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T&T Clark Scriptural Traces (10 vols.)
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Gathering Interest

Overview

Over the last 40 years this pioneering series has established an unrivaled reputation for cutting-edge international scholarship in Biblical Studies and has attracted leading authors and editors in the field. The series takes many original and creative approaches to its subjects, including innovative work from historical and theological perspectives, social-scientific and literary theory, and more recent developments in cultural studies and reception history.

In the Logos edition, these volumes are enhanced by amazing functionality. Important terms link to dictionaries, encyclopedias, and a wealth of other resources in your digital library. Perform powerful searches to find exactly what you’re looking for. Take the discussion with you using tablet and mobile apps. With Logos Bible Software, the most efficient and comprehensive research tools are in one place, so you get the most out of your study.

Key Features

Product Details

  • Title: T&T Clark Scriptural Traces (10 vols.)
  • Series: Scriptural Traces
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Volumes: 10
  • Pages: 2976
  • Resource Type: Monographs

Individual Titles

Children’s Bibles in America: A Reception History of the Story of Noah’s Ark in US Children’s Bibles

  • Author: Russell W. Dalton
  • Series: Scriptural Traces
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2015
  • Pages: 320

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Children’s Bibles have been among the most popular and influential types of religious publications in the United States, providing many Americans with their first formative experiences of the Bible and its stories. In Children’s Bibles in America, Russell W. Dalton explores the variety of ways in which children’s Bibles have adapted, illustrated, and retold Bible stories for children throughout U.S. history. This reception history of the story of Noah as it appears in children’s Bibles provides striking examples of the multivalence and malleability of biblical texts, and offers intriguing snapshots of American culture and American religion in their most basic forms. Dalton demonstrates the ways in which children’s Bibles reflect and reveal America’s diverse and changing beliefs about God, childhood, morality, and what must be passed on to the next generation.

Dalton uses the popular story of Noah’s ark as a case study, exploring how it has been adapted and appropriated to serve in a variety of social agendas. Throughout America’s history, the image of God in children’s Bible adaptations of the story of Noah has ranged from that of a powerful, angry God who might destroy children at any time to that of a friendly God who will always keep children safe. At the same time, Noah has been lifted up as a model of virtues ranging from hard work and humble obedience to patience and positive thinking. Dalton explores these uses of the story of Noah and more as he engages the fields of biblical studies, the history of religion in America, religious education, childhood studies, and children’s literature.

It is a scholarly book well written and researched with a strong engagement with the relevant literature. At the same time it presents an engaging and informative narrative which draws the reader into the central thesis of the book.

British Journal of Religious Education

Russell W. Dalton is Professor of Religious Education at Brite Divinity School, Texas, USA.

Harnessing Chaos: The Bible in English Political Discourse since 1968

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Harnessing Chaos is an explanation of changes in dominant politicized assumptions about what the Bible ‘really means’ in English culture since the 1960s. James G. Crossley looks at how the social upheavals of the 1960s, and the economic shift from the post-war dominance of Keynesianism to the post-1970s dominance of neoliberalism, brought about certain emphases and nuances in the ways in which the Bible is popularly understood, particularly in relation to dominant political ideas. This book examines the decline of politically radical biblical interpretation in parliamentary politics and the victory of (a modified form of) Margaret Thatcher’s re-reading of the liberal Bible tradition, following the normalisation of (a modified form of) Thatcherism more generally.

Part I looks at the potential options for politicized readings of the Bible at the end of the the1960s, focussing on the examples of Christopher Hill and Enoch Powell. Part II analyses the role of Thatcher’s specific contribution to political interpretation of the Bible and assumptions about ‘religion’. Part III highlights the importance of (often unintended) ideological changes towards forms of Thatcherite interpretation in popular culture and with particular reference to Monty Python’s Life of Brian and the Manchester music scene between 1976 and 1994. Part IV concerns the modification of Thatcher’s Bible, particularly with reference to the embrace of socially liberal values, by looking at the electoral decline of the Conservative Party through the work of Jeffrey Archer on Judas and the final victory of Thatcherism through Tony Blair’s exegesis. Some consideration is then given to the Bible in an Age of Coalition and how politically radical biblical interpretations retain a presence outside parliamentary politics. Harnessing Chaos concludes with reflections on why politicians in English politicians bother using the Bible at all.

