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T&T Clark Jewish Backgrounds Collection (9 vols.)
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Gathering Interest

Overview

This collection provides a multi-faceted study on the nation of Israel. Including contributions to the fields of history, archaeology, biblical studies, interpretation, and ancient manuscripts, this collection contains a helpful array of resources for expanding your knowledge of the Old Testament and Israel.

In the Logos edition, these volumes are enhanced by amazing functionality. Important terms link to dictionaries, encyclopedias, and a wealth of other resources in your digital library. Perform powerful searches to find exactly what you’re looking for. Take the discussion with you using tablet and mobile apps. With Logos Bible Software, the most efficient and comprehensive research tools are in one place, so you get the most out of your study.

Key Features

  • Provides insights into the history and culture of Israel during multiple periods
  • Contains valuable contributions to Jewish and Old Testament studies
  • Examines Israels’ interaction with foreign nations

Product Details

  • Title: T&T Clark Jewish Background Collection (9 vols.)
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Volumes: 9
  • Pages: 2,476
  • Resource Type: Monographs

Individual Titles

A History of the Jews and Judaism in the Second Temple Period, Volume 2

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

This is the second volume of the projected four-volume history of the Second Temple period. It is axiomatic that there are large gaps in the history of the Persian period, but the early Greek period is possibly even less known. This volume brings together all we know about the Jews during the period from Alexander’s conquest to the eve of the Maccabaean revolt, including the Jews in Egypt as well as the situation in Judah. Based directly on the primary sources, which are surveyed, the study addresses questions such as administration, society, religion, economy, jurisprudence, Hellenism and Jewish identity. These are discussed in the context of the wider Hellenistic world and its history. A strength of the study is its extensive up-to-date secondary bibliography (approximately one thousand items).

The first installment of Grabbe’s ambitious four volume project is extremely rich, methodologically self-aware, and judicious in its historical judgements. One now awaits with expectation for the remaining three volumes.

The Expository Times

Lester L. Grabbe is Professor Emeritus of Hebrew Bible and Early Judaism at the University of Hull. He is founder and convenor of the European Seminar in Historical Methodology.

Exile and Restoration Revisited

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

This volume had its origins in a session presented to the Society of Biblical Literature in Washington in 2006 in order to examine the legacy of Peter Ackroyd to the field of biblical studies. Ackroyd’s work stretched over a wide range of topics within Biblical Studies, notably study of prophetic literature and work on exile and restoration. This volume particularly focuses upon his work on the latter. Whilst the present work is founded upon the papers given at the session it also includes several essays solicited subsequently which further serve to draw the contributions together into a fitting tribute to a pioneer in his field.

The contributions take account of Ackroyd’s approach to the theme of exile and restoration, focusing largely upon the study of Ezra-Nehemiah and Chronicles. As a brief flavour, Bob Becking examines the epigraphic evidence concerning the mixed marriage crisis Ezra-Nehemiah. Joe Blenkinsopp seeks to find the ‘Sons of Aaron’ before the 5th Century in a fascinating essay focusing which picks up the work of R.H. Kennett over a century ago. Among the other distinguished contributors are John Bergsma, Eric Myers and Jill Middlemass.

Gary N. Knoppers, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA.

Lester L. Grabbe is Professor Emeritus of Hebrew Bible and Early Judaism at the University of Hull. He is founder and convenor of the European Seminar in Historical Methodology.

Israel and Empire: A Postcolonial History of Israel and Early Judaism

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Israel and Empire introduces students to the history, literature, and theology of the Hebrew Bible and texts of early Judaism, enabling them to read these texts through the lens of postcolonial interpretation. This approach should allow students to recognize not only how cultural and socio-political forces shaped ancient Israel and the worldviews of the early Jews but also the impact of imperialism on modern readings of the Bible.

Perdue and Carter cover a broad sweep of history, from 1300 BCE to 72 CE, including the late Bronze age, Egyptian imperialism, Israel’s entrance into Canaan, the Davidic-Solomonic Empire, the Assyrian Empire, the Babylonian Empire, the Persian Empire, the Greek Empire, the Maccabean Empire, and Roman rule. Additionally the authors show how earlier examples of imperialism in the Ancient Near East provide a window through which to see the forces and effects of imperialism in modern history.

