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Supernatural: What the Bible Teaches about the Unseen World—And Why It Matters

Supernatural: What the Bible Teaches about the Unseen World—And Why It Matters

Michael S. Heiser

| Lexham Press | 2015

Details

TODAY’S CHRISTIANS NEED A SUPERNATURAL WORLDVIEW. Start with a skeptical, naturalistic culture. Add the church’s tendency to avoid or gloss over difficult supernatural Bible passages. The result: most Christians miss the supernatural worldview of the ancient authors, and misunderstand Scripture. The Bible is full of passages that offer mysterious, little-known promises and revelations—but too often we misread them because we think, “This can’t mean what it seems to mean.” But it does. And one thing is for sure: Readers of this book will never read their Bibles in the same way again. Their understanding of God, and their hunger to find out more, will grow. While this book contains “mind bombs” that will intrigue and amaze the average Christian, they won’t undermine any core beliefs. Instead, readers will find themselves engaged in an enthusiastic pursuit of the truth, resulting in a new appreciation for God’s Word. A quick glance at the movie and book best-seller lists demonstrates that today’s culture is fascinated by the supernatural. The Bible has all of the supernatural drama with one unique difference—it’s all true.

Author Bio

Dr. Michael S. Heiser is a Scholar-in-Residence for Faithlife Corporation, the makers of Logos Bible Software. His varied academic background enables him to operate in the realm of critical scholarship and the wider Christian community. His experience in teaching at the undergraduate level and writing for the layperson both directly contribute to Logos’ goal of adapting scholarly tools for nonspecialists.

Dr. Heiser earned his PhD in Hebrew Bible and Semitic languages and holds and MA in ancient history and Hebrew studies. He is the coeditor of Old Testament Greek Pseudepigrapha with Morphology and Semitic Inscriptions: Analyzed Texts and English Translations, and can do translation work in roughly a dozen ancient languages, including Biblical Hebrew, Greek, Aramaic, Egyptian hieroglyphs, and Ugaritic cuneiform. He also specializes in Israelite religion (especially Israel’s divine council), contextualizing biblical theology with Israelite and ancient Near Eastern religion, Jewish binitarianism, biblical languages, ancient Semitic languages, textual criticism, comparative philology, and Second Temple period Jewish literature. In addition, he was named the 2007 Pacific Northwest Regional Scholar by the Society of Biblical Literature.