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Welwyn Commentary Series Upgrade (6 vols.)
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Gathering Interest

Overview

Dedicated to the practical exposition and exhortation of Scripture, the Welwyn Commentary Series is designed for pastoral ministry and preaching. Combining exegesis, hermeneutics, history, and pastoral insight, these scholarly resources are carefully crafted to meet the day-to-day needs of pastors as they grapple with the word of God. The Welwyn Commentary Series emphasizes the meaning of the text for our everyday lives. Each section summarizes and explains a passage of Scripture, examining the intention of the author, the cultural context, and the questions and issues raised by the particular passage. These eminently readable commentaries also contain numerous illustrations and pointed application.

In the Logos edition, these volumes are enhanced by amazing functionality. Important terms link to dictionaries, encyclopedias, and a wealth of other resources in your digital library. Perform powerful searches to find exactly what you’re looking for. Take the discussion with you using tablet and mobile apps. With Logos Bible Software, the most efficient and comprehensive research tools are in one place, so you get the most out of your study.

Key Features

  • Provides detailed verse-by-verse exposition
  • Ideal for sermon preparation and Bible study
  • Contains detailed book outlines

Product Details

Individual Titles

Psalms Volume 1: From Suffering to Glory

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

The Psalms continue to have an enormous influence on people’s lives all round the world and down the centuries they have brought comfort and encouragement to countless millions of people.

Dag Hammarskjold, the second Secretary-General of the United Nations, died in a plane crash in 1961. His briefcase was recovered from the crash site and among the items it contained were a copy of the New Testament and the Book of Psalms. In the New Testament the most quoted book of the Old Testament is the Psalms. Jesus clearly committed them to memory and found them speaking to him and for him concerning his ministry in life and death. The Apostles turned to the Psalms in their preaching as well as when praying for boldness in the face of strong persecution. Following the example set by our Lord, the writers of the New Testament saw them as pointers to the person and work of Christ.

In this commentary, Philip Eveson brings his skills as an Old Testament scholar, blended with a warm pastor’s heart to produce a work that will serve the student, the preacher/teacher and the devotional reader equally well.

Philip Eveson is a former Principal of the London Theological Seminary (LTS) and was one of the four original faculty members. The subjects he has taught at LTS have included the Biblical Languages, Exegesis and Theology and preaching the Old Testament. He has pastored churches in South Wales and London and travelled worldwide lecturing and preaching. Though retired he is active in preaching and writing, and entertaining his four grandchildren. His commentaries on Genesis (2001) and Leviticus (2007) are published by EP in the Welwyn Commentary Series and he is the author of the EP Bitesize Biography of Matthew Henry.

Psalms Volume 2: From Suffering to Glory

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

In this commentary, Philip Eveson brings his skills as an Old Testament scholar, blended with a warm pastor’s heart to produce a work that will serve the student, the preacher/teacher and the devotional reader equally well.

As in his commentary on Genesis, Philip Eveson has done a superb work in his two-volume Commentary on the Psalms. He has provided a treasury of food for the soul as well as fodder for the preacher. Eveson indicates awareness of critical questions along the way regarding the Psalms, but never at the expense of rich insight arising from solid exegesis. He does his own work well, never simply re-hashing what others have already said. Among the many commentaries old and new available on the Psalms, Eveson’s work ranks right at the top. Highly recommended.

O. Palmer Robertson Director and vice chancellor of African Bible College in Uganda.

Philip Eveson is a former Principal of the London Theological Seminary (LTS) and was one of the four original faculty members. The subjects he has taught at LTS have included the Biblical Languages, Exegesis and Theology and preaching the Old Testament. He has pastored churches in South Wales and London and travelled worldwide lecturing and preaching. Though retired he is active in preaching and writing, and entertaining his four grandchildren. His commentaries on Genesis (2001) and Leviticus (2007) are published by EP in the Welwyn Commentary Series and he is the author of the EP Bitesize Biography of Matthew Henry.

Ecclesiastes: A Quest for Meaning?

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

The latest addition to the Welwyn Commentary series has leading Old Testament scholar and series editor John D Currid bring a fresh approach to a book that seems to draw a lot of comment of the the wrong kind. In his Introduction he says:

There is no book in the Old Testament that is as maligned and criticized as the book of Ecclesiastes. People point to the teachings of vanity, scepticism, and fatalism that they see so dominant in the writing. Why live, one asks, if the writer of Ecclesiastes is right that life is without meaning and purpose?... I would argue that the real reason that no book in the Old Testament is as disparaged as Ecclesiastes is simply because no book is so misunderstood. It is ironic, in my opinion, that no book in the Old Testament is, in reality, as joyful as Ecclesiastes. When the reader properly understands the argument in the book, he will be led to joy and he will be filled with adoration for God. Consequently, that which is criticized for having no joy is really the book that brings joy.

