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Catholic Studies Bundle, ver. 2, M (23 vols.)
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Overview

Bring your faith further with the inspirational writings of the saints and the documents of the Catholic Church. You’ll dive right into both Vatican I and II, the writings of St. John of the Cross, St. Francis of Assisi, St. Teresa of Avila, St Ignatius of Loyola, and St. Therese of Lisiux, the Latin and English versions of the Catechism of the Catholic Church, the Latin Vulgate, and the catechism, canons, and decrees of the Council of Trent.

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13 Vols.

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23 Vols.

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74 Vols.

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326 Vols.

New to Version 2
The Imitation of Christ        
The Interior Castle        
Catholic Principles for Interpreting Scripture        
Bible Conversations: Catholic-Protestant Dialogues on the Bible, Tradition, and Salvation        
Biblical Catholic Answers for John Calvin        
Biblical Catholic Eucharistic Theology        
Biblical Catholic Salvation: Faith Working through Love        
Biblical Evidence for the Communion of Saints        
Development of Catholic Doctrine: Evolution, Revolution, or an Organic Process?        
Martin Luther: Catholic Critical Analysis and Praise        
More Biblical Evidence for Catholicism        
Orthodoxy and Catholicism: A Comparison        
The Catholic Mary: Quite Contrary to the Bible?        
Queen Mother: A Biblical Theology of Mary's Queenship        
Answering the New Atheism: Dismantling Dawkins’ Case against God        
Scripture Matters: Essays on Reading the Bible from the Heart of the Church        
Spirit and Life: Essays on Interpreting the Bible in Ordinary Time        
Understanding “Our Father”: Biblical Reflections on the Lord’s Prayer        
Modern Catholic Social Teaching: Commentaries and Interpretations        
A Catholic Commentary on Holy Scripture        
Disciplinary Decrees of the General Councils: Text, Translation, and Commentary        
Letter and Spirit (7 vols.)        
Also Included
Catechism of the Catholic Church: English and Latin (2 vols.)        
Vatican II Documents        
The Catechism of the Council of Trent        
The Canons and Decrees of The Council of Trent        
The Sources of Catholic Dogma        
The Decrees of the Vatican Council (Vatican I, English)        
Biblia Sacra Vulgata        
The Confessions of Saint Augustine        
The Book of the Popes        
Pictorial Lives of the Saints        
Saint Anselm’s Book of Meditations and Prayers        
A History of the Mass and Its Ceremonies in the Eastern and Western Church        
The Dark Night of the Soul        
The Ascent of Mount Carmel        
Writings of Saint Francis of Assisi        
The Practice of the Presence of God        
The Spiritual Exercises        
A Manual of Councils of the Holy Catholic Church (2 vols.)        
The Story of a Soul, with Letters        
Saint Bernard on Consideration        
Saint Bernard on the Love of God        
The Holy Rule        
Redemptor Hominis        
Dives in Misericordia        
Laborem Exercens        
Slavorum Apostoli        
Dominum et Vivificantem        
Redemptoris Mater        
Sollicitudo Rei Socialis        
Redemptoris Missio        
Centesimus Annus        
Veritatis Splendor        
Evangelium Vitae        
Ut Unum Sint        
Fides et Ratio        
Ecclesia de Eucharistia        
Deus Caritas Est        
Spe Salvi        
Caritas in Veritate        
Nova Vulgata: Bibliorum Sacrorum Editio        
A Dictionary of Canon Law        
The Book of Saints        
A Catholic Dictionary        
Ecclesiastical Dictionary        
The Externals of the Catholic Church        
Catholic Pocket Dictionary and Cyclopedia        
A History of the Councils of the Church, vols. 1–5        
The Didache: A Window on the Earliest Christians        
The Introduction to the Devout Life        
Lives of the Saints        
Prayers and Meditations on the Life of Christ        
The Founders of the New Devotion: Being the Lives of Gerard Groote, Florentius Radewin, and Their Followers        
The Chronicle of the Canons Regular of Mount St. Agnes        
A Meditation on the Incarnation of Christ, Sermons on the Life and Passion of Our Lord, and Of Hearing and Speaking Good Words        
Sermons to the Novices Regular        
The Soliloquy of the Soul        
The Little Garden of Roses and Valley of Lilies        
Outlines of Dogmatic Theology        
The Great Commentary of Cornelius à Lapide (8 vols.)        
Catena Aurea: Commentary on the Four Gospels, Collected out of the Works of the Fathers (4 vols.)        
Kinship by Covenant: A Canonical Approach to the Fulfillment of God’s Saving Promises        
Biblical Interpretation in the Early Church: An Historical Introduction to Patristic Exegesis        
Summa Contra Gentiles        
Orthodoxy        
Heretics        
What I Saw in America        
The New Jerusalem        
All Things Considered        
What’s Wrong with the World        
A Miscellany of Men        
Divorce vs. Democracy        
Utopia of Usurers        
The Superstition of Divorce        
Eugenics and Other Evils        
God: His Knowability, Essence, and Attributes        
The Divine Trinity: A Dogmatic Treatise        
God: The Author of Nature and the Supernatural        
Christology: A Dogmatic Treatise on the Incarnation        
Soteriology: A Dogmatic Treatise on the Redemption        
Mariology: A Dogmatic Treatise on the Blessed Virgin Mary        
Grace, Actual and Habitual: A Dogmatic Treatise        
The Sacraments: A Dogmatic Treatise, vol. 1        
The Sacraments: A Dogmatic Treatise, vol. 2        
The Sacraments: A Dogmatic Treatise, vol. 3        
The Sacraments: A Dogmatic Treatise, vol. 4        
Eschatology, or the Catholic Doctrine of the Last Things: A Dogmatic Treatise        
The Confession of St. Patrick        
The Life and Writings of St. Patrick        
The Philocalia of Origen        
A Commentary upon the Gospel According to S. Luke, vol. 1        
Commentary on the Gospel According to S. John, vols. 1–2        
Five Tomes against Nestorius; Scholia on the Incarnation; Christ is One; Fragments against Diore of Tarsus, Theodore of Mopsuestia, the Synousiasts        
The Three Epistles of S. Cyril, Archbishop of Alexandria (3 vols.)        
Aquinas on Doctrine: A Critical Introduction        
Losing the Sacred: Ritual, Modernity and Liturgical Reform        
The Papal Encyclicals (5 vols.)        
The Glory of the Lord, vol. 1: Seeing the Form        
The Glory of the Lord, vol. 2: Clerical Styles        
The Glory of the Lord, vol. 3: Lay Styles        
The Glory of the Lord, vol. 4: The Realm of Metaphysics in Antiquity        
The Glory of the Lord, vol. 5: The Realm of Metaphysics in the Modern Age        
The Glory of the Lord, vol. 6: Theology: The Old Covenant        
The Glory of the Lord, vol. 7: Theology: The New Covenant        
Theo–Drama, vol. 1: Prolegomena        
Theo–Drama, vol. 2: Dramatis Personae        
Theo–Drama, vol. 3: Dramatis Personae        
Theo–Drama, vol. 4: The Action        
Theo–Drama, vol. 5: The Last Act        
Theo–Logic, vol. 1: The Truth of the World        
Theo–Logic, vol. 2: Truth of God        
Theo–Logic, vol. 3: The Spirit of the Truth        
Epilogue        
Behold the Pierced One: An Approach to a Spiritual Christology        
Called to Communion: Understanding the Church Today        
Church, Ecumenism and Politics: New Endeavors in Ecclesiology        
Co–Workers of the Truth: Meditations for Every Day of the Year        
Credo for Today: What Christians Believe        
God is Near Us: The Eucharist, the Heart of Life        
Introduction to Christianity (rev. ed.)        
Jesus of Nazareth: Holy Week: From the Entrance into Jerusalem to the Resurrection        
Principles of Catholic Theology: Building Stones for a Fundamental Theology        
The God of Jesus Christ: Meditations on the Triune God        
The Nature and Mission of Theology        
The Spirit of the Liturgy        
Truth and Tolerance: Christian Belief and World Religions        
What It Means to Be a Christian        
The Works of Dionysius the Areopagite (2 vols.)        
Against War        
Ciceronianus or A Dialogue on the Best Style of Speaking        
The Colloquies of Desiderius Erasmus (3 vols.)        
The Complaint of Peace        
Enchiridion Militis Christiani or The Manual of the Christian Knight        
Epistles of Erasmus (3 vols.)        
In Praise of Folly        
Proverbs Chiefly Taken from the Adagia of Erasmus        
The Apophthegmes of Erasmus        
Institutio Principis Christiani: Chapters III–XI        
Erasmus        
Erasmus and other Essays        
Erasmus and Luther: Their Attitude to Toleration        
The Birth of the Messiah: A Commentary on the Infancy Narratives in the Gospels of Matthew and Luke        
The Death of the Messiah, from Gethsemane to the Grave, vols. 1–2        
An Introduction to the Gospel of John        
An Introduction to the New Testament        
The Ecclesiastical History of the English Nation        
The Historical Works of Venerable Bede        
Explanation of the Apocalypse        
An Exposition of the Gospels of Matthew and Mark        
An Exposition of the Gospel of St. Luke        
An Exposition of the Gospel of St. John        
An Exposition of the Epistles of St. Paul and of the Catholic Epistles (2 vols.)        
Outlines of Jewish History        
Outlines of the Life of Our Lord        
Outlines of New Testament History        
General Introduction to the Study of the Holy Scriptures        
Arians of the Fourth Century        
Two Essays on Scripture Miracles and on Ecclesiastical        
An Essay on the Development of Christian Doctrine        
Essays: Critical and Historical (2 vols.)        
An Essay in Aid of a Grammar of Assent        
The Via Media of the Anglican Church (2 vols.)        
Apologia Pro Vita Sua        
Stray Essays on Various Controversial Points        
Lectures on Justification        
Lectures on Certain Difficulties Felt by Anglicans in Submitting to the Catholic Church        
Lectures on the Present Position of Catholics in England        
The Idea of a University: Defined and Illustrated        
Historical Sketches (3 vols.)        
Tracts: Theological and Ecclesiastical        
The Dream of Gerontius        
Parochial and Plain Sermons (8 vols.)        
Sermons Bearing on Subjects of the Day        
Sermons Preached Before the University of Oxford        
Discourses Addressed to Mixed Congregations        
Sermons Preached on Various Occasions        
Haydock’s Catholic Bible Commentary        
A Practical Commentary on Holy Scripture        
Liturgies Eastern and Western        
Liturgies Eastern and Western: Eastern Liturgies        
The Theology of St. Cyril of Alexandria        
The Sayings of the Fathers        
Boethius: The Theological Tractates and The Consolation of Philosophy        
Morals on the Book of Job (3 vols.)        
An Encyclopedist of the Dark Ages: Isidore of Seville        
On Holy Images        
Barlaam and Ioasaph (English and Greek Texts)        
Explanation of the Rule of St. Augustine        
The Didascalicon of Hugh of St. Victor        
The Love Letters of Abelard and Heloise        
St. Bernard of Clairvaux’s Life of St. Malachy of Armagh        
Concerning Grace and Free Will        
Life and Works of Saint Bernard, vol. 1        
Life and Works of Saint Bernard, vol. 2        
St. Bernard’s Sermons on the Canticle of Canticles (2 vols.)        
Sermons of St. Bernard on Advent and Christmas        
The Moral Concordances of Saint Anthony of Padua        
The Exempla or Illustrative Stories from the Sermones Vulgares of Jacques de Vitry        
Ninety–Nine Homilies of S. Thomas Aquinas upon the Epistles and Gospels for Forty–Nine Sundays of the Christian Year        
The Religious State, the Episcopate and the Priestly Office        
The Bread of Life, or, St. Thomas Aquinas on the Adorable Sacrament of the Altar        
The Life of Christ        
The Virtues of a Religious Superior        
The Life of Saint Francis        
Mystical Opuscula        
Breviloquium        
On Union with God        
The Form of Perfect Living and Other Prose Treatises        
Treatise on Consummate Perfection        
The Dialogue of the Seraphic Virgin Catherine of Siena        
Medieval Preachers and Medieval Preaching        
A Commentary on the Psalms from Primitive and Mediæval Writers, vol. 1: Psalm 1 to Psalm 38        
A Commentary on the Psalms from Primitive and Mediæval Writers, vol. 2: Psalm 39 to Psalm 80        
A Commentary on the Psalms from Primitive and Mediæval Writers, vol. 3: Psalm 81 to Psalm 118        
A Commentary on the Psalms from Primitive and Mediæval Writers, vol. 4: Psalm 119 to Psalm 150        

Key Features

  • Details of the doctrine, dogma, and basic tenets of the Catholic Church
  • Discourses the fundamentals of the Catholic faith
  • Essential works of Catholic theology and dogma in the English language
  • Exegetical overview of key points in the life of Christ

Catechismus Catholicae Ecclesiae

Any study of Catholicism must begin with the Catechism of the Catholic Church. Officially promulgated by Pope John Paul II in 1997, it is the first “universal” Catholic catechism since the Reformation and only the second in history. It is an epochal work that expresses the tenets of the Catholic faith consistent with their articulation at the Second Vatican Council, while remaining in organic unity with the tradition of the Church, drawing in abundance on the sources of Sacred Scripture, the Fathers of the Church, the liturgy, and magisterial authority. If one wants to know what the Catholic Church teaches, the Catechism, as John Paul II stated, is the “sure norm.”

