is Professor Emeritus of Religious Studies at the University of Tennessee in Knoxville, Tennessee.

The Genesis of Good and Evil: The Fall(out) and Original Sin in the Bible

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

For centuries, the Garden of Eden story has been a cornerstone for the Christian doctrine of “the Fall” and “original sin.” In recent years, many scholars have disputed this understanding of Genesis 3 because it has no words for sin, transgression, disobedience, or punishment. Instead, it is about how the human condition came about. Yet the picture is not so simple. The Genesis of Good and Evil examines how the idea of “the Fall” developed in Jewish tradition on the eve of Christianity. In the end, the Garden of Eden is a rich study of humans in relation to God that leaves open many questions. One such question is, Does Genesis 3, 4, and 6, taken together, support the Christian doctrine of original sin? Smith’s well-informed, close reading of these chapters concludes that it does. In this book, he addresses the many mysterious matters of the Garden story and invites readers to explore questions of their own.

Was there a “Fall”? Was there an “original sin”? The prolific author Mark S. Smith offers insight and writes with clarity, insight, and profundity on these pivotal topics that are so vital to biblical theology. While not all will agree with every element of his analysis of the relevant texts, his reflections will provoke better understanding and further discussion. All those who are interested in these important questions will have to reckon with Smith’s perspective.

Tremper Longman III, Distinguished Scholar and Professor Emeritus of Biblical Studies, Westmont College

Mark S. Smith is Helena Professor of Old Testament Literature and Exegesis at Princeton Theological Seminary and Skirball Professor Emeritus of Hebrew Bible and Ancient Near Eastern Studies at New York University. He has also served as visiting professor at the Pontifical Biblical Institute in Rome and at the Hebrew University in Jerusalem. An award-winning author, Smith has written sixteen books, including The Early History of God: Yahweh and the Other Deities in Ancient Israel; The Origins of Biblical Monotheism: Israel’s Polytheistic Background and the Ugaritic Texts; God in Translation: Deities in Cross-Cultural Discourse in the Biblical World; How Human Is God? Seven Questions about God and Humanity in the Bible; and Where the Gods Are: Spatial Dimensions of Anthropomorphism in the Biblical World. His current research focuses on a commentary on the book of Judges, coauthored with archaeologist Elizabeth Bloch-Smith.

Theology in Exodus: Biblical Theology in the Form of a Commentary

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

This groundbreaking book points to a fresh new way of doing biblical theology. Donald Gowan organizes his study of the book of Exodus like a traditional commentary, following the text of Exodus from beginning to end. Unlike a traditional commentary, however, Gowan asks only one question of Exodus: what does this book say about God? He then traces the major affirmations about God found in Exodus through the rest of the scripture and into the theologies of Judaism and Christianity. This study will be of interest to any who wish to rethink the ways that biblical theology is done.

Donald E. Gowan is Robert Cleveland Holland Professor Emeritus of Old Testament at Pittsburgh Theological Seminary in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. He is a minister in the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) and has authored several books on the Old Testament, including Theology in Exodus and Theology of the Prophetic Books.

Theology of the Prophetic Books: The Death and Resurrection of Israel

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Donald Gowan offers a unified reading of the prophetic books, showing that each has a distinctive contribution to make to a central theme. These books—Isaiah through Malachi—respond to three key moments in Israel’s history: the end of the Northern Kingdom in 722 BCE, the end of the Southern Kingdom in 587 BCE, and the beginning of the restoration from the Babylonian exile in 538 BCE. Gowan traces the theme of death and resurrection throughout these accounts, finding a symbolic message of particular significance to Christian interpreters of the Bible.

Donald E. Gowan is Robert Cleveland Holland Professor Emeritus of Old Testament at Pittsburgh Theological Seminary in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. He is a minister in the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) and has authored several books on the Old Testament, including Theology in Exodus and Theology of the Prophetic Books.

Reviews

0 ratings

Sign in with your Faithlife account

  1. Kytriya

    Kytriya

    5/8/2019

    I wish I could add this to my Wish List but apparently that is denied me. :P
    Reply

$91.99

Collection value: $115.93
Save $23.94 (20%)