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Bristol Classics Homer Bundle (14 vols.)
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Overview

No literary or historical library is complete without Homer’s two inaugural works of Western literature, the Iliad and the Odyssey. The themes and artistry of these poems resonate through thousands of years of mythology, philosophy, drama, poetry, and prose. Telling the timeless stories of the Trojan War and wily Odysseus’ perilous journey home, Homer eloquently comments on the mortality and morality of mankind.

The tools and texts in this bundle allow you to explore the many facets of the Iliad and the Odyssey, and their legacy. Standard-setting Greek texts and vibrant contemporary translations enable thorough study of Homer’s work. Expert annotations and line-by-line commentary offer insight into Homer’s context and methods. And literary studies from distinguished classicists reveal the brilliance of the blind bard and his significance in the Western canon.

This bundle includes:

Reading Homer in Logos brings unparalleled functionality and depth to your study. Study his works alongside a library of other Greek texts and translations. Use Logos’ language tools to go deeper into the Greek text and explore Homer’s poetic Greek. Important terms link to dictionaries, encyclopedias, and a wealth of other resources in your digital library. Powerful searches help you find exactly what you’re looking for. Tablet and mobile apps let you take your study with you. With Logos Bible Software, the most efficient and comprehensive research tools are in one place, so you get the most out of your study.

Studying the Classics? Enjoy huge savings with the Bristol Classics Culture and History Bundle.

Key Features

  • Enables in-depth study of two keystone works of Western literature
  • Presents standard-setting Greek texts and vibrant contemporary translations
  • Provides expert annotations and line-by-line commentary
  • Includes literary studies and introductions from distinguished classicists

Product Details

Individual Titles

Homer

  • Author: Jasper Griffin
  • Publisher: Bristol Classical Library
  • Publication Date: 2001
  • Pages: 120

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

The Iliad and the Odyssey stand at the very beginning of Western literature. Much has been written about their origins and authorship, but Jasper Griffin—although he touches briefly on those questions—is here concerned with the ideas of the poems, which have had an incalculable influence on Western thought. He shows that each of the two epics has its own coherent and suggestive view of the world and of humanity’s place in it.

Jasper Griffin was public orator and professor of classical literature at the University of Oxford. He was also a fellow of Balliol College and elected a fellow of the British Academy.

Homer: Iliad I

  • Author: Homer
  • Editors: J.A. Harrison and R.H. Jordan
  • Series: Greek Text
  • Publisher: Bristol Classical Library
  • Publication Date: 1991
  • Pages: 104

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

This edition of the first book of the Iliad provides an excellent introduction to a first reading of Homer. J.A. Harrison and R.H. Jordan deal with the origin of Achilles’ wrath which gives rise to the poem’s main plot—introducing principal characters such as Odysseus and Nestor, and foreshadows the role the gods play in the story. This edition provides text with notes on facing pages, an introduction to Homer’s poetry, bibliography, vocabulary, glossary of proper names and short appendices on Homeric dialect forms, prepositional usages, formulaic composition and the dactylic hexameter—everything needed by the student tackling Homeric epic for the first time.

J.A. Harrison was assistant classical master at the Methodist College, Belfast, Ireland.

R.H. Jordan was head of classics and senior vice principal of the Methodist College, Belfast, Ireland.

Homer: Iliad III

  • Author: Homer
  • Editor: J.T. Hooker
  • Series: Greek Texts
  • Publisher: Bristol Classical Library
  • Publication Date: 1991
  • Pages: 96

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

This edition contains the Greek text, and is supplemented by an introduction giving the necessary background and setting Book III in the context of the Iliad as a whole, explanatory notes and a vocabulary.

J.T. Hooker was reader in Greek at University College, London.

Homer: Iliad I-XII

  • Author: Homer
  • Editor: M.M. Willcock
  • Series: Greek Text
  • Publisher: Bristol Classical Library
  • Publication Date: 1998
  • Pages: 328

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

M.M. Willcock’s classic edition of the Iliad has become the standard edition of Homer’s epic. These first 12 books of the Iliad feature a concise introduction and commentary. Willcock also includes a summary of significant aspects of Homeric diction in the early lines of each book, so that the student may begin on any particular line. Although the book is designed for undergraduates, the tight compass of these books does not prevent the editor from engaging in—or referring to—problems of composition or text addressed by more advanced scholars.

M.M. Willcock was professor of classics at the University of Lancaster and later, professor of Latin at the University of Cambridge.