The beauty and profundity of the text is such that while it was intended as a reference work, it is often read as devotional literature, permeated as it is with a subtle theology of love and communion. It is nevertheless comprehensive in its treatment, covering everything from contraception to the doctrine of the Trinity, from Purgatory to papal infallibility.

The Catechism is organized around "four pillars" of Catholicism: Creed, Sacraments, Moral Life, and Prayer; and it discusses these with reference to the most shared aspects of the Christian faith—for example, the Apostles’ Creed, the Ten Commandments, and the Our Father—and so is a welcome tool for facilitating dialogue between all Christians. Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger, now Pope Benedict XVI, oversaw the drafting of the text, and he has repeatedly pointed to the Catechism as a significant step toward an authoritative interpretation of the “Spirit of Vatican II,” toward a cessation of conflicts which have often rent the Church in the aftermath of the council, and toward a rapprochement with those Christians whom the council termed “Separated Brethren.”

Indeed, the Catechism of the Catholic Church: English and Latin (2 vols.) is a work that deserves a place in every Christian’s library. This collection includes both the English and Latin editions of the Catechism.

Redemptor Hominis

Pope John Paul II promulgated Redemptor Hominis (Redeemer of Man) only five months after his election to the pontifical throne. The encyclical letter provided an outline for the objectives of his pontificate. Rooted in the pope’s characteristic “personalism,” the letter explores the far-reaching implications of the fact that “the Redeemer of man, Jesus Christ, is the center of the universe and of history.” In section one, “Inheritance,” the pope expressed the need to continue the work of the Second Vatican Council, especially with regards to ecumenism. In section two, “The Mystery of the Redemption,” the Incarnation is placed at the very center of human reality, redeeming the true dignity of humanity and of all creation. In section three, “Redeemed Man and His Situation in the Modern World,” the pope expresses that the condition of humanity in the world must be the concern of the Church because of the inherent dignity of man as confirmed in Christ. In the final section, “The Church’s Mission and Man’s Destiny,” the Church is posited as the living reality of man’s redeemed vocation, a reality that is most perfect in the Eucharist.

Dives in Misericordia

Written in 1980, Dives in Misericordia (Rich in Mercy) was Pope John Paul II’s second encyclical. The letter focuses on the mercy of God, an attribute, the pope argues, that is stronger than all evil. What’s more, God’s mercy does not humiliate man, but rather elevates his dignity. As the manifestation of God’s love in the world, mercy is the central message of Christ’s preaching. The letter as a whole is an exploration of the role of God the Father’s mercy throughout salvation history and within the mystery of redemption. It follows this theme through eight sections: “He Who Sees Me Sees the Father,” “The Messianic Message,” “The Old Testament,” “The Parable of the Prodigal Son,” “The Paschal Mystery,” “Mercy . . . From Generation to Generation,” “The Mercy of God in the Mission of the Church,” and “The Prayer of the Church in Our Times.”

Laborem Exercens

Pope John Paul II wrote Laborem Exercens (Through Work) in 1981 for the ninetieth anniversary of the famous encyclical Rerum Novarum of Leo III on the question of labor in modern economies. Laborem Exercens makes an important contribution to Catholic social doctrine. Rooted in the pontiff’s characteristic personalism, the letter seeks to expound a concept of labor that is consistent with the dignity of the human person. This involves the total subordination of all aspects of the economy and production to the worker’s status as a human person. It also explores the dignity inherent in labor. The letter has four sections: “Work and Man,” “Conflict between Labor and Capital in the Present Phase of History,” “Rights of the Workers,” and “Elements for a Spirituality of Work.”

Slavorum Apostoli

Pope John Paul II wrote Slavorum Apostoli (The Apostles of the Slavs) in 1985. The letter is a commemoration of Saints Cyril and Methodius, the ninth-century apostles to the Slavic nations of Europe. The encyclical, written by the first Slavic pope, focused on the cultural unity of the Slavic nations with the rest of Europe, and is seen to have had two primary objectives: undermine the isolation of the Communist bloc and work toward the unity of the Latin, Greek, and Slavonic branches of Christianity.

Dominum et Vivificantem

Promulgated in 1986, Dominum et Vivifcantem (The Lord and Giver of Life) focuses on the action of the Holy Spirit in the life of the Church. It is the final letter in Pope John Paul II’s treatment of the Trinity, following Redemptor Hominis on the Son and Dives in Misericordia on the Father. In the first section, “The Spirit of the Father and of the Son, Given to the Church,” the pope explores the action of the Holy Spirit through the Church in history. The second section, “The Spirit Who Convinces the World Concerning Sin,” considers the continuing forgiveness and redemption from sin offered to man through the Holy Spirit. In the third section, “The Spirit Who Gives Life,” the pontiff explains that even in the face of the atheistic materialism of modern culture, openness between man and God remains through the work of the Holy Spirit, most perfectly in the Sacraments of the Church. The Holy Spirit is, therefore, the guardian of hope.

Redemptoris Mater

Pope John Paul II promulgated Redemptoris Mater (The Mother of the Redeemer) in 1987. The encyclical is a complex exploration of Mariology. The first section, “Mary in the Mystery of Christ,” explains Mary’s role in the divine plan of salvation. The second section, “The Mother of God at the Center of the Pilgrim Church,” discusses Mary’s continuing role as the perfect “mirror” of faith. The pope explains, Mary’s journey of faith becomes one with that of the Church at Pentecost. “Thus, from the very first moment, the Church ‘looked at” Mary through Jesus, just as she ‘looked at’ Jesus through Mary.” In the third and final section, “Maternal Mediation,” the pope explores Mary as Mediatrix, as the intercessor in unity with both her Son and the pilgrim Church. “Thus, throughout her life, the Church maintains with the Mother of God a link which embraces, in the saving mystery, the past, the present, and the future, and venerates her as the spiritual mother of humanity and the advocate of grace.”

Sollicitudo Rei Socialis

Written in 1987, Sollicitudo Rei Socialis (Solicitude for Social Issues) was John Paul II’s second social encyclical. In it, the pontiff elaborates on Catholic social teaching and applies its principles to the problem of under-developed and developing nations. Central to this social teaching is that all aspects of social action must “respect and promote all the dimensions of the human person.” The pontiff’s essential message is that progress is about more than the accumulation of material goods or social power, and so it supersedes vying economic or ideological systems. Rather, progress is found in justice and the “authentic development” of the human person. After the introduction, section two, “Originality of the Encyclical Populorum Progressio,” comments on Pope Paul VI’s letter of twenty years prior. Section three “Survey of the Contemporary World,” lays out the pope’s understanding of the current situation. Section four “Authentic Human Development,” explores the meaning of “development” in light of Catholic social teaching. Section five, “A Theological Reading of Modern Problems,” applies this teaching to the current situation. Section six, “Some Particular Guidelines,” provides a way forward, paying special attention to the Church’s “preference for the poor.”

Redemptoris Missio

Pope John Paul II promulgated Redemptoris Missio (Mission of the Redeemer) in 1990. The encyclical is an urgent call for the Church to renew her commitment to evangelize the world. The letter is divided into two parts. The first part, made up of three sections, “Jesus Christ, The Only Savior,&edquo; “The Kingdom of God,” and “The Holy Spirit: The Principal Agent of Mission,” presents a theological defense for the imperative of evangelization. The second part, made up of five sections, “The Vast Horizons of the Mission ad Gentes,” “The Paths of Mission,” “Leaders and Workers in the Missionary Apostolate,” “Cooperation in Missionary Activity,” and “Missionary Spirituality,” provides guidelines for the application of the theology of mission to the contemporary Church.

Centesimus Annus

Written in 1991 on the occasion of the 100-year anniversary of Leo XIII’s ground-breaking social encyclical Rerum Novarum, John Paul II’s Centesimus Annus (The Hundredth Year) brought the principles of Catholic social teaching to bear on contemporaneous political and economic issues. It emphasizes the dignity and rights of workers, the right to private property, the right to a just wage, and the right to religious freedom. It also articulates that the kingdom of God cannot be confused with temporal political or economic arrangements and seeks to explicate the two over-riding principles of the Church’s social teaching: solidarity (which focuses on empathy and human dignity), and subsidiarity (the principle that communities of a higher order should not interfere in the life of communities of a lower order unless necessary). The encyclical is made up of six sections: “Characteristics of Rerum Novarum,” “Towards the ‘New Things’ of Today,” “The Year 1989,” “Private Property and the Universal Destination of Material Goods,” “State and Culture,” and “Man Is the Way of the Church.”

Veritatis Splendor

Pope John Paul II promulgated Veritatis Splendor (The Splendor of Truth) in 1993. The letter is one of the most important works of moral theology in the Catholic tradition. At its core the work is a refutation of moral relativism and nihilism. The pontiff asserts that absolute truth does exist and that it is accessible to mankind. Also, the encyclical re-states that the Magisterium of the Church has authority to pronounce definitively on moral issues. Other focuses are the natural law, human freedom, the role of conscience, the reality of evil, and a refutation of the concept of the “fundamental option.” The letter is divided into three sections: “Teacher, What Good Must I do . . . ?,” “Do Not be Conformed to this World,” and “Lest the Cross of Christ be Emptied of Its Power.”

Evangelium Vitae

Pope John Paul II issued Evangelium Vitae (The Gospel of Life) in 1995. The encyclical states the Church’s teaching on the dignity and inviolability of human life. The pontiff asserts that the immorality of murder, abortion, and euthanasia is a teaching of the ordinary and universal Magisterium of the Church and is therefore infallible and unchangeable. He also treats capital punishment, stating it to be normally immoral. The letter also deals with more general issues such as sexual morality, the importance of the family, and society’s duty to care for the sick and the poor. The encyclical is divided into four sections, “The Voice of Your Brother’s Blood Cries to Me from the Ground: Present-Day Threats to Human Life,” “I Came That They May Have Life: The Christian Message Concerning Life,” “You Shall Not Kill: God’s Holy Law,” and “You Did It to Me: For a New Culture of Human Life.”

Ut Unum Sint

Pope John Paul II wrote Ut Unum Sint (That They Might Be One) in 1995. The encyclical focuses on the Roman Catholic Church’s relationship with the Orthodox Churches and with other Christian ecclesial communities and expresses the Church’s commitment to an ecumenism that does not dilute the importance of doctrine. The letter is divided into three sections: “The Catholic Church’s Commitment to Ecumenism,” “The Fruits of Dialogue,” and “Quanta est Nobis Via?.”

Fides et Ratio

Written in 1998, Fides et Ratio (Faith and Reason) is Pope John Paul II’s treatment of the relationship between faith and reason. The pope re-iterates the Church’s teaching that faith and reason are not only not in conflict, but are in their essences bound up together. Faith without reason tends toward superstition and reason without faith tends toward nihilism. The pope calls for their re-integration and defends the Church’s responsibility to intervene in philosophy when its errors threaten revelation. The letter is divided into seven sections: “The Revelation of God’s Wisdom,” “Credo ut Intellegam,&rquo; “The Relationship between Faith and Reason,” “The Magisterium’s Interventions in Philosophical Matters,” “The Interaction between Philosophy and Theology,” and “Current Requirements and Tasks.”

Ecclesia de Eucharistia

Ecclesia de Eucharistia (Church of the Eucharist) was promulgated by Pope John Paul II in 2003. The encyclical focuses on the Eucharist as the “source and the summit” of Christian life and as the most precious possession of the Church. The pope calls for a renewal of Eucharistic devotion, asserts the sacrificial character of the Mass, and re-iterates the necessity of the ministerial priesthood and the reality of apostolic succession. The letter is divided into six sections: “The Mystery of Faith,” “The Eucharist Builds the Church,” “The Apostolicity of the Eucharist and the Church,” “The Eucharist and Ecclesial Communion,” “The Dignity of the Eucharistic Celebration,” and “At the School of Mary, ‘Woman of the Eucharist.’”

