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The Sources of Catholic Dogma

by Denzinger, Henry, Deferrari, Roy J., Rahner, Karl

B. Herder 1957

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The Sources of Catholic Dogma See inside
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Overview

Denzinger’s collection of articles of faith and morality for the Catholic Church is widely used as a comprehensive reference book. Presented in a practical and accessible manner, it includes dogmatic definitions, creeds of the faith, and decrees of Church leadership. Since its first printing a century and a half ago, this book has received accolades and wide appeal among Catholic scholarly works. First published in 1854 as Enchiridion Symbolorum et Definitionum, Denzinger’s Sources of Catholic Dogma is among the most important works of dogmatic theology in print today.

Key Features

  • Essential works of Catholic theology and dogma in the English language
  • Logos editions allow for quick and easy document navigation
  • All Scripture passages are displayed on mouseover and are linked directly to original language texts and English translations

Praise for the Print Edition

This book should be on the shelves of every English-speaking Catholic, beside a copy of The Haydock Bible (The Douay-Rheims Old and New Testament) and Fundamentals of Catholic Dogma. The Bible is the only perfect book but these books will provide a lifetime of contemplation of ‘those mysteries of faith which must be known and believed in order to be numbered among the elect’ (Pope Pius X, Acerbo Nimis, 2).

—Mark Michael Zima, author of Mother Teresa: The Case for The Cause

Product Details

  • Title: The Sources of Catholic Dogma
  • Author: Henry Denzinger
  • Publisher: B. Herder Book Co.
  • Publication Date: 1957
  • Pages: 715

About Heinrich Joseph Dominicus Denzinger

Heinrich Joseph Dominicus Denzinger (1819–1844) was a prominent Catholic theologian. He studied at Würzburg, where he received his Ph.D., and also studied in Rome. He was ordained in 1844 and became Professor of Dogmatic theology at Würzburg in 1848.