Faithlife Corporation

Business Hours

Monday – Saturday
6 AM – 6 PM PDT
Local: 9:52 PM
Studies of the New Testament and its World (SNTW) (15 vols.)
This image is for illustration only. The product is a download.
Runs on Windows, Mac and mobile.
Save 48% today!
Customize the length of your payment plan in cart
9 easy payments of
$20.00 each
with
$20.00 down

Your Custom Discount

Reg. Price $291.99
Save up to 71% during June's Monthly Sale -$141.99
Your Price $150.00
You Save $141.99 48%
Sale Price
$150.00
48% OFF!
Reg.: $291.99

Overview

The Studies of the New Testament and Its World series reflects a serious examination of the concerns and topics surrounding the first-century Christians and early Christian writings. In this series, the authors establish a firm foothold in early church studies with impactful research on such topics as Christian identity formation, the social background of the ancient world, Paul’s cosmology, and the early church’s use of baptism. Seminary students will find these scholarly and well-researched books challenging and thought-provoking, as will pastors and lay-persons interested in early Christianity.

With very recent studies and top scholarship in the field of ancient Christianity, this collection plugs you into the world of the earliest Christian writers and their audiences. See how the New Testament interrupted the world around it by studying the social and rhetorical lenses through which the New Testament and early theology was received.

In the Logos editions, volumes from the Studies of the New Testament and Its World are enhanced by amazing functionality. Scripture citations link directly to English translations—as do citations to early church documents such as the Didache and the Shepherd of Hermas—and important historical, theological, or original-language terms link to dictionaries, encyclopedias, and a wealth of other resources in your digital library. Perform powerful searches to find exactly what you’re looking for. Take the discussion with you using tablet and mobile apps. With Logos Bible Software, the most efficient and comprehensive research tools are in one place, so you get the most out of your study.

Key Features

  • Discusses identity formation of early Christians, the social norm of letter writing in the ancient world, and Baptism in the early church
  • Provides penetrating research on the Gospels, the Pauline corpus, and apocryphal Christian texts
  • Explores the use of Paul and the Gospels in the ancient Christian world

Product Details

Individual Titles

The Gospel of Matthew and Christian Judaism

  • Author: David C. Sim
  • Series: Studies of the New Testament and Its World (SNTW)
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 1998
  • Pages: 347

Table of Contents: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4

Sample pages: 1 | 2 | 3

Sim’s book is a meticulously researched study, reconstructing the Matthean community at the time the Gospel was written. In tracing its full history, he demonstrates that the Matthean community can only be understood in the context of two distinct and opposing Christian perspectives existing in the early Church: the first was represented by the Jerusalem church and the Matthean community and maintained that the Christian message must be preached within the context of Judaism; the second, opposing perspective, represented by Paul and his followers, believed Christians were not inclined to observe the Jewish law. Dr. Sim also reconstructs the conflicts within the Jewish and Gentile worlds in the aftermath of the Jewish war.

David Sim is Senior Lecturer in Theology, Australian Catholic University, Queensland. He is the coauthor of The Gospel of Matthew in its Roman Imperial Context.

Conflicting Mythologies: Identity Formation in the Gospels of Mark and Matthew

  • Author: John K. Riches
  • Series: Studies of the New Testament and Its World (SNTW)
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2000
  • Pages: 369

Table of Contents: 1 | 2 | 3

Sample pages: 1 | 2 | 3

Conflicting Mythologies presents a cultural and anthropological interpretation of Matthew and Mark, examining their contribution to the formation of early Christian identity, world view and ethos. John Riches studies what sacred space and ethnicity meant to the authors of these two Gospels and how early Christian group identity emerged through a dynamic process of reshaping traditional Jewish symbols and motifs associated with descent, kinship and territory. Clearly influenced by their Jewish heritage, the Evangelists, according to Riches, attempted to propose a view of the world with opposing cosmologies. The title of Riches book reflects the struggle Mark and Matthew’s narratives faced in trying to make sense of the world and of human experience in terms of a paradoxical cosmology.