Deus Caritas Est

Written in 2005, Deus Caritas Est (God is Love) was Pope Benedict XVI’s first encyclical letter. It focuses on Love as the central reality of existence. The letter explores the concept of love at a theological and philosophical level, discussing eros, agape, and philia. It also articulates how love should become manifest in the life of the Church, through the proclamation of the word of God, the celebration of the Sacraments, and the exercise of charity. The encyclical is divided into two sections: “The Unity of Love in Creation and in Salvation History,” and “Caritas: The Practice of Love by the Church as a ‘Community of Love.’”

Spe Salvi

Pope Benedict XVI promulgated Spe Salvi (Saved by Hope) in 2007. The encyclical is a exploration of the theological virtue of hope and its relationship to redemption. The pontiff explains that the hope offered by Christ is not that of political liberation or economic abundance, but is rather of an encounter with the living God that surpasses all socio-political considerations. The letter is divided into eight sections: “Faith is Hope,” “The Concept of Faith-Based Hope in the New Testament and the Early Church,” “Eternal Life—What Is It?,” “Is Christian Hope Individualistic?,” “The Transformation of Christian Faith-Hope in the Modern Age,” “The True Shape of Christian Hope,” “‘Settings’ for Learning and Practicing Hope,” and “Mary, Star of Hope.”

Caritas in Veritate

Published in 2009, Caritas in Veritate (Charity in Truth) was pope Benedict XVI’s first social encyclical. The encyclical is concerned with many aspects of global development and economic and political justice. The pontiff aims to lay down moral guidelines within which specific policies can be crafted. These guidelines include a rejection of both socialist and free-market ideologies in favor of a conception within which all social actions are informed by ethics. The letter discusses poverty, population issues, the environment, relativism, sexual exploitation, and many other timely issues. It is divided into six sections: “The Message of ‘Populorum Progressio,’” “Human Development in Our Time,” “Fraternity, Economic Development and Civil Society,” “The Development of People, Rights and Duties, and the Environment,” “The Cooperation of the Human Family,” and “The Development of Peoples and Technology.”

Nova Vulgata: Bibliorum Sacrorum Editio

The Nova Vulgata is the official Latin version of the Bible for the Catholic Church. It has its origins in the Second Vatican Council (1962-1965), which put forth the mandate for a revision of the Latin Psalter in order to bring it in line with modern text-critical research. Then in 1965, Pope Paul VI established a commission to expand the revision to cover the entire Bible. The revised Psalter was completed and published in 1969, followed by the New Testament in 1971, and the entire Vulgate was completed in 1979. A second edition was then published several years later in 1986.

The textual basis of the Nova Vulgata is the critical edition of Jerome’s Vulgate, as edited by the monks of the Benedictine Abbey of St. Jerome in Rome and the critical edition of the Vulgate edited by Robert Weber (also available with a critical apparatus in the German Bible Society Bundle). The basis for Tobit and Judith are the Old Latin manuscripts that predate Jerome’s translation. Together this collection of texts were revised according to modern critical editions of the Hebrew, Aramaic, and Greek, along with a number of places where the editors believed that Jerome had misunderstood the meaning of the original or had translated it obscurely.

The original goal of the Nova Vulgata was to provide an authoritative edition of Jerome’s translation for the production of a reformed Latin liturgy, while also correcting the Vulgate in use and taking into account other important liturgical factors such as readability in public and singability for choirs.

[The] Nova Vulgata appeared in 1979. Intended for liturgical and pastoral use, the text represents a happy synthesis between the demands of textual criticism and respect for the ecclesiastical Latin of the church.

—Raymond F. Collins, Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary

A Dictionary of Canon Law

This pocket manual of canon law is a digest of the 1917 Code. On most subjects, the points of the law are scattered through the Code. By gathering these points under their respective heads and arranging them in alphabetical order, with reference to canon, paragraph, and number in the Code, this manual aims to be a clear, intelligent counselor in the ordinary affairs of Catholic life, and a ready index to the Code for questions that require knowledge of the niceties of ecclesiastical law.

Under the more than 600 titles, there is hardly any conceivable point or topic embraced by the Code that is not brought out and elucidated by the rays focused upon it from every related portion of the Law. And so by its aid the student can at once get a summary of the Church’s enactments upon any required subject and with the help of the numbered references can verify and, if need be, supplement the epitomized information.

The Ecclesiastical Review

The Book of Saints

The Book of Saints serves as a dictionary for servants of God canonized by the Catholic Church, extracted from the Roman and other Martyrologies.

A Catholic Dictionary

A Catholic Dictionary contains definitions and accounts of the doctrine, discipline, rites, ceremonies, councils, and religious orders of the Catholic Church.

We are disposed to think that, since Butler’s Lives of the Saints, there has not appeared in the English language any Catholic work so important as this.

Dublin Review

A most important and valuable work, for which we have long been waiting.

Andover Review

It is the only book that we know of that can be called a trustworthy source of information on Catholic Doctrine.

Christian Advocate

William E. Addis (1844–1917) was elected a fellow in mental and moral philosophy at Royal University of Ireland. He is the author of numerous works, including Anglicanism and the Fathers and Anglican Misrepresentation.

Thomas Arnold (1823–1900) was a lecturer in literature at Dublin University, and then was Professor of English Language and Literature at University College of St. Stephen’s Green. He authored a widely used school textbook, A Manual of English Literature, and the autobiography, Passages of a Wandering Life.

Ecclesiastical Dictionary

The object of the Ecclesiastical Dictionary is to furnish, in concise form, information upon ecclesiastical, biblical, archeological, and historical subjects pertaining to the Catholic Church. The more than 3,000 articles contained in the dictionary have been culled from various works and the Scripture quotations are mostly made from the Latin Vulgate.

John Thein was Priest of the Diocese of Cleveland, and the author of numerous works, including Christian Anthropology, the four-volume Answers to Difficulties of the Bible, and The Catechism of Rodez.

The Externals of the Catholic Church

The Externals of the Catholic Church covers the government, ceremonies, festivals, sacramentals, and devotions of the Catholic Church in great detail.

John Francis Sullivan was the author of several noted works, including The Visible Church, The Fundamentals of Catholic Belief, and Saint Thomas Aquinas and the Papal Monarchy.

Catholic Pocket Dictionary and Cyclopedia

Catholic Pocket Dictionary and Cyclopedia contains brief explanations of the doctrines, discipline, rites, ceremonies, and councils of the Catholic Church, including an abridged account of the religious orders. Added is McGovern’s “150 Important Facts in Church History Explained.”

James J. McGovern studied in Rome in the Propaganda College, where he received his Doctor of Sacred Theology and Doctor of Canon Law. He is also the author, editor, and compiler of The Manual of the Holy Catholic Church (1906).

A History of the Councils of the Church, vols. 1–5

This work is widely recognized as a classic of ecclesiastical history. Based directly on the primary sources, Charles Joseph von Hefele reconstructs the most significant Church gatherings from the council of Jerusalem, depicted in The Acts of the Apostles, to the Second Council of Nicaea in 787. This was the period of the undivided Church, when East and West were united and governed primarily through periodic gatherings, the most famous being the seven ecumenical councils held in 325, 381, 431, 451, 553, 680, and 787. This history clearly and thoroughly explains the major issues dealt with at each council, including clear descriptions of the numerous heretical movements of the early Church. It also describes with great detail the politics surrounding the calling and conclusion of the councils.

Charles Joseph von Hefele was bishop of Rottenburg and professor of theology at the University of Tübingen.

Kinship by Covenant: A Canonical Approach to the Fulfillment of God’s Saving Promises

While the canonical scriptures were produced over many centuries and represent a diverse library of texts, they are unified by stories of divine covenants and their implications for God’s people. In this deeply researched and thoughtful book, Scott Hahn shows how covenant, as an overarching theme, makes possible a coherent reading of the diverse traditions found within the canonical scriptures.

Biblical covenants, though varied in form and content, all serve the purpose of extending sacred bonds of kinship, Hahn explains. Specifically, divine covenants form and shape a father-son bond between God and the chosen people. Biblical narratives turn on that fact, and biblical theology depends upon it. With meticulous attention to detail, the author demonstrates how divine sonship represents a covenant relationship with God that has been consistent throughout salvation history. A canonical reading of this divine plan reveals an illuminating pattern of promise and fulfillment in both the Old and New Testaments. God’s saving mercies are based upon his sworn commitments, which he keeps even when his people break the covenant.

Both well-written and exhaustive, this impressive work will fascinate readers with New Testament truths about God’s unyielding covenant with his chosen, fallible people.

—David Noel Freedman, editor of the Anchor Yale Bible

This book is the fruit of an immense amount of research in the contemporary study of the Biblical covenant. No one who takes up the challenge to study it, whether scholar or not, will come away from reading it without being more astute in matters human and divine. The thesis of the book is masterly in its basic insight: life lived under Biblical covenant cannot be separated from life lived in relationships dictated by familial terms and ties. It is the family which is central to the Bible’s view of life for the simple reason that the family is central to life itself.

—James Swetnam, S. J., Pontifical Biblical Institute

Scott Hahn opens new vistas, chases down old haunts, and leads us to a fuller, deeper, and more penetrating understanding of covenant. Until we get ‘covenant’ right, we simply don’t understand the Bible. When I think of the word ‘covenant’ I think of Kinship by Covenant. When I have any questions about ‘covenant,’ this is the first book I will turn to for ever and a day.

—Scot McKnight, editor of The Face of New Testament Studies: A Survey of Recent Research

At last Scott Hahn’s Kinship by Covenant is published! Maintaining a masterful command of the data on biblical and ancient near eastern covenants, the work exposes how, for over a century, biblical scholarship lost sight of the covenant as a kinship-forging ritual. Richly documented, theologically profound, the book will prove an invaluable resource in Old and New Testament study.

—Gregory Yuri Glazov, Seton Hall University, Immaculate Conception Seminary

The Confession of St. Patrick

“I am Patrick, a sinner, the most unschooled and least of all the faithful, and utterly despised by many,” was the first sentence St. Patrick penned of his Confession—the autobiography of his life and missionary journeys. Over the past centuries, various writers have quoted from St. Patrick’s Confession, finding encouragement in its many lessons of faith and humility. The Confession St. Patrick is a translation of St. Patrick’s famous Confession from its original Latin. It includes an extensive introduction and notes, as well as an explanation of the translation process Thomas Olden underwent.

Thomas Olden (1823–1900) was the rector of Ballyclogh 1868–1899, Cork, Ireland. He attended Trinity College in Dublin and received a BA, MA, BD, and honorary DD. An Irish Anglican writer, he wrote over sixty entries, mostly on Irish saints.

The Life and Writings of St. Patrick

The Life and Writings of St. Patrick is one of the fullest and exact accounts of St. Patrick’s missionary labors in Ireland. Avoiding bias opinions of the saint by gathering information from ancient records, this biography allows the story of St. Patrick’s life to speak for itself. It includes nine appendixes that discuss—in detail—various aspects of St. Patrick’s life, as well as a map illustrating St. Patrick’s missionary journeys through Ireland.

Dr. Healy has gone over the ground himself; has collected the popular traditions; has identified, wherever possible, the sites of the old Patrician churches, and to our mind has given the most accurate, the most complete, and the most interesting account of what may be called the topography of St. Patrick’s life.

The Irish Ecclesiastical Record

Dr. Healy gives us, form an inside standpoint, a copious and exhaustive history of Ireland’s Apostle. The present work, containing over seven hundred and fifty good-sized pages, embodies everything of value that is known, or probably ever will be known, on the subject. Its chief excellence is the wealth of topographical lore which the learned author has brought to his task. . . . The narrative of St. Patrick’s journeying is greatly enlivened by the Archbishop’s identification of the various places and landmarks in the modern nomenclature.

Catholic World

John Healy (1841–1918) was Archbishop of Tuam from 1903 to 1918. Prior to that, He served as Bishop of Clonfert from 1896 to 1903.

A Commentary upon the Gospel According to S. Luke, vol. 1

This commentary, like many other patristic commentaries, was delivered in a course of short sermons. Volume one includes eighty sermons and covers the Gospel of Luke up to chapter 11:14.

