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Library of Hebrew/Old Testament Studies 2018 (10 vols.)
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Gathering Interest

Overview

Over the last 40 years the Library of Hebrew Bible/Old Testament Studies series has established an unrivaled reputation for cutting-edge international scholarship in biblical studies and has attracted leading authors and editors in the field. The series takes many original and creative approaches to its subjects, including innovative work from historical and theological perspectives, social-scientific and literary theory, and more recent developments in cultural studies and reception history. This collection contains the latest ten volumes from this prestigious series and is perfect for a readership of scholars, teachers in the field of Old Testament studies, postgraduate students, and advanced undergraduates.

In the Logos edition, these volumes are enhanced by amazing functionality. Important terms link to dictionaries, encyclopedias, and a wealth of other resources in your digital library. Perform powerful searches to find exactly what you’re looking for. Take the discussion with you using tablet and mobile apps. With Logos Bible Software, the most efficient and comprehensive research tools are in one place, so you get the most out of your study.

Key Features

  • Offers the latest, cutting-edge scholarship on key Old Testament characters, themes, books, interpretations, and literary relationships
  • Provides innovative, interdisciplinary, and international perspectives
  • Examines the Old Testament according to its historical and theological features, social-scientific and literary criticism, reception and cultural theories, and more

Product Details

Individual Titles

The Characters of Elijah and Elisha and the Deuteronomic Evaluation of Prophecy: Miracles and Manipulation

  • Author: Roy L. Heller
  • Series: Library of Hebrew/Old Testament Studies (LHBOTS)
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2018
  • Pages: 264

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Roy L. Heller looks at the prophets Elijah and Elisha in the books of Kings charting a two-fold characterization that portrays these prophetic figures in both positive and negative lights. In the narratives of Kings Elijah and Elisha often parallel other prophetic figures from Israel’s history: they perform miraculous signs, they speak in the name of God, and they pronounce judgments upon the nation of Israel for its idolatrous worship. There are, however, other stories which have troubled readers and scholars alike: Elijah’s cowardly running from the threats of Jezebel, his self-pitying complaint to God that he was the only true Israelite left, and Elisha’s cursing a group of little boys who, in turn, are slaughtered by two female bears. Scholars have traditionally ignored or belittled the negative stories of the prophets, seeing them as either late additions to the biblical text or as minor, unimportant stories that can easily be dismissed.

Heller, however, argues that the dual characterization of Elijah and Elisha reflects an ambivalent attitude that the narrator of Kings has toward prophecy as a whole, an attitude that is reflected in the book of Deuteronomy itself. This forces readers of the biblical text to pose the question; “how may Israel best know and follow God?” The stories of Elijah and Elisha make the answer clear: the words and lives of the prophets are a possible way for God to reveal how Israel is to live, but those words and lives must always be considered with a degree of suspicion and must always be evaluated in light of the clear and straightforward teaching of Deuteronomy.

Roy Heller is associate professor of Old Testament at Perkins School of Theology (Southern Methodist University) and is the author of Narrative Structure and Discourse Constellations: An Analysis of Clause Function in Biblical Hebrew Prose.

The City in the Hebrew Bible: Critical, Literary and Exegetical Approaches

  • Editors: James K. Aitken and Hilary F. Marlow
  • Series: Library of Hebrew/Old Testament Studies (LHBOTS)
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2018
  • Pages: 264

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

These essays explore the idea of the city in the Hebrew Bible by means of thematic and textual studies. The essays are united by their portrayal of how the city is envisaged in the Hebrew Bible and how the city shapes the writing of the literature considered. In its conceptual framework the volume draws upon a number of other disciplines, including literary studies, urban geography and psycho-linguistics, to present chapters that stimulate further discussion on the role of urbanism in the biblical text.

The introduction examines how cities can be conceived and portrayed, before surveying recent studies on the city and the Hebrew Bible. Chapters then address such issues as the use of the Hebrew term for “city,” the rhythm of the city throughout the biblical text, as well as reflections on textual geography and the work of urban theorists in relation to the Song of Songs. Issues both ancient and modern, historical and literary, are addressed in this fascinating collection, which provides readers with a multi-faceted and interdisciplinary view of the city in the Hebrew Bible.