This volume serves as a useful guide to the discipline ... for readers who want to know more about what postcolonialism is and how it might be applied to study of the Bible ... This will be a good introduction to the subject for students and scholars for whom the subject is new.

—Lester L. Grabbe, University of Hull, Theology, 118.3

Leo G. Perdue is Professor of Hebrew Bible at Brite Divinity School, Fort Worth, TX, USA. He is the author of numerous books, including Wisdom and Creation: The Theology of Wisdom Literature

Warren Carter is Professor of New Testament Brite Divinity School Texas Christian University, Fort Worth, TX

Israel in Transition

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

For more than a decade the European Seminar in Historical Methodology has debated the history of ancient Israel (or Palestine or the Southern Levant, as some prefer). A number of different topics have been the focus of discussion and published collections, but several have centered on historical periods. The really seminal period—one of great debates over a number of different topics—is the four centuries between the Late Bronze II and Iron IIA, but it seemed appropriate to leave it toward the end of the various historical periods. It was also important to give a prominent place to archaeology, and the best way to do this seemed to be to have a special Seminar session devoted entirely to archaeology.

Lester L. Grabbe is Professor Emeritus of Hebrew Bible and Early Judaism at the University of Hull. He is founder and convenor of the European Seminar in Historical Methodology.

Israel in Transition 2

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Israel in Transition 2 is the second in a two-volume work addressing some of the historical problems relating to the early history of Israel, from its first mention around 1200 BCE to the beginnings of the kingdoms of Israel and Judah. During this four century transition period Israel moved from a group of small settlements in the Judean and Samarian hill country to the two kingdoms of Israel and Judah, occupying much of the land on the west side of the Jordan.

The present volume engages with the relevant texts. These include various inscriptions, such as the Tel Dan inscription and the Assyrian inscriptions, but also an examination of the biblical text. The articles discuss various individual problems relating to Israelite history, but ultimately the aim is to comment on historical methodology.

The debate among Seminar members illustrates not only the problems but also suggests solutions and usable methods. The editor provides a perspective on the debate in a Conclusion that summarizes the contributions of the two volumes together.

Lester L. Grabbe is Professor Emeritus of Hebrew Bible and Early Judaism at the University of Hull. He is founder and convenor of the European Seminar in Historical Methodology.

Jesus, an Emerging Jewish Mosaic: Jewish Perspectives, Post-Holocaust

  • Author: Daniel F. Moore
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2008
  • Pages: 344

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Since Martin Buber in Two Types of Faith acknowledged Jesus as his “great brother,” other Jewish writers have sought to ascertain a place for Jesus within the larger context of Jewish history. In the aftermath of the Shoah, specifically in the afflicted consciousness of humanity, Jew and Christian alike began to ask how this tragedy could have happened, especially among and against people of faith. In an effort to assure that such a tragedy never happens again, the focus of some fell upon Jesus, previously the obstacle to reconciliation, but now perceived as the obvious and most viable bridge to span the chasm and assuage the wound of anti-Jewish and anti-Christian sentiments. Still others chose to join and expand the academic quest for the historical Jesus, adding Jewish voices to the effort to explore more rigorously and objectively the figure of Jesus in historical writing. In this unique and illuminating volume, Father Daniel F. Moore presents the historical identity of Jesus through lens of such Jewish scholars as Schalom Ben-Chorin, David Flusser, Geza Vermes, and Jacob Neuser. A useful book for those interesting in ecumenical discourse and Jesus studies.

Daniel F. Moore, S.S., S.T.D., is currently the Vice-Rector of Theological College, the university seminary at The Catholic University of America, Washington, D.C

Jewish and Christian Scripture as Artifact and Canon

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Jewish and Christian Scripture as Artifact and Canon constitutes a collection of studies that reflect and contribute to the growing scholarly interest in manuscripts as artifacts and witnesses to early stages in Jewish and Christian understanding of sacred scripture.