Cyril of Alexandria was the Patriarch of Alexandria from 412 to 444. His uncle, Pope Theophilus of Alexandria, was Patriarch of Alexandria from 385 to 412. Cyril was well educated, wrote extensively, and was a leading figure in the First Council of Ephesus in 431, the third ecumenical council of the early Christian Church. The council convened amid disputes over the teachings of Nestorius, Patriarch of Constantinople, and Cyril led the charges of heresy against Nestorius. Nestorius’ teachings were condemned by the council, leading to the formation of separate denominations that broke from the Orthodox church.

Cyril of Alexandria is venerated as a saint in the Roman Catholic Church, Eastern Orthodox Church, Oriental Orthodox Church, Anglican Church, and Lutheran Church.

Commentary on the Gospel According to S. John, vols. 1–2

Volume one of Cyril of Alexander’s Commentary on the Gospel According to S. John is divided into ten chapters and covers John 1–9:1.

Volume two of Cyril of Alexander’s Commentary on the Gospel According to S. John is divided into seven chapters and covers John 9:2–21. This volume also contains indices that cover both volumes.

Cyril of Alexandria was the Patriarch of Alexandria from 412 to 444. His uncle, Pope Theophilus of Alexandria, was Patriarch of Alexandria from 385 to 412. Cyril was well educated, wrote extensively, and was a leading figure in the First Council of Ephesus in 431, the third ecumenical council of the early Christian Church. The council convened amid disputes over the teachings of Nestorius, Patriarch of Constantinople, and Cyril led the charges of heresy against Nestorius. Nestorius’ teachings were condemned by the council, leading to the formation of separate denominations that broke from the Orthodox church.

Cyril of Alexandria is venerated as a saint in the Roman Catholic Church, Eastern Orthodox Church, Oriental Orthodox Church, Anglican Church, and Lutheran Church.

Five Tomes against Nestorius; Scholia on the Incarnation; Christ is One; Fragments against Diore of Tarsus, Theodore of Mopsuestia, the Synousiasts

This volume contains the following works by Cyril of Alexandria:

  1. Five Books against Nestorius
    • Tome I
    • Tome II
    • Tome III
    • Tome IV
    • Tome V
  2. The Scholia on the Incarnation
  3. That Christ is One by Way of Dispute with Hermias
  4. Fragments of Treatise against Diodre, Bishop of Tarsus
  5. Fragments of Treatise against Theodore, of Mopsuestia
  6. Fragments of Treatise against the Synousiasts

Cyril of Alexandria was the Patriarch of Alexandria from 412 to 444. His uncle, Pope Theophilus of Alexandria, was Patriarch of Alexandria from 385 to 412. Cyril was well educated, wrote extensively, and was a leading figure in the First Council of Ephesus in 431, the third ecumenical council of the early Christian Church. The council convened amid disputes over the teachings of Nestorius, Patriarch of Constantinople, and Cyril led the charges of heresy against Nestorius. Nestorius’ teachings were condemned by the council, leading to the formation of separate denominations that broke from the Orthodox church.

Cyril of Alexandria is venerated as a saint in the Roman Catholic Church, Eastern Orthodox Church, Oriental Orthodox Church, Anglican Church, and Lutheran Church.

The Three Epistles of S. Cyril, Archbishop of Alexandria (3 vols.)

This volume contains two letters to Nestorius and one letter to John Bishop of Antioch. Editor P. E. Pusey presents the letters in Greek and Latin with notes and provides the English translations. The former of the two letters to Nestorius was read at the very opening of the Council of Ephesus, immediately after the recitation of the Nicene Creed.

Cyril of Alexandria was the Patriarch of Alexandria from 412 to 444. His uncle, Pope Theophilus of Alexandria, was Patriarch of Alexandria from 385 to 412. Cyril was well educated, wrote extensively, and was a leading figure in the First Council of Ephesus in 431, the third ecumenical council of the early Christian Church. The council convened amid disputes over the teachings of Nestorius, Patriarch of Constantinople, and Cyril led the charges of heresy against Nestorius. Nestorius’ teachings were condemned by the council, leading to the formation of separate denominations that broke from the Orthodox church.

Cyril of Alexandria is venerated as a saint in the Roman Catholic Church, Eastern Orthodox Church, Oriental Orthodox Church, Anglican Church, and Lutheran Church.

The Glory of the Lord, vol. 1: Seeing the Form

The work opens with a critical review of developments in Protestant and Catholic Theology since the Reformation which have led to the steady neglect of aesthetics in Christian theology. From here, von Balthasar turns to the central theme of the volume: the question of theological knowledge. He re-examines the nature of Christian believing (here he quickly draws widely on such theological figures as Anselm, Pascal and Newman) which gives due place to the particular kind of “knowing” which develops within the personal relationship to the believer to the God mediated through the revelation-form of Jesus Christ.

Hans Urs von Balthasar (1905–1988) was a Swiss theologian, considered to be one of the most important Catholic intellectuals and writers of the twentieth century. Incredibly prolific and diverse, he wrote over one hundred books and hundreds of articles. He was nominated to be a cardinal of the Catholic Church, but died two days before his ceremony.

The Glory of the Lord, vol. 2: Clerical Styles

Henri de Lubac has described von Balthasar as “probably the most cultured man in Europe”. In this volume von Balthasar shows the extraordinary range of his knowledge and expertise in a series of essays designed to illustrate different ways in which theologians have shared their work. What he offers is “a typology of the relationship between beauty and revelation” which shows “that there neither has been nor could be any true great and historically fruitful theology which was not expressly conceived and born under the constellation of beauty and grace”. The volume offers a series of studies of representative figures from the earlier period of Christian theology, including Irenaeus, Augustine, Denys, Anselm, and Bonventura.

Hans Urs von Balthasar (1905–1988) was a Swiss theologian, considered to be one of the most important Catholic intellectuals and writers of the twentieth century. Incredibly prolific and diverse, he wrote over one hundred books and hundreds of articles. He was nominated to be a cardinal of the Catholic Church, but died two days before his ceremony.

The Glory of the Lord, vol. 3: Lay Styles

In this volume von Balthasar turns to the works of the lay theologians, the poets and the philosopher theologians who have kept alive the grand tradition of Christian theology in writings formally very different from the works of the Fathers and the great Scholastics. This volume contains studies of Dante, John of the Cross, Pascal, Hamann, Soloviev, Hopkins, and Peguy.

Hans Urs von Balthasar (1905–1988) was a Swiss theologian, considered to be one of the most important Catholic intellectuals and writers of the twentieth century. Incredibly prolific and diverse, he wrote over one hundred books and hundreds of articles. He was nominated to be a cardinal of the Catholic Church, but died two days before his ceremony.

The Glory of the Lord, vol. 4: The Realm of Metaphysics in Antiquity

In this fourth volume of his magnum opus, von Balthasar considers the metaphysical tradition of the contemplation of Being. He provides major studies of Homer, the Greek Tragedians, Plato, and Plotinus and the development of this tradition in the Middle Ages. He then explores the analogy between the metaphysical vision of the Being and the Christian vision of the divine glory of the Trinity. The book is a remarkable attempt to rediscover the ancient vision of Being in all its awesomeness as the context within which the specifically Christian vision, rooted in God’s gracious self-revelation, took form and was expressed.

Hans Urs von Balthasar (1905–1988) was a Swiss theologian, considered to be one of the most important Catholic intellectuals and writers of the twentieth century. Incredibly prolific and diverse, he wrote over one hundred books and hundreds of articles. He was nominated to be a cardinal of the Catholic Church, but died two days before his ceremony.

The Glory of the Lord, vol. 5: The Realm of Metaphysics in the Modern Age

In this second volume on the metaphysical traditions of the West, von Balthasar presents a series of studies of representative mystics, theologians, philosophers, and poets and explores the three main streams of metaphysics which have developed since the “catastrophe” of Nominalism. The way of self-abandonment to the divine glory is traced through figures like Eckhart, Julian of Norwich, Ignatius, de Sales; the attempt to relocate theology in a recovery of antiquity’s sense of being and beauty through figures like Nicholas of Cusa, Holderlin, Goethe, Heidegger; the metaphysics of spirit through Descartes, Leibniz, Spinoza, and the Idealists. The strengths and weaknesses of these ways are relentlessly exposed. The volume ends with the search for the Christian contribution to metaphysics.

Hans Urs von Balthasar (1905–1988) was a Swiss theologian, considered to be one of the most important Catholic intellectuals and writers of the twentieth century. Incredibly prolific and diverse, he wrote over one hundred books and hundreds of articles. He was nominated to be a cardinal of the Catholic Church, but died two days before his ceremony.

The Glory of the Lord, vol. 6: Theology: The Old Covenant

This volume initiates von Balthasar’s study of the biblical vision and understanding of God’s glory. Starting with the theophanies of the Patriarchal period, it shows how such glory is most fully expressed in the graciousness of the Covenant relationship between God and Israel. But the breaking of that relationship by Israel means that in the later books of the Old Testament, the divine glory is seen in God’s willingness to bear with his people in the dark side of their history. There is no final version of God’s glory in the Old Testament. In the 500 years before Christ, the Covenant relation is more of an idea than reality. The vision of the transcendent glory of God which is developed in the later writings is only fragmentary. It will find its strange and unexpected fulfillment in the new Covenant.

Hans Urs von Balthasar (1905–1988) was a Swiss theologian, considered to be one of the most important Catholic intellectuals and writers of the twentieth century. Incredibly prolific and diverse, he wrote over one hundred books and hundreds of articles. He was nominated to be a cardinal of the Catholic Church, but died two days before his ceremony.

The Glory of the Lord, vol. 7: Theology: The New Covenant

In this final volume of his great work, von Balthasar reflects on the New Testament vision of God’s revelation of his glory in Christ. This divine “appearing” is grounded in the self-emptying of the eternal logos in the incarnation, cross, and descent into hell. Christ is the man who represents God and is also God; He is a symbol of the world and is also the world. He dies, but in dying rises into the eternal life of God. It is in Christ’s incarnation and resurrection that the Christian vision is truly expressed and the joining of God and the world in the new and eternal covenant is realized.

Hans Urs von Balthasar (1905–1988) was a Swiss theologian, considered to be one of the most important Catholic intellectuals and writers of the twentieth century. Incredibly prolific and diverse, he wrote over one hundred books and hundreds of articles. He was nominated to be a cardinal of the Catholic Church, but died two days before his ceremony.

Theo–Drama, vol. 1: Prolegomena

This is the introduction to the second part of the trilogy which is von Balthasar’s major work. The Glory of the Lord approaches revelation from the standpoint of the beautiful. The final part of the trilogy, the Theo-Logic, will treat Christian revelation from the standpoint of the true.

In this first volume von Balthasar shows how many of the trends of modern theology (e.g. “event”, “history”, “orthopraxy”, “dialogue”, “political theology”) point to an understanding of human and cosmic reality as a divine drama. He will then consider objections to such a theological dramatic theory and also the relationship between the Church and the theater. This volume assembles the materials and the themes that will make it possible in subsequent volumes to develop this theological dramatic theory.

Hans Urs von Balthasar (1905–1988) was a Swiss theologian, considered to be one of the most important Catholic intellectuals and writers of the twentieth century. Incredibly prolific and diverse, he wrote over one hundred books and hundreds of articles. He was nominated to be a cardinal of the Catholic Church, but died two days before his ceremony.

Theo–Drama, vol. 2: Dramatis Personae

The first volume of this series surveyed the great world dramatists to gather concepts and ideas to apply to the real stage, which is the universe God has made and centered into himself as an actor. This volume describes the actors, the dramatis personae. This is his theological anthropology concerning man, his freedom and destiny in the light of biblical revelation. Von Balthasar is concerned here with the dramatic character of existence as a whole, approaching the topic through a consideration of the various conditions and situations of mankind as a drama that involves both the Creator and His creatures.

Hans Urs von Balthasar (1905–1988) was a Swiss theologian, considered to be one of the most important Catholic intellectuals and writers of the twentieth century. Incredibly prolific and diverse, he wrote over one hundred books and hundreds of articles. He was nominated to be a cardinal of the Catholic Church, but died two days before his ceremony.

Theo–Drama, vol. 3: Dramatis Personae

The third volume of Theo-Drama is considered the most central book of von Balthasar’s entire theological project. Structurally it is the middle volume of the middle part of his theological trilogy: Glory of the Lord, Theo-Drama, and Theo-Logic. More significantly, it contains von Balthasar’s synthetic treatment of the central mysteries of the Catholic Faith: Christ, Mary, the Church, man, and the Trinity.

