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Products>Word Biblical Commentary | WBC (61 vols.)

Word Biblical Commentary | WBC (61 vols.)

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Overview

The Word Biblical Commentary delivers the best in biblical scholarship, from the leading scholars of our day who share a commitment to Scripture as divine revelation. This series emphasizes a thorough analysis of textual, linguistic, structural, and theological evidence. The result is judicious and balanced insight into the meanings of the text in the framework of biblical theology. These widely acclaimed commentaries serve as exceptional resources for the professional theologian and instructor, the seminary or university student, the working minister, and everyone concerned with building theological understanding from a solid base of biblical scholarship. Contributors—all of whom rank among the leading Christian scholars of the English-speaking world—write authoritatively on the portions of Scripture in which they specialize. This collection also includes an enviable scholar’s array of Bible translations and Greek and Hebrew resources for in-depth research.

Resource Experts
  • Provides contributions from today’s leading biblical scholars, including Gordon J. Wenham, David J. A. Clines, Peter C. Craigie, John E. Goldingay, Donald A. Hagner, John Nolland, James D. G. Dunn, and dozens of others
  • Incorporates Greek and Hebrew resources for in-depth research
  • Contains author translations
  • Includes Greek and Hebrew text throughout; Hebrew also transliterated
  • Introduction—covers issues pertaining to the whole book, including context, date, authorship, composition, interpretive issues, purpose, and theology.

Each section of the commentary includes:

  • Pericope Bibliography—a helpful resource containing the most important works that pertain to each particular pericope.
  • Translation—the author’s own translation of the biblical text, reflecting the end result of exegesis and attending to Hebrew and Greek idiomatic usage of words, phrases, and tenses, yet in reasonably good English.
  • Notes—the author’s notes to the translation that address any textual variants, grammatical forms, syntactical constructions, basic meanings of words, and problems of translation.
  • Form/Structure/Setting—a discussion of redaction, genre, sources, and tradition as they concern the origin of the pericope, its canonical form, and its relation to the biblical and extra-biblical contexts in order to illuminate the structure and character of the pericope. Rhetorical or compositional features important to understanding the passage are also introduced here.
  • Comment—verse-by-verse interpretation of the text and dialogue with other interpreters, engaging with current opinion and scholarly research.
  • Explanation—brings together all the results of the discussion in previous sections to expose the meaning and intention of the text at several levels: (1) within the context of the book itself; (2) its meaning in the OT or NT; (3) its place in the entire canon; (4) theological relevance to broader OT or NT issues.
  • General Bibliography—occurring at the end of each volume, this extensive bibliographycontains all sources used anywhere in the commentary.
  • Title: Word Biblical Commentary
  • Publisher: Thomas Nelson
  • Volumes: 61
  • Pages: 28,000+
  • Resource Types: Commentaries
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This massive collection contains 61 digital volumes of material. In the Logos edition, these digital volumes are enhanced by amazing functionality. Every word from every book has been indexed and catalogued to help you search the entire Word Biblical Commentary for a particular verse or topic. Scripture citations link directly to English Bible translations, and important terms link to a wealth of other resources in your digital library, including tools for original languages, dictionaries, encyclopedias, commentaries, and theology texts. Perform powerful searches to find exactly what you’re looking for. Take the discussion with you using tablet and mobile apps. With Logos Bible Software, the most efficient and comprehensive research tools are in one place, so you get the most out of your study.

Volume 1: Genesis 1–15

  • Author: Gordon J. Wenham
  • Editor: John D.W. Watts
  • Series: Word Biblical Commentary
  • Publisher: Thomas Nelson
  • Publication Date: 1987
  • Pages: 408

Examine the compositional sources, textual witnesses, chronology, and theological significance of Genesis with Pentateuch expert Gordon J. Wenham. Review and evaluate modern critical perspectives on Genesis, and consider the legacy of nineteenth-century “higher critical” understanding of Genesis as an evolutionary document, and its relationship to other ancient Near Eastern creation stories such as the Enûma Eliš. Organized for easy reference, Word Biblical Commentaries make an ideal Bible study companion whether you are studying a single passage or a complete biblical book.

Gordon J. Wenham is lecturer in Old Testament at Trinity College, Bristol. Wenham studied Old Testament at Cambridge and Tremper Longman has called him “one of the finest evangelical commentators today.” He is the author of Psalms as Torah: Reading Biblical Song Ethically, The Book of Leviticus, and Story as Torah: Reading Old Testament Narrative Ethically.

Volume 2: Genesis 16–50

  • Author: Gordon J. Wenham
  • Editor: John D.W. Watts
  • Edition: 2nd or Revised and expanded
  • Series: Word Biblical Commentary
  • Publisher: Thomas Nelson
  • Publication Date: 1994
  • Pages: 564

Examine the compositional sources, textual witnesses, chronology, and theological significance of Genesis with Pentateuch expert Gordon J. Wenham. Review and evaluate modern critical perspectives on Genesis, and consider the legacy of nineteenth-century “higher critical” understanding of Genesis as an evolutionary document, and its relationship to other ancient Near Eastern creation stories such as the Enûma Eliš. This volume contains an illuminating excursus on the significance of circumcision. Organized for easy reference, Word Biblical Commentaries make an ideal Bible study companion whether you are studying a single passage or a complete biblical book.

Gordon J. Wenham is lecturer in Old Testament at Trinity College, Bristol. Wenham studied Old Testament at Cambridge and Tremper Longman has called him “one of the finest evangelical commentators today.” He is the author of Psalms as Torah: Reading Biblical Song Ethically, The Book of Leviticus, and Story as Torah: Reading Old Testament Narrative Ethically.

Volume 3: Exodus

  • Author: John I. Durham
  • Editor: John D.W. Watts
  • Series: Word Biblical Commentary
  • Publisher: Thomas Nelson
  • Publication Date: 1987
  • Pages: 560

Study the book John I. Durham calls “A trip across holy ground,” and learn how the its narrative records the exhilarating liberation of Israel from Egypt. Durham considers the historical evidence for Israel’s presence and flight from Egypt, the call of Moses , Egypt’s plagues, and significance of Exodus’ abundance of cultic symbols and imagery. He evaluates modern critical perspectives on Exodus, and evaluates the legacy of nineteenth-century “higher critical” interpretation for the book’s historicity. Organized for easy reference, Word Biblical Commentaries make an ideal Bible study companion whether you are studying a single passage or a complete biblical book.

John I. Durham is professor of Hebrew and Old Testament at Southeastern Baptist Seminary in Wake Forest, North Carolina.

Volume 4: Leviticus

  • Author: John E. Hartley
  • Editor: John D.W. Watts
  • Series: Word Biblical Commentary
  • Publisher: Thomas Nelson
  • Publication Date: 1992
  • Pages: 515

Far from boring, John Hartley argues, Leviticus contains the very heart beat of faith for Jews and Christians. Experience the pure worship and holy living of God’s as you study Leviticus’ textual witnesses, composition, and theological significance. Evaluate modern critical perspectives on the book, and consider the legacy of nineteenth-century “higher critical” interpretation. Organized for easy reference, Word Biblical commentaries make an ideal Bible study companion whether you are studying a single passage or a complete biblical book.

John E. Hartley is professor of Old Testament and chair of the department of biblical studies in the C.P. Haggard School of Theology at Azusa Pacific University. He is the author of The Book of Job: New International Commentary on the Old Testament (NICOT), Genesis: Understanding the Bible, and Salvation.

Volume 5: Numbers

  • Author: Phillip J. Budd
  • Editor: John D.W. Watts
  • Series: Word Biblical Commentary
  • Publisher: Thomas Nelson
  • Publication Date: 1984
  • Pages: 409

Build your knowledge of Israel’s wilderness wanderings and the development of the Hebrew cult as you study the textual history, composition, theological significance, and historical context of Numbers. Evaluate modern critical perspectives on the book, and consider the legacy of nineteenth-century “higher critical” interpretation. Organized for easy reference, Word Biblical commentaries make an ideal Bible study companion whether you are studying a single passage or a complete biblical book.

Phillip J. Budd is lecturer in Old Testament at Westminster College, Oxford, and Ripon College, Cuddesdon, England.

Volume 6a: Deuteronomy 1:1–21:9, 2nd ed.

  • Author: Duane L. Christensen
  • Editor: John D.W. Watts
  • Edition: 2nd
  • Series: Word Biblical Commentary
  • Publisher: Thomas Nelson
  • Publication Date: 2001
  • Pages: 576

For centuries the book of Deuteronomy has been studied as a compilation of three sermons followed by three appendices. In his penetrating new study of this fifth book of the Pentateuch, Duane Christensen argues that “Deuteronomy is best explained as a didactic poem, composed to be recited publicly to music in ancient Israel within a liturgical setting.” Christensen calls readers to understand Deuteronomy not only as an ancient code of Hebraic law but rather as “a work of extraordinary literary coherence, poetic beauty, and political sophistication.” Christensen's fresh look at this ancient book immerses the reader in a probing analysis of the literary, theological, and social issues of Moses' day. Organized for easy reference, Word Biblical commentaries make an ideal Bible study companion whether you are studying a single passage or a complete biblical book.

Duane L. Christensen is professor of biblical studies and ancient Near Eastern History at William Carey International University. He is the author of Anchor Yale Bible: Nahum.

Volume 6b: Deuteronomy 21:10–34:12

  • Author: Duane L. Christensen
  • Editor: John D.W. Watts
  • Series: Word Biblical Commentary
  • Publisher: Thomas Nelson
  • Publication Date: 2002
  • Pages: 592

For centuries the book of Deuteronomy has been studied as a compilation of three sermons followed by three appendices. In his penetrating new study of this fifth book of the Pentateuch, Duane Christensen argues that “Deuteronomy is best explained as a didactic poem, composed to be recited publicly to music in ancient Israel within a liturgical setting.” Christensen calls readers to understand Deuteronomy not only as an ancient code of Hebraic law but rather as “a work of extraordinary literary coherence, poetic beauty, and political sophistication.” Christensen's fresh look at this ancient book immerses the reader in a probing analysis of the literary, theological, and social issues of Moses’ day. Organized for easy reference, Word Biblical commentaries make an ideal Bible study companion whether you are studying a single passage or a complete biblical book.