James G. Crossley is Professor of Bible at St. Mary’s University Twickenham, UK.

Ireland and the Reception of the Bible: Social and Cultural Perspectives

  • Editors: Bradford A. Anderson & Jonathan Kearney
  • Series: Scriptural Traces
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2018
  • Pages: 416

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Drawing on the work of leading figures in biblical, religious, historical, and cultural studies in Ireland and beyond, this volume explores the reception of the Bible in Ireland, focusing on the social and cultural dimensions of such use of the Bible. This includes the transmission of the Bible, the Bible and identity formation, engagement beyond Ireland, and cultural and artistic appropriation of the Bible. The chapters collected here are particularly useful and insightful for those researching the use and reception of the Bible, as well as those with broader interests in social and cultural dimensions of Irish history and Irish studies.

The chapters challenge the perception in the minds of many that the Bible is a static book with a fixed place in the world that can be relegated to ecclesial contexts and perhaps academic study. Rather, as this book shows, the role of the Bible in the world is much more complex. Nowhere is this clearer than in Ireland, with its rich and complex religious, cultural, and social history. This volume examines these very issues, highlighting the varied ways in which the Bible has impacted Irish life and society, as well as the ways in which the cultural specificity of Ireland has impacted the use and development of the Bible both in Ireland and further afield.

Bradford A. Anderson is Lecturer in Biblical Studies at Dublin City University, Ireland. His research focuses on the Hebrew Bible, as well as the reception and use of the sacred texts.

Jonathan Kearney is Lecturer in Jewish and Islamic Studies at Dublin City University, Ireland. His research explores the textual traditions of Judaism, Islam and Christianity.

Judas Iscariot: Damned or Redeemed

  • Author: Carol A. Hebron
  • Series: Scriptural Traces
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2016
  • Pages: 288

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

At the beginning of the 20th century, Judas was characterised in film as the epitome of evil: the villainous Jew. Film-makers cast Judas in this way because this was the Judas that audiences had come to recognize and even expect. But in the following three decades, film-makers—as a result of critical biblical study—were more circumspect about accepting the alleged historicity of the Gospel accounts. Carol A. Hebron examines the figure of Judas across film history to show how the portrayal becomes more nuanced and more significant, even to the point where Judas becomes the protagonist with a role in the film equal in importance to that of Jesus’. Hebron examines how, in these films, we begin to see a rehabilitation of the Judas character and a restoration of Judaism.

Hebron reveals two distinct theologies: ‘rejection’ and ‘acceptance’. The Nazi Holocaust and the exposure of the horrors of genocide at the end of World War II influenced how Judaism, Jews, and Judas, were to be portrayed in film. Rehabilitating the Judas character and the Jews was necessary, and film was deemed an appropriate medium in which to begin that process.

Hebron’s study is of interest not just to the academic, but also to those such as ministers and preachers who engage with people in the informal learning context of the churches. Students of film and popular culture would also find much to engage them in this book... A fascinating and engaging read.

Regent’s Reviews

Carol A. Hebron is an adjunct lecturer at Charles Sturt University School of Theology in Brisbane, Australia. She is also Subject Coordinator for Theology, the Arts and Film, Teaching the Bible, Teaching World Religions, and Media, Popular Culture, and the Arts. Hebron is also a priest in the Anglican Diocese of Brisbane.

Musical Illuminations of Genesis Narratives

  • Author: Helen Leneman
  • Series: Scriptural Traces
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2017
  • Pages: 320

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

This volume examines the stories of Genesis in music, showing how musical settings can illuminate many of the Bible’s most noted tales. Helen Leneman studies oratorios, operas and songs (as well as their librettos) to shed light on how Genesis has been understood and experienced over time. Examining an extensive range of musical settings of stories from the book of Genesis, Leneman offers an overview of chiefly 19th and 20th century musical engagements with this biblical text.