The various elements of von Balthasar’s theological reflection converge here, and here as nowhere else one can find the systematic elaboration of his Christology, Mariology, ecclesiology, anthropology and Trinitarian doctrine. It is both a one-volume compendium of this theology and a key to his trilogy and other writings.

Hans Urs von Balthasar (1905–1988) was a Swiss theologian, considered to be one of the most important Catholic intellectuals and writers of the twentieth century. Incredibly prolific and diverse, he wrote over one hundred books and hundreds of articles. He was nominated to be a cardinal of the Catholic Church, but died two days before his ceremony.

Theo–Drama, vol. 4: The Action

Having presented his Christology and Mariology under the sign of the “Dramatis Personae” in volume three of Theo-Drama, von Balthasar now turns to the action of the divine drama itself. Here we find his soteriology, where time, freedom, history, power, sin, conflict are seen in the light of the Cross, the culmination of the action and passion of God and man.

As Balthasar expresses it in the conclusion to his preface: here “we discern the unity of ‘glory’ and the ‘dramatic’. God’s glory, as it appears in the world—supremely in Christ—is not something static that could be observed by a neutral investigator. It manifests itself only through the personal involvement whereby God himself comes forth to do battle and is both victor and vanquished. If this glory is to come within our range at all, an analogous initiative is called for on our part. Revelation is a battlefield. Those who do battle on it can only be believers and theologians, provided they have equipped themselves with the whole armor of God (Eph 6:11).”

Hans Urs von Balthasar (1905–1988) was a Swiss theologian, considered to be one of the most important Catholic intellectuals and writers of the twentieth century. Incredibly prolific and diverse, he wrote over one hundred books and hundreds of articles. He was nominated to be a cardinal of the Catholic Church, but died two days before his ceremony.

Theo–Drama, vol. 5: The Last Act

This is the final volume of this series on “theological dramatic theory” by the great 20th century theologian Balthasar. This series is the second part of Balthasar’s trilogy on the good, the beautiful, and the true which is his major work. The first series in the trilogy is The Glory of the Lord, and following this Theo-Drama series will be Theo-Logic.

In this series “the good” has been the focus. Balthasar maintains that it is in the theater that man attempts a kind of transcendence to observe and to judge his own truth about himself. He sees the phenomenon of theater as a source of fruitfulness for theological reflection on the cosmic drama that involves earth and heaven. This fifth volume is Trinitarian, focusing on the mystery of God. He draws heavily on Scripture and many passages from the works of the mystic Adrienne von Spyer. Some of the topics covered include “A Christian Eschatology,” “The World is from the Trinity,” “Earth moves Heavenward,” and “The Final Act: A Trinitarian Drama.”

Hans Urs von Balthasar (1905–1988) was a Swiss theologian, considered to be one of the most important Catholic intellectuals and writers of the twentieth century. Incredibly prolific and diverse, he wrote over one hundred books and hundreds of articles. He was nominated to be a cardinal of the Catholic Church, but died two days before his ceremony.

Theo–Logic, vol. 1: The Truth of the World

Theo-Logic is the third and crowning part of the great trilogy of the masterwork of theologian Hans Urs von Balthasar, following his first two parts, The Glory of the Lord and Theo-Drama. This third part of the trilogy focuses on theological “logic” and what role it plays in the event of God’s self-revelation through the Incarnation of the Logos and the outpouring of the Holy Spirit.

The Truth of the World searches to uncover the structures that characterize the truth of finite being, while keeping in mind that this truth cannot be explained outside of its circumincessive relation to the other transcendentals. This volume investigates truth as nature, freedom, mystery, and participation.

Hans Urs von Balthasar (1905–1988) was a Swiss theologian, considered to be one of the most important Catholic intellectuals and writers of the twentieth century. Incredibly prolific and diverse, he wrote over one hundred books and hundreds of articles. He was nominated to be a cardinal of the Catholic Church, but died two days before his ceremony.

Theo–Logic, vol. 2: Truth of God

Truth of God concentrates on the truth that God has made known to us by his own initiative through free revelation, which therefore also becomes the ultimate norm of the truth of the world. This revelation, far from abrogating worldly truth, elevates and perfects it beyond itself. But the understanding, and description, of this relationship presupposes the analysis of the first volume.

While the first volume works with philosophical concepts from a philosophical point of view, the second follows a theological method from a theological point of view.

Hans Urs von Balthasar (1905–1988) was a Swiss theologian, considered to be one of the most important Catholic intellectuals and writers of the twentieth century. Incredibly prolific and diverse, he wrote over one hundred books and hundreds of articles. He was nominated to be a cardinal of the Catholic Church, but died two days before his ceremony.

Theo–Logic, vol. 3: The Spirit of the Truth

The final volume of the Theo-Logic focuses on the work of the Holy Spirit. Though Balthasar devotes some thought to the relations within the Trinity and to the problem of the filioque, he spends the better part of the volume presenting his ideas of the objective and subjective aspects of the Spirit’s person and work.

Hans Urs von Balthasar (1905–1988) was a Swiss theologian, considered to be one of the most important Catholic intellectuals and writers of the twentieth century. Incredibly prolific and diverse, he wrote over one hundred books and hundreds of articles. He was nominated to be a cardinal of the Catholic Church, but died two days before his ceremony.

Epilogue

The great trilogy of theology by Hans Urs von Balthasar includes The Glory of the Lord, Theo-Drama, and Theo-Logic. His Epilogue, a single volume, is the closing of his masterwork, giving final details and overview to the prior volumes in the trilogy.

Hans Urs von Balthasar (1905–1988) was a Swiss theologian, considered to be one of the most important Catholic intellectuals and writers of the twentieth century. Incredibly prolific and diverse, he wrote over one hundred books and hundreds of articles. He was nominated to be a cardinal of the Catholic Church, but died two days before his ceremony.

The Colloquies of Desiderius Erasmus (3 vols.)

One of the most important figures of the 16th century, Desiderius Erasmus was a leading reformist and Renaissance humanist. Through his works and letters, Erasmus championed that true religion was a matter of inward devotion rather than outward symbols of ceremony and ritual, and sought to reform aspects of the Church from within. His works showed an astonishing intelligence, razor-sharp wit, and an authentic love for God and humanity. Soon after publication, his works were translated and read all over Europe.

The Colloquies of Erasmus still hold interest to many—the linguist, the historian, the moralist, the theologian, the lover of fiction—the short ruminations that fill these pages are funny, inspiring, rich with knowledge, poignant, captivating, and entertaining. These works were in high demand when they were published, creating a sensation all over Europe and placing Erasmus on the short list of must-read Latin scholars.

Perhaps no man wielded a greater influence in the sixteenth century than Erasmus. Both in his relation to Protestantism and Romanism, Erasmus was an epoch-making personality. The modern age cannot be understood without a study of his writings and the tracing of his influence.

The Reformed Church Review

To read Erasmus is to grow in wisdom.

Journal of the Evangelical Theological Society

Desiderius Erasmus (1466–1536) was a priest, scholar, author, and translator known as a leading figure in the Renaissance humanist movement before and during the Reformation. In 1506 he graduated as Doctor of Divinity from Turin University, and later was Lady Margaret’s Professor of Divinity at the University of Cambridge. He then taught at Queens College, Cambridge for five years before becoming an independent scholar. Erasmus’ works were very influential; his books were produced in many editions and translations and printed all through Europe during his lifetime.

Nathan Bailey was a philologist and lexicographer. His An Universal Etymological English Dictionary was the most widely used dictionary of the eighteenth century.

Epistles of Erasmus (3 vols.)

One of the most important figures of the 16th century, Desiderius Erasmus was a leading reformist and Renaissance humanist. Through his works and letters, Erasmus championed that true religion was a matter of inward devotion rather than outward symbols of ceremony and ritual, and sought to reform aspects of the Church from within. His works showed an astonishing intelligence, razor-sharp wit, and an authentic love for God and humanity. Soon after publication, his works were translated and read all over Europe.

The Epistles of Erasmus contain well over seven hundred letters from the approximate years 1493–1518, plus a detailed introduction, a chronological register of the letters, a table of correspondent’s names, detailed index, and five appendixes.

Desiderius Erasmus (1466–1536) was a priest, scholar, author, and translator known as a leading figure in the Renaissance humanist movement before and during the Reformation. In 1506 he graduated as Doctor of Divinity from Turin University, and later was Lady Margaret’s Professor of Divinity at the University of Cambridge. He then taught at Queens College, Cambridge for five years before becoming an independent scholar. Erasmus’ works were very influential; his books were produced in many editions and translations and printed all through Europe during his lifetime.

Francis Morgan Nichols  (18261915) was also the translator of works such as Britton, The Roman Forum, The Marvels of Rome, and The History of Dedham.

The Birth of the Messiah: A Commentary on the Infancy Narratives in the Gospels of Matthew and Luke

In some ways the narratives of Jesus’ birth and infancy are the last frontiers to be crossed in the critical approach to the Gospels. For some, the stories of Jesus’ birth are given dubious historical value. For others, the popular character of these narratives—the exotic magi, birth star, angelic messengers, and so on—renders them as legends unworthy to be a vehicle of the pure Gospel message. Still others deem them simple Christian folklore devoid of any real theology—only written for romantics or the naïve. Yet each Christmas, Christian clergy and the people to whom they minister must continue to face them.

According to Raymond Brown, introductory materials on the New Testament in general and the Gospels in particular gives the infancy narratives short shrift, disproportionate to their role in Christian theology, art, and poetic imagination. Perhaps the most visible sign of this neglect is the absence of a major modern commentary which treats the two infancy narratives together.

It was from this felt need that efforts for a new commentary were undertaken. In The Birth of the Messiah, Raymond Brown is interested in the role the infancy narratives played in the early Christian understanding of Jesus. By treating the two narratives together in the same volume, Brown points out their common tendencies and emphases. By giving them two distinct treatments, however, he also shows how each fits within the theological framework of its respective Gospel, and thus offers us reasons for the differences between the infancy narratives.

In The Birth of the Messiah, Brown contends that the infancy narratives are, indeed, worthy vehicles of the Gospel messages. In fact, they contain the Gospel message in miniature. On a deeper level, this commentary reflects the instinct recognizing the infancy narratives as the essence of the Good News—namely, that God has made himself present to us in the life of the Messiah who walked the earth.

A line-by-line exegesis . . . that not only synthesizes a generation of modern scholarship but also provides a coherent and compelling explanation of what the stories of Christ’s birth were meant to convey . . . Brown manages to rescue the Christmas story from both the contempt of experts and the sentimentality of naive laymen . . . Ordinary Christians can thank this priestly scholar for helping them to put the adult Christ back into Christmas.

Newsweek

A work of highest critical historical scholarship in a form that is accessible to the average well-educated reader . . . Brown’s treatment of the infancy narratives is definitive. It will undoubtedly be the standard work on the subject for years to come.

Best Sellers

Recommended to readers at all levels and without reservation.

America

A masterly work. Every conclusion is argued with the utmost thoroughness.

Catholic Biblical Quarterly

A magnificent tome, which puts previous studies in the shade and which promises to remain standard for a very long time. A superb study, rich in content, profound in insight.

The Living Church

One of the premier events in biblical publishing. . . . One thing is sure: This book will become a classic study on the nature and message of the infancy and message of the infancy narratives.

The Bible Today

Raymond E. Brown taught for many years at Saint Mary’s Seminary in Baltimore and was Professor of Biblical Studies at the Union Theological Seminary for two decades. He was the author of three books in the Anchor Yale Bible series on the Gospels and Epistles of John. He died in 1998.

The Death of the Messiah, from Gethsemane to the Grave, vols. 1–2

The Passion Narrative proceeds from arrest through trial to condemnation, execution, and burial. In each Gospel, it records the longest consecutive action of Jesus. It has captured the attention and imagination of dramatists and artists, and it has inspired the poetry and music of the church for two thousand years. Alongside “born of the Virgin Mary,” the other phrase that made its way into the creed, “suffered under Pontius Pilate,” has become a marker anchoring Christian belief about the Son of God to a Jesus who was a human figure of actual history.

Historically, Jesus’ death was the most public event of his life. Theologically, Christians have interpreted the death of Jesus on the cross as a key element of God’s plan for the justification, redemption, and salvation of all. Spiritually, the Jesus of the Passion has been the focus of Christian meditation for countless would-be disciples who take seriously the command of the Master to take up the cross and follow him. Pastorally, the passion is the centerpiece of Lent and Holy Week, and the most sacred time in the liturgical calendar. From every point of view, the Passion is the central narrative in the Christian story.