Duane L. Christensen is professor of biblical studies and ancient Near Eastern History at William Carey International University. He is the author of Anchor Yale Bible: Nahum.

Volume 7a: Joshua 1–12, 2nd ed.

  • Author: Trent C. Butler
  • Editor: Nancy DeClaisse-Walford
  • Edition: Second
  • Series: Word Biblical Commentary
  • Publisher: Zondervan
  • Publication Date: 2014
  • Pages: 576

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

This updated and revised edition of Trent C. Butler’s commentary on Joshua features solid biblical scholarship, thorough coverage of the original Hebrew, and close analysis of the ancient manuscripts of Joshua. It includes Butler’s translation of the text, explanatory notes, and commentary to help any professor, student, or pastor with research and writing.

Trent C. Butler served 10 years on the faculty of the International Baptist Theological Seminary in Ruschilkon, Switzerland, and for 22 years as editorial director for Holman Bible Publishers. He wrote the Word Biblical Commentary volume on Judges, the Layman’s Bible Book Commentary on Isaiah, the Holman Old Testament Commentaries on Isaiah and on Hosea through Micah, and the Holman New Testament Commentary on Luke.

Volume 7b: Joshua 13–24, 2nd ed.

  • Author: Trent C. Butler
  • Editor: Nancy DeClaisse-Walford
  • Edition: Second
  • Series: Word Biblical Commentary
  • Publisher: Zondervan
  • Publication Date: 2014
  • Pages: 368

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

This updated and revised edition of Trent C. Butler’s commentary on Joshua features solid biblical scholarship, thorough coverage of the original Hebrew, and close analysis of the ancient manuscripts of Joshua. It includes Butler’s translation of the text, explanatory notes, and commentary to help any professor, student, or pastor with research and writing.

Trent C. Butler served 10 years on the faculty of the International Baptist Theological Seminary in Ruschilkon, Switzerland, and for 22 years as editorial director for Holman Bible Publishers. He wrote the Word Biblical Commentary volume on Judges, the Layman’s Bible Book Commentary on Isaiah, the Holman Old Testament Commentaries on Isaiah and on Hosea through Micah, and the Holman New Testament Commentary on Luke.

Volume 8: Judges

  • Author: Trent C. Butler
  • General Editors: Bruce M. Metzger, David A. Hubbard, and Glenn W. Barker
  • Series: Word Biblical Commentary
  • Publisher: Thomas Nelson
  • Publication Date: 2009
  • Pages: 640

Dr. Trent Butler expounds on the book of Judges as a riddle. The book takes up a dreary theme of failure and disobedience and presents it with irony, satire, and humor. These instances of humor not only enliven the stories, they also provide the keys that he uses to address the scholarly riddles the book so frequently presents. Dr. Butler observes that Judges is a complex work of literature that cannot be easily reduced to a thesis sentence or to one single purpose statement. The central themes, though, are clear enough. Each story deals in one way or another with a crisis in leadership. The problem of disobedience also shadows leaders and people throughout the book. Political judgments color the way the stories are told, foreshadowing the later division of Israel into two warring kingdoms. Finally, despite the absence of any overt theological statements, the stories all point to the sovereignty of God over God's people, and the worship that they owe him. Throughout the commentary, Dr. Butler presents thorough reviews of the latest scholarship and up-to-date bibliographies to guide readers through the research on the fascinating riddles of Judges.

Trent C. Butler served ten years on the faculty of the International Baptist Theological Seminary in Ruschilkon, Switzerland, and for twenty-two years as editor and editorial director for Holman Bible Publishers. He wrote the Word Biblical Commentary volume on Joshua, the Layman's Bible Book Commentary on Isaiah, the Holman Old Testament Commentaries on Isaiah and on Hosea through Micah, and the Holman New Testament Commentary on Luke. Dr. Butler has a Ph.D. in biblical studies and linguistics from Vanderbilt University, has done further study at Heidelberg and Zurich, and has participated in the excavation of Beersheba. Currently, he is a retired free-lance editor.

Volume 9: Ruth, Esther

  • Author: Fredric W. Bush
  • Editor: John D.W. Watts
  • Series: Word Biblical Commentary
  • Publisher: Thomas Nelson
  • Publication Date: 1996
  • Pages: 528

Engage the challenging books of Ruth and Esther utilizing the dynamic expertise of Frederic Bush. Study the narratives of these books by drawing on Bush’s knowledge of ancient Near Eastern customs, languages, and Hebrew narrative and poetry to illuminate the meaning of these books, and the development and transmission of each book’s textual witnesses. Organized for easy reference, Word Biblical commentaries make an ideal Bible study companion whether you are studying a single passage or a complete biblical book.

Fredric W. Bush is professor emeritus of ancient Near Eastern studies at Fuller Theological Seminary. he is the coauthor Old Testament Survey: The Message, Form, and Background of the Old Testament.

Volume 10: 1 Samuel

  • Author: Ralph W. Klein
  • Editor: John D.W. Watts
  • Series: Word Biblical Commentary
  • Publisher: Thomas Nelson
  • Publication Date: 1989
  • Pages: 338

Explore the textual basis, historical context, literary structure, and theological significance of some of the Bible’s most famous narratives with this commentary on 1 Samuel. Review and evaluate modern critical perspectives on the book, and considers the legacy of modern historical-critical studies. Organized for easy reference, Word Biblical commentaries make an ideal Bible study companion whether you are studying a single passage or a complete biblical book.

Ralph W. Klein is Christ Seminary-Seminex professor of Old Testament at the Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago. He is the author of 2 Chronicles: A Commentary and 2 Maccabees, both in the Hermeneia commentary series.

Volume 11: 2 Samuel

  • Author: A.A. Anderson
  • Editor: John D.W. Watts
  • Series: Word Biblical Commentary
  • Publisher: Thomas Nelson
  • Publication Date: 1989
  • Pages: 348

Focus on David’s ascension and kingdom in this commentary on 2 Samuel; a book commentator A.A. Anderson calls the “central book in Scripture.” Noting 2 Samuel’s profound influence on other New Testament and Old Testament books, Anderson studies the textual history, literary structure, historical context, and ultimate significance of this book. Organized for easy reference, Word Biblical commentaries make an ideal Bible study companion whether you are studying a single passage or a complete biblical book.

A.A. Anderson is honorary fellow in the faculty of theology at the University of Manchester in England. He is the author of Qumran Cave 4: Discoveries in the Judaean Desert and The Book of Psalms.

Volume 12: 1 Kings, 2nd ed.

  • Author: Simon J. DeVries
  • Editor: John D.W. Watts
  • Edition: 2nd
  • Series: Word Biblical Commentary
  • Publisher: Thomas Nelson
  • Publication Date: 2004
  • Pages: 376

Gain scholarly insight into the intricacies of both the events and the textual challenges of 1 Kings. Review the succession from David to Solomon, Solomon’s reign and puzzling life and chronologies of the Hebrew kings. Study the geo-political context of Israel and the shape of its international relations as it emerges as a regional power and is eventually split into two kingdoms. Simon Devries writes, “The scene is history; the players are kings and prophets; behind the curtain is the Lord of history, challenging his players to make history the scene of salvific revelation.”

Simon J. DeVries is professor emeritus of Old Testament at The Methodist Theological School in Delaware, Ohio. He is the author of Forms of Old Testament Literature: 1 and 2 Chronicles.

Volume 13: 2 Kings

  • Author: T.R. Hobbs
  • Editor: John D.W. Watts
  • Series: Word Biblical Commentary
  • Publisher: Thomas Nelson
  • Publication Date: 1986
  • Pages: 387

Experience the tragic drama of 2 Kings as you follow the long descent of Israel and Judah to the destruction of Jerusalem and Babylonian exile. T.R. Hobbs argues that 2 Kings was intended to review the past, but also to point to the promised return to the Promised Land. He examines the historical context, textual witnesses, theological themes, and literary techniques of the author of 2 Kings. Hobbs outlines the implications of the prophetic witness in post-monarchy Judah, and examines the source materials for this dramatic historical book. Organized for easy reference, Word Biblical commentaries make an ideal Bible study companion whether you are studying a single passage or a complete biblical book.

T. R. Hobbs is professor of Hebrew and Old Testament interpretation at McMaster Divinity College, Hamilton, Ontario. He is the author of A Time for War: A Study of Warfare in the Old Testament.

Volume 14: 1 Chronicles

  • Author: Roddy L. Braun
  • Editor: John D.W. Watts
  • Series: Word Biblical Commentary
  • Publisher: Thomas Nelson
  • Publication Date: 1986
  • Pages: 311

Take a fresh look at 1 Chronicles and discover its meaning for God's people by examining its origins, textual witnesses, geo-political and historical context, and theological meaning. Examine 1 Chronicles’ parallel passages from Samuel and Kings, and understand how Solomon’s temple functions as a unifying literary theme in the book. Organized for easy reference, Word Biblical commentaries make an ideal Bible study companion whether you are studying a single passage or a complete biblical book.

Roddy L. Braun is pastor of Our Savior Lutheran Church, Arlington, Virginia, and was professor of Semitic languages at Concordia Senior College, Fort Wayne, Indiana. He is the author of Jesus: His Name and Titles: A Devotional and Theological Study.

Volume 15: 2 Chronicles

  • Author: Raymond B. Dillard
  • Editor: John D.W. Watts
  • Series: Word Biblical Commentary
  • Publisher: Thomas Nelson
  • Publication Date: 1988
  • Pages: 323

Study the literary structure, the Chroniclers use of other Old Testament books, the narratives, geo-political context, and textual witnesses of 2 Chronicles. Dillard’s lucid writing and careful study—solidly based on his familiarity with ancient languages secondary literature—make his volume on 2 Chronicles an invaluable resource for the preacher, teacher, and serious student. Organized for easy reference, Word Biblical commentaries make an ideal Bible study companion whether you are studying a single passage or a complete biblical book.

