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Preaching: Intermediate Certificate Program
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Overview

In the Preaching: Intermediate Certificate Program you’ll build a deeper understanding of biblical preaching. You’ll learn key presentation and delivery aspects of preaching and focus on the preaching disciplines of meditation, prayer, and fasting. You’ll also learn how to incorporate a redemptive focus into sermons. These courses will help you preach biblical truth in depth in a way that is faithful to the original context of Scripture and to the context of your congregation.

Individual Titles

How to Apply for a Mobile Ed Certificate of Completion

  1. Complete all Mobile Ed courses in this certificate program. This involves viewing all videos and taking all quizzes.
  2. Write a 750-word response on any topic covered for each course in the certificate program. Post your response to the appropriate Faithlife group in the comments section. Search course code here to find group.
  3. Email certificate@faithlife.com once you have completed all videos and quizzes and have posted responses in the appropriate Faithlife group for each Mobile Ed course in the certificate program. Please include your full name, title of completed certificate program, and links for each Faithlife group post in your email.
  4. Our certificate program team will review the application and email the Certificate of Completion once you have completed all requirements. Please allow 7–10 business days for review.

BI201 The Story of the Bible

  • Instructor: Michael W. Goheen
  • Publication Date: 2014
  • Video Hours: 6

The Bible is a grand collection of 66 separate books—how are those books unified? This course introduces students to the unifying storyline that runs through the entire Bible. Dr. Michael Goheen—expert in missiology, theology, and worldview studies—shows how the drama of the Bible unfolds by tracing the major theological themes of redemption and restoration across both Testaments.

Contents:

Unit 1: Introduction
  • The Three Categories of This Course
  • Starting with Jesus
  • Our Lives Are Shaped by Story
  • The Bible as One Story
  • Using Reading Plans to Help Read the Bible as One Story
  • The Authority of the Biblical Story
  • Two Different and Incompatible Stories
  • The Drama of Scripture
  • Quiz – Unit 1
Unit 2: Act 1: God Establishes His Kingdom
  • Genesis 1 in Its Historical and Literary Context
  • Genesis 1 in Its Ancient Near Eastern Context
  • Using The Context of Scripture to Compare Creation Accounts
  • Literary Structure of Genesis 1
  • The Importance of Genesis 1 in the Bible Story
  • Quiz – Unit 2
Unit 3: Act 2: Rebellion in the Kingdom
  • Sin and Judgment in Genesis 3–11
  • Genesis 3 and the Origin of Sin
  • The Consequences of Sin
  • Quiz – Unit 3
Unit 4: Act 3: The King Chooses Israel
  • Redemption Initiated
  • Sin and Promise in Genesis 3–11
  • Blessed to Be a Blessing: Genesis 12:1–3
  • Using Theological Lexicons to Understand the Meaning of Blessing
  • From Promise to Covenant
  • The Patriarchal Narratives of Genesis 12–50
  • From Genesis to Exodus
  • Redemption from Egypt
  • God and Israel’s Covenant
  • Israel’s Covenant Vocation
  • The Purpose of the Law
  • God’s Tabernacle Presence
  • Using a Bible Dictionary to Understand the Significance of Tabernacle
  • Leviticus: Repairing the Covenant
  • Numbers: Through the Wilderness
  • Deuteronomy: Israel Prepared to Enter the Land
  • Quiz – Unit 4a
  • Israel on the Land
  • Joshua: God Gives Israel the Land
  • Judges: Israel’s Failure on the Land
  • The Storyline of Samuel
  • A Faithful Covenant King
  • The Davidic Covenant
  • The Temple
  • Using a Greek Lexicon to Look Up the Basic Meaning of Greek Words
  • Historical Overview
  • First and Second Kings: Israel’s Demise
  • The Prophetic Message
  • Return from Exile
  • Ezra and Nehemiah: Post-Exilic Crisis of Faith
  • The Writings
  • The Intertestamental Period
  • The Unfolding Story of the Intertestamental Period
  • Quiz – Unit 4b
  • Midterm Exam
Unit 5: Act 4: The Coming of the King
  • The Kingdom of God
  • Highlighting “Kingdom” in the Gospels with Visual Filters
  • Jesus’ Kingdom Mission: A New Way
  • Jesus Prepares for His Kingdom Mission
  • Jesus Gathers His People
  • Jesus Announces the Arrival of the Kingdom
  • An “Already–Not Yet” Kingdom
  • Jesus Reveals the Kingdom
  • The Source of Jesus’ Power
  • Opposition to Jesus’ Mission
  • Jesus Welcomes Sinners and Outcasts
  • Quiz – Unit 5a
  • Jesus Forms an “End-Time” Community
  • Jesus Explains the Kingdom with Parables
  • Jesus Is the Embodiment of the Kingdom
  • Who Is Jesus?
  • Finding the Titles of Jesus with the Bible Facts Tool
  • Three Symbolic Actions of Jesus
  • The Context for the Cross and Resurrection
  • Crucifixion and the Death of Jesus
  • The Significance and Meaning of the Death of Jesus
  • The Significance and Meaning of the Resurrection of Jesus
  • Resurrection in Three Stages
  • The Risen Lord Commissions His Disciples
  • Using the Passage Guide to Find Parallel Gospel Accounts
  • Quiz – Unit 5b
Unit 6: Act 5: Spreading the News of the King
  • The Mission of the Church
  • The Exaltation of Jesus
  • Pentecost: The Coming of the Spirit
  • The Story of Acts
  • Prophecy Fulfilled: A Light on a Hill
  • Searching for “Means of Grace”
  • Witness in Judea and Samaria
  • The Church as a Missionary Community
  • Spontaneous Expansion of the Church
  • The Pattern of Paul
  • Two Perspectives on Paul
  • The Teaching of Paul
  • The Ending of Acts
  • Our Place in the Story
  • Creating and Searching a Church History Collection
  • Quiz – Unit 6
Unit 7: Act 6: Return of the King
  • Restoration Completed
  • The End of the Story
  • Quiz – Unit 7
  • Final Exam