Dr John D Currid is Carl McMurray Professor of Old Testament at the Reformed Theological Seminary, Charlotte, North Carolina. In addition to being Series Editor of the EP Study Commentaries and Welwyn Commentaries, he is author of the EP Study Commentaries on the Pentateuch, and the Welwyn Commentaries on Joshua, Ruth and Habakkuk.

Galatians: No Longer Slaves But Sons

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Galatians: a letter that had great importance for the magisterial Reformers (Luther on Galatians is always in print) and in recent years has been at the heart of the the debate on New Covenant theology and the New Perspective on Paul. Mark Johnston brings Paul’s letter back where it belongs—with a pastor’s heart and unerring clarity he makes this vital Scripture accessible to the ordinary Christian.

The message of Galatians is a vitally important one since it addresses the heart of the gospel. Not surprisingly, the devil knows this and commentators are divided on its meaning. That is why a sure and trusted guide is essential, one familiar with both old and new perspectives on Paul’s understanding of the gospel. Mark Johnston is that trusted guide and the church is greatly in his debt for the clarity and conviction of these pages.

Derek W. H. Thomas Senior Minister, First Presbyterian Church, Columbia, SC

Mark Johnston trained for the ministry at Westminster Seminary, Philadelphia, before returning to Ireland as a Church Planter. From there he went on to pastor churches in London, Philadelphia and currently Cardiff. He also serves on the Board of the Banner of Truth Trust. Mark is married to Fiona and they have two grown up children. He has authored a number of books and has a monthly column in Place for Truth, an American Reformed website. Among other things he enjoys Photography, fly fishing, Irish music and surfing in his spare time.

1 & 2 Peter: Feed My Sheep

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Who would not be interested in the story of a man who showed tremendous potential as a disciple of the Lord Jesus Christ, failed spectacularly and then was transformed by the drawing love of the Saviour to become a great preacher, church leader and shepherd of the Lord’s flock? That is the story of Peter, and in this warm devotional commentary William VanDoodewaard brings the letters Peter wrote to Christians in Asia Minor to life. Here you will be encouraged, blessed and challenged as God’s Word is lovingly explained. Look elsewhere for critical debate and doubts. Read on for divinely-inspired Scripture dealt with as it should be: evangelically faithful, Christ-centered truth.

Originally written in a pre-Christian environment, the Letters of Peter have been a special help to persecuted disciples throughout the centuries. Today they also speak with fresh power and relevance in the post-Christian west where the dismantling of gospel values is fast producing new forms of totalitarianism and a marginalization of believers. In this beautifully written exposition, Dr Bill VanDoodewaard combines sensitivity to the text of Scripture with wise contemporary pastoral application. Best of all, Feed My Sheep highlights the tender encouragement Peter gives in his emphasis on the unrivalled spiritual privileges Christians enjoy. It is a superb companion to reading and re-reading 1 & 2 Peter.

—Sinclair B. Ferguson

Dr. William VanDoodewaard (PhD, Aberdeen) is a minister in the Associate Reformed Presbyterian Church, and serves as Professor of Church History at Puritan Reformed Theological Seminary. He has served as Visiting Research Fellow at Queen’s University Belfast and Visiting Scholar at Princeton Theological Seminary for his work in the history of biblical interpretation, and is the author of The Quest for the Historical Adam (2015).

Hebrews: The Name High Over All

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Richard Brooks brings a pastor’s heart to this commentary, combined with the ability to make the Word of God accessible to the ordinary reader.

Hebrews is chiefly, pre-eminently, gloriously about the Lord Jesus Christ…his, and his alone, is the name high over all. The entire book (as is the case for the entire Bible) is concerned to set forth the Second Person of the Godhead, in the fullness of his glory and majesty, his grace and his tenderness…there is a clear focus upon both Jesus’ deity and his humanity, the great mystery of his two complete, perfect and distinct natures in his one person. Here awaiting us in Hebrews are ‘the unsearchable riches of Christ’ (Ephesians 3:8). Here set before us in richness and fullness is God’s ‘inexpressible gift’ (2 Corinthians 9:15). Here to our delight is the one who ‘is altogether desirable’ (Song of Songs 5:16).

Richard Brooks studied theology at Cambridge and trained for the Christian ministry at Bristol. His pastorates included York Evangelical Church and The Dales Evangelical Church, Matlock.