Raymond B. Dillard is professor of Old Testament language and literature at Westminster Theological Seminary in Philadelphia. He served as editor, translator, and consultant for the New International Version, Old Testament. He is the author of Faith in the Face of Apostasy: The Gospel According to Elijah and Elisha and coauthor with Tremper Longman of Introduction to the Old Testament.

Volume 16: Ezra, Nehemiah

  • Author: H.G.M. Willamson
  • Editor: John D.W. Watts
  • Series: Word Biblical Commentary
  • Publisher: Thomas Nelson
  • Publication Date: 1985
  • Pages: 472

Based on years of intensive study and research, this commentary provides competent guidance to the complexities of Ezra and Nehemiah. The author gives special attention to the perplexing problems associated with their form, structure, and literary history. Supporting the view that much of this material is from the fifth century BC, just as it claims to be, he concludes that “there is good reason to approach Ezra and Nehemiah as two parts of single work and that this work is to be regarded as complete as it stands.” Williamson also focuses on sections of these books commonly referred to as the “Ezra Memoir” and the “Nehemiah Memoir.” He notes the specifically theological purpose of such sections, in which the rebuilding of Jerusalem and the Temple are defended against the enemies, and the leaders of Israel plead for recognition of their faithfulness to the commission given them by God through the Persian kings.

H. G. M. Willamson is lecturer in Hebrew and Aramaic at Cambridge University. He is the author of International Critical Commentary: Isaiah: 1–5, Sheffield Old Testament Guides: Ezra and Nehemiah, and coeditor of Dictionary of the Old Testament: Historical Books.

Volume 17: Job 1–20

  • Author: David J.A. Clines
  • Editor: John D.W. Watts
  • Series: Word Biblical Commentary
  • Publisher: Thomas Nelson
  • Publication Date: 1989
  • Pages: 501

Learn how every element of Job is an essential element in the weaving of a literary and theological masterpiece. Examine the enigmatic origins and context of Job, its textual tradition, its complex structural relationships, and keys to its elegant poetry. This volume never loses sight of the big picture or the details. It constantly surveys the progress of Job, unravels the identity of its characters, and attempts to identify the distinctive viewpoints of the book’s speakers. The textual notes, which center on explaining why the English versions of Job differ so amazingly from one another, support the author's carefully worded translation.

David J.A. Clines is emeritus professor of biblical studies at the University of Sheffield. He currently serves as publisher and director of Sheffield Phoenix Press. He served as president of the Society for Old Testament Study (1996) and the Society of Biblical Literature (2009). He is the author of The Theme of the Pentateuch, Interested Parties: The Ideology of Writers and Readers of the Hebrew Bible, and On the Way to Postmodern: Old Testament Essays.

Volume 18a: Job 21–37

  • Author: David J.A. Clines
  • Editor: John D.W. Watts
  • Series: Word Biblical Commentary
  • Publisher: Thomas Nelson
  • Publication Date: 1989
  • Pages: 501

Learn how every element of Job is an essential element in the weaving of a literary and theological masterpiece. Examine the enigmatic origins and context of Job, its textual tradition, its complex structural relationships, and keys to its elegant poetry. This volume never loses sight of the big picture or the details. It constantly surveys the progress of Job, unravels the identity of its characters, and attempts to identify the distinctive viewpoints of the book’s speakers. The textual notes, which center on explaining why the English versions of Job differ so amazingly from one another, support the author's carefully worded translation.

David J. A. Clines is emeritus professor of biblical studies at the University of Sheffield. He currently serves as publisher and director of Sheffield Phoenix Press. He served as president of the Society for Old Testament Study (1996) and the Society of Biblical Literature (2009). He is the author of The Theme of the Pentateuch, Interested Parties: The Ideology of Writers and Readers of the Hebrew Bible, and On the Way to Postmodern: Old Testament Essays.

Volume 18b: Job 38–42

  • Author: David J.A. Clines
  • Series: Word Biblical Commentary
  • Publisher: Thomas Nelson
  • Publication Date: 2011
  • Pages: 544

Job 38–42 is the final volume in professor David Cline's monumental study of Job. This volume is devoted entirely to the response of the Lord from the tempest to Job and the replies of Job (Job 38–42), presenting the Lord's own explanation of his manifold purposes in creation and bringing to an unexpected conclusion Job's dramatic quest for justice.

Difficult portions of the Hebrew text are thoroughly handled, but the commentary is written for the non-technical reader and scholar alike. Clines uncovers the driving force of the argument and the drama of the book. Explanation sections at the end of each chapter brilliantly summarize the views of the speakers and offer thoughtful reflections on their theological value.

David J. A. Clines is emeritus professor of biblical studies at the University of Sheffield. He currently serves as publisher and director of Sheffield Phoenix Press. He served as president of the Society for Old Testament Study (1996) and the Society of Biblical Literature (2009). He is the author of The Theme of the Pentateuch, Interested Parties: The Ideology of Writers and Readers of the Hebrew Bible, and On the Way to Postmodern: Old Testament Essays.

Volume 19: Psalms 1–50, rev. ed.

  • Author: Peter C. Craigie
  • Editor: John D.W. Watts
  • Edition: 2nd
  • Series: Word Biblical Commentary
  • Publisher: Thomas Nelson
  • Publication Date: 2004
  • Pages: 504

Peter Craigie demonstrates that the biblical psalms express “the most profound of human feelings and insights—prayer, praise, liturgy, wisdom and lament.” Through careful analysis of language, form, and historical setting, he communicates both the emotional and theological impact of the psalms as originally experienced by the people of Israel at public worship and in private devotions. Professor Craigie's translations and interpretations of the first 50 Psalms provide insights into the Hebrew language and how Israel's literature draws from Ugaritic texts. He provides a careful and critical analysis of various scholarly proposals and their implications for modern interpretation of the Psalter.

Peter C. Craigie (1938–1985) was dean of the faculty of humanities at the University of Calgary. He is the author of The Book of Deuteronomy: New International Commentary on the Old Testament, Ugarit and the Old Testament: The Story of a Remarkable Discovery and its Impact on Old Testament Studies, and The Problem of War in the Old Testament.

Volume 20: Psalms 51–100

  • Author: Marvin E. Tate
  • Editor: John D.W. Watts
  • Series: Word Biblical Commentary
  • Publisher: Thomas Nelson
  • Publication Date: 1991
  • Pages: 612

Marvin Tate’s distinctive commentary traces all the biographical, historical, literary, and practical concepts of these middle psalms and demonstrates how the purpose of each one unfolds. The middle section of the Hebrew Psalter has long been regarded as an inspiring anthology of ancient religious poetry. Within this part of the Sepher Tehillim or Book of Praises, are 11 of the 12 psalms of Asaph (73–83), one of Solomon's two (72), the sole offerings of Ethan (89) and Moses (90), and four of the songs ascribed to the sons of Korah—not to mention the many attributed to David. Organized for easy reference, Word Biblical commentaries make an ideal Bible study companion whether you are studying a single passage or a complete biblical book.

Marvin E. Tate is senior professor of Old Testament interpretation at The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary in Louisville, Kentucky. He is author of From Promise to Exile: The Former Prophets.

Volume 21: Psalms 101–150, rev. ed.

  • Author: Leslie C. Allen
  • Editor: John D.W. Watts
  • Edition: 2nd
  • Series: Word Biblical Commentary
  • Publisher: Thomas Nelson
  • Publication Date: 2002
  • Pages: 450

Get a fresh understanding of the last 50 Psalms, as well as a deeper appreciation of their impact, in their original setting and in their history of interpretation throughout church history. Survey current research into these psalms, and review a fresh translation and textual notes.

Leslie C. Allen is professor of Old Testament at Fuller Theological Seminary, and was lecturer in Hebrew, Aramaic & Judaism at London Bible College. He is the author of The New International Commentary on the Old Testament: The Books of Joel, Obadiah, Jonah, and Micah, A Liturgy of Grief: A Pastoral Commentary on Lamentations, and Old Testament Library: Jeremiah.

Volume 22: Proverbs

  • Author: Roland E. Murphy
  • Editor: John D.W. Watts
  • Series: Word Biblical Commentary
  • Publisher: Thomas Nelson
  • Publication Date: 1998
  • Pages: 305

Roland Murphy approaches Proverbs as “a collection of collections.” The long poems of chapters 1–9 introduce the collections of short sayings in chapters 10-31. With this division Murphy accepts “the unproven but likely assumption” that during the postexilic period chapters 1-9 set the tone for the mostly pre-exilic collections in chapters 10–31. Murphy cautions his readers to consider the limitations of proverbial sayings. The Israelite sages sought in their optimistic teachings to express “the mystery that surrounds all human action: not only self-knowledge, but knowledge of the mysterious role of God.” Much of the wisdom of Proverbs points out the ambiguities of life. Yet the Proverbs do not provide the final word; "rather they act as a goad, a prod to further thought."

Roland E. Murphy is George Washington Ivey Emeritus Professor of Biblical Studies at Duke University. He is the author of Hermeneia: Song of Songs.

Volume 23a: Ecclesiastes

  • Author: Roland E. Murphy
  • Editor: John D.W. Watts
  • Series: Word Biblical Commentary
  • Publisher: Thomas Nelson
  • Publication Date: 1992
  • Pages: 170

Delve into the perplexing book of Ecclesiastes and study its textual history, historical context, and place in Israel’s wisdom tradition, with Roland Murphy. Revealing vast knowledge of past and present studies on Ecclesiastes, Murphy surveys the broad range of conflicting ideas about this book in historical and contemporary scholarship, dissecting all the major theories of authorship, dating, sociological setting, and linguistic analysis.

Roland E. Murphy is George Washington Ivey Emeritus Professor of Biblical Studies at Duke University. He is the author of Hermeneia: Song of Songs.