Scholars and textual critics have in recent years rightly recognized the contribution that ancient manuscripts make to our understanding of the development of canon in its broadest and most inclusive sense. The studies included in this volume shed significant light on the most important questions touching the emergence of canon consciousness and written communication in the early centuries of the Christian church. The concern here is not in recovering a theoretical “original text” or early “recognized canon,” but in analysis of and appreciation for texts as they actually circulated and were preserved through time. Some of the essays in this collection explore the interface between canon as theological concept, on the one hand, and canon as reflected in the physical/artifactual evidence, on the other. Other essays explore what the artifacts tell us about life and belief in early communities of faith. Still other studies investigate the visual dimension and artistic expressions of faith, including theology and biblical interpretation communicated through the medium of art and icon in manuscripts. The volume also includes scientific studies concerned with the physical properties of particular manuscripts. These studies will stimulate new discussion in this important area of research and will point students and scholars in new directions for future work.

In this stimulating collection of essays scholars of varied disciplines investigate the material features of the Jewish and Christian Scriptures... since scholarly interest in the books and the book culture of antiquity has been on the rise, the present volume will find a receptive audience.

Journal of Jewish Studies

Craig A. Evans (Ph.D., Claremont) is Payzant Distinguished Professor of New Testament, Acadia Divinity College Wolfville, Nova Scotia, Canada.

H. Daniel Zacharias is a Lecturer at Acadia Divinity College, Nova Scotia, Canada.

“On Her Account”: Reconfiguring Israel in Ruth, Esther, and Judith

  • Author: Anne-Mareike Wetter
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2015
  • Pages: 304

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Anne-Mareike Wetter investigates how the books of Ruth, Esther and Judith contribute to the discussion about Israel’s ethnic and religious identity in the formative period following the Babylonian Exile. Although each of these narratives deals with variations of the theme of survival in a hostile world, the question underlying them is a different one: “Who are we, and who is our ‘other’?” The narratives are presented as sequels to Israel’s history as put forward in other (now biblical) texts, and presuppose God’s continuing involvement with his people. However, they subtly modify the way in which Israel can or should relate to her God by suggesting alternatives for official Temple worship or bypassing the latter altogether. While older prophetic texts make use of metaphoric language portraying Israel as YHWH’s unfaithful wife, grieving widow, or ravaged virgin, Ruth, Esther and Judith can be construed as embodiments of Israel of a different kind.

Wetter argues for a revisioning of Israel in and through the bodies of the three female characters, as a community which is simultaneously vulnerable and inviolable, marginalized and empowered. Their tricksterism, in all its comicality, underlines the precarious situation in which the women and the community they represent are caught. Yet it also has the power to both defeat threats from outside and amend Israel’s self-perception on the inside. Israel no longer has to perceive of itself as a battered wife but as one who can deploy her qualities–seductive and otherwise–for the survival of the community.

This is a timely book that continues current trends concerning the portrayal of identity in the biblical texts and takes these conversations further.... This volume draws on up to date scholarship in a recognizable way while offering keen insights that push the fields of these three texts into some unexpected waters.... [A]ny researcher or reader of Ruth, Esther of Judith studies, as well as those with a broader interest in biblical intertextuality, will find this to be a valuable and engaging book.

Reviews in Religion and Theology

Anne-Mareike Wetter (PhD, Utrecht University, Netherlands) is at the Leiden Institute for Area Studies (LIAS), the Netherlands.

Second Temple Studies IV: Historiography and History

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

The book represents the collection of the papers presented at the 2004 SBL sessions for the section, Social-Scientific Studies of the Second Temple period, the purpose of which was to create understanding about current historiography as it relates to biblical studies and ancient Israel amidst diverging academic trends. Papers and responses sought to avoid polemics while concurrently bringing to clarification methodological practices of prominent historians in an effort to move beyond hortatory polemics. Those writing papers were asked to specify their own methodology and the assumptions and philosophy underlying their methodology in an effort to create understanding for the audience. Respondents to the papers met two requests—to summarize the methodology of the paper and to respond to the methodology, philosophy, and presuppositions of the historian.

The book would be of interest to scholars keeping up with current issues in historiography, and general readers trying to grasp why biblical scholars seem to have such divergent views on the relationship between the Bible and history. The book’s dialectic coverage stands directly on the main arteries of today’s historiography issues in Second Temple studies.

—Lindsey Arielle Askin, University of Cambridge, Reviews in Religion and Theology

Alice Hunt is President of Chicago Theological Seminary.