James K. Aitken is lecturer in Hebrew, Old Testament and Second Temple Studies at the Faculty of Divinity at the University of Cambridge in the United Kingdom.

Hilary F. Marlow is senior researcher at the Faraday Institute for Science and Religion at the University of Cambridge in the United Kingdom. She has written extensively on the interaction between people and the natural world in Jewish and Christian traditions.

Covenant Relationships and the Editing of the Hebrew Psalter

  • Author: Adam D. Hensley
  • Series: Library of Hebrew/Old Testament Studies (LHBOTS)
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2018
  • Pages: 328

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

An examination of the relationship between the Davidic covenant and Abrahamic and Mosaic covenants reflected in the editorial shape and shaping of the Masoretic Psalter. Hensley proposes that the editors of the Psalter understood these covenants as a theological unity, whose common fulfillment centers on an anticipated royal successor to David. To test this hypothesis Hensley examines the Psalter’s references and allusions to covenant(s) in light of editorial evidence.

The book is split into three parts. Part I reassesses different kinds of editorial evidence, their implications, and their utility for discerning editorial intent. It also re-evaluates the Qumran Psalms hypothesis championed by Sanders, Wilson, and others. Part II engages in extensive survey work on references and allusions to covenant(s) in the Psalter, assessing the extent to which they gravitate around David. Hensley traces phraseological and intertextual allusions to covenant promises and obligations, providing the first survey of its kind on the subject of covenant in the Psalter. Part III then investigates a strong allusion to the Abrahamic covenantal promises in Ps 72:17 in the context of Book II of the Psalter, and the Psalter’s fullest echoes of the “grace formula” (Exod 34:6) in Psalm 86:15, 103:8, and 145:8 in the contexts of Books III, IV, and V respectively.

Hensley shows that rather than the Davidic covenantal promises being “democratized,” the promises and obligations of the pre-monarchic covenants are consistently “royalized” throughout the Psalter and its books, depicting the anticipated Davidic figure as a Moses-like intercessor and mediator of covenant renewal, and the leader of a “new song” for a “new exodus.”

Adam D. Hensley is lecturer in Old Testament at Australian Lutheran College in Australia.

“Even God Cannot Change the Past”: Reflections on Seventeen Years of the European Seminar in Historical Methodology

  • Editor: Lester L. Grabbe
  • Series: Library of Hebrew/Old Testament Studies (LHBOTS)
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2018
  • Pages: 256

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

This volume represents the final publication of the European Seminar in Historical Methodology. The volume reflects on the ground-breaking work of this prestigious seminar in the field of biblical history.

In part one, long-term members of the seminar (Bob Becking, Ehud Ben Zvi, Philip R. Davies, Ernst Axel Knauf, Niels Peter Lemche, Thomas L Thompson) provide reflections on its work. Part two presents an opportunity for readers to benefit from contributions that have remained heretofore unpublished. This includes material on the Persian period, questions of orality and writing, and contributions on the Maccabean period. Bringing these papers together in a published form provides a fitting way to round out the work of this significant endeavor in historical methodology.

Lester L. Grabbe is professor emeritus of Hebrew Bible and Early Judaism at the University of Hull. He is founder and convenor of the European Seminar in Historical Methodology. He recently wrote Ancient Israel: What Do We Know and How Do We Know It?

The ‘Geometrics’ of the Rahab Story: A Multi-Dimensional Analysis of Joshua 2

  • Author: Andrzej Toczyski SDB
  • Series: Library of Hebrew/Old Testament Studies (LHBOTS)
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2018
  • Pages: 216

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Examines the dialectic relationship between the text, conceived as the vehicle of narrative communication, and the reader in an assessment of the story of Rahab–the prostitute from Jericho–in Joshua 2. Toczyski uses his study to examine how this story has been read by various audiences across time, the different interpretive perspectives and methodologies that have thus been brought to the text and the influences this has had on the manner in which the story has been interpreted.