Homer: Iliad VI

  • Author: Homer
  • Editors: R.H. Jordan and J.A. Harrison
  • Series: Greek Texts
  • Publisher: Bristol Classical Library
  • Publication Date: 2010
  • Pages: 112

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

This edition of the Iliad’s sixth book makes ideal reading for a student approaching the epic for the first time. Amongst other episodes, it includes the meeting of Diomedes and Glaukos in battle, which throws light on the ethics of epic warfare, and the touching scene of Hector’s final parting from his wife Andromache and infant son Astyanax.

This illustrated edition includes text with notes on the facing page, introduction, and select bibliography of further reading. There are also short appendixes introducing the forms of Homeric dialect with their Attic equivalents, prepositional usages in Homer, Homeric formulas, and scansion of the hexameter. A consolidated vocabulary and glossary of proper names follow. Jordan and Harrison provide all the basic material needed for early Greek learners to tackle their first book of Homer with confidence and understanding.

J.A. Harrison was assistant classical master at the Methodist College, Belfast, Ireland.

R.H. Jordan was head of classics and senior vice principal of the Methodist College, Belfast, Ireland.

Homer: Iliad XIII-XXIV

  • Author: Homer
  • Editor: M.M. Willcock
  • Publisher: Bristol Classical Library
  • Publication Date: 1999
  • Pages: 360

This text provides a line-by-line commentary on Books XIII-XXIV of Homer’s epic poem, the Iliad. M.M. Willcock’s classic edition has become the standard edition of Homer’s epic. This volume of the second 12 books of the Iliad features a concise introduction and commentary. Willcock also includes a summary of significant aspects of Homeric diction in the early lines of each book, so that the student may begin on any particular line. Although the book is designed for undergraduates, the tight compass of these books does not prevent the editor from engaging in—or referring to—problems of composition or text addressed by more advanced scholars.

M.M. Willcock was professor of classics at the University of Lancaster and later, professor of Latin at the University of Cambridge.

Homer's Iliad

  • Author: Peter Jones
  • Series: Classical Studies
  • Publisher: Bristol Classical Library
  • Publication Date: 2003
  • Pages: 256

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Homer’s mighty epic, the Iliad, is the inaugural work of Western literature and one of the defining masterpieces of our culture. The purpose of Peter Jones’ new, line-by-line commentary is to help as wide an audience as possible to understand and appreciate the poem through the best of recent scholarship on the man and his work.

Peter Jones bases his commentary on three of the most widely used translations, those of E.V. Rieu, Martin Hammond, and Richmond Lattimore. Jones also provides a useful introduction to the whole work and separate short introductions to each book of the Iliad.

Peter Jones was cofounder of the Friends of Classics, senior lecturer in classics at the University of Newcastle, and one of the best-known figures in classical instruction. He regularly contributed to British national newspapers, and wrote such highly successful books as Learn Latin, Learn Ancient Greek, and Classics in Translation.

Homer: The Odyssey

  • Author: Homer
  • Translator: Martin Hammond
  • Publisher: Bristol Classical Press
  • Publication Date: 2000
  • Pages: 320

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

In this vibrant new translation of Homer’s epic—featuring a readable prose format—Martin Hammond recreates as closely as possible both the simplicity and the intensity of the original Greek. With an introduction by Jasper Griffin and a comprehensive index, it sets a new and lasting standard in the interpretation of a masterpiece of Greek literature for both the student and the general reader.

Martin Hammond was head of classics and master in college at Eton College. He was also headmaster of City of London School, and Tonbridge School, Kent.

Homer: Odyssey IX

  • Author: Homer
  • Editor: J.V. Muir
  • Series: Greek Texts
  • Publisher: Bristol Classical Press
  • Publication Date: 1991
  • Pages: 80

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

This edition of one of the most enduringly popular and familiar books of the Odyssey—the encounter of Odysseus and his men with the cannibal Cyclops Polyphemos—grew out of the classes taken at the Joint Association of Classics Greek Summer School, where students who had completed a beginners’ course were making their first acquaintance with Homeric verse.

The complete text of the book, with generous narrative headings, and illustrations from Greek art, is complemented by a running vocabulary and translation assistance. The brief introduction deals with the composition of the Homeric poems, with the story of the Odyssey as a whole and this book in particular. It considers the peculiarities of Homeric dialect forms and the scansion of hexameter verse. The book is ideal for all those tackling Homer for the first time.

J.V. Muir is the translator and editor of Alcidamas: The Works and Fragments and coauthor of Greek Religion and Society.

Homer: Odyssey I–XII

  • Author: Homer
  • Editor: W.B. Stanford
  • Series: Greek Texts
  • Publisher: Bristol Classical Press
  • Publication Date: 1998
  • Pages: 432

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

First published in the outstanding and long-running “Red Macmillan” series in 1947 and substantially updated in 1959, W.B. Stanford’s Odyssey—of which this is the first of two volumes—has remained the standard edition used in universities for the early reading of Homer. A substantial introduction covers many of the questions that lie behind the poem, including a thorough summary of Homeric grammar. The text is elucidated with full annotations, indexes and bibliography.