Volume 23b: Song of Songs/Lamentations

  • Authors: Duane Garrett and Paul R. House
  • Editor: John D.W. Watts
  • Series: Word Biblical Commentary
  • Publisher: Thomas Nelson
  • Publication Date: 2004
  • Pages: 496

Join Duane Garrett and Paul House as they examine two of the Bible’s most unusual and compelling books. They examine the textual history, historical context, literary structure, and authorship, of each book, providing extensive notes and bibliographic references.

Duane Garrett is John R. Sampey Professor of Old Testament Interpretation at The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary. He has served on the faculty at Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary, Bethel Seminary, Canadian Southern Baptist Seminary, Mid-America Baptist Seminary, and Korea Baptist Seminary.

Paul R. House is professor of biblical studies at Wheaton College, Wheaton, Illinois. He is the author of Fallen: A Theology of Sin, 1, 2 Kings: New American Commentary, and Old Testament Theology.

Volume 24: Isaiah 1–33, rev. ed.

  • Author: John D.W. Watts
  • Editor: John D.W. Watts
  • Edition: 2nd
  • Series: Word Biblical Commentary
  • Publisher: Thomas Nelson
  • Publication Date: 2004
  • Pages: 624

Study the epic story of the prophet Isaiah and his dealings with Israel and other nations with John Watts. From the opening covenantal indictment to the messianic proclamations in chapters 55–66, Watts explores the complex historical background, textual difficulties, interpretive issues, and source theories for the book Isaiah. One of the most detailed commentaries ever produced on Isaiah, Watts work is a standard text for students of Isaiah.

John D.W. Watts was president and professor of Old Testament at the Baptist Theological Seminary, Ruschlikon, Switzerland. He also served as professor of Old Testament at Fuller Theological Seminary and the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary in Louisville, Kentucky. He is the author of Studying the Book of Amos, Obadiah: A Critical Exegetical Commentary, and The Books of Joel, Obadiah, Jonah, Nahum, Habakkuk and Zephaniah.

Volume 25: Isaiah 34–66, rev. ed.

  • Author: John D.W. Watts
  • Editor: John D.W. Watts
  • Edition: 2nd
  • Series: Word Biblical Commentary
  • Publisher: Thomas Nelson
  • Publication Date: 2005
  • Pages: 448

Study the epic story of the prophet Isaiah and his dealings with Israel and other nations with John Watts. From the opening covenantal indictment to the messianic proclamations in chapters 55–66, Watts explores the complex historical background, textual difficulties, interpretive issues, and source theories for the book Isaiah. One of the most detailed commentaries ever produced on Isaiah, Watts’ work is a standard text for students of Isaiah.

John D.W. Watts was president and professor of Old Testament at the Baptist Theological Seminary, Ruschlikon, Switzerland. He also served as professor of Old Testament at Fuller Theological Seminary and the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary in Louisville, Kentucky. He is the author of Studying the Book of Amos, Obadiah: A Critical Exegetical Commentary, and The Books of Joel, Obadiah, Jonah, Nahum, Habakkuk and Zephaniah.

Volume 26: Jeremiah 1–25

  • Author: Peter C. Craigie
  • Editor: John D.W. Watts
  • Series: Word Biblical Commentary
  • Publisher: Thomas Nelson
  • Publication Date: 1991
  • Pages: 440

Examine the compositional sources, textual witnesses, chronology, and theological significance of Jeremiah with Peter Craigie. Review and evaluate modern critical perspectives to Jeremiah, and consider the legacy of nineteenth-century “higher critical” understanding of Jeremiah as an evolutionary document. Organized for easy reference, Word Biblical commentaries make an ideal Bible study companion whether you are studying a single passage or a complete biblical book.

Peter C. Craigie (1938–1985) was dean of the faculty of humanities at the University of Calgary. He is the author of The Book of Deuteronomy: New International Commentary on the Old Testament, Ugarit and the Old Testament: The Story of a Remarkable Discovery and its Impact on Old Testament Studies, and The Problem of War in the Old Testament.

Volume 27: Jeremiah 26–52

  • Authors: Gerald L. Keown, Pamela J. Scalise, and Thomas G. Smothers
  • Editor: John D.W. Watts
  • Series: Word Biblical Commentary
  • Publisher: Thomas Nelson
  • Publication Date: 1995
  • Pages: 402

Examine the compositional sources, textual witnesses, chronology, and theological significance of Jeremiah. Review and evaluate modern critical perspectives to Jeremiah, and consider the legacy of nineteenth-century “higher critical” understanding of Jeremiah as an evolutionary document. Organized for easy reference, Word Biblical commentaries make an ideal Bible study companion whether you are studying a single passage or a complete biblical book.

Gerald L. Keown is professor of Old Testament interpretation and associate dean of the school of divinity at Gardner-Webb University.

Pamela J. Scalise Pam Scalise is professor of Old Testament at Fuller Theological Seminary Seattle, Washington. She coauthored The Minor Prophets, vol. 2 with John Goldingay.

Thomas G. Smothers (1934–2012) was professor of Old Testament at the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, Louisville, Kentucky.

Volume 28: Ezekiel 1–19

  • Author: Leslie C. Allen
  • Editor: John D.W. Watts
  • Series: Word Biblical Commentary
  • Publisher: Thomas Nelson
  • Publication Date: 1994
  • Pages: 348

Delve deep into the language, structure, and background of the mysterious prophecies of Ezekiel. Allen’s mastery of Hebrew provides a fresh translation and is accompanied by notes interpreting the significance of textual variants. Focusing on the meaning of the text, Allen illuminates the historical setting of the book and explains the role of the prophet with clarity and precision.

Leslie C. Allen is professor of Old Testament at Fuller Theological Seminary, and was lecturer in Hebrew, Aramaic and Judaism at London Bible College. He is the author of The New International Commentary on the Old Testament: The Books of Joel, Obadiah, Jonah, and Micah, A Liturgy of Grief: A Pastoral Commentary on Lamentations, and Old Testament Library: Jeremiah.

Volume 29: Ezekiel 20–48

  • Author: Leslie C. Allen
  • Editor: John D.W. Watts
  • Series: Word Biblical Commentary
  • Publisher: Thomas Nelson
  • Publication Date: 1990
  • Pages: 336

Delve deep into the language, structure, and background of the mysterious prophecies of Ezekiel. Allen’s mastery of Hebrew provides a fresh translation and is accompanied by notes interpreting the significance of textual variants. Focusing on the meaning of the text, Allen illuminates the historical setting of the book and explains the role of the prophet with clarity and precision.

Leslie C. Allen is professor of Old Testament at Fuller Theological Seminary, and was lecturer in Hebrew, Aramaic and Judaism at London Bible College. He is the author of The New International Commentary on the Old Testament: The Books of Joel, Obadiah, Jonah, and Micah, A Liturgy of Grief: A Pastoral Commentary on Lamentations, and Old Testament Library: Jeremiah.

Volume 30: Daniel

  • Author: John E. Goldingay
  • Editor: John D.W. Watts
  • Series: Word Biblical Commentary
  • Publisher: Thomas Nelson
  • Publication Date: 1989
  • Pages: 416

Uncover the mysteries of Daniel with leading Old Testament scholar John Goldingay. Goldingay illuminates Daniel’s historical setting and uses it to explain the book’s prophecies. he analyzes the composition of the book, and provides a fresh translation.

John E. Goldingay is David Allan Hubbard Professor of Old Testament at Fuller Theological Seminary in Pasadena, California. An internationally respected Old Testament scholar, Goldingay is the author of many commentaries and books, including Old Testament Theology, Old Testament for Everyone, and Theological Diversity and the Authority of the Old Testament.

Volume 31: Hosea–Jonah

  • Author: Douglas Stuart
  • Editor: John D.W. Watts
  • Series: Word Biblical Commentary
  • Publisher: Thomas Nelson
  • Publication Date: 1987
  • Pages: 588

Study the books of Hosea, Joel, Amos, Obadiah, and Jonah, with pioneering Old Testament scholar Douglas Stuart. Heart breaking, strange, and hopeful stories these books are among the Bible’s most misunderstood and Stuart illuminates their meaning by examining their historical context, and unlocking their mysterious stories and prophecies.

Douglas Stuart is professor of Old Testament at Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary in South Hamilton, Massachusetts. He is the author of New American Commentary: Exodus, Old Testament Exegesis: A Handbook for Students and Pastors, and coauthor with Gordon Fee of How to Read the Bible for All Its Worth.

Volume 32: Micah–Malachi

  • Author: Ralph L. Smith
  • Editor: John D.W. Watts
  • Series: Word Biblical Commentary
  • Publisher: Thomas Nelson
  • Publication Date: 1984
  • Pages: 358

Explore the mysterious prophecies of Micah, Nahum, Habakkuk, Zephaniah, Haggai, Zechariah, and Malachi by studying their historical context, textual transmission, composition, and theological meaning.

Ralph L. Smith is professor emeritus of Old Testament at Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary. He is the author of Old Testament Theology: Its History, Method, and Message.

Volume 33a: Matthew 1–13

  • Author: Donald A. Hagner
  • Editor: Ralph P. Martin
  • Series: Word Biblical Commentary
  • Publisher: Thomas Nelson
  • Publication Date: 1993
  • Pages: 504

One of the most detailed and thorough treatments of Matthew ever written, Donald Hagner’s commentary addresses the relationship of Matthew to Luke and Mark, examines the major issues for interpreting Matthew, and provides an fresh translation based on engagement with the book’s textual history. Focusing on interpretation and message of Jesus’ kingdom, Hagner draws out illuminating theological themes, applying them to contemporary life.

Donald A. Hagner is the George Eldon Ladd Emeritus Professor of New Testament and the senior professor of New Testament at Fuller Theological Seminary. He is the author of Encountering the Book of Hebrews, The Jewish Reclamation of Jesus, and The New Testament: A Historical and Theological Introduction. Hagner is the coeditor of the New International Greek Testament Commentary with I. Howard Marshall and an ordained minister in the American Presbyterian Church.

