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IVP Missiological Engagements Collection (7 vols.)
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Gathering Interest

Overview

The Missiological Engagements series charts interdisciplinary and innovative trajectories in the history, theology and practice of Christian mission at the beginning of the third millennium.

Books in the series, both monographs and edited collections, feature contributions by leading thinkers representing evangelical, Protestant, Roman Catholic and Orthodox traditions, who work within or across the range of biblical, historical, theological and social scientific disciplines. Authors and editors will include the full spectrum of younger and emerging researchers to established and renowned scholars from the Euro-American West and the majority world, whose missiological scholarship will bridge church, academy and society.

Among its guiding questions are the following: What are the major opportunities and challenges for Christian mission in the twenty-first century? How does the missionary impulse of the gospel reframe theology and hermeneutics within a global and intercultural context? What kind of missiological thinking ought to be retrieved and reappropriated for a dynamic global Christianity? What innovations in the theology and practice of mission are needed for a renewed and revitalized Christian witness in a postmodern, postcolonial, postsecular and post-Christian world?

Missiological Engagements reflects cutting-edge trends, research and innovations in the field that will be of relevance to theorists and practitioners in churches, academic domains, mission organizations and NGOs, among other arenas.

In the Logos edition, these volumes are enhanced by amazing functionality. Important terms link to dictionaries, encyclopedias, and a wealth of other resources in your digital library. Perform powerful searches to find exactly what you’re looking for. Take the discussion with you using tablet and mobile apps. With Logos Bible Software, the most efficient and comprehensive research tools are in one place, so you get the most out of your study.

Key Features

  • Examines key issues and directions in the modern Christian mission
  • Presents a variety of perspectives from leading thinkers from multiple traditions
  • Discusses relevant trends and ideas in Christian mission that are applicable to many

Product Details

Individual Titles

Apostolicity: The Ecumenical Question in World Christian Perspective

  • Author: John G. Flett
  • Series: Missiological Engagements
  • Publisher: IVP Academic
  • Publication Date: 2016
  • Pages: 390

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

What constitutes the unity of the church over time and across cultures? Can our account of the church’s apostolic faith embrace the cultural diversity of world Christianity?

The ecumenical movement that began in the twentieth century posed the problem of the church’s apostolicity in profound new ways. In the attempt to find unity in the midst of the Protestant-Catholic schism, participants in this movement defined the church as a distinct culture—complete with its own structures, rituals, architecture and music. Apostolicity became a matter of cultivating the church’s own (Western) culture. At the same time it became disconnected from mission, and more importantly, from the diverse reality of world Christianity.

In this pioneering study, John Flett assesses the state of the conversation about the apostolic nature of the church. He contends that the pursuit of ecumenical unity has come at the expense of dealing responsibly with crosscultural difference. By looking out to the church beyond the West and back to the New Testament, Flett presents a bold account of an apostolicity that embraces plurality.

Apostolicity is associated with the very foundation of the church, yet its meaning has been distorted by faulty interpretation. Rather than preserving the binary definition—cultivation of the faith, communication of the faith—for most of the past two millennia the priority has been firmly placed on cultivation, making communication subsidiary. This has had profoundly negative consequences for both church and mission. In this pioneering study Dr. John Flett shows with multiple examples—historical, theological and cultural—how pervasive and influential this traditional view has been. Today’s pluriform and polycentric global Christianity will continue to move with a limp so long as a true apostolicity is not appropriated. This work boldly and constructively points the way forward.

—Wilbert R. Shenk, senior professor of mission history and contemporary culture, Fuller Graduate School of Intercultural Studies

Following John Flett’s incisive critique of the missio Dei paradigm in The Witness of God, Apostolicity—a further interrogation of post-war ecumenical theology—does not disappoint. In this challenging book Flett tackles the theological significance of the diversity recognized in the study of world Christianity. This leads him to question an ecumenical understanding of apostolicity as based on historical origins and the continuity of church cultures. He does so on the grounds that it leads merely to church replication and not mission, which, following Christ in the Spirit, is anything but smooth and predictable. The book encourages serious engagement at the interface of church history, mission realities and Christian doctrine.