John Riches is Professor of Divinity and Biblical Criticism Emeritus, University of Glasgow. He is the author of Matthew in the Sheffield/T & T Clark Bible Guides series, and co-author of The Synoptic Gospels.

The Social Ethos of the Corinthian Correspondence

  • Author: David G. Horrell
  • Series: Studies of the New Testament and Its World (SNTW)
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 1996
  • Pages: 390

Table of Contents: 1 | 2 | 3

Sample pages: 1 | 2 | 3

In The Social Ethos, David Horrell offers an exemplary study of how sociological perspectives can be used in New Testament studies. The focus of these studies is the Corinthian letters written by Paul and Clement’s letter written from Rome to Corinth near the end of the first century. These letters provide a rich example of the social ethos of early Christian teaching and its development. It lifts the roof off the Corinthian church, allowing an assessment of how Pauline Christianity shaped relationships within the Christian community and how those relationships changed over time, as expressed in Clement’s letter.

David Horrell is Lecturer in New Testament Studies in the Department of Theology, University of Exeter. He is the author of Solidarity and Difference: A Contemporary Reading of Paul’s Ethics.

Renewal through Suffering: A Study of 2 Corinthians

  • Author: A. E. Harvey
  • Series: Studies of the New Testament and Its World (SNTW)
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 1996
  • Pages: 153

Table of Contents: 1

Sample pages: 1 | 2 | 3

Paul’s opening remarks in his second letter to the Corinthian church make reference to certain troubles or problems he faced (problems which could possibly lead to imminent death from either an illness or persecution). Harvey uses these references as a springboard to understanding the profound but difficult language found in this epistle. He begins by exploring the social, economic and religious consequences of illness or disability in antiquity. Paul uses his malady as an opportunity to present a new understanding of suffering for the first-century Christian. The remainder of Harvey’s book acts as a running commentary on this biographical approach to understanding 2 Corinthians.

A. E. Harvey was a Lecturer in Theology at the University of Oxford and a former Canon of Westminster. He is the author of Companion to the New Testament.

Constructing the World: A Study in Paul’s Cosmological Language

  • Author: Edward Adams
  • Series: Studies of the New Testament and Its World (SNTW)
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2000
  • Pages: 300

Table of Contents: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 |5

Sample pages: 1 | 2 | 3

Dr. Adams focuses, in this ground-breaking study, on Paul’s understanding and use of the cosmological concepts ‘world’ and ‘creation’. He confronts this study by using current disciplines, such as critical linguistics, to understand the differing perspectives on the world found in 1 Corinthians and Romans by examining Paul’s historical and social context.

Edward Adams is Lecturer in New Testament, King’s College, University of London. He has taught widely in the field of New Testament and early Christianity and currently teaches undergraduate courses on Paul in Context, New Testament eschatology and Colossians in Greek. At MA level, he co-ordinates and is the principal teacher for the foundational course of the MA in Biblical Studies. He is the author of Christianity at Corinth and The Stars will Fall from the Heaven.

Paul, Poverty and Survival

  • Author: Justin J. Meggitt
  • Series: Studies of the New Testament and Its World (SNTW)
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 1998
  • Pages: 274

Table of Contents: 1 | 2

Sample pages: 1 | 2 | 3

Meggitt examines the economic and social life of Pauline churches. His work presents to us the lives and minds of the earliest Christians and contributes to our understanding of the origins of Christianity. He further explores the nature of the Roman economy and the lives of those living in the first-century Mediterranean world. Some of the aspects he focuses on are: employment, nutrition, clothing and housing. In disclosing the Pauline church’s strategies for survival, Meggitt is able to draw on many background sources for the first time in this kind of study.

