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Bloomsbury Academic Greek Tragedy Bundle (13 vols.)
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Overview

The Bloomsbury Academic Greek Tragedy Bundle brings together the most trusted resources for serious study of ancient Greek drama. Featuring the most authoritative translations, line-by-line commentaries, in-depth introductions, and extensively annotated Greek texts, these volumes are a great place to start your classical study or to augment your library with the most advanced tools applied to the best texts.

Fifth-century Athens saw the flourishing of historiography, philosophy, politics, and science with Socrates, Plato, Herodotus, Thucydides, Pericles, and Hippocrates. But some of the most brilliant contributions to this first chapter of the Western canon were artistic. Sophocles, Aeschylus, and Euripides brought all the learning of the age home to Athenian hearts. Literacy in the work of these three playwrights is essential to a full understanding of the Athenian Golden Age and all Western art that followed.

This bundle includes:

The Noet editions of these valuable volumes are enhanced by amazing functionality. Study the Greek tragedians alongside a library of classic literature and philosophy. Important terms link to dictionaries, encyclopedias, and a wealth of other resources in your digital library. Powerful searches help you find exactly what you’re looking for. Tablet and mobile apps let you take your study with you. With Noet, the most efficient and comprehensive research tools are in one place, so you get the most out of your study.

Studying the Classics? Enjoy huge savings with the Bloomsbury Academic Culture and History Bundle.

Sophocles: Oedipus Tyrannus will be downloaded as three resources: English, Greek, and Notes.

Sophocles: Antigone will be downloaded as three resources: English, Greek, and Notes.

Key Features

  • Select works from the three great Greek Tragedians: Sophocles, Aeschylus, and Euripides
  • Trusted translations, line-by-line-commentaries, and in-depth introductions
  • Extensively annotated Greek texts
  • Expert insight into ancient Greek tragedy’s structure, context, and reception through the centuries

Product Details

Individual Titles

The Plays of Sophocles

  • Author: A.F. Garvie
  • Publisher: Bloomsbury
  • Publication Date: 2005
  • Pages: 128

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Explore the psychology of Greek tragedy and the tragic hero with A.F. Garvie’s analysis of Sophocles’ plays. Garvie breaks down the dramatic structure and character development of all seven of Sophocles plays. A brief concluding chapter draws together Garvie’s analysis and paints a full picture of drama in Athens’ golden age. Garvie aims to help readers understand why Sophocles is still worth reading—or going to see in the theatre—in the twenty-first century. Garvie shows how far Sophoclean scholarship has moved in recent decades, away from the once prevalent view that he was a pious religious conformist who said nothing profound or original, but who said it very beautifully.

A.F. Garvie is emeritus professor of Greek at the University of Glasgow.

Sophocles: Oedipus Tyrannus

  • Author: Sophocles
  • Translator: Richard C. Jebb
  • Series: Classical Commentaries
  • Publisher: Bloomsbury
  • Publication Date: 2004
  • Pages: 384

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

The first of the three Theban plays, Oedipus Tyrannus is the epitome of Greek tragedy. The legendary tale of the doomed king presents archetypal models of the tragic. This volume features the full editions from the distinguished classicist, Richard C. Jebb. A thoughtful introduction illuminates the significance of Jebb’s treatment of Oedipus Tyrannus and its value for—and contrast with—subsequent interpretations, for which a select bibliography is included. This volume includes both the original Greek and Jebb’s translation and critical analysis.

Richard C. Jebb was regius professor of Greek and fellow of Trinity College, Cambridge, UK. He was one of the foremost classicists of the Victorian era and his editions of Sophocles had a profound influence on subsequent scholarship.

Sophocles: Oedipus Coloneus

  • Author: Sophocles
  • Translator: Richard C. Jebb
  • Series: Classic Commentaries
  • Publisher: Bloomsbury
  • Publication Date: 2004
  • Pages: 384

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

The middle volume in the three Theban plays, written shortly before Sophocles death, Oedipus Coloneus is the most contemplative of the plays. It depicts Oedipus coming to terms with the tragic events of his life just before his death. This volume features the full editions from the distinguished classicist, Richard C. Jebb. A thoughtful introduction illuminates the significance of Jebb's treatment of Oedipus Coloneus and its value for—and contrast with—subsequent interpretations, for which a select bibliography is included. This volume includes both the original Greek and Jebb’s translation and critical analysis.

Richard C. Jebb was regius professor of Greek and fellow of Trinity College, Cambridge, UK. He was one of the foremost clasicists of the Victorian era and his editions of Sophocles had a profound influence on subsequent scholarship.