—Kirsteen Kim, professor of theology and world Christianity, Leeds Trinity University, editor of Mission Studies

John G. Flett (PhD, Princeton Theological Seminary) lectures in intercultural theology and mission studies at Pilgrim Theological College, part of the the University of Divinity in Melbourne, Australia. Originally from New Zealand, Flett has taught in the United States, South Korea, the Democratic Republic of Congo, and Germany. He is the author of The Witness of God: The Trinity, Missio Dei, Karl Barth and the Nature of Christian Community and is ordained in the Presbyterian Church (USA).

Dynamics of Muslim Worlds: Regional, Theological, and Missiological Perspectives

  • Editor: Evelyne A. Reisacher
  • Series: Missiological Engagements
  • Publisher: IVP Academic
  • Publication Date: 2017
  • Pages: 256

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Christians in the West have many questions about the identity of Islam and Muslim societies. Due in part to misleading media reports and a lack of interreligious dialogue, a majority of Western Christians view Islam as more prone to violence. The perplexity is compounded by news of violent conflicts involving Muslim communities in various parts of the world. Discussions about Muslims in the media often give the impression that Islam is a single, uniform entity.

The reality is that global Islam is a complex and diverse phenomenon, not a monolithic one. Unfortunately, what makes the headlines often shapes Christian mission strategies that are overshadowed, if not controlled, by such reports. The challenge for understanding Islam is further complicated by the fact that an already very diverse Islam across the world stage is fluid and dynamic, with changes motivated as much by Islamic agency from within as by forces impinging “from without.”

Dynamics of Muslim Worlds brings together leading missiologists, theologians, and historians from the 2016 Missiology Lectures at Fuller Theological Seminary’s School of Intercultural Studies to present a nuanced account of contemporary Muslim societies. Edited by Evelyne A. Reisacher, the contributions to this Missiological Engagements volume explore the changing dynamics of Islam today and how current religious and social climates shape Christian engagement with Muslims. This is a fresh look at a topic of increasing importance in our present global context.

Dynamics of Muslim Worlds develops a vigorous missiology through its thoughtful engagement with anthropological and sociological perspectives. The missiological assessments offered are from multiple perspectives that are helpful, constructive, and thoroughly biblical. New analytical frameworks are proposed for understanding and defining the diversity of ever-changing Islamic societies. The reader will be enabled to reflect upon the implications for gospel proclamation among Muslims in the twenty-first century. An excellent resource for practitioners and scholars.

—Paul Martindale, ranked adjunct assistant professor of Islamic studies and crosscultural ministry, Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary

Evelyne A. Reisacher (PhD, Fuller Theological Seminary) is associate professor of Islamic studies and intercultural relations at Fuller Theological Seminary. For twenty years, she worked at a French organization called L’Ami, facilitating the relationship between churches and North African immigrants and developing courses, teaching tools, and seminars for sharing the gospel cross-culturally. She has trained Christian leaders and church members in Europe, North Africa, the Middle East, and South East Asia.

Reisacher has published several articles on gender issues in Islam and Muslim-Christian relations. She is the general editor of Toward Respectful Understanding and Witness among Muslims: Festschrift in Honor of J. Dudley Woodberry, and the associate editor of From the Straight Path to the Narrow Way: Journeys of Faith. Additionally, she has published chapters in the books Peace-Building By, Between, and Beyond Muslims and Evangelical Christians and A Worldview Approach to Ministry among Muslim Women.

Intercultural Theology, vol. 1: Intercultural Hermeneutics

  • Author: Henning Wrogemann
  • Translator: Karl E. Böhmer
  • Series: Missiological Engagements
  • Publisher: IVP Academic
  • Publication Date: 2016
  • Pages: 431

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Christianity is not only a global but also an intercultural phenomenon. The diversity of world Christianity is evident not merely outside our borders but even within our own neighborhoods.

