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Perspectives on Hebrew Scriptures and Its Contexts (11 vols.)
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Gathering Interest

Overview

Understanding the ancient world of the Hebrew Bible yields priceless insight into the Old Testament’s meaning. This diverse collection features cutting-edge scholarship on the Hebrew Bible, ancient Israelite society, and related ancient societies, as well as linguistic studies on biblical Hebrew and cognate languages. You can also explore how biblical texts were received and reproduced through the centuries, and survey the history of archaeological, sociological, linguistic, and theological study of the Hebrew Bible. Top researchers such as Ehud Ben Zvi, Diana Edelman, Niels Peter Lemche, Ian Young, and Noel Weeks make this an invaluable addition to a biblical scholar’s library.

In the Logos editions, these valuable volumes are enhanced by amazing functionality. Scripture citations link directly to English translations, and important terms link to dictionaries, encyclopedias, and a wealth of other resources in your digital library. Perform powerful searches to find exactly what you’re looking for. Take the discussion with you using tablet and mobile apps. With Logos Bible Software, the most efficient and comprehensive research tools are in one place, so you get the most out of your study.

Get the latest scholarship on the Hebrew Bible with the Journal of Hebrew Scriptures.

Key Features

  • Diverse contributions from respected scholars
  • Valuable insight into the origin and context of the Hebrew Bible
  • Unique linguistic and literary studies

Individual Titles

A Palimpsest: Rhetoric, Ideology, Stylistics, and Language Relating to Persian Israel

  • Editors: Ehud Ben Zvi, Diana Edelman, and Frank Polak
  • Series: Perspectives on Hebrew Scriptures and Its Contexts
  • Publisher: Gorgias Press
  • Publication Date: 2009
  • Pages: 343

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Explore the language, rhetoric, and ideology of the writers of the Hebrew Bible. Diverse contributors, including Philippe Guillaume, Jean-Daniel Macchi, Ian Young, Ehud Ben Zvi, and Diana Vikander Edelman, offer linguistic insight on aspects of language and ideology in the books of Genesis, Samuel, Jeremiah, Nahum, Esther, Ezra, Nehemiah, and more.

Ehud Ben Zvi is professor of history and classics at the University of Alberta. He serves as the general editor of the Journal of Hebrew Scriptures.

Diana Edelman is a reader in the department of biblical studies at the University of Sheffield. She earned her BA in Religion at Smith College, and her MA and PhD at the University of Chicago. She has participated in numerous archaeological excavations in Palestine.

Frank Polak is associate professor of biblical studies at Tel Aviv University.

The Concept of Intention in the Old Testament, Philo of Alexandria and the Early Rabbinic Literature

  • Author: Aurelian Botica
  • Series: Perspectives on Hebrew Scriptures and Its Contexts
  • Publisher: Gorgias Press
  • Publication Date: 2011
  • Pages: 513

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Does it matter in criminal or cultic law? Does God take into account only the physical act, or does he consider the motivation? Were there differences between the biblical, Hellenistic and rabbinic views on intent? Aurelian Botica asks what the Old Testament, Philo of Alexandria and the Early Rabbinic literature thought about sin and human intent. Botica explores a number of practical cases in which intent mattered.

Hellenistic authors such as Philo, and Rabbinic authors showed a profound familiarity with the vocabulary of intent. They too asked: how did God and their fellow human beings view intent? Would a human court or God punish the mere thoughts of adultery or violence? Would thoughts and intentions such as these remain unpunished, even when not leading to deeds? Botica surveys a wide number of texts in order to answer these and other difficult questions.

Aurelian Botica is professor of the theology at Emanuel University of Oradea. He earned his PhD in Semitic languages from Hebrew Union College in Cincinnati, Ohio.

Conceptual Metaphors in Poetic Texts: Proceedings of the Metaphor Research Group of the European Association of Biblical Studies in Lincoln 2009

  • Editor: Antje Labahn
  • Series: Perspectives on Hebrew Scriptures and Its Contexts
  • Publisher: Gorgias Press
  • Publication Date: 2013
  • Pages: 178

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Metaphor illuminates truths and clarifies vagary in a way plain words cannot. The Bible is filled with metaphorical handholds for understanding the nature of God, life, and heaven in tangible ways This volume takes a new approach to understanding metaphors as conceptualizing aspects of life. The contributors provide close analysis of metaphors in various biblical books, including Psalms, Job, Judges, Chronicles, Isaiah and Hosea.

Antje Labahn earned a PhD in Old Testament from the University of Göttingen and is professor of Old Testament at Wuppertal / Bethel Theological College.