Sophocles: Antigone

  • Author: Sophocles
  • Translator: Richard C. Jebb
  • Series: Classic Commentaries
  • Publisher: Bloomsbury
  • Publication Date: 2004
  • Pages: 384

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

The last in the trilogy of Theban plays, but the first to be written, Antigone deals with weighty political themes such as justice, natural law, civil disobedience, and the ideal ruler. This volume features the full editions from the distinguished classicist, Richard C. Jebb. A thoughtful introduction illuminates the significance of Jebb's treatment of Antigone and its value for—and contrast with—subsequent interpretations, for which a select bibliography is included. This volume includes both the original Greek and Jebb’s translation and critical analysis.

Richard C. Jebb was regius professor of Greek and fellow of Trinity College, Cambridge, UK. He was one of the foremost clasicists of the Victorian era and his editions of Sophocles had a profound influence on subsequent scholarship.

Aeschylean Tragedy

  • Author: Alan H. Sommerstein
  • Edition: 2nd
  • Publisher: Bloomsbury
  • Publication Date: 2010
  • Pages: 400

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Aeschylus was the dramatist who made Athenian tragedy one of the world’s great art-forms. Alan H. Sommerstein—analyzing the seven extant plays of the Aeschylean corpus and utilizing the knowledge we have of the 70 or more whose scripts have not survived—explores Aeschylus’ poetic, dramatic, theatrical, and musical techniques, as well as his social, political, and religious ideas, and the significance of his drama for our own day. Sommerstein pays special attention to the Oresteia trilogy, and the other surviving plays are viewed against the background of the four-play productions of which they formed part. He also analyzes Aeschylus’ theater, his satyr dramas, and his dramatizations of the Iliad and Odyssey. A detailed chapter-by-chapter guide to further reading, and an approach that assumes no knowledge of Greek make this the perfect gateway for the serious study of Aeschylus.

Sommerstein builds his interpretations carefully from exemplary command of detail, and offers admirably clear positions with which one can grapple.

Bryn Mawr Classical Review

Alan H. Sommerstein is professor of Greek at the University of Nottingham.

The Plays of Aeschylus

  • Author: A.F. Garvie
  • Publisher: Bloomsbury
  • Publication Date: 2010
  • Pages: 128

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Aeschylus is the oldest of the three great Greek tragedians. Born probably in 525 or 524 BC, he lived through the end of tyranny at Athens and the restitution of democracy. He took part in the battle of Marathon in 490 and probably also in the battle of Salamis in 480, the subject of his Persians. During his life he made at least two visits to Sicily, and died there at Gela in 456 or 455 (Though a later story holds he was killed by a tortoise, which an eagle dropped on his bald head, mistaking it for a rock on which to crack the tortoise’s shell). This book deals with Aeschylus’ six extant plays in the chronological order of their first production: Persians, the earliest Greek tragedy that has come down to us; Seven against Thebes; Suppliants; and the three plays of the Oresteia trilogy: Agamemnon, Libation Bearers, and Eumenides. It also contains an essay on Prometheus Bound, now generally thought not to be by Aeschylus, but accepted as his in antiquity. Garvie’s readable introduction to the dramatist for serious students of Classical civilization and ancient history will interest students of other disciplines and the non-specialist reader.

A.F. Garvie is emeritus professor of Greek at the University of Glasgow.

Aeschylus: Choephori

  • Author: Aeschylus
  • Editor: A. Bowen
  • Series: Greek Texts
  • Publisher: Bloomsbury
  • Publication Date: 1991
  • Pages: 196

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Produced in 458 BC, Aeschylus’ Choephori is the second play in the Oresteian trilogy. The bloodshed begun in the first play with the murder of Agamemnon by his wife Clytemnestra is here continued when Agamemnon’s son Orestes avenges his father’s death by killing Clytemnestra. It is not until the third and final play, Eumenides, that peace is restored to the family of the Atreidae. A. Bowen’s edition takes into account the large amount of recent research on the play and tackles the problems presented by an unusually corrupt text. The introduction discusses the pre-Aeschylean Orestes tradition in literature and art, as well as the place of Choephori within the Oresteia, its imagery and dramatic structure, the questions of staging the play, and the manuscript tradition. Bowen’s commentary looks at problems of style, dramatic technique, and interpretation of the play, and before each scene is discussed, Bowen analyzes its contribution to the drama as a whole.

Aeschylus: Persians

  • Author: Aeschylus
  • Translator: A.J. Podlecki
  • Series: Classical Studies
  • Publisher: Bloomsbury
  • Publication Date: 1991
  • Pages: 136

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Persians is Aeschylus’ earliest surviving play. Unlike all other surviving Greek tragedies, which deal with persons and events from the remote, mythical past, it is about living persons and events that took place barely eight years before it was produced in March 472 BC. The setting of the play is Susa, the Persian capital. Its hero, the Persian king who came so close to defeating the Greeks in 480. Its theme, his own defeat at their hands. A.J. Podlecki’s translation of the play is complemented by a comprehensive introduction and notes, drawing the reader’s attention to conventions of idiom and imagery, legend and allusion. With detailed discussion of the play in relation to possible antecedents, levels of tragic action, and metrical scheme, the book is ideally suited to students of drama and literature as well as classics.

