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Reformed Academic Dissertations (3 vols.)
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Reformed Academic Dissertations (3 vols.)

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P&R 2017

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Gathering Interest

Overview

P&R’s Reformed Academic Dissertation (RAD) series consists of top-tier dissertations (Ph.D., Th.D., D.Min., and Th.M.) that advance biblical and theological scholarship by making distinctive contributions in the areas of theology, ethics, biblical studies, apologetics, and counseling. Dissertations in the RAD series are carefully selected, on the basis of strong recommendations by the authors’ supervisors and examiners and by our internal readers, to be part of our collection. Each selected dissertation provides clear, fresh, and engaging insights about significant theological issues.

In the Logos edition, these volumes are enhanced by amazing functionality. Important terms link to dictionaries, encyclopedias, and a wealth of other resources in your digital library. Perform powerful searches to find exactly what you’re looking for. Take the discussion with you using tablet and mobile apps. With Logos Bible Software, the most efficient and comprehensive research tools are in one place, so you get the most out of your study.

Key Features

  • Contains carefully selected scholarly discussions of relevant theological issues
  • Examines the views and contributions of key reformed theologians
  • Provides excellent examples of thorough biblical research

Product Details

Individual Titles

From Inscrutability to Concursus: Benjamin B. Warfield’s Theological Construction of Revelation’s Mode from 1880 to 1915

  • Author: Jeffrey A. Stivason
  • Series: Reformed Academic Dissertations (RAD)
  • Publisher: P&R
  • Publication Date: 2001
  • Pages: 264

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Benjamin B. Warfield, one of the Reformed world’s most celebrated theologians, was a theological diagnostician who demonstrated a remarkable ability to grasp the origin and direction of theological trends. The challenge in Warfield’s day was to explain how God communicated. Pursuing the answer to that question led him on the theological journey that is chronicled in this book. Our day is like Warfield’s: the need of the hour is not to explain revelation’s source but God’s mode of communicating, if we are to maintain that Scripture is indeed God’s Word.

A beautiful model of how theological research should be done.

—Richard C. Gamble, Professor of Systematic Theology, Reformed Presbyterian Theological Seminary

Jeffrey A. Stivason (M.Div., Reformed Presbyterian Theological Seminary; S.T.M., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary; Ph.D., Westminster Theological Seminary) is the pastor of Grace Reformed Presbyterian Church, Gibsonia, Pennsylvania, and a contributor to the forthcoming Jonathan Edwards Encyclopedia (Eerdmans).

The Doctrine of the Spirituality of the Church in the Ecclesiology of Charles Hodge

  • Author: Alan D. Strange
  • Series: Reformed Academic Dissertations (RAD)
  • Publisher: P&R
  • Publication Date: 2001
  • Pages: 432

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Charles Hodge (1797–1878) was arguably the leading Old School Presbyterian of the nineteenth century. He was involved with all the great ecclesiastical controversies of his day, including the question of the spirituality of the church. In Hodge’s hands the spirituality of the church functioned as a complex and subtle doctrine, not serving, as it did with some, as a “muzzle” for the prophetic voice of the church into society, but as a means of keeping its ecclesiastical focus from being swallowed by the political. For Hodge, the spirituality of the church meant that the primary calling of the church was not, first of all, temporal but spiritual, especially in its carrying out the Great Commission. Hodge believed, however, that even in carrying out its essentially spiritual duties, the scope of the church’s concern was broader temporally than some partisans of the spirituality of the church constructed it.

Carefully researched, copiously annotated, and enthusiastically written, these pages provide a vibrant and fascinating account . . . of issues that are still profoundly relevant to the church today.

Sinclair B. Ferguson, Teaching Fellow, Ligonier Ministries

Alan D. Strange (MDiv, Westminster Theological Seminary; MA, College of William and Mary; PhD, University of Wales) is professor of church history at Mid-America Reformed Seminary and associate pastor at New Covenant Community Church (OPC) in Joliet in Illinois. He has written for and serves as a contributing editor to The Confessional Presbyterian.

The Triune God of Unity in Diversity: An Analysis of Perspectivalism, the Trinitarian Theological Method of John Frame and Vern Poythress

  • Author: Timothy E. Miller
  • Series: Reformed Academic Dissertations (RAD)
  • Publisher: P&R
  • Publication Date: 2001
  • Pages: 384

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Timothy Miller defends and further develops the foundationally Trinitarian, multiperspectival theological method of John Frame and Vern Poythress, an eminently useful, historically Reformed tool for understanding all created reality.

Triperspectivalism is a theological method based on the Bible’s teaching about the one God in three persons. Tim Miller’s book presents an accurate formulation of this method and explores in depth the origin of the method in the doctrine of the Trinity. I recommend the book highly to those who aspire to be serious students of theological method and of the Trinity itself.

John Frame, Professor Emeritus of Systematic Theology and Philosophy, Reformed Theological Seminary, Orlando

Timothy E. Miller (M.A., Maranatha Baptist University; M.Div., Calvary Baptist Theological Seminary; Ph.D., Westminster Theological Seminary) is assistant professor of systematic theology and apologetics at Detroit Baptist Theological Seminary. He previously taught for four years at Maranatha Baptist University and was an assistant pastor in Philadelphia.