Justin Meggitt has been a British Academy Research Fellow in the Faculty of Divinity, and Fellow Commoner of Jesus College, University of Cambridge. He joined the Institute of Continuing Education at Cambridge in 2004. He is most interested in early Christianity in its social context. He is the author of the chapter Sources: Use, Abuse and Neglect in Christianity at Corinth: The Scholarly Quest for the Corinthian Church.

Into the Name of the Lord Jesus: Baptism in the Early Church

  • Author: Lars Hartman
  • Series: Studies of the New Testament and Its World (SNTW)
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 1997
  • Pages: 215

Table of Contents: 1 | 2

Sample pages: 1 | 2 | 3

Here, Dr. Hartman examines all New Testament passages which contain allusions to baptism. He discusses the variations and relative importance of these passages and includes a look at two documents from the Apostolic Fathers that shed further light on this subject for the early Christian. One of the particular motifs Hartman discovers is baptism’s relation to Christ. It is baptism into the name of the Lord Jesus that represents the fundamental reference point in this early Christian rite. It is this Name that gives baptism its significance and meaning.

Lars Hartman is Professor Emeritus of New Testament at the University of Uppsala, Sweden. He is the author of Asking for a Meaning: A Study of 1 Enoch 1-5 and Text-Centered New Testament Studies.

Law in Paul's Thought: A Contribution to the Development of Pauline Theology

  • Author: Hans Hübner
  • Series: Studies of the New Testament and Its World (SNTW)
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2004
  • Pages: 192

Sample pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5

According to the author, “Until now Paul’s theology has been treated in exegetical literature almost exclusively as a systematic whole. Here, by contrast, the attempt is made to show how Paul’s theology can be adequately understood only when it is seen in relation to its development. There is a decisive process of theological development between Galatians and Romans which in turn must be related to Paul’s biography.”

Law in Paul’s Thought examines the relation between Paul’s teaching in Galatians and Romans, arguing that there is a major shift in emphasis between the two. An intriguing and concisely argued monograph, it points to a striking discord within Paul’s view of the Law and asks whether these differences should not be explained in terms of development in Paul’s theology. The skillful way in which he traces the arguments and interconnections between arguments in the different passages is fascinating and illuminating.

Professor Hübner… sustains his interpretation with careful and exact exegesis. This is a book which will have to be taken into account in all future writings on Paul.

—Ernest Best

I regard Professor Hübner’s book as the best treatment of this subject which I know.

—A. Hanson

Hans Hübner is Professor of Biblical Theology at Georg-August University, Göttingen.

Conversion at Corinth: Perspectives on Conversion in Paul's Theology and the Corinthian Church

  • Author: Stephen J. Chester
  • Series: Studies of the New Testament and Its World (SNTW)
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2005
  • Pages: 416

Sample pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8

Paul's conversion and its impact on his theology have been studied extensively. Yet little has been done to relate this to Paul's attitude towards the conversion of others, or to perspectives on conversion held by converts in the churches Paul founded. Soteriology is often considered in isolation from the practical issues of how conversion was expected to take place and the nature of its expected consequences.

This book addresses these issues, taking account of recent developments in conversion studies in the social sciences and other disciplines. Stephen Chester first reviews these developments and assesses the potential value of sociologist Anthony Gidden's general social theory of structuration. He then utilizes this to explore Paul's perspectives on conversion in relation to both Gentile and Jewish converts. He also explores the Corinthians' perspectives on conversion in the context of Graeco-Roman religious and social life. Here emerges a fascinating account of perspectives on conversion in the crucial formative years of early Christianity.

Further scholarship will have to take note of Chester’s whole approach. Ultimately, both the theoretical discussion of conversion and the exegesis of 1 Corinthians in its cultural environment are first class. But this is a book that demands engagement not just from those concerned with the social world of the Corinthian Correspondence, but from all who are interested in Pauline theology.