The Plays of Euripides

  • Author: James Morwood
  • Publisher: Bloomsbury
  • Publication Date: 2002
  • Pages: 96

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

No book in English covering all the plays of Euripides has been published since 1967. In the meantime there has been something of a revolution in the way we view classical drama generally, and Euripides in particular. The Plays of Euripides reflects that revolution and shows how Euripides continually reinvented himself. A truly Protean figure, he seems to set out on a new journey in each of his surviving 19 plays. Between general introduction and final summary, James Morwood’s analysis identifies the themes that underlie the plays. Morwood concentrates, above all, on demonstrating the extraordinary diversity of this great dramatist.

James Morwood is an emeritus fellow of Wadham College, Oxford and was head of classics at Harrow School for 17 years.

Euripides: Alcestis

  • Author: Euripides
  • Editor: A.M. Dale
  • Series: Classic Commentaries
  • Publisher: Bloomsbury
  • Publication Date: 1999
  • Pages: 224

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Delve into the original Greek of Euripides with this analysis and commentary on the Greek text from A.M. Dale. Dale provides an extensive introduction to the genre, background, structure, and surviving manuscripts of Alcestis. The original Greek is fully annotated and followed by Dale’s line-by-line commentary (including metrical analysis) to this intriguing “pro-satyr” play, the earliest surviving play from the great tragedian.

A.M. Dale was reader in Classics in Birkbeck College, University of London, UK.

Euripides: Cyclops

  • Author: Euripides
  • Editor: R.A.S. Seaford
  • Series: Classic Commentaries
  • Publisher: Bloomsbury
  • Publication Date: 1998
  • Pages: 244

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Engage the original Greek of Euripides’ Cyclops with this introduction and commentary on the Greek text from R.A.S. Seaford. Cyclops is the only example of satyric drama to have survived in its entirety into the modern world. Seaford gives a historical and analytical account of the genre, tracing its origins, development and decline. He examines the place of satyrs in the religious imagination and practice of the Greeks, and the significance of Euripides’ divergence from the Homeric model. The line-by-line commentary pays close attention to problems of text, language and interpretation.

R.A.S. Seaford is professor of Classics and ancient history at the University of Exeter, UK.

Euripides: Helen

  • Author: Euripides
  • Editor: A.M. Dale
  • Series: Classic Commentaries
  • Publisher: Bloomsbury
  • Publication Date: 1996
  • Pages: 213

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

This scholarly edition of Euripides’ Helen includes an introduction, the Greek text, and detailed commentary/notes. A.M. Dale reviews the legend of Helen, Euripides’ text, Greek tradition, and chronological problems. Dale also gives details of metrical analysis, and comments clearly on many specific problems of text and meaning. His introduction and commentary provide informed access to this intriguing mixed-genre play.

A.M. Dale was reader in Classics in Birkbeck College, University of London, UK.

Euripides: Iphigenia in Tauris

  • Author: Euripides
  • Editor: Maurice Platnauer
  • Series: Classic Commentaries
  • Publisher: Bloomsbury
  • Publication Date: 1998
  • Pages: 208

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

This edition of Euripides’ Iphigenia in Tauris includes an introduction, the Greek text, detailed commentary, and a metrical scheme. Maurice Platnauer explores the origin, structure, and reception of Iphigenia in Tauris with rigorous annotations to the Greek text, an extensive introduction, and a line-by-line commentary. Students of Greek language and the classics will appreciate Platnauer’s thoughtful and responsible edition of this lesser-known play.

Maurice Platnauer was principal of Brasenose College, Oxford.

About the Greek Tragedians

Sophocles (496–406 BC), with Aeschylus and Euripides, was one of the great tragic dramatists of Athens. He is considered one history’s greatest poets. The subjects of his plays were drawn from mythology and legend. His plays contain at least one heroic figure—a character whose strength, courage, or intelligence exceeds the human norm, but who also possesses extraordinary pride or self-assurance. This combination of qualities leads to a tragic end for his characters.

Aeschylus (525–456 BC) is the dramatist who made Athenian tragedy one of the world’s great art forms. He witnessed the establishment of democracy at Athens and fought against the Persians at Marathon. He won the tragic prize at the City Dionysia 13 times between 499 and 458 BC, and in his later years was victorious almost every time he put on a production.

Euripides (485–406 BC) is one of antiquity’s greatest poets. He has been prized in every age for the pathos, terror, surprising plot twists, and intellectual probing of his dramatic creations. He wrote nearly 90 plays, and of these, 18 have come down to us from antiquity.