In particular Toczyski focuses on internal literary analysis of Joshua 2 and the external historical approach and what this can say about the readers of the text. The purpose of such insight is to register how successive interpretations overlap and set the interpretative pattern for subsequent generations of readers. As a result of this conceptual framework, Toczyski presents the Rahab story in the broader context of the communicative process, which has been challenging the story’s readers for centuries. This deep immersion into both internal and external contexts reveals the generally-overlooked thread within the Rahab story, namely “the power of storytelling”, which may prove relevant for contemporary readers by providing grounds for inter-cultural dialogue in the postmodern world.

Andrzej Toczyski SDB is lecturer in biblical studies at the Salesian Pontifical University at Jerusalem Campus in Israel.

The Land of Israel in the Book of Ezekiel

  • Author: Wojciech Pikor
  • Series: Library of Hebrew/Old Testament Studies (LHBOTS)
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2018
  • Pages: 288

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Pikor anaylzes the land of Israel in the book of Ezekiel showing how its preoccupation with the Babylonian exile and the loss of the Promised Land that this entails is directly linked to the danger this poses to Israel’s covenant with God. Pikor examines the motif of land in its literary and historical contexts and in relation to the oracles of salvation in chapters 34-39 as well as the vision of the new Israel and the return of Yahweh’s Glory to the temple.

Pikor begins by examining the motif of land in its literary and historical contexts. The main body of the book then addresses specific sections of Ezekiel. Chapter two analyzes the oracles of punishment addressed to Israel, in which the land undergoes a process of anthropomorphization. Chapter three situates the punishment experienced by Ezekiel and his listeners in a broader historical context suggested by the prophet in Ezekiel 20. Chapter four analyses the oracles of salvation in Ezekiel 34–39, in which the restoration of the land of Israel remains intertwined with the promise of the new covenant. Finally, chapter five addresses the closing vision of the new Israel (Ezekiel 40–48), which is characterized by the territorial dimension of the future restoration. This feature is shown via analysis of the rhetoric of the land, the crucial element of which is the return of Yahweh’s Glory to the temple. God’s presence adds sacral value to the land in which his covenant with his people is to be realized. The covenant will be finalized through Israel’s repopulation of the renewed land.

Wojciech Pikor is professor of Old Testament at the Theological Faculty of the Nicolaus Copernicus University in Torun, Poland.

Narrative Desire and the Book of Ruth

  • Author: Stephanie Day Powell
  • Series: Library of Hebrew/Old Testament Studies (LHBOTS)
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2018
  • Pages: 224

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Stephanie Day Powell illuminates the myriad forms of persuasion, inducement, discontent, and heartbreak experienced by readers of Ruth. Writing from a lesbian perspective, Powell draws upon biblical scholarship, contemporary film and literature, narrative studies, feminist and queer theories, trauma studies and psychoanalytic theory to trace the workings of desire that produced the book of Ruth and shaped its history of reception. Wrestling with the arguments for and against reading Ruth as a love story between women, Powell gleans new insights into the ancient world in which Ruth was written.

Ruth is known as a tale of two courageous women, the Moabite Ruth and her Israelite mother-in-law Naomi. As widows with scarce means of financial or social support, Ruth and Naomi are forced to creatively subvert the economic and legal systems of their day in order to survive. Through exceptional acts of loyalty, they, along with their kinsman Boaz, re-establish the bonds of family and community, while preserving the line of Israel’s great king David. Yet for many, the story of Ruth is deeply dissatisfying. Scholars increasingly recognize how Ruth’s textual “gaps” and ambiguities render conventional interpretations of the book’s meaning and purpose uncertain. Feminist and queer interpreters question the appropriation of a woman’s story to uphold patriarchal institutions and heteronormative values. Such avenues of inquiry lend themselves to questions of narrative desire, that is, the study of how stories frame our desires and how our own complex longings affect the way we read.

Stephanie Day Powell is a graduate of Drew University, where she completed her PhD in Hebrew Bible. Dr. Powell currently teaches at Manhattan College in New York, New York. She resides in Madison, New Jersey with her partner and their son.