Dr. Michael W. Goheen, professor of missiology at Calvin Theological Seminary, served as the Geneva Chair of Worldview Studies at Trinity Western University in Langley, British Columbia, and teaching fellow in mission studies at Regent College in Vancouver, British Columbia.

He has taught worldview, biblical theology, mission, and world Christianity at Redeemer University College and Dordt College. He began his professional life as a church planter and pastor in the Toronto area. He is also recognized as a leading scholar on the thought of Lesslie Newbigin.

Dr. Goheen has authored several books, including A Light to the Nations: The Missional Church in the Biblical Story (Baker, 2010) and As the Father Has Sent Me, I am Sending You: J.E. Lesslie Newbigin’s Missionary Ecclesiology (Zoetermeer, 2000). He also coauthored the best-selling Drama of Scripture: Finding Our Place in the Biblical Story (Baker, 2004), Living at the Crossroads: An Introduction to Christian Worldview (Baker, 2008), and The True Story of the Whole World: Finding Your Place in the Biblical Drama (Faith Alive, 2009). He has also coedited two volumes on globalization and the gospel, and on the unity of the church.

Dr. Goheen lives in the Vancouver area where he is minister of preaching at New West Christian Reformed Church. He’s been married to his wife, Marnie, for 33 years and has four married children and four grandchildren.

CM100 Basic History of Preaching

  • Instructor: Gary Carr
  • Publication Date: 2014
  • Video Hours: 2

In Basic History of Preaching, Dr. Gary Carr surveys the history of preaching from the early church to the present. He begins with an introduction to the origins of preaching in classical Greek rhetoric and then highlights notable preachers and their contribution to the nature of preaching in the time of the Church Fathers, the Middle Ages, the Reformation, and the succeeding centuries up to modern times.

Contents:

Introduction
  • Introducing the Speaker and the Course
Unit 1: Origins of Preaching and the Early Church
  • Greek Origins
  • From Cicero to the Early Church
  • Downloading and Using the Perseus Classics Collection
  • Early Adopters
  • Searching the Early Church Fathers Collection
  • Chrysostom
  • Search a Custom Collection of Chrysostom’s Writings
Unit 2: The Medieval Ages
  • Early Medieval Preaching
  • Studying Medieval Preachers in History Books
  • Savonarola
  • Using the Timeline to Study the Life of Savonarola
  • John Wycliffe
  • Exploring the Community Pricing Program with Focus on Medieval Works
Unit 3: The Reformation
  • Martin Luther
  • François Fénelon
  • John Calvin
Unit 4: The 18th Century
  • John Wesley
  • George Whitefield
  • Jonathan Edwards
  • Observing the Contents of Jonathan Edwards’ Preaching
Unit 5: The 19th Century
  • Charles Finney
  • Charles Spurgeon
  • Dwight L. Moody
  • Phillips Brooks
  • John Jasper
Unit 6: The 20th Century
  • Martin Luther King, Jr.
  • Phoebe Palmer and Other Female Preachers
  • Aimee Semple McPherson
  • Fulton Sheen
  • Billy Sunday
  • Using the Handbook of Contemporary Preachingto Improve Sermon Style
  • Billy Graham
  • G. Campbell Morgan
  • James Stewart
  • George Buttrick
  • Harry Fosdick
  • Two Resources Useful for Researching Historical Christians
  • Today’s Preachers
  • Finding and Bookmarking Resources from Modern Preachers

Dr. Gary Carr is vice president for adult and graduate studies at Southern Wesleyan University, overseeing administration operations and providing leadership for faculty services, student services, and chaplains’ services. He served as vice president for translations for the International Bible Society and as division chaplain, 2nd Marine Division and 24th Marine Expeditionary Unit. In addition, Dr. Carr has served as command chaplain aboard the aircraft carrier USS Kitty Hawk and Battle Force Seventh Fleet. He is an ordained minister in The Wesleyan Church and served as pastor for the Diamond Springs Wesleyan Church in Michigan.

CM101 Basic Elements of Preaching: An Introduction to Homiletics

  • Instructor: Gary Carr
  • Publication Date: 2014
  • Video Hours: 4

Dr. Gary Carr provides a brief survey of the basic elements of sermon preparation and delivery. The course delineates the basic parts of a sermon, defines the terms involved in preaching, and describes several different types of sermons. Carr discusses other issues related to preaching, like the preacher’s character, humor, logic, mannerisms, and speech.