Covenant and Grace in the Old Testament: Assyrian Propaganda and Israelite Faith

  • Author: Robert Miller
  • Series: Perspectives on Hebrew Scriptures and Its Contexts
  • Publisher: Gorgias Press
  • Publication Date: 2012
  • Pages: 335

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Robert Miller examines how Israel understood its relationship with Yahweh. His ambitious enterprise begins with one Aramaic text from the periphery of the Neo-Assyrian vassal system, and eventually leads to theological reflections on the nature of God’s dealings with humanity. Miller posits that Israel borrowed language from Assyria in describing its covenant with God and reexamines what “covenant” really meant.

Miller traces the language of covenant to its Assyrian roots, and looks at how and when it was adopted in Judah and used in parts of the Old Testament. He ends by reviewing the broader theological implications of his study in conversation with contemporary theologians. His work takes seriously the study of the text in its ancient context in order to highlight the theological content and its modern relevance.

Robert Miller is associate professor and area director of biblical studies at the Catholic University of America.

Cultural Memory in Biblical Exegesis

  • Editors: Pernille Carstens, Trine Hasselbalch, and Niels Peter Lemche
  • Series: Perspectives on Hebrew Scriptures and Its Contexts
  • Publisher: Gorgias Press
  • Publication Date: 2012
  • Pages: 400

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

This volume studies how cultural memory is inscribed and embodied in biblical culture—appearing as artifacts, text, pictures and ritual practice. Scholars of cultural memory research join forces in this volume to open new gates to cultural memory in biblical and cognate studies. They include a plethora of methods and perspectives in present research, allowing for much-needed reflection on the relationship between cultural memory approach and post-colonialism, globalism, and epistemology.

Pernille Carstens is a guest researcher with the University of Copenhagen faculty of theology.

Trine Hasselbalch is a post-doctoral fellow with the University of Copenhagen faculty of theology.

Niels Peter Lemche is professor of biblical exegesis at the University of Copenhagen. He is the founder and chief editor of the Scandinavian Journal of the Old Testament.

Dating Archaic Biblical Hebrew Poetry

  • Author: Robyn Vern
  • Series: Perspectives on Hebrew Scriptures and Its Contexts
  • Publisher: Gorgias Press
  • Publication Date: 2011
  • Pages: 302

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Robyn Vern critically analyzes the evidence and strategies researchers have used to identify and date a body of “archaic biblical Hebrew” poetry. Exodus 15:1–18, “Moses’ Song of the Sea”, is frequently claimed to be the oldest poem in this body, possibly dating to the second millennium BC. Vern proposes that linguistic data provides neither sufficient nor reliable evidence for dating purposes, though. The comparison of the second millennium sources with Archaic Biblical Hebrew poetic texts indicates that this Hebrew poetry is typologically more representative of first millennium sources. Vern argues that, while this does not eliminate the possibility that such a poem was written in the second millennium, linguistic evidence is an inappropriate tool for dating these poems.

Robyn Vern is an honorary associate of the University of Sydney.

Keter Shem Tov: Essays on the Dead Sea Scrolls in Memory of Alan Crown

  • Editors: Shani Tzoref and Ian Young
  • Series: Perspectives on Hebrew Scriptures and Its Contexts
  • Publisher: Gorgias Press
  • Publication Date: 2013
  • Pages: 410

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

This eclectic collection contains 16 articles on a variety of topics within Qumran Studies from established scholars in the field such as Emanuel Tov, Albert Baumgarten, William Loader and Shani Tzoref, as well as exciting new voices in the field.

Topics cover the full range of scholarly study of the Scrolls, from the impact of the Qumran discoveries on the study of the Hebrew Bible and the New Testament, to the study of the scrolls themselves and the community organizations presupposed in them. Other topics include sexuality, scribal practice, and the attitude to the Temple in the scrolls.

Build your library on the Dead Sea Scrolls with the Eerdmans Studies in the Dead Sea Scrolls (7 vols.).

Shani Tzoref is a Dead Sea Scrolls scholar and a research fellow at the Qumran Institute at the University of Göttingen.

Ian Young is associate professor in the department of Hebrew, biblical, and Jewish studies at the University of Sydney.

Neo-Assyrian Prophecy and the Hebrew Bible: Nahum, Habakkuk, and Zephaniah

  • Author: Russell Mack
  • Series: Perspectives on Hebrew Scriptures and Its Contexts
  • Publisher: Gorgias Press
  • Publication Date: 2011
  • Pages: 404

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Previous generations of scholars believed that prophecy was unique to ancient Israel, but archaeological discoveries reveal that prophecy was wider phenomenon in the ancient Near East. In this study, Russell Mack examines the similarities and differences of Neo-Assyrian and biblical prophecy.