Over the past half century theologians and missiologists have addressed this reality by developing local and contextual theologies and by exploring issues like contextualization, inculturation, and translation. In recent years these various trajectories have coalesced into a new field called intercultural theology. Bringing together missiology, religious studies, social science research, and Christian theology, the field of intercultural theology is a fresh attempt to rethink the discipline of theology in light of the diversity and pluriformity of Christianity today.

Henning Wrogemann, one of the leading missiologists and scholars of religion in Europe, has written the most comprehensive textbook on the subject of Christianity and culture today. In three volumes his Intercultural Theology provides an exhaustive account of the history, theory, and practice of Christian mission. Volume one introduces the concepts of culture and context, volume two surveys theologies of mission both past and present, and volume three explores theologies of religion and interreligious relationships.

In this first volume on intercultural hermeneutics, Wrogemann introduces the term “intercultural theology” and investigates what it means to understand another cultural context. In addition to surveying different hermeneutical theories and concepts of culture, he assesses how intercultural understanding has taken place throughout the history of Christian mission. Wrogemann also provides an extensive discussion of contextual theologies with a special focus on African theologies.

Intercultural Theology is an indispensable resource for all people—especially students, pastors, and scholars—that explores the defining issues of Christian identity and practice in the context of an increasingly intercultural and interreligious world.

Henning Wrogemann’s Intercultural Hermeneutics, the first in a groundbreaking three-volume introduction to mission studies, is a remarkable study of a key advance in the study of world Christianity. Refusing to avoid the difficult questions of culture, syncretism, inculturation, and identity, Wrogemann presents the reader with a kaleidoscope of expressions and themes found within the world Christian communion and with positive methodological steps by which this diversity might be understood in its difference. The more theoretical considerations, focused on semiotics, discourse, and cultural theory, are amply illustrated with living examples of intercultural encounter. A range of voices and church bodies all contributes to a vision remarkable in scope, which directs our attention to the gospel in its movement across every boundary. This three-volume series will prove to be a landmark in the study of mission.

—John G. Flett, Pilgrim Theological College, author of Apostolicity

Intercultural Theology, Volume 1: Intercultural Hermeneutics is filled with insight, erudition, and analytical wisdom. In this fine book, Henning Wrogemann lays a firm foundation for two more volumes that together with this one introduce the field of intercultural theology/mission studies. The comprehensiveness of the vision on offer is impressive, as Wrogemann ranges widely across theological disciplines, cultural studies, postcolonial scholarship, and discourse theory. Many examples drawn from the experience of the church in Africa in particular enhance the accessibility of what remains throughout a substantive study of world Christianity and ecumenical theology.

—Stanley H. Skreslet, F.S. Royster Professor of Missions, Union Presbyterian Seminary, Richmond, VA

Henning Wrogemann (DTheol, DHabil, Ruprecht-Karls University of Heidelberg) is a world-renowned missiologist and scholar of religion. He holds the chair for mission studies, comparative religion, and ecumenics at the Protestant University Wuppertal/Bethel in Germany, where he also heads the Institute for Intercultural Theology and Interreligious Studies. He is the chairman of the German Society of Missiology. Previously, Wrogemann served as a pastor in northern Germany, as the senior lecturer for missiology and comparative religion at the Mission Seminary Hermannsburg, and as a member of the mission board of the Evangelical Lutheran Mission in Lower-Saxony, Germany.

Intercultural Theology, vol. 2: Theologies of Mission

  • Author: Henning Wrogemann
  • Translator: Karl E. Böhmer
  • Series: Missiological Engagements
  • Publisher: IVP Academic
  • Publication Date: 2018
  • Pages: 454

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In this second volume of his three-volume Intercultural Theology, Henning Wrogemann turns to theologies of mission. Mission theologies, he argues, are found in a wide range of implicit as well as explicit forms, from the practice of Christian presence by a Pakistani Christian among a marginalized people to the published deliberations of mission scholars in the West. The task of intercultural theology is to investigate and promote awareness of the variety of culture- and context-specific theologies of mission.