Contents:

Introduction
  • Introducing the Speaker and Course
  • The Definition of Homiletics
  • The Outcomes of a Sermon
Unit 1: The Analysis of Sermon Style
  • Effect, Message-Centered, and Rhetorical Sermon Analysis
  • Mimetic Sermon Analysis
Unit 2: The Preparation of a Sermon
  • The Preparation of the Preacher
  • Steps in Preparing a Sermon
  • Using the Compare Pericopes Feature to Aid Sermon Structuring
  • Preparing to Proclaim a Text
  • Using the Preaching the WordCommentary Series in Sermon Preparation
Unit 3: The Introduction and Illustration of a Sermon
  • Sermon Introductions
  • Sermon Illustrations
  • Finding Illustrations in the Sermon Starter Guide and Topic Guide
  • Sources of Sermon Illustrations (Part 1)
  • Creating a Personal Book of Illustrations
  • Sources of Sermon Illustrations (Part 2)
  • Making a Point
  • Cultural Cues
  • Storytelling as Illustration
  • Preaching Parables
Unit 4: The Reasoning in a Sermon
  • Patterns of Thinking: Deductive Reasoning
  • Patterns of Thinking: Inductive Reasoning
Unit 5: The Conclusion of a Sermon
  • Sermon Conclusions
Unit 6: The Structure of a Sermon
  • Humor in the Pulpit
  • Types of Sermon Structure
  • Finding Sermons in Logos
  • The Lowry Loop
  • The Fireworks of a Sermon
  • The Use of Logic in Sermons
Unit 7: The Delivery of a Sermon
  • Pace and Posture in Sermons
  • Two Resources to Help Your Sermon Delivery
  • Voice in Sermons
Unit 8: The Types of a Sermon
  • Introducing Types of Preaching and Expository Preaching
  • Topical Preaching
  • Using the Sermon Starter Guide for Topical and Expository Sermons
  • Doctrinal, Narrative, and Pastoral Preaching
Unit 9: The Elements of a Sermon
  • Sermon Hooks
  • Verbs in Preaching
  • Idioms, Jargon, and Transitions in Preaching
  • Hand Gestures in Preaching
  • Series Preaching
  • Resources for Planning a Sermon Calendar
  • Making Mistakes in Preaching
  • Evangelism and Preaching
  • Homilies
  • A David Buttrick Sermon
Unit 10: The Preacher of a Sermon
  • The Preacher’s Authority and Resources
  • The Preacher’s Readiness
  • Using Prayer Lists, Daily Devotionals, and Bible Reading Plans
  • The Preacher’s Power
  • Notes for Sermon Ideas
  • Using Logos Notes for Sermon Preparation
  • Polarity in Preaching
Conclusion
  • Summary of the Course

Dr. Gary Carr is vice president for adult and graduate studies at Southern Wesleyan University, overseeing administration operations and providing leadership for faculty services, student services, and chaplains’ services. He served as vice president for translations for the International Bible Society and as division chaplain, 2nd Marine Division and 24th Marine Expeditionary Unit. In addition, Dr. Carr has served as command chaplain aboard the aircraft carrier USS Kitty Hawk and Battle Force Seventh Fleet. He is an ordained minister in The Wesleyan Church and served as pastor for the Diamond Springs Wesleyan Church in Michigan.

CM102 Invitation to Biblical Preaching I: Theological, Historical, and Pragmatic Reasons for Preaching

  • Instructor: J. Kent Edwards
  • Publication Date: 2014
  • Video Hours: 4

Preaching is one of the highest callings; it is also one of the most challenging. In this foundational course, Dr. J. Kent Edwards answers the question “Why preach?” He discusses what a biblical sermon looks like, what challenges you'll face, and what you can do to overcome them.

Contents:

Introduction
  • Introducing the Speaker and the Course
Unit 1: The Challenge of Preaching
  • Challenges to Biblical Preaching, Part 1
  • Challenges to Biblical Preaching, Part 2
Unit 2: Theological Reasons to Preach
  • God Exists and He Is Not Silent
  • Finding the “Fear of the Lord” and “Knowledge” with Proximity Searching
  • The Nature of God’s Word
  • The Value of God’s Word, Part 1
  • The Value of God’s Word, Part 2
  • Using Cross-References to Find Related Passages
  • The Power of God’s Word
  • Using the Clause Search to Find Where Scripture Was Fulfilled
  • The Examples in Scripture and a Command
Unit 3: Other Reasons to Preach
  • Historical Reasons to Preach
  • Using the Timeline to Find Historical Reasons to Preach
  • Pragmatic Reasons to Preach
  • Personal Reasons to Preach
  • Using the Bible Sense Lexicon to Find Biblical Predatory Animals
Unit 4: Marks of a Biblical Sermon
  • A Biblical Sermon Begins with Attitude
  • Researching the Antiochene and Alexandrian Hermeneutical Methods
  • The Role of the Human Authors
  • Using Wiki.Logos.com to Build Custom Collections
  • One Meaning, Many Applications
  • Introducing the Preaching the Word Commentary Series
  • True to the Bible in Content
  • Using Structural Outlines in Logos to Trace a Text’s Development
  • True to the Bible in Development and Purpose
  • True to the Bible in Form
  • Using Genre Coding to Identify the Genre of the Text
  • True to the Bible in Balance of Emphasis and Mood
Unit 5: What to Preach
  • Two Options for Preaching
  • Three Reasons for Preaching through Books
  • Four More Reasons for Preaching through Books