The massive amount of material written on the Passion Narrative creates a need for a work that brings together the scattered views, proposals, and interpretations. In this 2-volume work, Raymond Brown sifts through the material to offer a full-scale commentary on the Passion Narratives of the Gospels.

The Death of the Messiah serves a variety of audiences: scholars, pastors, students of the religion and theology of the Bible, interested Christians, and those of any persuasion who seek knowledge about the passion and death of Jesus. Brown treats subjects in a readable way, even when it requires greater length or exposition.

Volume 1 covers the scenes of Jesus in Gethsemane, Jesus before the Jewish authorities, and Jesus before Pilate. This volume contains translation, commentary, and analysis of each passage.

Volume 2 continues Raymond Brown’s project of commentary and analysis of the Passion Narrative, covering the scenes of Jesus’ crucifixion and burial. This volume also contains nine appendices on non-canonical passion narratives, historicity, views of Judas Iscariot, Old Testament background, and Jesus’ predictions of his death. Volume 2 concludes with a detailed bibliography and a 25-page subject index.

Once again Raymond Brown has written a magnum opus. A stunning array of fresh insights into how the passion stories came into being and what—scene by scene—the four Evangelists really say about the arrest and crucifixion of Jesus.

Newsweek

Father Raymond Brown has a strong claim to be the most distinguished of American New Testament scholars, and he has few competitors worldwide.

New York Times

The Death of the Messiah is first of all a scholarly work, but it is also enjoyably readable and accessible to the interested layman.

Newsday

Breathtaking! Raymond E. Brown’s The Death of the Messiah crowns two millennia of Christian scholarship pondering the ‘scandal of the crucifixion.’ Brown has once again demonstrated his position as Father, Rabbi, and Teacher to us all.

—Burton L. Visotzky, Jewish Theological Seminary

The supreme achievement of a deeply pastoral scholar.

—Sandra M. Schneiders, Jesuit School of Theology and Graduate Theological Union

The benchmark by which any future study of the Passion Narratives will be measured.

—John P. Meier, University of Notre Dame

These volumes are a treasure that spans the ages.

—Phyllis Trible, Wake Forest University Divinity School

Raymond E. Brown taught for many years at Saint Mary’s Seminary in Baltimore and was Professor of Biblical Studies at the Union Theological Seminary for two decades. He was the author of three books in the Anchor Yale Bible series on the Gospels and Epistles of John. He died in 1998.

An Introduction to the Gospel of John

When Raymond E. Brown died in 1998, less than a year after the publication of his masterpiece, An Introduction to the New Testament, he left behind a nearly completed revision of his acclaimed two-volume commentary on the Gospel of John in the Anchor Yale Bible. The manuscript, skillfully edited by Francis J. Moloney, displays the rare combination of meticulous scholarship and clear, engaging writing that made Father Brown’s books consistently outsell other works of biblical scholarship.

An Introduction to the Gospel of John represents the culmination of Brown’s long and intense examination of part of the New Testament. One of the most important aspects of this new book, particularly to the scholarly community, is how it differs from the original commentary in several important ways. It presents, for example, a new perspective on the historical development of the Gospels, and shows how Brown decided to open his work to literary readings of the text, rather than relying primarily on the historical, which informed the original volumes. In addition, there is an entire section devoted to Christology, absent in the original, as well as a magisterial new section on the representation of Jews in the Gospel of John.

Raymond E. Brown taught for many years at Saint Mary’s Seminary in Baltimore and was Professor of Biblical Studies at the Union Theological Seminary for two decades. He was the author of three books in the Anchor Yale Bible series on the Gospels and Epistles of John. He died in 1998.

An Introduction to the New Testament

When Raymond E. Brown died in 1998, less than a year after the publication of his masterpiece, An Introduction to the New Testament, he left behind a nearly completed revision of his acclaimed two-volume commentary on the Gospel of John in the Anchor Yale Bible. The manuscript, skillfully edited by Francis J. Moloney, displays the rare combination of meticulous scholarship and clear, engaging writing that made Father Brown’s books consistently outsell other works of biblical scholarship.

An Introduction to the Gospel of John represents the culmination of Brown’s long and intense examination of part of the New Testament. One of the most important aspects of this new book, particularly to the scholarly community, is how it differs from the original commentary in several important ways. It presents, for example, a new perspective on the historical development of the Gospels, and shows how Brown decided to open his work to literary readings of the text, rather than relying primarily on the historical, which informed the original volumes. In addition, there is an entire section devoted to Christology, absent in the original, as well as a magisterial new section on the representation of Jews in the Gospel of John.

Raymond E. Brown taught for many years at Saint Mary’s Seminary in Baltimore and was Professor of Biblical Studies at the Union Theological Seminary for two decades. He was the author of three books in the Anchor Yale Bible series on the Gospels and Epistles of John. He died in 1998.

An Exposition of the Epistles of St. Paul and of the Catholic Epistles (2 vols.)

John MacEvilly’s exposition of the Pauline and Catholic Epistles offers a clear, Catholic, passage-by-passage interpretation of the text. It combines traditional exegesis with moral exhortation and so has been widely used as a daily devotional. The work was originally intended for laymen, but quickly found a place as a textbook in seminary education and has seen numerous editions.

John MacEvilly was the archbishop of Tuam.

Essays: Critical and Historical (2 vols.)

This collection of essays was written early in Newman’s career from 1828–1842. Newman’s topics vary from literary criticism and the Greek poets to the catholicity of the Anglican church and the concept of Antichrist. These two volumes capture the academic breadth of Newman’s career as a Fellow at Oriel College. All of these articles were written during Newman’s Anglican period and do not always reflect his later thoughts toward the Catholic church.

John Henry Newman (February 21, 1801–August 11, 1890) was a priest and Cardinal in the Roman Catholic Church. His father was a banker and his mother’s family was French Huguenot. Newman was raised in a strict Calvinist home and received his primary education at the famous Ealing School. John Henry Newman graduated from Trinity College, Oxford in 1821 and was elected to a fellowship at Oriel College, Oxford in the following year. On June 13, 1824 he was ordained into the Anglican priesthood. From the early 1830’s until 1845, Newman was a leading figure in the Oxford Movement, a group of Anglican priests and scholars from Oxford who sought to restore the rites of the Anglican church to their Apostolic roots in the Early Church. Between 1842 and 1845, during a time of solitude and the completion of Essay on the Development of Christian Doctrine, Newman underwent a process conversion to Roman Catholicism. Newman also published the Oxford Conservative Journal during this time period as a platform for retracting any negative remarks he previously assailed towards the Roman Church.

He was officially received into the Catholic Church on October 9, 1845. The conversion of John Henry Newman to Catholicism was the result of a life’s long struggle to reconcile the historic faith handed down from the Apostles with his own Anglican tradition. Frustrated with the errors inherent in both Protestantism and Roman Catholicism, Newman abandoned his search for the via media (or, middle way) of Anglicanism and converted to the Roman Catholic Church. In 1848, Newman founded the Birmingham Oratory at Maryvale and began ministering to the Catholic population of the city. In 1851, the Bishops of Ireland elected to start a Catholic university in Dublin and they appointed Newman to be the founder and first rector of the institution. Maintaining his ministry at the Birmingham Oratory, Newman established what would become University College, Dublin. His Idea of a University was prepared for founding faculty of the university at Dublin. On May 12, 1879 Pope Leo XIII appointed Newman to the college of Cardinals. John Henry Cardinal Newman died on August 11, 1890. Cardinal Newman is currently under consideration by the Vatican for sainthood.

The Via Media of the Anglican Church (2 vols.)

Early in his career John Henry Newman held the view that the Anglican Church of England provided a sort of “middle way” between the perceived errors of the Roman Catholic church on the one hand, and those perceived errors manifested in many Protestant churches on the other hand. This two volume work outlines Newman‘s argument in support of this view and his recommendations for enacting further reform within the Anglican church.

John Henry Newman (February 21, 1801–August 11, 1890) was a priest and Cardinal in the Roman Catholic Church. His father was a banker and his mother’s family was French Huguenot. Newman was raised in a strict Calvinist home and received his primary education at the famous Ealing School. John Henry Newman graduated from Trinity College, Oxford in 1821 and was elected to a fellowship at Oriel College, Oxford in the following year. On June 13, 1824 he was ordained into the Anglican priesthood. From the early 1830’s until 1845, Newman was a leading figure in the Oxford Movement, a group of Anglican priests and scholars from Oxford who sought to restore the rites of the Anglican church to their Apostolic roots in the Early Church. Between 1842 and 1845, during a time of solitude and the completion of Essay on the Development of Christian Doctrine, Newman underwent a process conversion to Roman Catholicism. Newman also published the Oxford Conservative Journal during this time period as a platform for retracting any negative remarks he previously assailed towards the Roman Church.

He was officially received into the Catholic Church on October 9, 1845. The conversion of John Henry Newman to Catholicism was the result of a life’s long struggle to reconcile the historic faith handed down from the Apostles with his own Anglican tradition. Frustrated with the errors inherent in both Protestantism and Roman Catholicism, Newman abandoned his search for the via media (or, middle way) of Anglicanism and converted to the Roman Catholic Church. In 1848, Newman founded the Birmingham Oratory at Maryvale and began ministering to the Catholic population of the city. In 1851, the Bishops of Ireland elected to start a Catholic university in Dublin and they appointed Newman to be the founder and first rector of the institution. Maintaining his ministry at the Birmingham Oratory, Newman established what would become University College, Dublin. His Idea of a University was prepared for founding faculty of the university at Dublin. On May 12, 1879 Pope Leo XIII appointed Newman to the college of Cardinals. John Henry Cardinal Newman died on August 11, 1890. Cardinal Newman is currently under consideration by the Vatican for sainthood.

Historical Sketches (3 vols.)

These volumes are comprised of lengthy lectures and articles written for encyclopedic publications. John Henry Newman was among the greatest historians of his day and few can escape his influence on the study of Christian history.

John Henry Newman (February 21, 1801–August 11, 1890) was a priest and Cardinal in the Roman Catholic Church. His father was a banker and his mother’s family was French Huguenot. Newman was raised in a strict Calvinist home and received his primary education at the famous Ealing School. John Henry Newman graduated from Trinity College, Oxford in 1821 and was elected to a fellowship at Oriel College, Oxford in the following year. On June 13, 1824 he was ordained into the Anglican priesthood. From the early 1830’s until 1845, Newman was a leading figure in the Oxford Movement, a group of Anglican priests and scholars from Oxford who sought to restore the rites of the Anglican church to their Apostolic roots in the Early Church. Between 1842 and 1845, during a time of solitude and the completion of Essay on the Development of Christian Doctrine, Newman underwent a process conversion to Roman Catholicism. Newman also published the Oxford Conservative Journal during this time period as a platform for retracting any negative remarks he previously assailed towards the Roman Church.

He was officially received into the Catholic Church on October 9, 1845. The conversion of John Henry Newman to Catholicism was the result of a life’s long struggle to reconcile the historic faith handed down from the Apostles with his own Anglican tradition. Frustrated with the errors inherent in both Protestantism and Roman Catholicism, Newman abandoned his search for the via media (or, middle way) of Anglicanism and converted to the Roman Catholic Church. In 1848, Newman founded the Birmingham Oratory at Maryvale and began ministering to the Catholic population of the city. In 1851, the Bishops of Ireland elected to start a Catholic university in Dublin and they appointed Newman to be the founder and first rector of the institution. Maintaining his ministry at the Birmingham Oratory, Newman established what would become University College, Dublin. His Idea of a University was prepared for founding faculty of the university at Dublin. On May 12, 1879 Pope Leo XIII appointed Newman to the college of Cardinals. John Henry Cardinal Newman died on August 11, 1890. Cardinal Newman is currently under consideration by the Vatican for sainthood.

Parochial and Plain Sermons (8 vols.)

This volume contains sermons delivered during Newman’s post at Oriel College, Oxford. Most of the sermons in this collection include the date of delivery, making it easy to compare the practical, homiletical presentation of Newman’s theories to the more intricate nuances of his argument in a corresponding essay.

