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Mobile Education:

Preaching: Foundational Certificate Program

Preview: Explore the foundations of preaching with Dr. Kent Edwards

Preaching: Foundational Certificate Program

Designed to provide a foundation in preaching.

$1,155.76 or pay monthly

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Your biblical and theological foundations for preaching

The Preaching: Foundational Certificate Program is designed to equip pastors and other leaders for preaching powerful sermons. The foundational course content involves comprehensive study of preaching, from analyzing modern sermons to in-depth examination of Jesus’ Sermon on the Mount. The study is designed to provide understanding of the origin and development of preaching from classical Greek rhetoric and the early church to modern times, to analyzing the components of sermons and their effects on the congregation. Students will gain proficiency in developing and presenting “big idea” sermons and grasp the crucial role of context in accurate biblical interpretation.

Advance Your Skills and Understanding

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Learning Outcomes

  • Prepares the student for roles related to their contexts in Christian ministry, scholarship, and leadership.
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Research

  • Equips the student with tools for research in the field
  • Empowers the student with seminary-level training in the historical background of preaching and equips pastors who wish to deepen their research in this field
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Preaching & Teaching

  • Immerses the student in history and practice of preaching, giving them the tools to exegete the text and preach/teach it to others
Leader and followers

Leadership

  • Enables leaders in the church to learn how their presentation of the biblical text in preaching affects their leadership within the church

Sequence of Courses

The foundational study provides the building blocks for the program.

Courses - Foundational

CM100 Basic History of Preaching

CM100 Basic History of Preaching

Published: 2014

Video Hours: 2

Basic History of Preaching (CM100) surveys the history of preaching from the early church to the present. It begins with an introduction to the origins of preaching in classical Greek rhetoric and then highlights notable preachers and their contributions to the nature of preaching in the time of the church fathers, the Middle Ages, the Reformation, and succeeding centuries up to modern times.

Professor:

Dr. Gary Carr

DMin, Fuller Theological Seminary; MA, Asbury Theological Seminary

Dr. Gary Carr
CM101 Basic Elements of Preaching: An Introduction to Homiletics

CM101 Basic Elements of Preaching: An Introduction to Homiletics

Published: 2014

Video Hours: 2

Basic Elements of Preaching (CM101) is a brief survey of the basic elements of sermon preparation and delivery. The course delineates the basic parts of a sermon, defines terms involved in preaching, and describes several different types of sermons. Dr. Carr discusses other issues related to preaching, like the preacher’s character, humor, logic, mannerisms, and speech.

Professor:

Dr. Gary Carr

DMin, Fuller Theological Seminary; MA, Asbury Theological Seminary

Dr. Gary Carr
CM102 Invitation to Biblical Preaching I: Theological, Historical, and Pragmatic Reasons for Preaching

CM102 Invitation to Biblical Preaching I: Theological, Historical, and Pragmatic Reasons for Preaching

Published: 2014

Video Hours: 4

Invitation to Biblical Preaching I: Theological, Historical, and Pragmatic Reasons for Preaching (CM102) lays the foundation for biblical preaching. The course discusses the importance of preaching, covers what a biblical sermon looks like, and examines why preaching can be difficult work.

Professor:

Dr. J. Kent Edwards

PhD, Biola University; DMin, Denver Conservative Baptist Seminary; MDiv, Tyndale Seminary

Dr. J. Kent Edwards
CM103 Invitation to Biblical Preaching II: Preaching Biblical Sermons

CM103 Invitation to Biblical Preaching II: Preaching Biblical Sermons

Published: 2014

Video Hours: 8

Invitation to Biblical Preaching II: Preaching Biblical Sermons (CM103) provides the tools necessary to prepare a biblical sermon. The course moves from exegesis to exposition, showing students how they can apply the original context of Scripture to the context of their congregations. It also covers important presentation and delivery aspects of preaching, such as word choices, intonation, and non-verbal signals.

Professor:

Dr. J. Kent Edwards

PhD, Biola University; DMin, Denver Conservative Baptist Seminary; MDiv, Tyndale Seminary

Dr. J. Kent Edwards
NT251 Sermon on the Mount

NT251 Sermon on the Mount

Published: 2014

Video Hours: 5

The Sermon on the Mount (NT251) zeroes in on one of the most important texts studied throughout church history. The course covers the history of interpretation, gives direction for reading the Sermon according to its context and structure, and provides exposition of the text.

Professor:

Dr. Jonathan T. Pennington

PhD, University of St. Andrews; MDiv, Trinity Evangelical Divinity School

Dr. Jonathan T. Pennington
BI101 Introducing Biblical Interpretation: Contexts & Resources

BI101 Introducing Biblical Interpretation: Contexts & Resources

Published: 2014

Video Hours: 5

Introducing Biblical Interpretation: Contexts and Resources (BI101) provides an introduction to the science and art of Bible interpretation, focusing on the importance of interpreting the Bible in its original ancient contexts. These contexts include the biblical writers’ ancient worldview, historical circumstances, cultural and religious beliefs, attitudes of their day, literary genre, and the original languages of the Bible. The course aims to foster an awareness of these contexts, all of which require competence for correct interpretation. Students are introduced to tools for developing competence in all these areas.

Professor:

Dr. Michael Heiser

PhD, University of Wisconsin-Madison; MA, University of Wisconsin-Madison; MA, University of Pennsylvania

Dr. Michael Heiser

Included Resources

Your certificate program includes the selection of resources below, which are all used within the courses to expand upon and develop the concepts being taught.

Mobile Ed uses Logos and Logos uses Mobile Ed

Mobile Ed Is Powered By Logos Bible Software

Mobile Ed courses are tightly integrated with Logos base packages. The larger your base package, the more recommended course readings will be unlocked. To have access to all of the digital tools and research methods presented in each course, we recommend Logos 7 Gold.