Dr. J. Kent Edwards (MDiv, DMin, PhD) is the tenured professor of preaching and leadership at Talbot School of Theology, Biola University; the founding pastor of Oasis Community Church in Yorba Linda, California; and the founder and president of CrossTalk Global. Dr. Edwards is known for his passion for preaching, and brings over 30 years of Christian leadership experience, both as a senior pastor and a church planter. He is a popular conference speaker, the founder of The Journal of Christian Ministry, and the author of the award-winning books Effective First-Person Biblical Preaching and Deep Preaching.

CM151 Preparing and Delivering Christ-Centered Sermons I: Foundations and Structures

  • Instructor: Bryan Chapell
  • Publication Date: 2015
  • Video Hours: 15

Preparing and Delivering Christ-Centered Sermons I: Foundations and Structures (CM151) explains how to structure and deliver an expository sermon. It includes guidance on how to select a text and how to produce and format a sermon outline, with particular focus on the use of illustrations and methods for application.

Contents:

Introduction
  • Introducing the Speaker and the Course
Unit 1: Word and Witness
  • Power of God in His Word: Introduction
  • Power of God: Inherent in His Word
  • Power of God: Manifested in the Logos
  • Power of the Word: Applied in Expository Preaching
  • Creating a Passage List for “Word of God”
  • Effectiveness of the Word: Promoted by Testimony
  • Path of the Gospel and Path of the Listener
  • Ethos Implications
  • Performing a Greek Lemma Word Study
Unit 2: The Big Idea
  • Sermonic Unity: The Need for It
  • Sermonic Unity: Its Nature
  • Sermonic Unity: Identifying a Theme or Subtheme
  • Sermonic Unity: Stating Its Proposition
  • Purpose: Introducing the Fallen Condition Focus
  • Purpose: Identifying the Fallen Condition Focus and Its Implications
  • Purpose: Explaining the Fallen Condition Focus
  • Application: Its Necessity
  • Application: Consequences of Nonapplication
Unit 3: Text Selection and Interpretation
  • Study Tools
  • Building Digital Concordances
  • Selecting a Text: Rules
  • Selecting a Text: Cautions
  • Investigating Textual Differences
  • Selecting a Text: Conditions
  • Interpreting a Text: Standards
  • Interpreting a Text: Understanding the Language
  • Interpreting a Text: Genre, Text Features, and Context
  • Examining Specific Genres
  • Selecting a Text: Conclusions
Unit 4: The Road from Text to Sermon
  • Introduction to Moving from Text to Sermon
  • 1. What Does the Text Mean?
  • Studying Parallel Accounts
  • 2. How Do I Know What the Text Means?
  • Discovering Greek Grammatical Constructions
  • 3. What Concerns Caused the Text to Be Written? (Part 1)
  • 3. What Concerns Caused the Text to Be Written? (Part 2)
  • 4. What Do We Share in Common with the Author and Audience?
  • 5. How Should We Respond to the Truths of the Text?
  • 6. Communicating the Content and Application (Part 1)
  • 6. Communicating the Content and Application (Part 2)
Unit 5: Outlining and Arrangement
  • Introduction to Outlining and Arrangement
  • Purposes of an Outline
  • Qualities of Good Homiletical Outlines
  • Types of Homiletical Outlines
  • Building Logical and Sequential Outlines
  • Contents of Good Homiletical Outlines
  • Developmental Principles for Homiletical Outlines
  • Pulpit Outlines: Consistent Visual Markers and Cautions
Unit 6: Proposition and Main Points
  • What Is a Proposition?
  • Marks of a Good Proposition
  • Marks of Good “Formal” Main Points
  • Marks of Good “Conversational” Proposition and Main Points
  • Propositions and Main Points: Some Helpful Hints
  • Propositions and Main Points: Harmonizing Them
  • Propositions and Main Points: More Helpful Hints
Unit 7: Sermon Divisions and Development
  • Guidelines for Main Point Divisions
  • Guidelines for Subpoint Divisions (Part 1)
  • Guidelines for Subpoint Divisions (Part 2)
  • Three Basic Types of Subpoints
  • Standard Progression of Explanation within a Main Point
Unit 8: Classification of Messages
  • Classifications: Introduction
  • Topical Sermons
  • Building a Topical Sermon
  • Textual Sermons
  • Expository Sermons: Features and Advantages
  • Building an Expositional Sermon
  • Expository Sermons: Potential Problems
Unit 9: Exposition: Components and Proportions
  • Exposition: Introduction
  • Exposition: Three Essential Elements
  • Exposition and Illustrative Material
  • Collecting Media Illustrations
  • Application: Instructional and Situational Specificity
  • Application: Motivation and Enablement
  • The Shape of Exposition
  • Exposition: Summary
Unit 10: Illustrations That Empower Exposition
  • Illustrations: Introduction
  • Illustrations: Their Power
  • Illustration: Wrong Reasons for Doing It
  • Illustration: Right Reasons for Doing It
  • Illustrations: Providing Vicarious Learning Experiences
  • Illustrations: Isolating and Associating
  • Illustrations: Narrating
  • Illustrations: Introducing Them
  • Illustrations: Using Concreteness and Detail
  • Illustrations: Relating and Applying to Your Point
  • Illustrations: Expositional Rain (Part 1)
  • Illustrations: Expositional Rain (Part 2)
  • Illustrations: Sources
  • Illustrations: A Balanced View
  • Illustrations: Cautions (Part 1)
  • Illustrations: Cautions (Part 2)
Unit 11: Application
  • Application: Essential to Full Exposition
  • Finding Points of Application
  • What Is Application?
  • Application: Giving Reason, Focus, and Clarity to Exposition
  • Application: Required in Scripture
  • Components of Application: What?
  • Components of Application: Where?
  • Components of Application: Why? and How?
  • What Makes Application Difficult?
Unit 12: Overcoming the Application Breaking Point
  • Disarming Hostility
  • Making Sensible Proposals and Fitting the Tone to the Task
  • Providing Sufficient Guidance for Making Decisions
  • Other Recommendations
  • Application: Cautions and Attitude
  • Proper Attitudes for Making Applications
Unit 13: Sermon Introductions
  • Sermon Introductions: An Example
  • Sermon Introductions: Their Purpose
  • Sermon Introductions: Opening Words and Opening Moments
  • Sermon Introductions: Types (Part 1)
  • Sermon Introductions: Types (Part 2)
  • Marks of Poor Sermon Introductions
  • Marks of Good Sermon Introductions
  • Scripture Introductions: Their Separate Purpose
  • The Introduction Chain
Unit 14: Sermon Conclusions
  • Guiding Principles for Conclusions
  • Components of Conclusions
  • Effective Conclusions: Marks and Cautions
  • Cautions and Hints for Effective Conclusions
Conclusion
  • Looking Back and Looking Ahead