—Simon Gathercole, University of Aberdeen

… this is arguably the best particular study to date on the conversion of Paul and of the church at Corinth as reflected in 1 Corinthians… Chester is to be heartily thanked for this stimulating study. He is a worthy dialogue partner for any scholar seeking further understanding of Paul and conversion.

Review of Biblical Literature

Dr. Stephen J. Chester is Lecturer in New Testament Studies at International Christian College, Glasgow.

The Reasons for Romans

  • Author: Alexander J. M. Wedderburn
  • Series: Studies of the New Testament and Its World
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2004
  • Pages: 184

Sample pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5

Paul’s letter to the Romans is generally considered his most important. But why did he write it? Professor Wedderburn systematically surveys the range of recent scholarly opinion on this hotly contested question and clarifies the main issues. This remarkable, comprehensive and up-to-date volume will aid students and specialists alike.

This book should find its place in every bibliography on Paul’s letter to the Romans in theological college courses as perhaps the most even-handed and level-headed presentation of the discussion to date.

The Reformed Theological Review

…a stimulating book which will be of considerable interest to all students of Paul.

Christian Brethren Fellowship Journal

Alexander J. M. Wedderburn is Professor of New Testament in the Evangelisch-Theologische Facultat, Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Munich.

The Double Message

  • Author: Turid Karlsen
  • Series: Studies of the New Testament and Its World
  • Publisher: Continuum
  • Publication Date: 2004
  • Pages: 320

Sample pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4

Turid Karlsen Seim’s study of the Lukan treatment of women is a landmark in feminist studies of the New Testament. In the Gospel women have considerable prominence: they occur in “gender pairs” with men in such a way as to show their active participation in the ministry of Jesus; they are shown to exhibit ideal virtues of leadership, though they are not actually allowed to exercise it; they are custodians of the word up to the resurrection and bear witness, unsuccessfully, to the men.

But while they are highly visible in the Gospel, in its sequel, Acts, they are silenced. Even though they could accompany Jesus on long journeys, they are not part of the church’s apostolic witness. Women are silenced as the preaching of the church moves out of the new “family” surrounding Jesus’ preaching of the word to the public sphere of the world of men. Only in so far as women embrace a form of asceticism and so free themselves of men’s control can they achieve a certain freedom. In this advocacy of asceticism Luke is strikingly different from the Pastoral to which he is often compared.

Professor Seim sensitively explores these tensions within Luke’s narrative. While Luke’s work demonstrates nicely the powers which silence women, the narrative of their participation in Jesus’ ministry keeps alive the memory of their active role in the beginnings of the church. It is a dangerous memory which can act as a critique of the processes of marginalization of women to which Acts bears witness.

Here is a study which is balanced, drawing freely on historical- and literary-critical methods of enquiry, not forcing its case but sensitive to the subtle tensions in Luke’s “double message.”

Turid Karlsen Seim is Professor of Theology (New Testament) and Dean of the Faculty of Theology, University of Oslo.

Poetics for the Gospels?: Rethinking Narrative Criticism

  • Author: Petri Merenlahti
  • Series: Studies of the New Testament and Its World
  • Publisher: Continuum
  • Publication Date: 2005
  • Pages: 192

Sample pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4

Poetics, the study of the making of literary works, regards the gospels as literature, in contrast to the historical-critical approach. Petri Merenlahti makes the case that poetics offers a vital critical tool to interpreting the gospels. But he argues that poetics must also be 'historical', as perceptions of literary form and value are not fixed, but evolve and develop from one time and culture to another. Merenlahti provides a comprehensive account of the development and the state of the art of poetics and narrative criticism. Through scrupulous methodological discussion and detailed analysis of gospel narratives, he also offers a potentially highly productive future program for historical poetics in gospel studies.

Dr. Petri Merenlahti teaches in the Department of Biblical Studies, University of Helsinki.

