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Bristol Classics Thucydides Collection (4 vols.)
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$59.95
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Overview

A pioneering work of historiography, ThucydidesHistory of the Peloponnesian War is a landmark literary and scholarly achievement documenting the pivot point in the Golden Age of Athenian democracy. It is one of the West’s first scholarly histories, examining and recording the slow defeat of the nation its author once fought for. These works from the Bristol Classical Library offer the scholarly tools—line-by-line commentary, annotated texts, and literary and linguistic analysis—necessary to dig into Thucydides’ Greek. They are a great place to either start your classical study, or augment your library with the most advanced tools applied to the best texts.

Thucydides’ style differed drastically from that of his predecessor Herodotus. His writing set the tone of historiography for centuries to come—characterized by a strict adherence to chronology, a diminutive role for the divine pantheon, an objective account of events, and a matter-of-fact writing style. These accounts of Greek belligerence—emphasizing the strength found in utilitarian ideals and a coldly rational state with a strong leader—foreshadow the political theory of realists such as Hobbes and Machiavelli. Offering unparalleled detail, Thucydides’ History of the Peloponnesian War provides a glimpse into the ancient world—it’s a literary and scholarly gem that students, scholars, historians, and classicists will value and enjoy. Get the most out of Thucydides with these scholarly commentaries, notes, texts, and introductions.

Reading Thucydides in Logos brings unparalleled functionality and depth to your study. Study the Greek master alongside a library of other Greek texts and translations. Use Logos’ language tools to go deeper into the Greek text and explore Thucydides’ challenging Greek. The Timeline provides instant context to the narratives of the Histories. Tablet and mobile apps let you take your study with you. With Logos Bible Software, the most efficient and comprehensive research tools are in one place, so you get the most out of your study

Studying the Classics? Enjoy huge savings with the Bristol Classics Culture and History Bundle.

Books I, II, and VI will each be downloaded as two resources: Text and Notes.

Key Features

  • Includes Greek texts, annotations, and commentary on Thucydides’ History of the Peloponnesian War
  • Introduces Thucydides and his influence on historiography through the centuries
  • Provides insight into the end of the Athenian Golden Age

Product Details

Individual Titles

Thucydides and the Shaping of History

  • Author: Emily Greenwood
  • Publisher: Bristol Classical Press
  • Publication Date: 2005
  • Pages: 192

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Thucydides’ work was one of the most exciting creations in the cultural history of Greece in the fifth century BC—one of only two monumental prose works to have survived—and it still poses fresh and challenging questions about the writing of history. In the twenty-first century, it still challenges the reader. There is a marked tension in Thucydides’ work between his aim to write about contemporary events and his desire that his work should outlast the period in which he composed it. Thucydides and the Shaping of History addresses two important issues: how contemporary was the History of the Peloponnesian War when it was written in the fifth century, and how contemporary is it now?

Emily Greenwood approaches the shaping of history from three different angles: the way in which Thucydides shaped history and how his narrative shapes our experience as readers of the History; the relationship between Thucydides’ work and contemporary institutions, such as the theater; and the role that ancient readers and modern scholars have played in shaping how we perceive the History. Greenwood combines a close analysis of Thucydides’ narrative with a discussion of its intellectual motivation. She examines how the historian attempted to determine the way in which readers would respond to his conception of the events of the Peloponnesian War, and to ensure the continuing influence of his ideas.

Emily Greenwood is professor of classics at Yale University. She is the author of Afro-Greeks: Dialogues Between Anglophone Caribbean Literature and Classics in the Twentieth Century and coeditor of Reading Herodotus: A Study of the Logoi in Book V of Herodotus’ Histories and Homer in the Twentieth-Century: Between World Literature and the Western Canon.

Thucydides: Book I

  • Author: Thucydides
  • Editors: Thomas Wiedermann and E.C. Marchant
  • Series: Series Title (Series Abbreviation)
  • Publisher: Greek Texts
  • Publication Date: 1991
  • Pages: 300

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

This edition is intended primarily for undergraduates and candidates taking A-level examinations. It will also be useful to students who are approaching a book of Thucydides for the first time, or studying the Peloponnesian War from a more general, historical perspective. The text and notes are those of E.C. Marchant, originally published in 1905. A recent introduction by Thomas Wiedemann takes account of the questions which students today will want to ask about Thucydides’ history, and of the present state of research; it also covers the context and aims of the work and giving essential background to the events described. There is also a list of essential dates and a recent bibliography, in which a primary criterion for inclusion bas been accessibility to the non-academic English reader.

Thomas Wiedemann was professor of Latin at the University of Nottingham. His publications include Emperors and Gladiators, and, as editor, Cicero and the End of the Roman Republic.

E.C. Marchant was editor of Xenophon, Books I, II, III, V; Opuscula: Book V; and Thucydides, Books I, II, III, VI, VII; and coauthor of Latin Prose Composition, Latin Grammar, and Bell’s Latin Course.

Thucydides: Book II

  • Author: Thucydides
  • Editors: Thomas Wiedermann and E.C. Marchant
  • Series: Greek Texts
  • Publisher: Bristol Classical Press
  • Publication Date: 1991
  • Pages: 280

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

This book is published primarily for students approaching a book of Thucydides for the first time or studying the Peloponnesian War in a more general way. The Greek text and notes are those of E.C. Marchant, originally published in 1891, and the introduction is by Thomas Wiedemann, who takes into account the needs of the modern student and up-to-date research on Thucydides.

Thomas Wiedemann was professor of Latin at the University of Nottingham. His publications include Emperors and Gladiators, and, as editor, Cicero and the End of the Roman Republic.

E.C. Marchant was editor of Xenophon, Books I, II, III, V; Opuscula: Book V; and Thucydides, Books I, II, III, VI, VII; and coauthor of Latin Prose Composition, Latin Grammar, and Bell’s Latin Course.

Thucydides: Book VI

  • Author: Thucydides
  • Editor: Kenneth Dover
  • Series: Greek Texts
  • Publisher: Bristol Classical Press
  • Publication Date: 1999
  • Pages: 336

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Thucydides Book VI deals—through its speeches in particular—with Athenian motivation towards sending the great expedition to Sicily, with the attitudes of various factions involved, and with the seeds of the expedition's ultimate disastrous conclusion. It contains memorable sections on Alcibiades, on the Athenians’ excitement at the sailing, on the mutilation of the Herms and a digression on the fall of Athenian tyranny a century earlier.

This edition, with introduction and notes, is designed to help senior school and university students read, understand and enjoy Thucydides. Notes draw attention to features of language and style characteristic of the author, make explicit what the author took for granted in his original Greek audience, comment on the historical background, and offer grounds on which to reach decisions as to whether the author’s historical statements are true or false.

Kenneth Dover is professor emeritus of Greek in the University of St. Andrews and former president of Corpus Christi College, University of Oxford.

About Thucydides

Thucydides was a Greek historian and Athenian general, who was exiled after his failure to save the city of Amphipolis near the beginning of the Peloponnesian War. He used his status as an exile to move freely among Spartan allies during the way, giving him perspective from both sides. He returned to Athens only after its fall in 404 BC, having lived in exile for 20 years. Using his unique insights, he wrote his massively influential History of the Peloponnesian War, pioneering a scientific approach to history that focused on military and political perspectives.