Dr. Bryan Chapell is the senior pastor of Grace Presbyterian Church in Peoria, Illinois and president emeritus at Covenant Theological Seminary in St. Louis, Missouri, where he has served in leadership capacities since 1985. Dr. Chapell is an internationally renowned preacher, teacher, and speaker, and the author of many books, including Christ-Centered Worship, Each for the Other, Holiness by Grace, Praying Backwards, The Hardest Sermons You’ll Ever Have to Preach, and Christ-Centered Preaching, a preaching textbook now in multiple editions and many languages that has established him as one of the nation’s foremost teachers of homiletics. He and his wife, Kathy, have four children.

CM103 Invitation to Biblical Preaching II: Preaching Biblical Sermons

  • Instructor: J. Kent Edwards
  • Publication Date: 2014
  • Video Hours: 8

After looking at the reasons for preaching in Invitation to Biblical Preaching I, Dr. J. Kent Edwards walks through the important aspects of sermon preparation. Edwards moves from exegesis to exposition, showing students how they can apply the original context of Scripture to the context of their congregations. He also covers important presentation and delivery aspects of preaching like word choices, intonation, and nonverbal signals. This course will give you the tools you need to prepare and deliver biblical sermons.

Contents:

Introduction
  • Introducing the Speaker and the Course
Unit 1: How to Create a Sermon
  • Overview: Kent’s Story
  • The Power of an Idea
  • Two Parts of Preaching
  • Gathering Tools for the Exegetical Task
  • The Anatomy of an Idea
  • Practicing a Big Idea
  • A Metaphor for Finding the Big Idea
  • Creating a Customized Layout for Sermon Preparation
  • Practicing on Your Own
  • Creating a Devotional Schedule and Recording Notes
  • The Ladder of Abstraction
  • Practicing the Ladder of Abstraction
  • More Practice: The Lazy in Proverbs 24
  • More Practice: The Gospel of Luke
  • More Practice: A Good Name in Proverbs 22
  • More Practice: Miscellaneous Proverbs
  • Analyzing the Structure of Hebrew Poetry
  • More Practice: Business in James
  • More Practice: A Fresh Look at John 3:16
  • Using the Timeline to See a Passage’s Historical Context
  • More Practice: God’s Care in Psalm 121
  • Finding Old Testament Quotations or Allusions in New Testament Passages
Unit 2: How to Preach a Sermon
  • The Approach of the Biblical Writers
  • An Example: Paul’s Communication
  • Researching New Testament Topics in Extrabiblical Literature
  • The Big Idea and Your Audience
  • Bringing Biblical Ideas to the 21st Century
  • Turning One Big Idea into Three Ideas
  • The Three Ideas in Deuteronomy 22:8
  • The Three Ideas in 1 Peter 1:3–6
  • Practice, Practice, Practice
Unit 3: The Role of the Holy Spirit
  • The Third Component of Preaching
  • The Explosive Growth of the Early Church
  • Finding Every Reference to the Holy Spirit in Acts
  • The Apostolic Secret to Preaching
  • Human Limitations
  • Exegesis and Illumination
  • Five “Closet” Questions
  • Finding Time for the “Closet”
Unit 4: The Homiletics of a Sermon
  • An Overview of the Rules
  • The Structure of Jesus’ Sermon on the Mount
  • Making an Outline
  • Creating Sermon Outlines in Logos
  • Outlining an Epistle (Rom 5:1–5)
  • Transitions
  • Organizing Your Material: A-B-C-A
  • A: Restate the Point
  • B: Image the Truth
  • C: Deal with Objections
  • Imaging the Truth: Videos and Illustrations
  • Imaging the Truth: Metaphors
  • Metaphor Illustrated
  • Finding Metaphors
  • Conclusions
  • Introductions
  • Applications, Part 1
  • Applications, Part 2
  • Presentation and Delivery, Part 1
  • Presentation and Delivery, Part 2
Conclusion
  • Fanning the Flame
  • Creating Your Own Searchable Sermon Library

