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Exploring Libronix Searching

Exploring Logos Searching

The examples given here use the Basic Search dialog Open Basic Search in Libronix. To open this dialog, choose Basic Search on the Search menu.

Basic Searching

Selecting Resources To Search

The In drop down list chooses the resources that will be searched. This list contains:

  • all the collections you have created in Define Collections
  • the All Open Resources collection that searches all the currently open books
  • each open book, so you can quickly choose to search just one of them

Searching For a Word

To search for a word, simply enter it in the Search box.

Example:

To search for the word kingdom:

kingdom

Searching For Multiple Words

To search for multiple words, enter them in the Search box, separated by spaces. The search engine will find articles that contain one or more of these words. If the search results are being sorted by rank, articles that contain many of the words you specified are likely to be shown before articles that contained just one of the words. (Ranking uses a combination of many factors, so an article containing only one word may be shown near the top of the list if it scores highly in some other area.)

Example:

To search for the words kingdom and God:

kingdom God

Searching For a Phrase

To search for a phrase, enter the phrase inside double quotes in the Search box.

Example:

To search for the phrase kingdom of God:

"kingdom of God"

Searching For a Topic

To search for a topic, enter topic(, then the name of the topic, then a closing ).

Example:

To search for the topic kingdom:

topic(kingdom)

Wildcard Searching

The wildcard characters ? and * stand for any single letter, and any group of letters, respectively.

Example:

Searching for

r?se

would find rise, rose, and ruse, but not raise or risen.

Example:

Searching for

bapti*

would find baptise, baptist, baptize, baptizer,baptizing and so on.

Advanced Word Searching

Building Advanced Queries

The text you enter in the Search box is a query. A query consists of multiple terms. To perform advanced searches, you must understand what a term is, and how different terms can be connected.

A word by itself is a single term. For example, the query kingdom contains a single term, kingdom. The query kingdom God contains two separate terms (separated by a space). However, the query "kingdom of God" contains not three terms, but one. The double quotes force the multiple words to be interpreted as one term.

As you have seen from the Multiple Words example, multiple terms can be separated by spaces. Since a phrase (in double quotes) is a term, you can search for multiple phrases (or a combination of words and phrases) in the same way.

Example:

Searching for

"kingdom of God" repent "enter into"

finds articles that contain one or more of these terms. If search results are sorted by rank, articles containing more of these terms will be listed first.

Proximity Searching

You can search for two words that are within a certain proximity of one another.

Example:

To find instances of the word "please" or "pleases" within ten words of "God" or "Lord":

please,pleases within 10 words God,Lord

To find instances of "please" within seven characters of "God":

please within 7 chars God

You can search for a word that is a certain number of words or characters before or after another word.

Example:

To find instances of "we" up to three words before "people":

we before 3 words people

To find instances of "we" from two to four words after "people":

we after 2-4 words people

Field Searching

Words in the text may be marked with one or more invisible fields. For example, most Bibles support the "Bible" field. This field contains the text of Bible verses, but does not contain the section headings, introductions, translators' notes, etc. Many Bibles also support the "Words of Christ" field, which is the red-letter text.

To search for words in a field:

FieldName:Term

Note that the FieldName is case-insensitive but cannot contain spaces.

Example:

To find all occurrences of the phrase I am in Bible text only, ignoring section headings, translators' notes etc:

bible:"i am"

To search only the words of Christ for I am:

WordsOfChrist:"i am"

You can see the fields supported by a resource by choosing About This Resource on the Help menu. Under the Search Capabilities heading, all fields are listed with their aliases and a short description. Use one of the aliases as the FieldName in your query. Some common fields are:

Field Name

Occurs in

Explanation

Bible Bibles The text in the verses of the Bible, excluding section headings, introductions etc.
Footnote Most resources Text that is in footnotes. This can include translators' notes in Bibles.
Lemma Dictionaries The root form of the word. (This is used mainly with Greek and Hebrew.)
WordsOfChrist Bibles Text considered to be the words of Christ, traditionally the "red-letter" text.

Word Modifiers

A word modifier changes the way the search engine processes a word. We have already seen one word modifier, the topic() modifier. This causes the search engine to look for a topic instead of a word.

There are many modifiers that can be applied to a word. Most of them control whether the search engine finds related words or not. The search engine finds related words in three ways:

  • Stemming
  • Case Insensitivity
  • Accent Insensitivity

Stemming

Stemming is the process by which a word is automatically reduced to its root form by stripping common suffixes. For example, nationalism is reduced to national, which is reduced to nation. nations is also reduced to nation, so nationalism and nations have the same stem. When stemming is turned on (the default), searching for a word finds all words with the same stem. Note that this process is rule-based, not dictionary-based, so swam, swim, and swum are considered to have different stems.

Example:

Searching for

resume

would find resume, resumed, resumes, resuming, and so on.