W.B. Stanford was regius professor of Greek at Trinity College, Dublin and served as its twenty-second chancellor. He is best remembered for his commentaries on Homer, Aristophanes, and Sophocles.

Homer: Odyssey VI and VII

  • Author: Homer
  • Editor: Janet Watson
  • Series: Greek Texts
  • Publisher: Bristol Classical Press
  • Publication Date: 2002
  • Pages: 144

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

The sixth and seventh books of the Odyssey provide an ideal introduction to the work, illustrating the subtly drawn character of Nausicaa and Odysseus’ cunning intelligence at its best as he gains acceptance in the court of the Phaeacians. It contains text and vocabulary, expanded commentary, and a new introduction. It is geared to the needs of those coming to Homer for the first time, and assumes no previous knowledge of Homeric forms or grammar. An outline of these, and of the Homeric hexameter, is given in the introduction, and grammar points are reiterated in the commentary. The introduction also provides an outline of questions surrounding Homer and the composition of the Iliad and Odyssey, together with a discussion of the role of books six and seven within the epic’s overall structure.

Janet Watson teaches classics at the University of Newcastle.

Homer: Odyssey:XIII–XXIV

  • Author: Homer
  • Editor: W.B. Stanford and M.M. Willcock
  • Edition: 2nd
  • Series: Greek Texts
  • Publisher: Bristol Classical Press
  • Publication Date: 1998
  • Pages: 433

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

First published in the outstanding and long-running “Red Macmillan” series in 1948, this second volume of the Odyssey has remained the standard edition used by university students during their first reading of the epic. The introduction covers many of the questions that lie behind the poem, and includes a useful summary of Homeric grammar. The text is elucidated with full annotations, indexes and bibliography.

W.B. Stanford was regius professor of Greek at Trinity College, Dublin and served as its twenty-second chancellor. He is best remembered for his commentaries on Homer, Aristophanes, and Sophocles.

M.M. Willcock was professor of classics at the University of Lancaster and later professor of Latin at the University of Cambridge.

Homer’s Odyssey: A Companion to the English Translation of Richmond Lattimore

  • Author: Peter Jones
  • Series: Classical Studies
  • Publisher: Bristol Classical Press
  • Publication Date: 1991
  • Pages: 288

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Peter Jones provides a line-by-line commentary on Homer’s Odyssey that explains the factual details, mythological allusions, and Homeric conventions that a student or general reader could not be expected to bring to an initial encounter with the Odyssey. It also illuminates epic style, Homer’s methods of composition, the structure of work, and his characterization. The introduction describes the features of oral poetry and looks at the history of the text of the Odyssey.

Peter Jones was cofounder of the Friends of Classics, senior lecturer in classics at the University of Newcastle, and one of the best-known figures in the classical instruction. He regularly contributed to British national newspapers, and wrote such highly successful books as Learn Latin, Learn Ancient Greek, and the Classics in Translation.

Homer: The Resonance of Epic

  • Authors: Barbara Grazioso and Johannes Haubold
  • Series: Classical Literature and Society
  • Publisher: Bristol Classical Press
  • Publication Date: 2005
  • Pages: 192

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Barbara Grazioso and Johannes Haubold offer a new approach to the study of Homeric epic by combining ancient Greek perceptions of Homer with up-to-date scholarship on traditional poetry. Part I argues that, in the archaic period, the Greeks saw the lliad and Odyssey neither as literary works in the modern sense nor as the products of oral poetry. Instead, they regarded them as belonging to a much wider history of the divine cosmos, whose structures and themes are reflected in the resonant patterns of Homer’s traditional language and narrative techniques. Part II illustrates this claim by looking at some central aspects of the Homeric poems: the gods and fate, gender and society, death, and fame and poetry. Each section shows how the patterns and preoccupations of Homeric storytelling reflect a historical vision that encompasses the making of the universe, from its beginnings when Heaven mated with Earth, to the present day.

Barbara Grazioso is lecturer in classics at the University of Durham.

Johannes Haubold is lecturer in Greek literature at the University of Durham.

About Homer

Homer (ca. 8th century BC) is the traditional author of the Iliad and Odyssey. His life and origins are the subject of intense debate. No reliable biographical information exists, though legends abound. The name Homer is related to a Greek word meaning “blind,” giving rise to the tradition of Homer as the blind bard. Many modern scholars dismiss the notion of Homer as a single author, arguing that the works attributed to him are based on many generations of oral story telling. When speaking of Homer, these scholars are referring to the function of redacting oral tradition into a coherent whole.