Volume 33b: Matthew 14–28

  • Author: Donald A. Hagner
  • Editor: Ralph P. Martin
  • Series: Word Biblical Commentary
  • Publisher: Thomas Nelson
  • Publication Date: 1995
  • Pages: 576

One of the most detailed and thorough treatments of Matthew ever written, Donald Hagner’s commentary addresses the relationship of Matthew to Luke and Mark, examines the major issues for interpreting Matthew, and provides an fresh translation based on engagement with the book’s textual history. Focusing on interpretation and message of Jesus’ kingdom, Hagner draws out illuminating theological themes, applying them to contemporary life.

Donald A. Hagner is the George Eldon Ladd Emeritus Professor of New Testament and the senior professor of New Testament at Fuller Theological Seminary. He is the author of Encountering the Book of Hebrews, The Jewish Reclamation of Jesus, and The New Testament: A Historical and Theological Introduction. Hagner is the coeditor of the New International Greek Testament Commentary with I. Howard Marshall and an ordained minister in the American Presbyterian Church.

Volume 34a: Mark 1–8:26

  • Author: Robert A. Guelich
  • Editor: Ralph P. Martin
  • Series: Word Biblical Commentary
  • Publisher: Thomas Nelson
  • Publication Date: 1989
  • Pages: 454

Thoroughly engaging with the massive body of scholarship on Mark, Robert Guelich’s commentary presents a thorough textual, historical, and theological examination of Mark. He addresses “the synoptic problem” and provides an engaging and stimulating exposition on the church’s second gospel.

Robert A. Guelich (1939–1991) was professor of New Testament Studies at Fuller Theological Seminary. He is the author of The Sermon on the Mount: A Foundation for Understanding.

Volume 34b: Mark 8:27–16:20

  • Author: Craig A. Evans
  • Editor: Ralph P. Martin
  • Series: Word Biblical Commentary
  • Publisher: Thomas Nelson
  • Publication Date: 2001
  • Pages: 594

Thoroughly engaging with the massive body of scholarship on Mark, Craig Evans’s commentary presents a thorough textual, historical, and theological examination of Mark. He addresses “the synoptic problem” and provides an engaging and stimulating exposition on the church’s second gospel.

Dr. Craig A. Evans received his PhD in New Testament from Claremont Graduate University and his DHabil from the Karoli Gaspar Reformed University in Budapest. He is the John Bisagno Distinguished Professor of Christian Origins at Houston Baptist University in Texas.

Evans taught at Trinity Western University in British Columbia for 21 years, where he directed the graduate program in biblical studies and founded the Dead Sea Scrolls Institute. He has recently served on the advisory board for the Gospel of Judas for National Geographic Society and has appeared frequently as an expert commentator on network television programs.

Evans has written and edited extensively on the historical Jesus and the Jewish background of the New Testament era. His published works include From Prophecy to Testament, Jesus and the Ossuaries, Jesus: The Final Days, and Dictionary of New Testament Background.

Volume 35a: Luke 1:1–9:20

  • Author: John Nolland
  • Editor: Ralph P. Martin
  • Series: Word Biblical Commentary
  • Publisher: Thomas Nelson
  • Publication Date: 1989
  • Pages: 520

Explore the rich narrative of Luke’s gospel with leading New Testament scholar John Nolland. Examining the historical context, literary structure, and relationship to other gospels, Nolland provides a detailed reading of Luke that emphasizes the historicity of the book and its theological meaning.

John Nolland is academic dean and lecturer in New Testament studies at Trinity College, Bristol, England. He is an ordained minister of the Church of England, and author of The New International Greek Testament Commentary: The Gospel of Matthew and coauthor of Built upon the Rock: Studies in the Gospel of Matthew.

Volume 35b: Luke 9:21–18:34

  • Author: John Nolland
  • Editor: Ralph P. Martin
  • Series: Word Biblical Commentary
  • Publisher: Thomas Nelson
  • Publication Date: 1993
  • Pages: 510

Explore the rich narrative of Luke’s gospel with leading New Testament scholar John Nolland. Examining the historical context, literary structure, and relationship to other gospels, Nolland provides a detailed reading of Luke that emphasizes the historicity of the book and its theological meaning.

John Nolland is academic dean and lecturer in New Testament studies at Trinity College, Bristol, England. He is an ordained minister of the Church of England, and author of The New International Greek Testament Commentary: The Gospel of Matthew and coauthor of Built upon the Rock: Studies in the Gospel of Matthew.

Volume 35c: Luke 18:35–24:53

  • Author: John Nolland
  • Editor: Ralph P. Martin
  • Series: Word Biblical Commentary
  • Publisher: Thomas Nelson
  • Publication Date: 1993
  • Pages: 462

Explore the rich narrative of Luke’s gospel with leading New Testament scholar John Nolland. Examining the historical context, literary structure, and relationship to other gospels, Nolland provides a detailed reading of Luke that emphasizes the historicity of the book and its theological meaning.

John Nolland is academic dean and lecturer in New Testament studies at Trinity College, Bristol, England. He is an ordained minister of the Church of England, and author of The New International Greek Testament Commentary: The Gospel of Matthew and coauthor of Built upon the Rock: Studies in the Gospel of Matthew.

Volume 36: John, 2nd ed.

  • Author: George R. Beasley-Murray
  • Editor: Ralph P. Martin
  • Edition: 2nd
  • Series: Word Biblical Commentary
  • Publisher: Thomas Nelson
  • Publication Date: 1999
  • Pages: 588

Confront the historical, theological, and textual concerns raised by the fourth gospel. George Beasley-Murray reveals John’s unique presentation of Christ as truly human and fully divine, giving special emphasis to John’s concentration on the passion and victory of the incarnate Word. His commentary illuminates John’s primary themes—the cross and resurrection—while engaging thoughtfully with contemporary research.

George R. Beasley-Murray was principal of Spurgeon’s College in England and James Buchanan Harrison Professor of New Testament at Southern Baptist Theological Seminary. He is the author of Baptism in the New Testament, Jesus and the Kingdom of God, and Gospel of Life: Theology in the Fourth Gospel. Beasley-Murray’s son, Paul Beasley-Murray, wrote a biography about his father called Fearless for Truth: A Personal Portrait of George Raymond Beasley-Murray.

Volume 38a: Romans 1–8

  • Author: James D.G. Dunn
  • Editor: Ralph P. Martin
  • Series: Word Biblical Commentary
  • Publisher: Thomas Nelson
  • Publication Date: 1988
  • Pages: 513

See Romans in the light of modern historical and cultural studies with this commentary from ground breaking scholar James D.G. Dunn. Dunn maintains that it is imperative to grasp the coherence of Paul’s thought as it moves with sustained logic and consistent rigor from the opening announcement of God’s righteousness revealed in Christ and the gospel through each interlocking section of this epistle. He insists that the letter must be read and understood within a specific historical and cultural context. Paul’s background in Judaism, his perception of the role of the law as a marker of national Jewish identity, God’s saving actions in Christ both in continuity with the past and as a decisive new chapter in salvation and world history, and the ongoing eschatological tension between the “already” and the “not yet”–clues that inform a penetrating and moving piece of commentary writing.

James D.G. Dunn is Emeritus Lightfoot Professor of Divinity at the University of Durham and is a leading British New Testament scholar. Dunn is a significant proponent of the New Perspective on Paul, and became only the third British scholar to be made the president of the Studiorum Novi Testamenti Societas. He is the author of numerous books, including Did the First Christians Worship Jesus? The New Testament Evidence, The Epistles to Colossians and Philemon: New International Greek Testament Commentary, Jesus, Paul, and the Gospels, and The Oral Gospel Tradition.

Volume 38b: Romans 9–16

  • Author: James D.G. Dunn
  • Editor: Ralph P. Martin
  • Series: Word Biblical Commentary
  • Publisher: Thomas Nelson
  • Publication Date: 1988
  • Pages: 459

See Romans in the light of modern historical and cultural studies with this commentary from ground breaking scholar James D.G. Dunn. Dunn maintains that it is imperative to grasp the coherence of Paul’s thought as it moves with sustained logic and consistent rigor from the opening announcement of God’s righteousness revealed in Christ and the gospel through each interlocking section of this epistle. He insists that the letter must be read and understood within a specific historical and cultural context. Paul’s background in Judaism, his perception of the role of the law as a marker of national Jewish identity, God’s saving actions in Christ both in continuity with the past and as a decisive new chapter in salvation and world history, and the ongoing eschatological tension between the “already” and the “not yet”–clues that inform a penetrating and movving piece of commentary writing.

James D.G. Dunn is Emeritus Lightfoot Professor of Divinity at the University of Durham and is a leading British New Testament scholar. Dunn is a significant proponent of the New Perspective on Paul, and became only the third British scholar to be made the president of the Studiorum Novi Testamenti Societas. He is the author of numerous books, including Did the First Christians Worship Jesus? The New Testament Evidence, The Epistles to Colossians and Philemon: New International Greek Testament Commentary, Jesus, Paul, and the Gospels, and The Oral Gospel Tradition.

Volume 40: 2 Corinthians, 2nd ed.

  • Author: Ralph P. Martin
  • Editor: Lynn Allan Losie
  • Edition: Second
  • Series: Word Biblical Commentary
  • Publisher: Zondervan
  • Publication Date: 2014
  • Pages: 752

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Ralph P. Martin gives insight into the unique problems expressed in the ancient, hedonistic, cosmopolitan setting of Corinth. He shows how Paul’s attempt to clearly distinguish the gospel from Hellenistic Judaism and Hellenistic Jewish Christian ideology results in a moving statement of the Christian message. Rather than the “theology of glory” prevalent in Corinth, Paul articulates his theology of the cross as a “theology of weakness,” of servanthood and ministry. What was at stake at Corinth, says Dr. Martin, was “nothing less than the essence of the kerygma as expressed in the way of the cross . . . for proclamation and daily living.” This edition includes new sections on the “collection” and Paul’s rhetoric, issues of composition and social setting, and topics such as the Spirit, the opponents, Paul’s theology, and the Resurrection.