Leneman first discusses how Eve’s inner thoughts are explored by noted French composers Jules Massenet and Gabriel Fauré. The text then enters the deep waters of Noah’s flood in examination of several compositions, including two unusual settings by Igor Stravinsky and Benjamin Britten, as well as more conventional settings by Saint-Saëns and Donizetti. Two major 19th century oratorio settings of Abraham’s story by lesser known German composers Martin Blumner and Karl Mangold provide fascinating illuminations of the Abraham narratives, whereas parts of Rebecca’s story are found in works by César Franck, Ferdinand Hiller, and most unusually, by a French woman composer, Célanie Carissan. Finally, Leneman shows how Joseph’s story was set in numerous oratorios (including by Handel) but that one of the most important works based on his story is an opera by 18th century French composer Etienne Méhul. In addition to discussing these larger 19th century works, Leneman also examines several interesting atonal 20th century works based on the stories of Eve and the Flood, shedding new light on the history of the interpretation of the Book of Genesis.

Helen Leneman is a biblical scholar and musician based in Bethesda, Maryland, USA.

Paul’s Letters and the Construction of the European Self

  • Author: Fatima Tofighi
  • Series: Scriptural Traces
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2017
  • Pages: 192

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Even when he was a prototype of European identity, Paul transgressed the limits of Europe. It is not clear whether he was conformist or rebellious, orthodox or liberal, sexist, or egalitarian. Instead of pushing the Apostle into the arbitrary categories of modern European identity, Fatima Tofighi takes into account the challenge that Paul brings to normative conceptions of political theology (Rom 13), ‘religion’ (Gal 2.12-14), and women’s veiling (1 Cor 11. 5-16). Alternative interpretations of these passages, with the help of postmodern theory, both solve the major problems of biblical exegesis and offer a critique of the allegedly well-defined European categories.

Fatima Tofighi is Assistant Professor of Women and Religion, University of Religions, Qom, Iran.

Reception History and Biblical Studies: Theory and Practice

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

How do we begin to carry out such a vast task-the examination of three millennia of diverse uses and influences of the biblical texts? Where can the interested scholar find information on methods and techniques applicable to the many and varied ways in which these have happened?

Through a series of examples of reception history practitioners at work and of their reflections this volume sets the agenda for biblical reception, as it begins to chart the near-infinite series of complex interpretive ‘events’ that have been generated by the journey of the biblical texts down through the centuries. The chapters consider aspects as diverse as political and economic factors, cultural location, the discipline of Biblical Studies, and the impact of scholarly preconceptions, upon reception history. Topics covered include biblical figures and concepts, contemporary music, paintings, children’s Bibles, and interpreters as diverse as Calvin, Lenin, and Nick Cave.

A necessary and astutely judged volume that addresses comprehensively many of the issues, appraisals, and criticisms that have arisen and been put to this emerging field in biblical studies ... England and Lyons are to be commended for drawing together a great spectrum of scholars to advance convincingly the case for biblical reception history in the academy.

Theological Book Review

Emma England is Guest Researcher at the University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands. Her publications include work in children's Bibles and comics.

William John Lyons is Reader in Religion and History in the Department of History, University of Bristol, UK

Reception History, Tradition and Biblical Interpretation

  • Author: Robert Evans
  • Series: Scriptural Traces
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2014
  • Pages: 328

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

This study seeks to make a contribution to current debates about the nature of Wirkungsgeschichte or reception history and its place in contemporary Biblical Studies. The author addresses three crucial questions: the relationship between reception history and historical-critical exegesis; the form of reception history itself, with a focus on the issue of which acts of reception are selected and valorized; and the role of tradition, pre-judgements and theology in relation to reception history. Disagreements about these matters contribute to what many characterise as the fragmentation of the discipline of biblical studies.