From Warneck to Bosch, from Edinburgh to Lausanne to Busan, Wrogemann provides an overview of the theological underpinnings, rationalizations, and visions for mission and its practice. Tracing developments across a range of Christian traditions, movements, themes, and regions of the globe, from Europe and North America to sub-Saharan Africa, Wrogemann presents us with an array of mission theologies across the scope of the modern missionary movement. This rich conspectus is rounded out with the doxological dimension of mission and the varied facets of oikoumenism.

Masterful in its scope and detail, this volume will richly inform the study of missiology and global Christianity. And it is essential reading for doing theology in a multicultural key. In a day when the church in the West struggles to understand and appreciate its missionary legacy and calling, Wrogemann’s work sparkles with its deeply informed insights and inspiring vision.

Henning Wrogemann continues from his Intercultural Theology Volume One, on the need for understanding among the diverse world Christian churches, with Volume Two, an articulation of the range of diverse mission theologies in those churches. Amid the diversity, however, he ends with a nuanced discussion of the foundation that unifies all mission theologies: an oikoumenical, doxological understanding of mission. The spiritual foundation of all mission, he argues, is that we all do mission to praise God as we experience God’s power. Another tour de force for Wrogemann.

—Terry C. Muck, scholar of religion, comparative missiologist, former theological educator at Austin Presbyterian Theological Seminary and Asbury Theological Seminary

The publication in English of Volume Two of Henning Wrogemann’s Intercultural Theology is to be heartily welcomed. The book covers a phenomenal range, in terms of period, Christian tradition, and theme. All future students of the theology of Christian mission will want to consult this seminal and insightful work.

—Brian Stanley, professor of world Christianity, University of Edinburgh

Henning Wrogemann (DTheol, DHabil, Ruprecht-Karls University of Heidelberg) is a world-renowned missiologist and scholar of religion. He holds the chair for mission studies, comparative religion, and ecumenics at the Protestant University Wuppertal/Bethel in Germany, where he also heads the Institute for Intercultural Theology and Interreligious Studies. He is the chairman of the German Society of Missiology. Previously, Wrogemann served as a pastor in northern Germany, as the senior lecturer for missiology and comparative religion at the Mission Seminary Hermannsburg, and as a member of the mission board of the Evangelical Lutheran Mission in Lower-Saxony, Germany.

The Gospel and Pluralism Today: Reassessing Lesslie Newbigin in the 21st Century

  • Editors: Scott W. Sunquist and Amos Yong
  • Series: Missiological Engagements
  • Publisher: IVP Academic
  • Publication Date: 2015
  • Pages: 236

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Toward the end of the twentieth century, Lesslie Newbigin offered a penetrating analysis of the challenges of pluralism that confronted a Western culture and society reeling from the dissolution of Christendom. His enormous influence has been felt ever since. Newbigin (1909-1998) was a longtime Church of Scotland missionary to India and later General Secretary of the International Missionary Council and Associate General Secretary of the World Council of Churches.

The first installment in the Missiological Engagements series, the essays in this volume explore three aspects of Newbigin’s legacy. First, they assess the impact of his 1989 book, Gospel in a Pluralist Society, on Christian mission and evangelism in the West. Second, they critically analyze the nature of Western pluralism in its many dimensions to discern how Christianity can proclaim good news for today. Finally, the contributors discuss the influence of Newbigin’s work on the field of missiology. By looking backward, this volume recommends and advances a vision for Christian witness in the pluralistic world of the twenty-first century.

Contributors Include:

  • William Burrows
  • John Flett
  • Veli-Matti Kärkkäinen
  • Esther Meek
  • Wilbert Shenk
After a quarter century, Lesslie Newbigin’s testimony to ‘the gospel in a pluralist society’ still feels strikingly relevant, penetrating in its analysis and winsome in its pastoral encouragement of Christian discipleship and witness. Such is the testimony of the authors of this volume, who rehearse, interpret, receive and build upon Newbigin’s missional wisdom. They have done us the great service of calling us to do likewise!