Syllabus & Learning Outcomes

Introduction

The Preaching Certificate Program equips the Mobile Ed student with a foundation that is as much historical and homiletical as it is biblical and theological. Those completing the Preaching Certificate Program will come away understanding the history and practice of preaching, as well as the biblical and theological foundations for why to preach and how to preach.

Purpose

The Preaching Certificate Program is designed to provide a foundation of homiletical study for both professional and lay ministry. The courses advance the student’s readiness to exegete biblical texts and preach “big idea” sermons to others. The homiletical knowledge and skills developed by completing these courses will transform the student’s communication of the Word of God.

Specific Outcomes

Knowledge-Based Foundational Outcomes

  • Describe the origins of preaching in classical Greek rhetoric
  • Trace the development of the practice of preaching from the early church to modern times
  • Identify several key contributors to the development of preaching
  • Define and discuss the basic terms used in homiletics
  • Analyze your own and others’ sermons with regard to their effect on the congregation
  • Identify and describe the basic parts of a sermon
  • Identify different types of sermons
  • Recognize the importance of good sermon illustrations
  • Delineate the steps in preparing a sermon
  • Discuss the importance of the preacher’s character, speech, and mannerisms
  • Identify several challenges to biblical preaching
  • Summarize the theological, historical, pragmatic, and personal reasons for preaching
  • Describe the marks of a biblical sermon
  • Discuss the differences between topical preaching and preaching through the Bible
  • Define and explain the concept of a “big idea” and discuss the importance of preaching with one
  • Gain proficiency in developing “big ideas”
  • Describe the differences between the exegetical, homiletical, and preaching ideas
  • Discuss the role of the Holy Spirit in preaching
  • Identify the advantages of preaching from an outline
  • Describe each element of an outline for a sermon on an epistolary text
  • Summarize the importance of non-verbal communication in a sermon
  • Describe how the Sermon on the Mount fits into Matthew’s larger structural levels of narrative and discourse
  • Summarize key historical approaches to the Sermon on the Mount
  • Discuss interpretation of the Sermon on the Mount in light of virtue-ethics theory
  • Summarize both the continuity and discontinuity between Old Testament law and Jesus’ teaching in the Sermon on the Mount
  • Explain how the Lord’s Prayer relates to the kingdom of heaven
  • Describe how the Golden Rule sums up the vision Jesus is presenting in the Sermon on the Mount
  • Understand a variety of difficulties inherent to biblical interpretation
  • Grasp the crucial role of context for biblical interpretation
  • Comprehend the need for competence in various contexts—worldview, history, religion, literary—for accuracy in biblical interpretation

Skill-Based Foundational Outcomes Using Logos Bible Software

  • Download and use the Perseus Classics Collection
  • Search the Early Church Fathers Collection
  • Search custom-made collections of the writings of specific early church fathers
  • Study medieval preachers in history books
  • Use the Timeline tool to study the lives of historical preachers
  • Explore the Community Pricing Program
  • Observe the contents of Jonathan Edwards’ preaching
  • Use the Handbook of Contemporary Preaching to improve sermon style
  • Use 131 Christians Everyone Should Know and the Biographical Dictionary of Evangelicals for research
  • Find and bookmark resources from modern preachers
  • Use the Compare Pericopes feature to aid sermon structuring
  • Use the Preaching the Word commentary series
  • Browse illustrations in the Sermon Starter Guide and Topic Guide
  • Create your own book of illustrations with the Personal Books tool
  • Access external sermon sites from the Sermon Starter Guide
  • Access resources that teach better sermon delivery
  • Form expository and topical sermons using the Sermon Starter Guide
  • Access resources for planning a sermon calendar
  • Use prayer lists, daily devotionals, and Bible reading plans
  • Use Logos Notes for sermon preparation
  • Perform a Proximity search on two words or phrases
  • Use cross-reference functionality
  • Perform a Clause search
  • Use the Bible Sense Lexicon
  • Use the Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church
  • Use Wiki.Logos.com to help in building dynamic, rules-based custom collections
  • Use structural outlines in Logos to trace a text’s development
  • Use genre coding to identify the genre of a text
  • Explore the features of the Passage Guide to prepare for exegetical work
  • Create a custom layout geared toward sermon preparation
  • Create a devotional schedule and record notes
  • Use various resources to analyze the structure of Hebrew poetry
  • Use the Timeline to see events surrounding a given verse
  • Find New Testament quotations or allusions in Old Testament passages
  • Research New Testament topics in extrabiblical literature
  • Find every occurrence of “Holy Spirit” in Acts
  • Create a sermon outline in Logos
  • Create your own searchable sermon library
  • Use the Pericope tool to examine the literary structure of a biblical book
  • Add notes to your Bibles
  • Use interlinear Bibles and the Bible Sense Lexicon
  • Compare English translations with the Text Comparison tool
  • Use the Parallel Resources tool for efficient study
  • Use the Bible Word Study tool
  • Find English translations of ancient texts
  • Access reference works and monographs for studying ancient background and context
  • Compare different types of commentaries
  • Find scholarly journals in Logos
  • Access online resources for biblical interpretation
  • Use visual filters to study characterization in Old Testament narrative
  • Study how literary genre informs the meaning of a passage
  • Recognize various sub-genres of Old Testament prophecy
  • Identify the structure of New Testament letters
  • Recognize the importance of context for understanding metaphors
  • Detect the original language form (morphology) of words
  • Detect and use word relationships in interpretation
  • Access tools for analyzing the semantic range of a word's meaning
  • Use scholarly commentaries for word-level Bible study
  • Find original manuscript differences behind English translations