The Origin of Israelite Zion Theology

  • Author: Antti Laato
  • Series: Library of Hebrew/Old Testament Studies (LHBOTS)
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2018
  • Pages: 352

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

In this examination of Zion theology and how it arises in the book of Psalms Antti Laato’s starting-point is that the Hebrew Bible is the product of the exilic and postexilic times, which nonetheless contains older traditions that have played a significant role in the development of the text. Laato seeks out these older mythical traditions related to Zion using a comparative methodology and looking at Biblical traditions alongside Ugaritic texts and other ancient Near Eastern material. As such Laato provides a historical background for Zion theology which he can apply more broadly to the Psalms.

In addition, Laato argues that Zion-related theology in the Psalms is closely related to two events recounted in the Hebrew Bible. First, the architectural details of the Temple of Solomon (1 Kings 6-7), which can be compared with older mythical Zion-related traditions. Second, the religious traditions related to the reigns of David and Solomon such as the Ark Narrative, which ends with David’s transfer of the Ark to Jerusalem (2 Sam 6). From this Laato builds an argument for a possible setting in Jerusalem at the time of David and Solomon for the Zion theology that emerges in the Psalms.

Antti Laato is professor of Hebrew Bible at Abo Akedemi University in Finland.

Riddles and Revelations: Explorations into the Relationship between Wisdom and Prophecy in the Hebrew Bible

  • Editors: Mark J. Boda, Russell L. Meek, and William R. Osborne
  • Series: Library of Hebrew/Old Testament Studies (LHBOTS)
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2018
  • Pages: 320

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

A comprehensive examination of the links between wisdom literature and prophecy. The book is divided into four sections. The first addresses methodological concerns such as identifying “wisdom,” identifying potential sociological spheres for wisdom and prophecy in the ancient Near East, and recognizing potential textual relationships. The second examines the role of wisdom in the prophetic corpus more broadly in a book-by-book analysis of biblical texts, first examining the role of wisdom in the prophetic corpus of the Hebrew Bible.

The third section looks at elements of prophecy within the traditional wisdom books such as Job, Proverbs and Qoheleth. Finally, the book continues the conversation by providing two concluding chapters that evaluate, critique, engage, and raise new questions that Hebrew Bible scholars will need to wrestle with as the search for the relationship between wisdom and prophecy moves forward.

Mark J. Boda (PhD, University of Cambridge) is professor of Old Testament at McMaster Divinity College in Hamilton, Ontario. He is the author or editor of more than 25 books, including the Dictionary of the Old Testament: Prophets (coedited with Gordon McConville) and commentaries on Haggai, Zechariah, 1-2 Chronicles, and Judges.

Russell L. Meek is assistant professor of Old Testament and Hebrew at Louisiana College.

William R. Osborne is assistant professor of biblical and theological studies at College of the Ozarks.

Theophanic “Type-Scenes” in the Pentateuch: Visions of YHWH

  • Author: Nevada Levi DeLapp
  • Series: Library of Hebrew/Old Testament Studies (LHBOTS)
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2018
  • Pages: 200

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

An examination of the presence of theophanic scenes in the final form of the Pentateuch, which argues that rather than there being a single, over-arching theophanic “type-scene” there are multiple such scenes which reflect the individual theological tendencies of the biblical books within which they appear.

The Genesis type-scene revolves around YHWH’s promises in crisis situations (i.e., YHWH only appears when there is a crisis or threat to the Abrahamic promise). The Exodus type-scene typically includes the appearance of YHWH’s dangerous fiery presence (Kabod Adonai), a communal setting, and divine action constituting or preserving Israel as a people in preparation for the Abrahamic inheritance. In Leviticus the theophanies augment the Exodus type-scene with a liturgical setting where a specific priestly action brings forth a theophanic response.

DeLapp then shows how Numbers recontextualizes each of the preceding type-scenes as it retells the exodus narrative post-Sinai. When read synchronically the three type-scenes build on each other and follow the developing narrative logic of Israel’s larger story. Deuteronomy then re-reads the Exodus type-scene (and indirectly the Genesis type-scene) to ensure that later readers read the theophanies appropriately (i.e., YHWH only appeared as “formless” and shrouded in “fire”).

Nevada Levi DeLapp (PhD, Brite Divinity School at TCU) is currently pastor at Calvin Christian Reformed Church in LeMars, Iowa.