—George R. Hunsberger, professor emeritus of missiology, Western Theological Seminary

This book offers the best available reflection on Newbigin’s deep understanding of Christ’s gospel and human pluralisms with their merits, challenges and enduring relevance for missional thinking, living and service at all levels.

—Daniel Jeyaraj, professor of world Christianity, Liverpool Hope University

As I write this, I’m sitting in a coffee shop in Winson Green, Birmingham, where Lesslie Newbigin pastored after returning from India. Newbigin loved this community, with all its cultural and religious diversity. He was always a pastor. But he was also a scholar who studied cultures theologically and philosophically. In The Gospel and Pluralism Today, Scott W. Sunquist and Amos Yong bring together a remarkable collection of papers that reveal the ongoing value and contribution of Newbigin’s work. But Sunquist and Yong’s book doesn’t stop at Newbigin’s contribution. It builds on Newbigin’s thought, and it explores critical cultural and missionary issues that have emerged in the twenty-first century. In brief, this book is an invaluable addition to missiology and to the study of Newbigin’s pastoral-missionary paradigm.

—Graham Hill, Morling College, author of GlobalChurch

Scott W. Sunquist (PhD, Princeton Theological Seminary) is a professor and dean at the School of Intercultural Studies at Fuller Theological Seminary. Previously, he taught missiology and Christian history at Pittsburgh Theological Seminary and also lectured as a Presbyterian missionary at Trinity Theological College in Singapore. Writing frequently about Asian Christianity, global Christianity, and missiology, Sunquist is the editor of A Dictionary of Asian Christianity, coauthor of A History of the World Christian Movement, Volume I and Volume II, and coeditor of a volume of A History of Presbyterian Missions, 1944–2006, with his daughter. More recently, he is the author of an introduction to the study of mission, Understanding Christian Mission: Participation in Suffering and Glory, and a history of twentieth-century global Christianity, The Unexpected Christian Century: The Reversal and Transformation of Global Christianity, 1900–2000.

Amos Yong (PhD, Boston University) is professor of theology and mission and director of the Center for Missiological Research at Fuller Theological Seminary in Pasadena, California. He is the author or editor of over two dozen books, including Spirit of Love: A Trinitarian Theology of Grace, Afro-Pentecostalism: Black Pentecostal and Charismatic Christianity in History and Culture (coedited with Estrelda Alexander), Science and the Spirit: A Pentecostal Engagement with the Sciences (coedited with James K.A. Smith), and The Spirit Poured Out on All Flesh: Pentecostalism and the Possibility of Global Theology.

Yong is a member of the the American Academy of Religion, the Christian Theological Research Fellowship, and the Society for Pentecostal Studies. He is also a licensed minister with the General Council of the Assemblies of God.

The State of Missiology Today: Global Innovations in Christian Witness

  • Editor: Charles E. Van Engen
  • Series: Missiological Engagements
  • Publisher: IVP Academic
  • Publication Date: 2016
  • Pages: 304

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Mission is constantly innovating.

As contexts change, so too does the work of the church. Today, in the face of a rapidly changing world and a growing global church, the task of mission must continue to innovate in unexpected ways.

The State of Missiology Today explores the developments and transformations in the study and practice of mission. Looking both backwards—especially over the first half-century of Fuller Theological Seminary’s School of Intercultural Studies—and forwards, the contributors to this volume chart the current shape of mission studies and its prospects in the twenty-first century.