John Henry Newman (February 21, 1801–August 11, 1890) was a priest and Cardinal in the Roman Catholic Church. His father was a banker and his mother’s family was French Huguenot. Newman was raised in a strict Calvinist home and received his primary education at the famous Ealing School. John Henry Newman graduated from Trinity College, Oxford in 1821 and was elected to a fellowship at Oriel College, Oxford in the following year. On June 13, 1824 he was ordained into the Anglican priesthood. From the early 1830’s until 1845, Newman was a leading figure in the Oxford Movement, a group of Anglican priests and scholars from Oxford who sought to restore the rites of the Anglican church to their Apostolic roots in the Early Church. Between 1842 and 1845, during a time of solitude and the completion of Essay on the Development of Christian Doctrine, Newman underwent a process conversion to Roman Catholicism. Newman also published the Oxford Conservative Journal during this time period as a platform for retracting any negative remarks he previously assailed towards the Roman Church.

He was officially received into the Catholic Church on October 9, 1845. The conversion of John Henry Newman to Catholicism was the result of a life’s long struggle to reconcile the historic faith handed down from the Apostles with his own Anglican tradition. Frustrated with the errors inherent in both Protestantism and Roman Catholicism, Newman abandoned his search for the via media (or, middle way) of Anglicanism and converted to the Roman Catholic Church. In 1848, Newman founded the Birmingham Oratory at Maryvale and began ministering to the Catholic population of the city. In 1851, the Bishops of Ireland elected to start a Catholic university in Dublin and they appointed Newman to be the founder and first rector of the institution. Maintaining his ministry at the Birmingham Oratory, Newman established what would become University College, Dublin. His Idea of a University was prepared for founding faculty of the university at Dublin. On May 12, 1879 Pope Leo XIII appointed Newman to the college of Cardinals. John Henry Cardinal Newman died on August 11, 1890. Cardinal Newman is currently under consideration by the Vatican for sainthood.

The Sayings of the Fathers

From the middle of the fifth century, and probably from the late fourth century, collections of sayings from the hermits of the Egyptian desert began to be circulated. Smaller collections of these sayings were gradually assembled into larger collections arranged alphabetically, by author, or by subject. In The Sayings of the Fathers, Owen Chadwick translates the standard and celebrated edition of this collection of sayings that was printed by the Jesuit Heribert Rosweyde at Antwerp in 1615. Chadwick chose this version to translate because it is one of the earliest of the western collections, and because it was probably the most influential of the collections in western monastic history.

Owen Chadwick was made Fellow of Trinity Hall, Cambridge in 1947, and in 1968 was elected Regius Professor of Modern History, a chair he held for fourteen years. A prominent Christian historian, his books include The Secularization of the European Mind in the 19th Century, Hensley Henson: A Study in the Friction between Church and state, and The Christian Church in the Cold War.

Boethius: The Theological Tractates and The Consolation of Philosophy

During his brief life of 44 years, Boethius authored and translated numerous important works and treatises on the Christian faith. Considered by Stewart and Rand to be "the last of the Roman philosophers and the first of the scholastic theologians," an imprisoned Boethius penned The Consolation of Philosophy, his best known work, before being executed in 524 A. D. This volume contains the Latin texts and English translations of The Consolation of Philosophy, as well as the tractates On the Trinity (two treatises), On the Catholic Faith, and A Treatise Against Eutyches and Nestorius.

Hugh Fraser Stewart (1863–1948) was a fellow and chaplain of Trinity College, Cambridge, and the author of numerous books on Boethius, Augustine of Hippo, and Pascal.

Edward Kennard Rand (1871–1945) was born in Boston, Massachusetts and educated at Harvard where he taught medieval history and Latin for forty years. He was the founder and first president of the Medieval Academy of America, the founder and first editor of Speculum, and president of the American Philological Association from 1922–1923. He is the author of several books, including Founders of the Middle Ages and The Building of Eternal Rome, as well as hundreds of scholarly articles and essays.

Morals on the Book of Job (3 vols.)

St. Gregory the Great’s massive four-volume commentary on the Book of Job is thought to have been written between 578 and 595. The first two chapters from the Book of Job are explained in a three part structure: historical, allegorical, and moral application. Gregory the Great then follows a historical, mystical, and moral pattern of explaining the Book of Job.

Throughout the whole Church, and in particular England, the works of St. Gregory became the foundation of the moral, theological, and spiritual teaching during the centuries after his death. It is not too much to say that his Morals on the Book of Job and his treatise on the Pastoral Charge long formed the storehouses from which generations of spiritual writers drew their inspirations, their ideas, and frequently their very words.

The Dublin Review

Charles Marriott (1811–1858) was an Anglican priest, fellow of Oriel College, Oxford, and one of the members of the Oxford Movement.

An Encyclopedist of the Dark Ages: Isidore of Seville

Before offering an English translation of St. Isidore of Seville’s classic Etymologies, Ernest Brehaut provides a biography of Isidore’s life, and explores his relationship to previous culture, his view of education, and his world-view in general. Isidore’s vast encyclopedic systemization of ancient learning includes subjects such as theology, philosophy, medicine, and music, and is considered one of the most important sources for the history of intellectual culture in the early Middle Ages.

Ernest Brehaut (1873–1953) was a professor of history at Columbia University, New York, and also the author of History of the Franks.

On Holy Images

Responding to the edict by the Byzantine Emperor Leo III banning the veneration or exhibition of holy images, St. John Damascene penned a defense of holy images that garnered his reputation as an important thinker and writer. In On Holy Images, Allies provides an English translation from the original Greek of John Damascene's classic text, as well as translating three sermons on the Assumption of Mary.

A translation of the treatise on Holy Images by the last of the great Greek Fathers, who is at the same time the definite forerunner of the speculative method inaugurated by the scholastics of the Middle Ages, has a special interest and significance for our time.

The American Ecclesiastical Review

The Damascene's polemic is of great historical as well as dogmatic interest. It deserves attention for its argument, its style, and its effects.

The Critical Review of Theological and Philosophical Literature

Mary H. Allies translated numerous works from the Church Fathers, including Leaves from St. Augustine, as well as the biography of her father, Thomas Allies, the Story of a Mind.

Barlaam and Ioasaph (English and Greek Texts)

The Greek legend of Barlaam and Ioasaph, traditionally attributed to St. John Damascene, serves as a re-telling of the life of Buddha through a Christian lens. Although the story’s original plot may have been adapted from Christians of the East for their own use, St. Damascene's Barlaam and Ioasaph is clearly a celebration of Christian monasticism. The Greek text and the English translation are both provided in this volume, along with an in-depth introduction in which the authors discuss its authorship and more.

Despite its considerable interest, religious and in places fairly human, Barlaam and Ioasaph has never before been completely translated into English from the original, and the present undertaking is a work of considerable value, carefully executed.

The Nation

George Ratcliffe Woodward (1848–1934) was born in Hamilton Square, Birkenhead and educated at Gonville and Casius College, Cambridge. Woodward is most known for his writing and translating of hymns, and his works include Carols for Easter and Ascension-tide and A Cambridge Carol Book: Being Fifty-two Songs for Christmas, Easter, and Other Seasons.

Harold Mattingly (1884–1964) was Craven Scholar and Fellow of Gonville and Casius College, Cambridge. He joined the British Museum in 1910 in the Department of Printed Books before moving to the Department of Coins and Medals where he was responsible for a total revision of the chronology and study of Roman coinage. His other works include Earliest Times to the Fall of the Roman, The Imperial Civil Service of Rome, and The Man in the Roman Street.

Explanation of the Rule of St. Augustine

Sometimes thought of as a “Second Augustine” (“alter Ausgustinus”), Hugh of St. Victor (c. 1096–1141) taught at the Augustinian Abbey of Saint Victor in Paris after which he is named. His numerous theological works and commentaries on Augustine were highly regarded, and the hundreds of original works that have survived in libraries all across Europe today reflect how popular and influential they were. Dom Aloysius Smith presents an English translation of Hugh of St. Victor’s Explanation of the Rule of St. Augustine from the original Latin.

Dom Aloysius Smith was a celebrated translator whose numerous translations include Spiritual Director and Physician: The Spiritual Treatment of Sufferers from Nerves and Scruples and Life of St. Agnes: Virgin and Martyr.

The Didascalicon of Hugh of St. Victor

Composed in Paris in the late 1120’s, Hugh of St. Victor’s Didascalicon provided intellectual and practical orientation for students of varying ages and levels of attainment who came in numbers to the newly founded Abbey of Saint Victor. As students took up studies at their different levels, this "medieval guide to the arts" offered a survey of all they should ultimately read, and of the order, manner, and purpose which should govern their reading, both in the arts or disciplines, and in Sacred Scripture. Jerome Taylor provides an in-depth introduction to The Didascalicon of Hugh of St. Victor where he discusses the life of Hugh of St. Victor, the translation process from Latin to English, and the various original manuscripts still in existence.

This treatise, produced in the early years of the twelfth-century Renaissance by one of its most important theologians and educators, offers a vision of human knowledge as an integrated whole that works to perfect the human person. It is a crucial text for those interested in the study of the Bible in the Middle Ages, in the history of schools and pedagogy, and in the survival of the classical tradition in the West.

—Caroline Walker Bynum, Columbia University

Jerome Taylor was a professor of Medieval Studies at Notre Dame University. He has translated, edited, or contributed to numerous books, including Medieval English Drama: Essays Critical and Contextual, Chaucer Criticism: An Anthology, and Nature, Man, and Society in the Twelfth-Century: Essays on New Theological Perspectives in the Latin West.

The Love Letters of Abelard and Heloise

Like Romeo and Juliet, Abelard and Heloise are one of the most celebrated couples of all time. And like the Shakespearean play, their love story is marred by tragedy. The letters contained in this volume are some of the most passionate love letters ever written. Translated from the original 1722 Latin edition into English, Ralph Fletcher Seymour provides a brief introduction to their powerful, heart-wrenching story.

The Love of Abelard and Heloise is one of the romances, founded in literal reality, that have never lost their power.

American Lithographer

Ralph Fletcher Seymour (1876–1966) was an artist-in-residence at Knox College at taught illustration at the Art Institute of Chicago. He was a noted designer of bookplates, and for almost seven decades he ran his own book publishing firm in Chicago.

St. Bernard of Clairvaux’s Life of St. Malachy of Armagh

Written before the Synod of Kells met in 1152, Bernard of Clairvaux’s biography of Malachy of Armagh covers Malachy’s entire spirit-filled life, from boyhood to his canonization. Before the English translation of St. Bernard’s Life of St. Malachy of Armagh, translator H. J. Lawlor provides an in-depth, 60+ page introduction to the state of the Irish Church during the time of St. Malachy’s life, a time he calls “a Reformation, though it might perhaps be more accurately described as an ecclesiastical revolution.” Also included with this volume are various letters and two sermons from St. Bernard.

Dr. Lawlor has given us a delightful translation of St. Bernard’s Life of St. Malachy of Armagh. His introduction and annotations admit us to an intimate view of the Church of Ireland in the most critical period of her history.

Church Quarterly Review

Hugh Jackson Lawlor (1860–1938) was Professor of Ecclesiastical History at the University of Dublin and was also an Anglican Dean. He was the author and translator of numerous books, including Eusebius, Bishop of Caesarea, The Heresy of the Phrygians, and A Fresh Authority for the Synod of Kells, 1152.

Concerning Grace and Free Will

Watkin W. Williams translates from the original Latin into English St. Bernard of Clairvaux’s treatise Concerning Grace and Free Will. Williams provides abundant notes and commentary on St. Bernard’s exposition, as well as an in-depth introduction.

Watkin Wynn Williams is the author and translator of numerous books, including Monastic Studies, Studies in St. Bernard of Clairvaux, The Moral Theology of the Sacrament of Penance, and St. Bernard: The Man and His Message.

Life and Works of Saint Bernard, vol. 1

In volume one of Samuel J. Eales’ comprehensive two-volume collection of letters from Saint Bernard, Eales provides an in-depth introduction to the life and works of St. Bernard, a Bernadine Chronology, and a quick list of dates for each of the included letters. Eales also provides a summary at the top of each letter, as well as concise biographical material for each letter’s recipient. Volume one includes letters 1–145.

In his writings great natural powers shine forth resplendently, an intellect more than that of the subtle Abelard, an eloquence that was irresistible, an imagination like a poet, and a simplicity that wins the admiration of all. Priests will find it a most valuable book for spiritual reading and sermons.

Catholic World

No writer of the Middle Ages is so fruitful of moral inspiration as S. Bernard, no character is more beautiful, and no man in any age whatever so faithfully represented all that was best in the impulses of his time, or exercise so powerful an influence upon it. . . . There is no man whose letters cover so many subjects of abiding interest, or whose influence was so widely spread.