Dr. J. Kent Edwards (MDiv, DMin, PhD) is the tenured professor of preaching and leadership at Talbot School of Theology, Biola University; the founding pastor of Oasis Community Church in Yorba Linda, California; and the founder and president of CrossTalk Global. Dr. Edwards is known for his passion for preaching, and brings over 30 years of Christian leadership experience, both as a senior pastor and a church planter. He is a popular conference speaker, the founder of The Journal of Christian Ministry, and the author of the award-winning books Effective First-Person Biblical Preaching and Deep Preaching.

CM104 Introducing Biblical Preaching: Preach with Depth

  • Instructor: J. Kent Edwards
  • Publication Date: 2016
  • Video Hours: 6

Building on the foundation of Invitation to Preaching I: Theological, Historical, and Pragmatic Reasons for Preaching (CM102) and Invitation to Preaching II: Preaching Biblical Sermons (CM103), Deep Preaching (CM104) is the next logical course to take the preacher’s sermons to the next—deeper—level. Stepping beyond the nuts and bolts of how to prepare and preach a sermon, this course focuses on what makes biblical preaching powerful—namely, the work of the Holy Spirit. The preacher must utilize the God-given tools of meditation, prayer, and fasting in order to tap into the Holy Spirit’s power and for illumination to occur. In conjunction with the Spirit’s work, the preacher’s responsibility to look deeply into Scripture and into his listeners is also discussed, along with practical suggestions for doing so. The end goal is to equip the preacher to preach powerful, Spirit-filled sermons that actually change lives.

Contents:

Introduction
  • Introducing the Speaker and the Course
Unit 1: The Challenge of Deep Preaching
  • Why Is Our Preaching Not Affective Today Like in Acts 2?
  • An Overview of Preaching with Depth
  • Unit 1 Quiz
Unit 2: The Role of the Holy Spirit
  • The Apostolic Secret of Preaching
  • The Apostles Knew They Needed the Holy Spirit
  • We Need the Holy Spirit—Part One
  • We Need the Holy Spirit—Part Two
  • Unit 2 Quiz
Unit 3: The Tools of Our Trade
  • The Tool of Meditation—Part One
  • The Tool of Meditation—Part Two
  • The Tool of Prayer—Part One
  • The Tool of Prayer—Part Two
  • The Tool of Prayer—Part Three
  • The Tool of Fasting—Part One
  • The Tool of Fasting—Part Two
  • The Tool of Fasting—Part Three
  • The Heart of the Deep Preacher—Part One
  • The Heart of the Deep Preacher—Part Two
  • Unit 3 Quiz
Unit 4: Looking Deeply into Scripture: Five Perspectives
  • Looking Backwards
  • Looking Backwards: Genesis 1–2
  • Metaphoring the Idea of a Passage
  • Looking Upward: 2 Samuel 6
  • Looking Upward: John 8
  • Looking Inward—Part One
  • Looking Inward—Part Two
  • Looking Outward—Part One
  • Looking Outward—Part Two
  • Looking Forward
  • Unit 4 Quiz
Unit 5: Looking Deeply into Our Listeners
  • Allowing Our Listeners into Our Sermons
  • Peter’s Pentecost Sermon (Acts 2)
  • Peter in the Temple (Acts 3) and Stephen before the Sanhedrin (Acts 7)
  • Paul Contextualized Sermons (Acts 13, 14, and 17)
  • Understanding Our Listeners as a Group
  • Contextualization
  • Understanding Our Listeners Individually: Developmental Characteristics
  • Understanding Our Listeners Individually: Cultural Differences
  • Understanding Our Listeners Individually: Specific Needs
  • Getting to Know Our Listeners
  • Unit 5 Quiz
Unit 6: The Disciplines of the Deep Preacher
  • Life Disciplines
  • Preaching Disciplines
  • Unit 6 Quiz

Dr. J. Kent Edwards (MDiv, DMin, PhD) is the tenured professor of preaching and leadership at Talbot School of Theology, Biola University; the founding pastor of Oasis Community Church in Yorba Linda, California; and the founder and president of CrossTalk Global. Dr. Edwards is known for his passion for preaching, and brings over 30 years of Christian leadership experience, both as a senior pastor and a church planter. He is a popular conference speaker, the founder of The Journal of Christian Ministry, and the author of the award-winning books Effective First-Person Biblical Preaching and Deep Preaching.