Contributors:

  • J. Kwabena Asamoah-Gyadu
  • John Azumah
  • Pascal Bazzell
  • Stephen Bevans
  • Jayakumar Christian
  • Pablo A. Deiros
  • Sarita D. Gallagher
  • Anne-Marie Kool
  • Moonjang Lee
  • Wonsuk Ma
  • Gary L. McIntosh
  • Mary Motte, FMM
  • Terry Muck
  • Shawn B. Redford
  • Scott W. Sunquist
The State of Missiology Today captures the presentations given on the fiftieth anniversary of Fuller Seminary’s School of Intercultural Studies. Both well-known and emerging missiologists from around the world and across ecclesiastical communities met to honor and critique the past and anticipate the future of innovations in global mission. Beginning with Charles Van Engen’s introduction, noting ten missiological innovations that have been connected to Fuller, and ending with Scott Sunquist’s eight trends in mission to guide us into the future, the chapters in between are loaded with deep insights, relevant perspectives, and practical applications. Bravo! for a great book that will surely become a lasting landmark in missiology.

—Darrell Whiteman, missiological anthropologist, former professor, Asbury Theological Seminary

This collection of essays captures numerous insightful perspectives on contemporary approaches to the study and practice of Christian mission, and is a worthy testimony to Fuller’s powerful ongoing contributions to missiology.

—Paul Kollman, University of Notre Dame

Beginning with several assessments of the pioneering work and contribution of Donald McGavran and his successors at Fuller’s SWM/SIS, the contributors to this volume touch critically on historical developments, contemporary issues, and future possibilities for Christian communities who hear the Spirit’s enduring invitation to intercultural missional engagement. Practitioners, students, and scholars will find much to ponder, discuss, and act on by attending to these thoughtful voices from around the world.

—Thomas John Hastings, executive director, Overseas Ministries Study Center, New Haven, CT

In this volume, scholars and practitioners document and analyze contemporary innovations in Christian mission. The resulting kaleidoscope of approaches demonstrates a global transition from an outdated model of mission to a centered appreciation of diversity. As these writers show, that shift has massive implications. It opens the way for collaboration and further innovation in mission contexts around the world.

—Frances S. Adeney, William A. Benfield Professor Emerita of Evangelism and Global Mission, Louisville Presbyterian Theological Seminary

Charles E. Van Engen (PhD, Free University of Amsterdam) is the Arthur F. Glasser Professor Emeritus of Biblical Theology of Mission at Fuller Theological Seminary and has taught in the School of Intercultural Studies since 1988. Previously he was a missionary in Mexico, working primarily in theological education. Van Engen also taught missiology at Western Theological Seminary in Michigan and served as president of the General Synod of the Reformed Church in America from 1998 to 1999. He is the founding president and CEO of Latin American Christian Ministries, Inc. Over the past 30 years Van Engen has been involved in extensive preaching, teaching, and speaking on mission in Mexico and numerous countries in Latin America, Asia, Africa, the United States, Western Europe, and Canada.

Explorations in Asian Christianity: History, Theology, and Mission

  • Author: Scott W. Sunquist
  • Series: Missiological Engagements
  • Publisher: IVP Academic
  • Publication Date: 2017
  • Pages: 318

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Asia is the birthplace of Christianity. If Christianity is not usually seen as an Asian religion, that is because the history of Christianity in Asia has long been a difficult one. Whereas Christianity in the West received royal support, Asian Christianity has led a more nomadic and exilic existence. Today it is the least Christianized region of the world.

Scott W. Sunquist is a recognized expert on the history of the Christian faith in Asia. Over the years he has published and spoken frequently on this theme. Explorations in Asian Christianity gathers his key writings on the topic and organizes them into four main categories: surveys that look at Asian Christianity in broad perspective, historical investigations that look at how Christianity shapes our understanding of history and historiography, missiological studies that look closely at issues of place, and finally essays on theological education.

Topics explored in this volume include:

  • Ecumenism in Asia
  • The cruciform nature of Christianity
  • A missiology of place
  • The Christian view of time
  • Global migration

Explorations in Asian Christianity sheds light on one of the most important but least well-known areas in Christian history.