Ralph P. Martin (1925–2013) served as scholar-in-residence at several schools, including Fuller Theological Seminary, Haggard School of Theology, and Azusa Pacific University. He was a professor emeritus of New Testament at Fuller Theological Seminary and an associate professor in biblical studies at the University of Sheffield in England. He is the author of Word Biblical Commentary, Volume 43: Philippians (Revised Edition), Worship in the Early Church, and Word Biblical Commentary, Volume 40: 2 Corinthians.

Lynn Allan Losie is associate professor of New Testament at Azusa Pacific Seminary.

Volume 41: Galatians

  • Author: Richard N. Longenecker
  • Editor: Ralph P. Martin
  • Series: Word Biblical Commentary
  • Publisher: Thomas Nelson
  • Publication Date: 1990
  • Pages: 444

One of the most influential volumes on Galatians, Richard Longenecker offers a fresh translation of Galatians and gives the reader a thorough discussion of such matters as authorship, date, and textual problems, while also addressing the problems Paul faced within his Galatian churches. Longenecker reviews the message of Paul’s opponents and the impact of Paul’s thought on Christianity.

Volume 42: Ephesians

  • Author: Andrew T. Lincoln
  • Editor: Ralph P. Martin
  • Series: Word Biblical Commentary
  • Publisher: Thomas Nelson
  • Publication Date: 1990
  • Pages: 592

Focus on the power of Paul’s persuasive rhetoric and message in this commentary from Andrew T. Lincoln. Situating the epistle in its historical context, evaluating competing claims of authorship, and examining textual history of the book, Lincoln offers a fresh reading of this challenging epistle that expresses Paul’s vision for ecclesiastical and domestic life.

Andrew T. Lincoln is the Portland Professor of New Testament at the University of Gloucestershire. He is the author of Black’s New Testament Commentary: The Gospel According to Saint John.

Volume 43: Philippians, rev. ed.

  • Author: Gerald F. Hawthorne
  • Editor: Ralph P. Martin
  • Series: Word Biblical Commentary
  • Publisher: Thomas Nelson
  • Publication Date: 2004
  • Pages: 384

Engage Philippians through the fresh literary perspective of rhetorical criticism, and gain insights from recent archaeological discoveries, and a consideration of the “effective” history of the letter through its influence on the church. Gerald Hawthorne reassesses the issues of provenance and identity of Paul’s opponents and places special emphasis on the themes of joy in suffering and life in Christ are fleshed out in great detail.

Gerald F. Hawthorne (1925–2010) served as a professor of Greek for 42 years at Wheaton College in Wheaton, Illinois, as well as chairperson of the Institute for Biblical Research, which he founded. He coedited The Dictionary of Paul and His Letters.

Volume 45: 1 & 2 Thessalonians

  • Author: F.F. Bruce
  • Editor: Ralph P. Martin
  • Series: Word Biblical Commentary
  • Publisher: Thomas Nelson
  • Publication Date: 1982
  • Pages: 228

Detailed exegesis defines any commentary written by F.F. Bruce. Here, Bruce’s efforts provide detailed analysis of the Thessalonian context, the spread of the gospel in Macedonia, and a review of the textual transmission of these early New Testament books. Bruce explains why the Christian message caused a riot at Thessalonica, and traces the church’s anxieties over the return of Christ, clarifying Paul’s cautious response to speculation in Thessalonica and a discussion of how to deal with persecution.

F. F. Bruce (1910-1990) was Rylands Professor of Biblical Criticism and Exegesis at the University of Manchester in England. During his distinguished career, he wrote many bestselling commentaries and books, including The Canon of Scripture, Paul: Apostle of the Free Spirit, and The Epistle to the Galatians: New International Greek Testament Commentary. He also served as general editor of The New International Commentary on the New Testament.

Volume 46: Pastoral Epistles

  • Author: William D. Mounce
  • Editor: Ralph P. Martin
  • Series: Word Biblical Commentary
  • Publisher: Thomas Nelson
  • Publication Date: 2000
  • Pages: 786

Engage some of the hottest issues in contemporary society with this exhaustive treatment of 1 Timothy, 2 Timothy, and Titus. Defending traditional interpretations on multiple issues, William Mounce provides an intense examination of the text and presents multiple excursus on topics such as qualifications for leadership and authorship.

William D. Mounce is the president of Biblical Training, a nonprofit organization offering the finest in evangelical teaching to the world for free. He served at a church in Spokane, Washington, and was a professor of New Testament and director of the Greek program at Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary. He is the author of the bestselling Basics of Biblical Greek, Mounce’s Complete Expository Dictionary of Old and New Testament Words, and Morphology of Biblical Greek.

Volume 47a: Hebrews 1–8

  • Author: William L. Lane
  • Editor: Ralph P. Martin
  • Series: Word Biblical Commentary
  • Publisher: Thomas Nelson
  • Publication Date: 1991
  • Pages: 372

Winner of Christianity Today’s 1993 Critic’s Choice Award, this commentary provides an interpretation of the book of Hebrews in conversation with the rapidly growing body of scholarly literature. Acknowledging that many issues such as authorship and provenance remain open, William Lane examines the evidence available and makes a compelling case for his reading of the book and its historical background.

William L. Lane (1931–1999) was Paul T. Walls Chair in Wesleyan and Biblical Studies at Seattle Pacific University. He served as a translation team for the NASB and NIV translations of the Bible. He is the author of The New International Commentary on the New Testament: The Gospel of Mark.

Volume 47b: Hebrews 9–13

  • Author: William L. Lane
  • Editor: Ralph P. Martin
  • Series: Word Biblical Commentary
  • Publisher: Thomas Nelson
  • Publication Date: 1988
  • Pages: 450

Winner of Christianity Today’s 1993 Critic’s Choice Award, this commentary provides an interpretation of the book of Hebrews in conversation with the rapidly growing body of scholarly literature. Acknowledging that many issues such as authorship and provenance remain open, William Lane examines the evidence available and makes a compelling case for his reading of the book and its historical background.

William L. Lane (1931–1999) was Paul T. Walls Chair in Wesleyan and Biblical Studies at Seattle Pacific University. He served as a translation team for the NASB and NIV translations of the Bible. He is the author of The New International Commentary on the New Testament: The Gospel of Mark.

Volume 48: James

  • Author: Ralph P. Martin
  • Editor: Ralph P. Martin
  • Series: Word Biblical Commentary
  • Publisher: Thomas Nelson
  • Publication Date: 1988
  • Pages: 354

One of the most challenging New Testament books, James presents many historical, theological, and textual problems. Ralph Martin tackles each one in order and with scholarly precision. He provides detailed textual notes, places the epistle historically, and engages the theological controversies raised by this often maligned epistle.

Ralph P. Martin was a New Testament professor at the University of Manchester and Fuller Theological Seminary. He is the author of Worship in the Early Church, Interpretation: A Bible Commentary for Teaching and Preaching Ephesians, Colossians, & Philemon, and coedited Dictionary of Paul and His Letters.

Volume 49: 1 Peter

  • Author: J. Ramsey Michaels
  • Editor: Ralph P. Martin
  • Series: Word Biblical Commentary
  • Publisher: Thomas Nelson
  • Publication Date: 2010
  • Pages: 420

Presenting some of the most unique problems in the New Testament, 1 Peter requires a vast knowledge of the classical world and the New Testament documents. J. Ramsey Michaels’ work on 1 Peter provides a tour through all of the relevant historical data, examining the circumstance which gave rise to Peter’s exhortations. He provides analysis of textual problems, and draws out the epistle’s implications of the epistle for contemporary life.

J. Ramsey Michaels is professor emeritus of religious studies at Missouri State University, Springfield, Missouri, and adjunct professor of New Testament at Bangor Theological Seminary, Portland, Maine. He also taught at Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary. He is the author of several commentaries, on Revelation, including The New International Commentary on the New Testament: The Gospel of John, The IVP New Testament Commentary Series: Revelation, and Interpreting the Book of Revelation.

Volume 50: Jude, 2 Peter

  • Author: Richard Bauckham
  • Editor: Ralph P. Martin
  • Series: Word Biblical Commentary
  • Publisher: Thomas Nelson
  • Publication Date: 1983
  • Pages: 377

One of the earliest works of ground breaking scholar Richard Bauckham, this commentary provides a detailed examination of the socio-historical context with a special emphasis on the political state of the ancient world at the end of the first century. Bauckham reviews textual data, and draws out insight and applications for contemporary life.

Richard Bauckham was professor of New Testament studies at St Mary’s College, University of St Andrews. He retired in 2007 from this position in order to concentrate on research and writing. He currently is the senior scholar at Ridley Hall in Cambridge and visiting professor at St. Mellitus College. He is the author of Scripture, Tradition and Reason: A Study in the Criteria of Christian Doctrine, Jude and the Relatives of Jesus in the Early Church, and Jesus and the Eyewitnesses: The Gospels as Eyewitness Testimony.

Volume 51: 1, 2, 3 John

  • Author: Stephen S. Smalley
  • Editor: Ralph P. Martin
  • Series: Word Biblical Commentary
  • Publisher: Thomas Nelson
  • Publication Date: 2009
  • Pages: 350

Stephen Smalley’s exhaustive commentary on the Greek text of the letters of John argues that these epistles, together with the fourth Gospel, record and reflect the spiritual history of the Johannine community itself. These letters contain theological, ethical and practical truths that are fundamental to the Christian position in every age: that Jesus is one with God as well as one with us; that love and righteousness are indispensable to the believer who seeks as a child of God to walk in the light; and that unity, however flexible, is a demand laid upon the whole Church at all times.

Stephen S. Smalley is a New Testament scholar and author. He was formerly chaplain and dean of Peterhouse, Cambridge and vice-provost of Coventry Cathedral. He is dean emeritus of Chester Cathedral. Smalley has also taught at the universities of Ibadan and Manchester. He is the author of The Revelation to John: A Commentary on the Greek Text of the Apocalypse.