The study champions the hermeneutics of Hans-Georg Gadamer as a theoretical resource for understanding biblical interpretation, and a way of holding together with integrity the varied activities undertaken within the discipline. Each aspect of the argument is illustrated, tested and further explored with reference to the post-history of exhortations in the New Testament to ‘be subject’. These have been widely cited and applied for 2,000 years—in literature, law and politics as well as in theological traditions. In this way the study makes a contribution not just to the theory but also the practice of reception history.

A valuable, enlightening study... Many NT scholars will value this book, particularly for the study of reception of hupotassein. Those interested in hermeneutics will wish to pay special attention to Evans’ argument for the important place of historical criticism in Gadamer’s scheme.

Journal for the Study of the New Testament

Robert Evans is Senior Lecturer in New Testament Theology and Senior University Teaching Fellow at the University of Chester, UK. His earlier studies were in English Literature and Anglo-Saxon. He is biblical studies consultant for the British Sign Language Bible Translation Project. He is author of Judge for Yourselves: Reading 1 Corinthians.

The Bible, Gender, and Reception History: The Case of Job’s Wife

  • Author: Katherine Low
  • Series: Scriptural Traces
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2013
  • Pages: 240

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

The Bible, Gender, and Reception History: The Case of Job’s Wife investigates the fleeting appearance in the Bible of Job’s wife and its impact on the imaginations of readers throughout history. It begins by presenting key interpretive gaps in the biblical text concerning Job and his wife, explaining the way gender studies offers guiding principles with which the author engages a reception history of their marriage. After analyzing Job and his wife within medieval Christian theology of Eden, the author identifies ways in which Job’s wife visually aligns with medieval images of Satan. The volume explores portrayals of Job and his wife in publications on marriage and gender roles in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, moving onto an investigation of William Blake’s sharp artistic divergence from the common tradition in his representation of Job’s wife as a shrew. In the exploration of societal portrayals of Job and his Wife throughout history, this book discovers how arguments about marriage intertwine with not only gender roles, but also, with political, social, and historical movements.

Katherine Low is Assistant Professor of Religion and Chaplain at Mary Baldwin College in Staunton, Virginia. She has published articles in JSOT, Journal of Religion and Film and Journal of Feminist Studies in Religion, exploring the intersections of religion, gender, and culture.

The Reformed David(s) and the Question of Resistance to Tyranny

  • Author: Nevada Levi DeLapp
  • Series: Scriptural Traces
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2014
  • Pages: 248

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

This study centers on the question: how do particular readers read a biblical passage? What factors govern each reading? DeLapp here attempts to set up a test case for observing how both socio-historical and textual factors play a part in how a person reads a biblical text. Using a reception-historical methodology, he surveys five Reformed authors and their readings of the David and Saul story (primarily 1 Sam 24 and 26). From this survey two interrelated phenomena emerge. First, all the authors find in David an ideal model for civic praxis-a “Davidic social imaginary” (Charles Taylor). Second, despite this primary agreement, the authors display two different reading trajectories when discussing David’s relationship with Saul. Some read the story as showing a persecuted exile, who refuses to offer active resistance against a tyrannical monarch. Others read the story as exemplifying active defensive resistance against a tyrant.

To account for this convergence and divergence in the readings, DeLapp argues for a two-fold conclusion. The authors are influenced both by their socio-historical contexts and by the shape of the biblical text itself. Given a Deuteronomic frame conducive to the social imaginary, the paradigmatic narratives of 1 Sam 24 and 26 offer a narrative gap never resolved. The story never makes explicit to the reader what David is doing in the wilderness in relation to King Saul. As a result, the authors fill in the “gap” in ways that accord with their own socio-historical experiences.

A fast-paced and engaging study, in which DeLapp makes his case well. It is likely to be of particular interest to early modern historians... However, individuals interested in the interpretation of 1 Samuel will also find plenty of food for thought.

The Expository Times

Nevada Levi DeLapp (Ph.D., Brite Divinity School at TCU) is currently Pastor at Calvin Christian Reformed Church, LeMars, Iowa, USA.