For those unfamiliar with Asian Christianity, this collection of essays serves as an excellent introduction. It covers a range of topics, from an overview of the history of Christianity in Asia to specific contextual issues such as ecumenism and migration. The essays are judiciously chosen; some offer a bird’s-eye view while others give us a real feel of life on the ground. Overall, Sunquist makes the reader acutely aware of the complexity of Asian Christianity and the challenges it poses. It’s a must-read for Christians aspiring to enter the borderlands of mission in Asia.

—Simon Chan, Trinity Theological College, Singapore

Explorations in Asian Christianity cements Scott Sunquist’s reputation as one of the most reliable and insightful storytellers of the many dimensions of Christianity in Asia. From first page to last, he brings into relief the reality that Christian history cannot be divorced from the study of mission, and that both the study of Scripture and Christian history as a whole are the story of Jesus-followers finding their identity in mission. Writing history in Sunquist’s hands becomes profoundly theological. There is nothing like it to reveal to readers the depth and breadth of Asian Christianity and the way in which Asians have made it a vital Asian religion with many faces, not a remnant of Western colonialism. Of special value is the nuanced way in which Sunquist takes account of Catholic, classic Protestant, Evangelical, and Pentecostal strands, and the ways in which they develop differently in different contexts.

—William R. Burrows, managing editor emeritus, Orbis Books, research professor of missiology, New York Theological Seminary

Scott W. Sunquist (PhD, Princeton Theological Seminary) is a professor and dean at the School of Intercultural Studies at Fuller Theological Seminary. Previously, he taught missiology and Christian history at Pittsburgh Theological Seminary and also lectured as a Presbyterian missionary at Trinity Theological College in Singapore. Writing frequently about Asian Christianity, global Christianity, and missiology, Sunquist is the editor of A Dictionary of Asian Christianity, coauthor of A History of the World Christian Movement, Volume I and Volume II, and coeditor of a volume of A History of Presbyterian Missions, 1944–2006, with his daughter. More recently, he is the author of an introduction to the study of mission, Understanding Christian Mission: Participation in Suffering and Glory, and a history of twentieth-century global Christianity, The Unexpected Christian Century: The Reversal and Transformation of Global Christianity, 1900–2000.

About the Series Editors

Scott W. Sunquist (PhD, Princeton Theological Seminary) is a professor and dean at the School of Intercultural Studies at Fuller Theological Seminary. Previously, he taught missiology and Christian history at Pittsburgh Theological Seminary and also lectured as a Presbyterian missionary at Trinity Theological College in Singapore. Writing frequently about Asian Christianity, global Christianity, and missiology, Sunquist is the editor of A Dictionary of Asian Christianity, coauthor of A History of the World Christian Movement, Volume I and Volume II, and coeditor of a volume of A History of Presbyterian Missions, 1944–2006, with his daughter. More recently, he is the author of an introduction to the study of mission, Understanding Christian Mission: Participation in Suffering and Glory, and a history of twentieth-century global Christianity, The Unexpected Christian Century: The Reversal and Transformation of Global Christianity, 1900–2000.

Amos Yong (PhD, Boston University) is professor of theology and mission and director of the Center for Missiological Research at Fuller Theological Seminary in Pasadena, California. He is the author or editor of over two dozen books, including Spirit of Love: A Trinitarian Theology of Grace, Afro-Pentecostalism: Black Pentecostal and Charismatic Christianity in History and Culture (coedited with Estrelda Alexander), Science and the Spirit: A Pentecostal Engagement with the Sciences (coedited with James K.A. Smith), and The Spirit Poured Out on All Flesh: Pentecostalism and the Possibility of Global Theology.

Yong is a member of the the American Academy of Religion, the Christian Theological Research Fellowship, and the Society for Pentecostal Studies. He is also a licensed minister with the General Council of the Assemblies of God.

John R. Franke (DPhil, Oxford) is associate professor of theology at Biblical Theological Seminary in Hatfield, Pennsylvania. With Stanley J. Grenz, he is coauthor of Beyond Foundationalism: Shaping Theology in a Postmodern Context.