Business Hours

Monday – Saturday
6 AM – 6 PM PDT
Local: 10:45 AM
Wipf & Stock Studies on Biblical Prophets (3 vols.)
This image is for illustration only. The product is a download.

Wipf & Stock Studies on Biblical Prophets (3 vols.)

by ,

Wipf & Stock 2013

Runs on Windows, Mac and mobile.
$49.95
Reg.: $64.95
Gathering Interest

Overview

The Wipf & Stock Studies on Biblical Prophets equips readers for deeper study of important biblical figures and prophetic texts.

This collection presents two companion volumes of essays on the prophet Ezekiel by distinguished Old Testament scholar, Daniel I. Block. The first volume explores the times, the message, and the methods of the prophetic priest. The second discusses the theme of kingship in Ezekiel—both his assessment of Judah’s historical kings and his hope for a restored Davidic king/prince—and the mysterious visions concerning Gog’s attack on restored Israel and concerning the new temple. And in I Saw the Lord: A Biblical Theology of Vision, discover rich insights into the theology of visions, and into the visions of Isaiah, Ezekiel, Daniel, Paul, and John as Abner Chou explores the possibility that these writers saw different facets of the climax of history.

With Logos Bible Software, these volumes are enhanced with cutting-edge research tools. Scripture citations appear on mouseover in your preferred English translation. Important terms link to dictionaries, encyclopedias, and a wealth of other resources in your digital library. Powerful topical searches help you find exactly what you’re looking for. Tablet and mobile apps let you take the discussion with you. With Logos Bible Software, the most efficient and comprehensive research tools are in one place, so you get the most out of your study.

Key Features

  • Presents a biblical theology of vision
  • Analyzes the prophet and book of Ezekiel in depth
  • Provides fresh insights into Ezekiel’s visions

Product Details

Individual Titles

I Saw the Lord: A Biblical Theology of Vision

  • Author: Abner Chou
  • Publisher: Wipf & Stock
  • Publication Date: 2013
  • Pages: 280

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

The visions of Isaiah, Ezekiel, Daniel, Paul, and John have captivated the people of God. Could it be that we are drawn to these spectacular passages because they are all different angles of the same eschatological event? This study explores the visions of these writers as they relate to their individual theology in light of the possibility that these writers saw different facets of the climax of history when the Son receives all glory.

Someone somewhere wrote that a book is good if the reader opens it with expectation and closes it with delight and profit. I Saw the Lord is just such a book. Chou takes us on an exegetical and theological tour of the synoptic visions of Isaiah, Ezekiel, Daniel, Paul, and John. We witness his persistent examination of the biblical text in the light of innertextual and intertextual elements as he investigates the potential harmonization of these visions.

William D. Barrick, professor of Old Testament, The Master’s Seminary

Abner Chou is associate professor of biblical studies at the Master’s College and Seminary. He is a contributor to the Lexham Bible Dictionary and the Faithlife Study Bible.

By the River Chebar: Historical, Literary, and Theological Studies in the Book of Ezekiel

  • Author: Daniel I. Block
  • Publisher: Wipf & Stock
  • Publication Date: 2013
  • Pages: 336

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6

To many readers, the book of Ezekiel is a hopeless riddle. We still find many features of the man and his message difficult and sometimes even shocking—if not offensive. The bizarre opening vision catches us off guard and tempts us to stop reading. However, if we persist, and if we meditate long and hard on individual utterances and sign actions, we will discover that despite the strangeness of the man and his utterances, this is the most clearly organized of the major prophetic books. Individual prophecies are clearly marked by headings and often by conclusions. If we persist, we will also discover that from a rhetorical perspective, this priestly prophet knew his audience; he recognized in Judah’s rebellion against YHWH the underlying cause of the divine fury that resulted in the exile of his people and the fall of Jerusalem to the Babylonians in 586 BC. But he also recognized that YHWH’s judgment could not be the last word. Because his covenant was eternal and irrevocable he looked forward to a day of spiritual renewal and national restoration.

This is the first of two volumes of essays on Ezekiel and his book. The seven general essays and two studies of particular texts in this collection explore the times, the message, and the methods of the prophetic priest.

Once again Daniel Block has provided wise perspectives that enable us to ‘see with our eyes, hear with our ears, and set our hearts’ (Ezekiel 40:4) on many of the enigmas in the book of Ezekiel.

Mark J. Boda, professor of Old Testament, McMaster Divinity College

Few scholars, whether evangelical or critical, Christian or Jewish, know the book of Ezekiel like Daniel Block. This collection of essays profoundly deepens and enriches our appreciation of the prophet’s work and is an essential resource for all who study it.

Iain Duguid, professor of religion, Grove City College

Beyond the River Chebar: Studies in Kingship and Eschatology in the Book of Ezekiel

  • Author: Daniel I. Block
  • Publisher: Wipf & Stock
  • Publication Date: 2013
  • Pages: 256

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6

To many readers the book of Ezekiel is a hopeless riddle. However, if we take the time to study it, we will discover that despite the strangeness of the man and his utterances this is the most clearly organized of the major prophetic books. If we persist, we will also discover that from a rhetorical perspective, this priestly prophet knew his audience; he recognized in Judah’s rebellion against YHWH the underlying cause of the divine fury that resulted in the exile of his people and the fall of Jerusalem to the Babylonians in 586 BC. But he also recognized that YHWH’s judgment could not be the last word. Because his covenant was eternal and irrevocable he looked forward to a day of spiritual renewal and national restoration.

This is the second of two volumes of Block’s essays on the book of Ezekiel. The essays in this volume explore the theme of Kingship in Ezekiel—both his assessment of Judah’s historical kings and his hope for a restored Davidic King/Prince—and the mysterious visions concerning Gog’s attack on restored Israel (Ezekiel 38–39) and concerning the new temple (40–48). Block brings to bear decades of study of the book to open up fresh insights on the ancient text.

Few people know the book of Ezekiel as well as Block does and fewer still are able to explain the unique and challenging aspects of this great prophet's rich theology as well as he does. The book's nine individual studies address Ezekiel’s purposes in ways that allow a reader to see, through experienced eyes, real treasures of biblical theology. For anyone planning to preach or teach Ezekiel, Block’s work provides a wonderful introduction—better, I think, than one could find in any of the standard commentaries.

Douglas Stuart, professor of Old Testament, Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary

Daniel Block is one of the foremost Ezekiel scholars of our time, author of a major two-volume commentary on the book and numerous other studies. In Beyond the River Chebar: Studies in Kingship and Eschatology in the Book of Ezekiel he gathers together a selection of the important essays he has written on these themes over the years. It is splendid to have these available between two covers and we are again indebted to Daniel Block.

Paul M. Joyce, Samuel Davidson Professor of Old Testament/Hebrew Bible, King’s College London