CM152 Preparing and Delivering Christ-Centered Sermons II: Communicating a Theology of Grace

  • Instructor: Bryan Chapell
  • Publication Date: 2015
  • Video Hours: 6

Preparing and Delivering Christ-Centered Sermons II: Communicating a Theology of Grace (CM152) builds on the theology of grace that runs throughout Scripture and is fulfilled in Jesus Christ. The course describes how to use this hermeneutic to preach redemptive messages that provide hope in Christ in a way moralizing messages cannot. It provides extensive explanation of how to incorporate that redemptive focus into sermon application.

Contents:

Introduction
  • Introducing the Speaker and the Course
Unit 1: Understanding the Redemptive Approach
  • Anselm’s Flowers and Justification
  • The Fallen Condition Focus
  • The Goal of Redemptive Preaching
  • The Progressive Revelation Principle
  • The Organic Principle
  • Discovering Old Testament Quotes and Allusions in the New Testament
  • The Redemptive Principle
  • The Implications of the Redemptive Perspective
  • The Necessity of Redemptive Interpretation
  • The Nature of Nonredemptive Preaching
  • The Deadly Be’s: Design for Nonredemptive Preaching
  • The Demerits of Nonredemptive Preaching
  • Consulting Creeds, Confessions, and Catechisms
Unit 2: Developing Redemptive Messages
  • Review of Redemptive Principles for Christ-Centered Preaching
  • Distinctives of Christ-Centered Preaching
  • What Redemptive Preaching Actually Is
  • A Basic Process of Christ-Centered Preaching
  • Using Clause Search to Discover Divine Action in the Old Testament
  • Traditional Approaches Useful for Some Texts
  • Redemptive-Historical Approaches Useful for All Texts
  • Interpretive Options: Redemptive-Historical
  • Interpretive Options: Doctrinal Instruction and Literary Motif
  • Interpretive Options: Relational-Interaction
  • Redemptive “Lenses” to Use in Approaching All Texts
Unit 3: Preaching Christ-Centered Application
  • The Grace of God Affects the Application
  • The Highest Goal of Preaching
  • Themes: Grace despite Our Sin
  • Themes: Grace, Sin, and Holiness
  • Motivation: Compulsion and Conduct
  • Motivation: Our Conduct and God’s Acceptance
  • Motivation: Imperative and Indicative—Part 1
  • Tracking Imperative and Indicative Relationships in the New Testament
  • Motivation: Imperative and Indicative—Part 2
  • Motivation: Loving God
  • Motivation: Loving Everyone God Loves
  • Motivation: Self-Promotion or Self-Protection
  • Motivation: Slavish Fear
  • Motivation: Objective versus Subjective Guilt
  • Answering the “How” Question
  • Believing Change Is Possible
  • The “Why” Is the “How”: Love Is Power
  • The Power of the Disciplines
  • Christ-Centered Application: Conclusion
Unit 4: Preaching from the Biblical Genres
  • History and Biography: Locating the Event or Person in Redemptive History
  • History and Biography: Exposing Grace Principles
  • History and Biography: Example (2 Samuel 23:8–39)
  • Law
  • Poetry and Wisdom
  • Prophecy and Apocalyptic
  • Gospels
  • Epistles

Dr. Bryan Chapell is the senior pastor of Grace Presbyterian Church in Peoria, Illinois and president emeritus at Covenant Theological Seminary in St. Louis, Missouri, where he has served in leadership capacities since 1985. Dr. Chapell is an internationally renowned preacher, teacher, and speaker, and the author of many books, including Christ-Centered Worship, Each for the Other, Holiness by Grace, Praying Backwards, The Hardest Sermons You’ll Ever Have to Preach, and Christ-Centered Preaching, a preaching textbook now in multiple editions and many languages that has established him as one of the nation’s foremost teachers of homiletics. He and his wife, Kathy, have four children.

CM153 Preparing and Delivering Christ-Centered Sermons III: Advanced Techniques and Thought

  • Instructor: Bryan Chapell
  • Publication Date: 2015
  • Video Hours: 11

In part three of his series on preaching, Dr. Bryan Chapell shares advanced techniques to help you in the pulpit. He starts with his battle-tested methods, explaining how to use voice and gesture and where to add transitions to create a natural flow. You’ll learn a variety of sermon preparation and delivery methods and how to develop your own style.

Dr. Chapell then guides you away from the pulpit and into the pew. He explains the typical mindset of the different generations and common presuppositions that non-Christians and Christians bring with them on Sunday. You’ll discover how to approach sermon application based on who’s sitting in front of you and how to speak biblical truth in a way they will understand.