Case Insensitivity

In case-insensitive mode (the default), the search engine finds all words that use the same letters, whether they are in upper or lower case.

Example:

Searching for

resume

would find resume, Resume, RESUME, and so on.

Accent Insensitivity

In accent-insensitive mode (the default), the search engine finds all words that use the same letters, and ignores any accents that may be on those letters.

Example:

Searching for

resume

would find resume, résumé, and so on.

By default, all three of these methods are used.

Example:

Searching for

resume

would find resume, RESUME, resuming, résumé,Résumés, Resumed, and many other combinations.

To use a modifier:

ModifierName(Term)

Note that the ModifierName is case-insensitive but cannot contain spaces. The modifiers available in the Libronix search engine are described in the following sections.

nostem()

The nostem() modifier turns off stemming. If no other modifiers are specified, the search will still be case-insensitive and accent-insensitive.

Example:

Searching for

nostem(resume)

would find resume, résumé, RESUME, and so on.

case()

The case() modifier turns off case-insensitivity and also turns off stemming. It searches for the case exactly as typed. If no other modifiers are specified, the search will still be accent-insensitive.

Example:

Searching for

case(resume

would find resume, résumé, and so on.

marks()

The marks() modifier turns off accent-insensitivity and also turns off stemming. It searches for the word with marks (i.e. accents) exactly as typed. If no other modifiers are specified, the search will still be case-insensitive.

Example:

Searching for

marks(resume)

would find resume, RESUME, and so on.

exact()

The exact() modifier is a combination of the case(), marks(), and nostem() modifiers described above. It causes the search engine to search for the word exactly as you typed it.

Example:

Searching for

resume

would find resume, RESUME, resuming, résumé,Résumés, Resumed, and many other combinations.

Searching for

exact(resume)

would find only resume.

topic()

The topic() modifier searches for topics. See the Searching For a Topic section above for examples.

Combining Modifiers

The term with its modifier is itself a term, so you can combine two or more modifiers by placing one inside the other.

Example:

exact(word)

is the same as

nostem(case(marks(word)))

Searching For Data Types

What is a Data Type?

A "data type" is a family of related items. For example:

  • "Genesis 1:1-3" and "Jn 3:16" are both Bible references. They both belong to the "Bible" family.
  • "Page iii" and "Pages 3-5" are page numbers. They both belong to the "Page" family.

Note that without extra information, it may not be possible to tell which family an item belongs to. For example, 153 could be a Greek Strong's Number, a Hebrew Strong's Number, a page number, or perhaps just a plain old number with no special meaning. Conversely, a specific item in a family may be displayed in many different ways. "John 3:16" could be displayed as "Jn 3:16" or just "v. 16", depending on context.

You can see a list of the data types supported by Libronix by opening the KeyLink Options dialog Open KeyLink Options Dialog in Libronix. To do this, open the Tools menu, choose Options, then choose KeyLink. The Data Type drop down list shows the supported data types.

Searching for Data Type References

Using data types properly allows you to efficiently and exhaustively search your library for items in data type families. For example, say you want to search a particular resource for every time the author cites John 3:16. Doing a word or phrase search would not find every occurrence, since searching for "John 3:16" would only find every place where the exact text "John 3:16" occurs. If the author referred to the passage as "3:16" or "v. 16" then this search would not find it.

The data type search syntax bible = "John 3:16" will find every reference to that verse, no matter how it appears in the text of the resource.

A data type search has the following format:

DataType Relation "Item".

Item is the item you want to search for. In the example above, it is "John 3:16" (including the double quotes).

DataType is the name of the family of items that Item belongs to. This must be included because Item might belong to more than one family.

Relation determines the items from DataType that are returned by the search. The allowable values are:

Relation

What Is Returned

Example

= Anything exactly equal to Item bible = "Jn 3:16" finds John 3:16, but not John 3:16-18.
in Anything that intersects Item bible in "Jn 3:16-18" finds John 3:16, John 3, John 3:17-20.
< Anything less than Item
<= Anything less than or equal to Item
> Anything greater than Item
>= Anything greater than or equal to Item

Example:

To find all references to John 3:16 (or a passage containing it):

bible in "John 3:16"

To find all references to just John 3:16:

bible = "John 3:16"

Example:

To find all instances of a Strong's Number (search KJV or NASB95 and select 'Chapters or Sections' for Return option in Bible Search dialog):

HebrewStrongs = 7225

To find two Strong's Numbers in the same verse (search KJV or NASB95 and select 'Verses' for Return option in Bible Search dialog):

GreekStrongs = 3870 AND GreekStrongs = 4236

See Also:

Libronix Data Types
How to Define a Collection
Online Tutorial Videos
Condensed Display at Top of Report Windows


 

Last Updated: 4/21/2009