Volume 52a: Revelation 1–5

  • Author: David E. Aune
  • Editor: Ralph P. Martin
  • Series: Word Biblical Commentary
  • Publisher: Thomas Nelson
  • Publication Date: 1997
  • Pages: 592

An advocate of source criticism and an expert in early Christian prophecy, David Aune examines the full range of secular and biblical literature in search of possible sources for the striking literary devices in Revelation—over three volumes and more than 1,500 pages. His mastery of an incredibly broad range of ancient writings enables him to compare every pericope of Revelation to the literary traditions of the ages that preceded its writing, and thus to evaluate the possible sources for the forms John employed to write his vision. Aune’s detailed introductory comments scrutinize the entire expanse of this mysterious book, providing a monumental treatment of Revelation’s textual history. He provides an expanded outline of all twenty-two chapters and focuses on the implications for the book of Revelation in such matters as:

  • the use of chronological eschatological visions
  • the recurring sets of sevens
  • the paired angelic revelations beginning in 17:1 and 21:9
  • the scenes in the heavenly throne room with their hymns
  • possible connections between the scrolls in chapters 5 and 10

David E. Aune is Walter Professor of New Testament and Christian Origins at the University of Notre Dame. In 2012 he was named the honorary president for life of the Chicago Society of Biblical research. He is the author of The New Testament in Its Literary Environment, Prophecy in Early Christianity and the Ancient Mediterranean World, and Apocalypticism, Prophecy, and Magic in Early Christianity: Collected Essays.

Volume 52b: Revelation 6–16

  • Author: David E. Aune
  • Editor: Ralph P. Martin
  • Series: Word Biblical Commentary
  • Publisher: Thomas Nelson
  • Publication Date: 1998
  • Pages: 576

An advocate of source criticism and an expert in early Christian prophecy, David Aune examines the full range of secular and biblical literature in search of possible sources for the striking literary devices in Revelation—over three volumes and more than 1,500 pages. His mastery of an incredibly broad range of ancient writings enables him to compare every pericope of Revelation to the literary traditions of the ages that preceded its writing, and thus to evaluate the possible sources for the forms John employed to write his vision. Aune’s detailed introductory comments scrutinize the entire expanse of this mysterious book, providing a monumental treatment of Revelation’s textual history. He provides an expanded outline of all twenty-two chapters and focuses on the implications for the book of Revelation in such matters as:

  • the use of chronological eschatological visions
  • the recurring sets of sevens
  • the paired angelic revelations beginning in 17:1 and 21:9
  • the scenes in the heavenly throne room with their hymns
  • possible connections between the scrolls in chapters 5 and 10

David E. Aune is Walter Professor of New Testament and Christian Origins at the University of Notre Dame. In 2012 he was named the honorary president for life of the Chicago Society of Biblical research. He is the author of The New Testament in Its Literary Environment, Prophecy in Early Christianity and the Ancient Mediterranean World, and Apocalypticism, Prophecy, and Magic in Early Christianity: Collected Essays.

Volume 52c: Revelation 17–22

  • Author: David E. Aune
  • Editor: Ralph P. Martin
  • Series: Word Biblical Commentary
  • Publisher: Thomas Nelson
  • Publication Date: 1998
  • Pages: 504

An advocate of source criticism and an expert in early Christian prophecy, David Aune examines the full range of secular and biblical literature in search of possible sources for the striking literary devices in Revelation—over three volumes and more than 1,500 pages. His mastery of an incredibly broad range of ancient writings enables him to compare every pericope of Revelation to the literary traditions of the ages that preceded its writing, and thus to evaluate the possible sources for the forms John employed to write his vision. Aune’s detailed introductory comments scrutinize the entire expanse of this mysterious book, providing a monumental treatment of Revelation’s textual history. He provides an expanded outline of all twenty-two chapters and focuses on the implications for the book of Revelation in such matters as:

  • the use of chronological eschatological visions
  • the recurring sets of sevens
  • the paired angelic revelations beginning in 17:1 and 21:9
  • the scenes in the heavenly throne room with their hymns
  • possible connections between the scrolls in chapters 5 and 10
.

David E. Aune is Walter Professor of New Testament and Christian Origins at the University of Notre Dame. In 2012 he was named the honorary president for life of the Chicago Society of Biblical research. He is the author of The New Testament in Its Literary Environment, Prophecy in Early Christianity and the Ancient Mediterranean World, and Apocalypticism, Prophecy, and Magic in Early Christianity: Collected Essays.

Reviews

97 ratings

4.74.74.74.74.7

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  1. Lee Yen Ter

    Lee Yen Ter

    4/5/2021

    44444
  2. Mark Fan

    Mark Fan

    3/26/2021

    55555
  3. Mark Fan

    Mark Fan

    3/26/2021

    22222
  4. George Torres

    George Torres

    3/18/2021

    55555
    A comprehensive resource for any serious Bible study candidate.
    Reply

  5. Dr. Anthony Mazak
  6. Thiago Serra

    Thiago Serra

    2/15/2021

    55555
    a year after the purchase, I can say that it was worth every penny. rich content, vast bibliography, great research work. God bless the authors and organizers.
    Reply

  7. Pastor Duret Gray
  8. Samuel Bauer

    Samuel Bauer

    11/13/2020

    55555
  9. Randy

    Randy

    9/24/2020

    33333
    What I appreciate about these volumes, is the thoroughness of the content. They have a detailed bibliography. They offer an original translation of the original languages. A "Notes" segment comes next, giving details about how they reached their conclusions in the translation. After this, they feature a segment called "Form/Structure/Setting", which provides an overview. Next, you get to the "comments" segment (which is all many commentaries offer). Finally, they include an "Explanation" which deals more with the practical application of the passage. I commend the set for being consistently thorough. The set is very thorough and deep, which I appreciate. The set is written by a number of different commentators. In my opinion, the content is kind of hit-and-miss. For example, the pastoral epistles volume, written by Mounce, is right on. The second volume of Psalms was insufferable in my opinion (see my comment on that volume), and I will never use that commentary again. The Bible says "faith comes by hearing, and hearing by the word of God" (Romans 10:17). The result of studying the Bible should be confidence, not doubt. What I don't like about the set is that, more often than not, it tends to raise more doubts in my mind than it does to promote faith. Things you've believed for years are dismissed as improbable, sometimes with little explanation. It feels like my faith is being attacked, and that seeds of doubt are regularly being sewn. They also frequently conclude to the effect "we can't know", etc., over matters that seem obvious. Evidently, this is viewed as being "scholarly", but really it seems more like Satan planting doubts.
    Reply

  10. Keif Jackson

    Keif Jackson

    9/21/2020

    55555
    Love it !!
    Reply

  11. Reuven Milles

    Reuven Milles

    9/16/2020

    55555
  12. Chuck Evans

    Chuck Evans

    9/13/2020

    55555
  13. Pastor Mark Stevenson
  14. Andy Foxall

    Andy Foxall

    8/20/2020

    55555
  15. Jon A Covey

    Jon A Covey

    8/10/2020

    55555
    My only frustration is Acts is not included, although I just discovered 1 Corinthians is also missing. The commentaries are heavy duty, and I got them because one of my pastors had an entire bookcase holding just them. That was impressive to me, but when I got it there was so much detail and scholarly discussions, I seldom used it for a long time because it took so long to read the article containing something I wanted to get a view on, especially when my wife and I are doing our evening devotions and she asks a question about something and I didn't want to spend 10-20 minutes reading the commentary on a single verse. Now it's one of my regularly loaded books when I open Logos. It might take a long read to get around to answering a question, but there's so much to learn along the way. My wife likes the OT commentaries because she grew up as a Jew and was bat mitzvahed and went to Hebrew school, so she likes the commentaries' approach, displaying the Hebrew and giving the authors' translations, often dealing with technical issues. I like that and the NT Greek discussions since I know Greek than Hebrew.
    Reply

  16. Kenneth

    Kenneth

    5/26/2020

    55555
  17. Kukjin

    Kukjin

    3/30/2020

    55555
  18. Cornel Pascu

    Cornel Pascu

    3/25/2020

    55555
  19. Carl young

    Carl young

    1/31/2020

    22222
  20. Sungwon Jang

    Sungwon Jang

    11/16/2019

    55555
  21. Chuck Guy

    Chuck Guy

    10/30/2019

    55555
  22. Allen W

    Allen W

    10/27/2019

    44444
    Agree with Eric, any word on timeline for 1 Corinthians?
    Reply

  23. Eric Wiggle

    Eric Wiggle

    10/25/2019

    55555
    Love the set, wondering when Acts and 1st Corinthians are due?
    Reply

  24. Rob Surgenor

    Rob Surgenor

    10/17/2019

    55555
  25. Ryan

    Ryan

    10/5/2019

    55555
  26. Sergio Dario Costa Silva
  27. Tim Anderson

    Tim Anderson

    9/9/2019

    44444
    It is a good solid series of commentaries, used them in print, just starting to find out how they work with the Logos software. So far I am pleased. Agree with other reviews that at $400 you could find a better deal on the commentary set that is as solid as WBC.
    Reply

  28. Gerald Penny

    Gerald Penny

    9/6/2019

    44444
    WBC is a very helpful tool due to its thorough handling of the original languages. A must-have for the serious Bible student.
    Reply

  29. R.  Dennis Macaleer
    This is the finest commentary set on the market today. Because the scholarship is updated, its quality and usefulness even surpasses the classics like Matthew Henry. The authors of the various volumes are some of the most respected scholars in their fields. These scholars avoid some of the extremes in biblical study from both the left and the right, which allows the reader to trust the comments and conclusions reached in the text. Each passage of Scripture is analyzed in four different ways. The notes section offers information on words, textual variants and such. The eponymously named form/structure section analyzes the form and structure. The comment section offers several paragraphs on each verse in great detail. The explanation section gives a summary of the first three sections for those a little short on study time. This is THE commentary set every teacher/pastor/student needs to have to do thorough exegesis. And when it was on sale at $400 there was no reason not to get it.
    Reply

  30. Ehud Garcia

    Ehud Garcia

    9/5/2019

    I was with great joy that I purchased the Word Biblical Commentary! I have a few hard copies and ALWAYS wanted to have the entire set, but finances did not allow it. WBC has been one of my key commentaries for a number of years; as I needed one or two volumes at a time, I would purchase them. Now, with the full set I am most glad and already using them for my regular preaching and teaching.
    Reply