Contents:

Introduction
  • Introducing the Speaker and the Course
Unit 1: Transitions and the Dialogical Method
  • The Function of Transitions
  • The Nature of Transitions
  • Dialogical Transitions
  • Logical and Numerical Connections
  • Parallel Statements, Illustrative Transitions, and Tiebacks
  • Billboards
  • Verse References
  • The Memory Retention Hierarchy
Unit 2: Methods of Sermon Preparation
  • Manuscript Sermons
  • Outlined Sermons
  • Fully Extemporized Sermons
  • Options for Sermon Notes
  • Evaluating Impromptu Preaching
  • Evaluating Preaching from Outlines
  • Evaluating Manuscript Preaching
  • Converting a Manuscript to an Outline
  • Preaching from Memory
Unit 3: Basic Features of Sermon Delivery
  • The Power of Natural Delivery
  • Transparent Delivery
  • Expression in Delivery
  • Appropriate Volume
  • Variety in Verbal Expressions
  • Intensity of Expression
  • Gesturing and Eye Contact
  • Facial Expressions and Hand Gestures
  • Body Movement
  • Gestures to Avoid
Unit 4: Dress and Style for Sermon Delivery
  • Community and Gospel Considerations
  • Identifying with the People
  • Principles for Appropriate Dress
  • The Power of Dress
  • Cultivating a Personal Style through Vulnerability
  • Cultivating a Personal Style through Language
  • Cultivating a Plain Style
Unit 5: Preparation and Planning for Expository Sermons
  • Spiritual Preparation
  • Intellectual Preparation: Knowing God’s Word
  • Intellectual Preparation: Knowing Our World
  • Preparation of the Attitude
  • Sermon Planning
  • Weekly Sermon Planning
  • Disciplined Sermon Preparation
  • Collecting Material for Sermons
  • Filing Collected Material
  • Planning for Practice and Prayer
Unit 6: The Expositor’s Stance
  • RAMBOPP: Text and Sermon Focus
  • RAMBOPP: Presentation Focus
  • Emphasizing the Priority of God’s Word
  • Reading God’s Word Meaningfully
  • Tips for Reading God’s Word
  • More Tips for Reading God’s Word
Unit 7: Inductive Homiletic Approaches
  • Comparing Deductive and Inductive Approaches
  • The Roots of Inductive Homiletics
  • Starting with Questions
  • Varying the Order of Sermon Components
  • Varying the Time Spent on Sermon Components
  • Preaching via Story: Commented Retelling
  • Preaching via Story: Contemporary Retelling
  • Constructing Homiletical Plots
  • Choosing Appropriate Sermon Approaches and Forms
  • Variations on Problem-Solution Sermons
Unit 8: New Listeners: Inside and Outside the Church
  • Biblical and Doctrinal Knowledge in the Church
  • Generational Differences in the Church
  • Reasons for Attending Church
  • Spiritual State of the Church
  • God, Religion, and Culture for the Unchurched
  • Values of the Unchurched
  • Effective Preaching for New Listeners
  • Providing Clear and Redemptive Direction to Listeners
  • Addressing Objections and Self-Centeredness of Listeners
  • Crafting Language for New Listeners
  • Elements of Evangelistic Preaching
  • Evangelistic Preaching for Different Audiences
  • Evangelistic Preaching for All Audiences
  • Keys to Conversational Preaching
Unit 9: Sermon Applications for New Listeners
  • Principles of Traditional Application
  • Troubling Aspects of Application
  • Specifying Situations for Sermon Application
  • Common Situations for Sermon Application
  • Addressing Motivations in Sermon Applications
  • How Disobedience Affects Relationship with God
  • Enabling Change in Sermon Application
  • Opening the Horizon for Sermon Application
  • Reversing the Train in Sermon Application
  • Loving a Puritan and a Parable: Two-Phased Messages
  • Turning the Radio on: The Applicational Model
  • Selecting an Appropriate Sermon Model
Conclusion
  • Course Summary

Dr. Bryan Chapell is the senior pastor of Grace Presbyterian Church in Peoria, Illinois and president emeritus at Covenant Theological Seminary in St. Louis, Missouri, where he has served in leadership capacities since 1985. Dr. Chapell is an internationally renowned preacher, teacher, and speaker, and the author of many books, including Christ-Centered Worship, Each for the Other, Holiness by Grace, Praying Backwards, The Hardest Sermons You’ll Ever Have to Preach, and Christ-Centered Preaching, a preaching textbook now in multiple editions and many languages that has established him as one of the nation’s foremost teachers of homiletics. He and his wife, Kathy, have four children.

Product Details

  • Title: Preaching: Intermediate Certificate Program
  • Publisher: Lexham Press
  • Product Type: Logos Mobile Education
  • Resource Type: Courseware, including transcripts, audio, and video resources
  • Courses: 9
  • Video Hours: 62

Getting the most out of Mobile Ed

Logos Mobile Education is a highly effective cross-platform learning environment that integrates world class teaching with the powerful study tools and theological libraries available in Logos Bible Software. Every course provides links to additional resources and suggested readings that supplement the lecture material at the end of every transcript segment.

All courses in this bundle come with an Activities resource that functions as a type of “workbook” for the courses. This resource includes learning activities such as: places for you to respond to reflection questions, exercises that will challenge and show you how deepen your understanding of this course by using specific Logos tools and resources, tutorial videos on different features of Logos Bible Software, and links to relevant Logos guides and tools. A link to open the Activities resource is conveniently placed at the end of every segment.

 

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