Recent scholarship has utilized Neo-Assyrian prophecy to illumine biblical prophecy. While these attempts have focused primarily on the role of the prophet, Mack focuses on the prophetic literature. He analyzes Nahum, Habakkuk, and Zephaniah, three books traditionally dated to the seventh century BC, to look for what should be the greatest degree of correspondence between Assyrian and biblical prophecy. However, his detailed literary analysis highlights significant differences in ideology and genre adaptation in these supposedly contemporaneous materials, suggesting a different socio-political origin, and raising questions concerning when these books were written.

Russell Mack is an adjunct professor of Bible at Cincinnati Christian University.

Sources and Authors: Assumptions in the Study of Hebrew Bible Narrative

  • Author: Noel Weeks
  • Series: Perspectives on Hebrew Scriptures and Its Contexts
  • Publisher: Gorgias Press
  • Publication Date: 2011
  • Pages: 391

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Study of the Hebrew Bible has tended to bifurcate into a historical approach which seeks out the various sources from which the text was composed, and a literary approach which concentrates on the devices which hold the text together and assist in conveying its message. Why are there two approaches—one of which emphasizes the diversity of the text and another which recognizes its unity?

Noel Weeks work investigates Genesis, Judges, the books of Samuel, Kings and Chronicles, looking at the way the message is conveyed and how that has been misunderstood through assumptions about the capacities and intentions of original writers. He argues that holding to the inability of early writers to be sophisticated, and the more recent recognition of the sophistication of the text, must lead to theories of the late origin of the text.

Noel Weeks is a senior lecturer in ancient history at the University of Sydney. He earned his BS in Zoology from the University of New England, Armidale and his BD and ThM from Westminster Theological Seminary, as well as a PhD in Mediterranean studies from Brandeis University, Massachusetts.

The Reception and Remembrance of Abraham

  • Editors: Pernille Carstens and Niels Peter Lemche
  • Series: Perspectives on Hebrew Scriptures and Its Contexts
  • Publisher: Gorgias Press
  • Publication Date: 2011
  • Pages: 160

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

This book explores the role of the Biblical patriarch Abraham in the formation and use of authoritative texts in the Persian and Hellenistic periods.

The various contributions to this book demonstrate how the Persian and Hellenistic writers intended to socialize their readers by constructing shared images of Abraham as a figure of the past. He is variously presented as the proto-Moses and is also a figure prepared for martyrdom, thus reflecting the readiness for martyrdom that appeared in Hellenistic and Roman Judaism. The book also explores how allusions to the past function as a memory within the Abraham stories.

Pernille Carstens is a guest researcher with the University of Copenhagen faculty of theology.

Niels Peter Lemche is professor of biblical exegesis at the University of Copenhagen. He is the founder and chief editor of the Scandinavian Journal of the Old Testament.

Verbs of Leading in the Hebrew Bible

  • Author: Daniel Leavins
  • Series: Perspectives on Hebrew Scriptures and Its Contexts
  • Publisher: Gorgias Press
  • Publication Date: 2011
  • Pages: 324

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Authors of the Hebrew Bible had at least 17 different verbs from which they could choose to represent the action of “leading” or “guiding” in the Hebrew Bible. What are these “verbs of leading” and how are they similar to and different from one another? Why were particular “leading” verbs chosen in particular contexts?

Daniel Leavins analyzes these “verbs of leading” in the Hebrew Bible. Every occurrence of the verbs of leading in the Hebrew Bible is examined through the lens of semantic-role theory by assigning semantic roles (Agent, Object, Goal, Source, Path) to each of the phrases typically used with the verbs. The verb class verbs of leading is defined, distinguishing features between the particular verbs of leading are identified, and several problematic passages in the Bible are dealt with using insights from this analysis. Although scholars have given the study of individual Biblical Hebrew words a great amount of attention in lexicons, articles, and books, little study has been done on specific verb groups in the Hebrew Bible. Leavins’ analysis provides a potential model for such work in the future.

Daniel Leavins is the senior pastor of Calvary Bible Church, Neenah, Wisconsin. He earned his ThM from Dallas Theological Seminary and his PhD in Semitic languages.

Product Details

  • Title: Perspectives on Hebrew Scriptures and Its Contexts Collection (17 vols.)
  • Publisher: Gorgias Press
  • Volumes: 11
  • Pages: 3,760