Neither Jew Nor Greek?: Constructing Early Christianity

  • Author: Judith Lieu
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2005
  • Pages: 288

Sample pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5

In this volume, Judith Lieu explores the formation and shaping of early Christian identity within Judaism and within the wider Graeco-Roman world in the period before 200 C.E. Bringing to bear the latest analytical methods, she particularly examines the way that literary texts presented early Christianity. She combines this with interdisciplinary historical investigation and interaction with the most recent work on Judaism in late Antiquity and on the Graeco-Roman world.

The result is a very significant contribution in four of the key questions in current New Testament scholarship: how did early Christian identity come to be formed; how should we best describe and understand the processes by which the Christian movement became separate from its Jewish origins; was there anything special or different about the way women entered Judaism and early Christianity; and how did martyrdom contribute to the construction of early Christian identity?

A wonderfully learned volume… Judith Lieu’s capacity to hold together biblical, Jewish and patristic material commands respect, and she is an authority on the borderland between early Christianity and Judaism.

—Stuart G. Hall, Theology

For both its content and scholarly method, Neither Jew Nor Greek? is a must for any theological library.

—Mary Coloe, Austrailian Biblical Review

Judith M. Lieu is Professor of New Testament Studies, King's College, London.

Thomas at the Crossroads: Essays on the Gospel of Thomas

  • Editor: Risto Uro
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 1998
  • Pages: 256

Sample pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6

The Gospel of Thomas is one of the most debated early Christian writings. Discovered as a Coptic translation in the Nag Hammadi Library, its date, message and relation to the canonical gospels have been the subject of much divisive argument. This volume offers new perspectives on the gospel and demonstrates the various ways in which it sheds light on the ideological and social history of early Christianity.

Expert scholars go to the heart of current issues in Thomasine studies, such as the role of oral and written traditions in the composition of the gospel, Thomas' relationship with the Gospel of John and with Gnostic and ascetic tendencies in early Christianity, the gospel's attitude to women followers of Jesus and to Jewish ritual practices.

This impressive collection of essays covers key areas of current study of Thomas… thoughly researched and cogently argued. The book will provide an invaluable for all future work on this fascinating text for beginners and advanced researchers alike.

—Christopher Tuckett

A substantial contribution to the scholarly study of the Gospel of Thomas, Thomas at the Crossroads offers innovative perspectives on some of the most controversial questions in Thomas studies today. These studies yield fruitful insights into the relation of the Gospel of Thomas to other early Christian gospel literature, to ‘Gnosticism,’ encratism and Judaism… The authors lead readers to an enriched understanding of early Christian thought and practice. Required reading for anyone interested in the meaning of this fascinating work and its place in the history of ancient Christianity.

—Christopher Tuckett

Dr Risto Uro is Lecturer in New Testament, University of Helsinki.

The Way of the Lord: Christological Exegesis of the Old Testament in the Gospel of Mark

  • Author: Joel Marcus
  • Publisher: Continuum
  • Publication Date: 2004
  • Pages: 256

Table of Contents: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

The New Testament’s messianic interpretation of the Old is an important key to its theology. This book examines the way the author of the Gospel of Mark uses the Old Testament to convey the identity of Jesus.

Joel Marcus examines in detail several important Markan passages which use the Old Testament. His central thesis is that Mark’s Old Testament usage follows paths already made by Jewish exegesis, particularly apocalyptic reinterpretations of Old Testament texts. Giving such eschatological exegesis his own characteristic twist, Mark presents Jesus as God’s true Messiah who brings the prophesied victory in eschatological holy war. Unlike the Jewish War against Rome in A.D. 66-72, however, the holy war portrayed by Mark is not fought with conventional weapons but won through the apocalyptic event of Jesus’ death and resurrection.

This thoroughly documented and closely argued study is an important contribution to our understanding of the Gospel of Mark.

Joel Marcus is Lecturer in the Department of Biblical Studies, University of Glasgow. He is also a series co-editor of the Studies of the New Testament and its World.