  31. Guy Gorman

    Guy Gorman

    9/5/2019

    55555
  32. Leon Adkins

    Leon Adkins

    9/4/2019

    33333
  33. Leon Adkins

    Leon Adkins

    9/4/2019

    33333
  34. Hebert Davi Liessi
  35. Claybon Collins Jr
  36. Debra W Bouey

    Debra W Bouey

    8/31/2019

    55555
  37. Thomas Binder

    Thomas Binder

    8/31/2019

    55555
  38. Vicky low

    Vicky low

    8/31/2019

    55555
  39. Andy Devine

    Andy Devine

    8/31/2019

    44444
  40. Alexandru Gutu
  41. Luke Heibel

    Luke Heibel

    8/24/2019

    33333
  42. Andrew Miller

    Andrew Miller

    8/13/2019

    I have been eyeing this resource for a while, and I have heard its commentary on Acts was superb. What happened to volume 37 on Acts for this collection?
    Reply

  43. Marc Paveglio
    No Colossians-Philemon? What's up with that? I just discovered the missing volume today.
    Reply

  44. Tony Robertson
    This is a good set but I am wondering if they will ever come out with Acts or is this set complete as it is.
    Reply

  45. Gabriel Lucente
  46. René van der Vegt
  47. EMANUEL BATISTA UCHOA
  48. EMANUEL BATISTA UCHOA
  49. Paul Khosla

    Paul Khosla

    3/9/2019

    Hi All. Is the WBC available as part of any of the logos packages?
    Reply

  50. Juhyuk

    Juhyuk

    2/2/2019

    55555
  51. Pechenyi Vasyl
    Hi. i want to by WBC Volume 44, Colossians-Philemon, but doesn't find of this bundle, and doesn't find this module separately. Please tell me, how to buy WBC Volume 44? Thank you.
    Reply

  52. JINYU ZHOU

    JINYU ZHOU

    12/14/2018

    55555
  53. robert@ccsanangelo.org
    Is this reformed or more traditionalist?
    Reply

  54. Keith Li

    Keith Li

    10/10/2018

    55555
    this time seems not full set, not included: vol 37, 39, 44
    Reply

  55. Jesus Pumarino Lavoignet
  56. Faithlife User
  57. Jim Brooks

    Jim Brooks

    8/18/2018

    55555
  58. David Istre

    David Istre

    7/19/2018

    Does this series not contain Acts? I thought it was a full-canon commentary?
    Reply

  59. Kristinn Fridfinnsson
    One of my best investments. Great!
    Reply

  60. Chris Trevino

    Chris Trevino

    5/24/2018

    55555
    Wow! The few volumes I've gotten to help with seminary and supporting a biblical theological perspective have proven invaluable. There are lots of detailed cross references and masterfully develops Scripture interpreting Scripture. I'm loving it.
    Reply

  61. Jung

    Jung

    5/22/2018

    55555
  62. XiangMing Ye

    XiangMing Ye

    5/17/2018

    Greate!
    Reply

  63. Charles C.G. Miller
    This is a great commentary with a lot of meat on the bones. All the books are not available. I have been waiting for years for the rest of the books. It is still a worthwhile purchase.
    Reply

  64. Sonia Martínez
    This collection is just amazing!!! When are we going to have the volumens 37, 39 and 44?
    Reply

  65. Christopher Engelsma
  66. 김민재

    김민재

    4/2/2018

    55555
  67. Cole Campbell

    Cole Campbell

    3/28/2018

    55555
  68. G. D. "Jerry" Ball
    If I order the updated volumes, will they overwrite the current versions I have on Logos? Or will I have both versions available?
    Reply

  69. Malua Library eBooks
  70. Angel Centeno
  71. Chris Figueroa
  72. Joe Marshall

    Joe Marshall

    1/31/2018

    55555
  73. David C. Alves
  74. BoCharmer

    BoCharmer

    1/10/2018

    55555
    Very technical and elaborate, exactly what I was looking for, Awesome!
    Reply

  75. B. David Orr

    B. David Orr

    11/13/2017

    55555
  76. HongIl

    HongIl

    10/7/2017

    55555
  77. Eric A Farmer

    Eric A Farmer

    7/16/2017

    55555
  78. JD

    JD

    7/6/2017

    55555
  79. Fred Robbins

    Fred Robbins

    6/29/2017

    44444
  80. Chris

    Chris

    6/24/2017

    55555
  81. Valdis

    Valdis

    6/14/2017

    55555
  82. Sang Cheol Yoo
  83. jose manuel aviles velez   (Joe Aviles)
    This books come in spanish? Please i need somebody to tell me. Thanks God Bless you.
    Reply

  84. Kris de Bruin

    Kris de Bruin

    5/19/2017

    55555
  85. Ricky Leung

    Ricky Leung

    5/14/2017

    55555
  86. liu yanwei

    liu yanwei

    5/12/2017

    44444
  87. David Leslie Bond
    Excellent series (in the neo-evangelical vein quite often) ...but what amazes me is that there is no recognition within Logos that I previously purchased from Logos(!) way OVER 90% of the series ...yet I am to receive ONLY 3 additional (updated or in one case new) commentaries for a mere 399 US dollars!?!?!? Where is your usual dynamic pricing, Logos?
    Reply

  88. Wonderer

    Wonderer

    5/11/2017

    55555
    Great set, highly recommended... To be honest, I'm surprised that it used to be priced lower then other sets of comparable length & depth. I'm a fan of cheaper prices (and generally hold out for good sales myself), but I also must say that the authors of these volumes deserve their pay (assuming that the increase makes it's way back to them). They have provided an excellent tool, well worth the investment!
    Reply

  89. Peter Shen

    Peter Shen

    5/11/2017

    55555
  90. Dom

    Dom

    5/9/2017

    55555
  91. MYUNG JAE OH

    MYUNG JAE OH

    5/9/2017

    55555
  92. Miroslaw Wrobel
    Wonderful tool for scholars!
    Reply

  93. Sergey Gladyshenko
    Why this sets can not be to divide on two parts, old and new testaments? There would be more selling of this product.
    Reply

  94. David Emme

    David Emme

    4/26/2017

    Costme 1199.99 even though I owe all but five volumes. Thought I bought this before but have to check. Who knows. Maybe they add another volume and surprise-I really did not buy the whole thing in the past! Maybe?
    Reply

  95. brian kent

    brian kent

    4/19/2017

    55555
  96. Cleber Denis Trindade
  97. Luiz Lacerda

    Luiz Lacerda

    3/15/2017

    Is there no comment from 1 Corinthians of the WBC?
    Reply

  98. Jan Elexiz Mercado
  99. sukjae lee

    sukjae lee

    2/28/2017

    55555
  100. Earl R Click Jr
    Where is Acts? Why is it not part of the collection?
    Reply

  101. Thomas Anthony
  102. Samuel B. Ball

    Samuel B. Ball

    12/19/2016

    Last year at this time, the WBC set was in the $600 range. (I know because I sold mine for $300, half of logos' price at the time). Then they shot up to around $1200. Now, if I were interested, I'm suppose to feel good about the amazing low price of $856? :(
    Reply

  103. Vincent Chia

    Vincent Chia

    10/6/2016

    55555
  104. jason

    jason

    9/21/2016

    55555
  105. Charlie Carter
  106. Timothy Slaughter
  107. John Goodman

    John Goodman

    3/9/2016

    55555
  108. David

    David

    2/8/2016

    55555
  109. Eric Louw

    Eric Louw

    12/18/2015

    55555
  110. J.E. Troy

    J.E. Troy

    10/6/2015

    55555
  111. Faithlife User
  112. Bradley Cowie

    Bradley Cowie

    10/1/2015

    Yeah. On one hand $10 per volume is a great deal, so I'm happy about that. But the bundle pricing is more hype than substance - the savings are negligible, which kind of annoys me because I'm not a big fan of hyped up marketing. Still, the price is good overall, so I'm taking the deal.
    Reply

  113. Ken Maynard

    Ken Maynard

    9/25/2015

    Missing 5 books, dynamic pricing more than price if sold separately. Not much of a deal!
    Reply

  114. Albert Cooper

    Albert Cooper

    9/21/2015

    55555
  115. GABRIEL VELAZQUEZ GUERRERO
    My mathematics 10 books X 9.99 = 99.90 Dinamics price $107.25 one difference $7.35
    Reply

  116. rasiedschlag

    rasiedschlag

    9/12/2015

    I'm confused. 62 x $9.99 = $619.38. How is buying it as a set ($664.95) a 5% discount?
    Reply

  117. Kevin Jones

    Kevin Jones

    9/12/2015

    44444
  118. Kevin M. Eisel
    I am still not seeing Acts of the Apostles or the 1st Corinthian Letter.... My collection was missing 4 books.... $42.90...
    Reply

  119. Jin Seob Lee

    Jin Seob Lee

    9/5/2015

    Same problem with me as Vaughan, Ruben. I do not have 9 books (including revised, second edition), so their price could be 99.9. But the dynamic price for 9 books indicates 107.26. Why 7.36 is added?
    Reply

  120. Nigel Carey

    Nigel Carey

    9/5/2015

    Same with me.... my discount is negative $6.50..... still I don't want to be too hard because this is a great company and probably a soon to be rectified oversight.
    Reply

  121. Bill Vaughan

    Bill Vaughan

    9/4/2015

    Same problem as Ruben. I own 57 of the 62 and it's offering me the set at 107.26 when the last five should about $50.
    Reply

  122. Ruben C Casas
    I already own 15 of the 62 volumes. Dynamic price for the 47 remaining volumes is $504.08. Individually each volume is $9.99 the total should be $469.53. Something is not right with dynamic pricing!
    Reply

  123. Denise T Plichta
    Still not seeing 1 Corinthians. Why hasn't WBC released a new one?
    Reply

  124. James

    James

    7/31/2015

    55555

$1,199.99

or
Starting at $35.98/mo at checkout