Athenaeum

Samuel J. Eales was Principal of St. Boniface, Warminster, and the author and translator of numerous books, including Sermons Ancient and Modern, The Voice from the Cross: Seven Brief Meditations on the Words of Our Lord Jesus Christ Spoken from His Cross, and The Privilege of Prayer.

Life and Works of Saint Bernard, vol. 2

In volume two of Samuel J. Eales’ comprehensive two-volume collection of letters from Saint Bernard, Eales provides an introduction with a description of the position and site of the Abbey of Clairvaux and some notes on the Seal of St. Bernard. Eales also provides a summary at the top of each letter, as well as concise biographical material for each letter’s recipient. Volume one includes letters 146–380.

The letters are of great historic interest, and many of them most touching. The simple earnestness of the man, and his utter freedom from ambition, strike us on almost every page.

Notes and Queries

English readers of every class and creed owe a debt of gratitude to Dr. Eales for the great and useful work which he has undertaken. It is strange that now for the first time has such a task been even, as far as we are aware, approached. We have indeed much to be grateful for to the first English translator of S. Bernard's works.

This Month

Samuel J. Eales was Principal of St. Boniface, Warminster, and the author and translator of numerous books, including Sermons Ancient and Modern, The Voice from the Cross: Seven Brief Meditations on the Words of Our Lord Jesus Christ Spoken from His Cross, and The Privilege of Prayer.

St. Bernard’s Sermons on the Canticle of Canticles (2 vols.)

Translated from the original Latin into English, these sermons on the "Song of Solomon, instead of being dry-as-dust homilies, are as varied and many-colored as is the spiritual life, every aspect of which they discuss with equal solidity and elegance." Volumes one and two of St. Bernard’s Sermons on the Canticle of Canticles contains sermons 1–86.

Bernard surpasses all the other Doctors of the Church.

—Martin Luther

The Abbot Bernard, in his book De Consideratione, speaks in the language of truth itself.

—John Calvin

He was gifted with a sublime eloquence, and so rich in saintly wisdom and eminent in holiness, that while we garner his teaching we should make his life our model. Bernard, the great contemplative, tasted all the sweetness of prayer; it you, too, would find a relish in prayer, ruminate his words. Not only are they spiritual and heart-penetrating, but they are also exquisite in style and calculated to impel you to the service of God.

—St. Bonaventure

Sermons of St. Bernard on Advent and Christmas

These 19 sermons, originally given in Latin at the Chapter-house at Clairvaux, all relate to the mysteries of Advent and Christmas. John Cuthbert Hedley, the Bishop of Newport from 1881–1915, provides and introduction to these illuminating sermons.

The Moral Concordances of Saint Anthony of Padua

St. Anthony of Padua was not only one of the greatest, but one of the most popular preachers of the Middle Ages. His extant sermons and sermon notes evince a grasp of the Scriptures which well entitled him to the name bestowed on him by Gregory IX, “The Ark of the Testament.” St. Anthony died in 1231, and it wasn’t until 1638 that the Moral Concordances were discovered in a library attached to the Church called Aracoeli, in Rome. J. M. Neale provides the English translation along with an in-depth introduction.

The book needs no commendation at our hands, it having already attained to the position of a standard work, yet we cannot do less than record our deliberate conviction that no clergyman’s library is complete without it.

Union Review

John Mason Neale was educated at Trinity College, Cambridge where he founded the Cambridge Camden Society (later known as the Ecclesiological Society). He was also the principal founder of the Anglican and Eastern Churches Association, a religious organization founded as the Anglican and Eastern Orthodox Churches Union in 1864. A well known hymnist and translator, his works include An Introduction to the History of the Holy Eastern Church, Essays on Liturgiology and Church History, and O come, O come, Emmanuel.

The Exempla or Illustrative Stories from the Sermones Vulgares of Jacques de Vitry

Jacques de Vitry was one of the most famous preachers of the Middle Ages, a true master of the medieval sermon form. This style used exempla, or examples, from everyday life, to illustrate the moral interpretation of Scripture passages. These exempla became themselves famous and widely used and offer a window into the moral imagination of the Christians of the Middle Ages, an imagination that intermixed the mundane with the fantastic and sublime. Preachers borrowed these exempla from each other and over the centuries they often took on established, proverbial forms. The exempla of Jacques de Vitry are extracted from his sermons, but they cannot be considered to have been written by him. Rather, they represent a body of fables, proverbs, and short tales that were widely used in the sermons of the Middle Ages and would often have been recognizable to audiences.

Thomas Frederick Crane studied law at Princeton and Columbia Law School and worked as a librarian at the newly founded Cornell University. At Cornell, he taught French, Italian, Spanish, as well as Medieval Literature. Crane was one of the founders of Journal of American Folklore and later served as the first Dean of the Arts College.

Ninety–Nine Homilies of S. Thomas Aquinas upon the Epistles and Gospels for Forty–Nine Sundays of the Christian Year

These homilies by the great St. Thomas Aquinas are divided into the following groups:

  • The Advent Homilies (9)
  • The Epiphany and Ante-Lenten Homilies (16)
  • The Lenten Homilies (12)
  • The Easter Homilies (12)
  • The Homilies from Trinity to Advent, part 1 (24)
  • The Homilies from Trinity to Advent, part 2 (26)
Valuable as giving the Scholastic interpretation of many texts; valuable as showing how the Schoolmen saw our Blessed Lord as shadowed forth in type and prophecy in God's servants of old.

Preface

John M. Ashley is the editor and translator of numerous works, including A Year with Great Preachers, Eucharistic Sermons by Great Preachers, and Origen the Preacher.

The Religious State, the Episcopate and the Priestly Office

An English translation of De perfectione spiritualis uitae, The Religious State, the Episcopate and the Priestly Office explores the doctrines concerning religious life and Christian perfection.

John Procter was ordained in 1872 and was a parish priest of St. Dominic's Priory Church in London. He authored and translated numerous books, including Saint Sebastian: Lay-Apostle and Martyr, The Perpetual Rosary, Short Lives of the Dominican Saints, and The Catholic Creed; or, What do Catholics Believe?

The Bread of Life, or, St. Thomas Aquinas on the Adorable Sacrament of the Altar

Divided into seven parts, The Bread of Life consists of thirty meditations on the Blessed Sacrament. Rawes has translated the original Latin into English and provided summaries for each meditation in the table of contents.

Henry Augustus Rawes (1826–1885) was born at Easington near Durham, England, and educated at Trinity College, Cambridge. His numerous works include Servants of the Holy Ghost, Foregleams of the Desired and Septem; or Seven Ways of Hearing Mass.

The Life of Christ

The Life of Christ consists of one hundred meditations on the life and work of Jesus Christ. These short meditations, averaging 1–3 pages in length, poetically illuminate the Scriptures, and "endeavors throughout to fix the gaze of the soul on the Divine Object."

It was written, and has been translated, to be a guide through the high and sacred ways of the spiritual life; the temper of prayer and faithful contemplation is astir in every chapter; and the true canon of its excellence can only be applied by those who have used it according to the intention of its author.

Church Quarterly Review

W. H. Hutchings was Sub-warden of the House of Mercy, Clewer, and the author and translator of numerous works, including The Confessions of S. Augustine, The Life of Prayer: A Series of Lectures, and The Mystery of Temptation: A Course of Lectures.

The Virtues of a Religious Superior

This classic handbook for those who take leadership roles in the church is divided into seven sections:

  • The Selection of Superiors
  • Zeal for Justice
  • Pity or Compassion
  • Patience
  • Edification
  • Prudent Discretion
  • Devotion to Prayer

Sabinus Mollitor (1865–1924) earned his degree in classical studies from Quincy College and received the Franciscan habit in 1886. He served as pastor at a number of German and American Indian parishes in Nebraska, Michigan, Wisconsin, and Ohio, and as a prison chaplain in Joliet, Illinois, and St. Louis, Missouri.

The Life of Saint Francis

Composed between 1260 and 1263 at the bidding of a Chapter-General of the Order, The Life of Saint Francis was intended to supersede former "Lives or Legends," and to become the official biography of the Saint. This classic volume is a standard reference for the study of the life of Saint Francis.

Emma Gurney Salter translated over thirty-five books, including Franciscan Legends in Italian Art, The Little Flowers of St. Francis, and The Vision of God.

Mystical Opuscula

This volume contains five works that cemented Bonaventure’s reputation as a mystical theologian: The Journey of the Mind to God, The Triple Way, Tree of Life, Mystical Vine, and On the Perfection of Life. This edition of José de Vinck’s translation of these texts is considered the authoritative, critical edition.

Baron José M. G. A. de Vinck is a publisher, editor, translator, writer, and owner of Alleluia Press. He wrote and translated books on philosophy and theology.

Breviloquium

This is Bonaventure’s comprehensive presentation of Christian doctrine, covering the Trinity, creation, the fall of man, the person and mission of Christ, the role of grace, the sacraments, and the Last Judgment.

Baron José M. G. A. de Vinck is a publisher, editor, translator, writer, and owner of Alleluia Press. He wrote and translated books on philosophy and theology.

On Union with God

Written towards the end of his life, St. Albert the Great’s On Union with God aimed to lay the principles down needed to lead the highest spiritual life. In the Preface, P. J. Berthier writes: “It seems as though, while one reads, the mists of earth vanish and the snowy summits appear of the mounts of God. We breathe only the pure atmosphere of prayer, peace, and love, and the one great fact of the universe, the Divine Presence, is felt and realized without effort.”

P. J. Berthier is the author and editor of numerous books, including Biblical Examples of Sentence, with Extracts from the Old and New Testament and The Practice of Style: Simplicity, Precision, and Harmony.

The Form of Perfect Living and Other Prose Treatises

This volume contains Geraldine E. Hodgson’s translations of four of Richard Rolle of Hampole’s prose treatises: The Form of Perfect Living, Our Daily Life, On Grace, and An Epistle on Charity.

Geraldine E. Hodgson is the author and translator of numerous works, including In the Way of the Saints, Early English Instructions and Devotions, and The Sanity of Mysticism: A Study of Richard Rolle.

Treatise on Consummate Perfection

Together with St. Francis of Assisi, Catherine of Siena is one of the two patron saints of Italy. Of her extant writings, her Dialogue, an abundant number of letters, and a series of prayers, are well known. This smaller work, Treatise on Consummate Perfection, is also attributed to Catherine, and is also written in the form of a brief Dialogue.

Augusta Theodosia Drane (1823–1894) wrote numerous books of prose and poetry, including The History of Saint Dominic, The Life of St Catherine of Siena, The Knights of St John and Songs in the Night and Other Poems.

The Dialogue of the Seraphic Virgin Catherine of Siena

After providing an in-depth introduction on the study of mysticism, Algar Thorold provides the English translation of Catherine of Siena’s Dialogue, a series of colloquies divided into four treatises: “A Treatise of Divine Providence,” “A Treatise of Discretion,” “A Treatise of Prayer,” and “A Treatise of Obedience.”

Mr. Thorold decidedly deserves the thanks of students of mysticism for his fine rendering of the Dialogue, and for his scholarly introduction. The Dialogue is a treasure-house of devotional inspiration to those who can read aright its messages, and the place it has held in the Church is sufficient guarantee of its astounding intellectual merit and its salutary efficacy.

Freeman’s Journal

Those who study mystical literature owe a debt of gratitude to Mr. Algar Thorold for rendering into English one of the great classics of mysticism. . . . Mr. Thorold's translation reads easily and well.

Scotsman

Mr. Thorold’s excellent essay on Mysticism shows an extensive acquaintance with leaders of modern thought outside the Catholic Church, and their views on the supernatural. The subject is beset with dangers, but the author has written nothing that is not in accordance with sound theology.

Tablet

Algar Labouchere Thorold (1866–1936) is the author and translator of numerous books, including Six Masters in Disillusion, The Life of Henry Labouchere, as well as the introduction to Mary G. Steegmann’s translation of The Book of Divine Consolation of the Blessed Angela of Foligno.

Medieval Preachers and Medieval Preaching

A survey of extracts from sermons from the Middle Ages, J. M. Neale provides an in-depth introduction to the sermons of that epoch, and then provides notes on the sermons sampled. Sermons included come from eminent Medieval preachers such as: St. Boniface, St. Bede, St. Atto of Vercell, St. Peter Damiani, St. Bruno of Aste, Peter Abaelard, Adam Scotus, Thomas à Kempis, and more.

A remarkable book; chiefly valuable to clergymen of all persuasions, but not without interest to the literary student, or the thoughtful frequenter of public worship.

The Living Age

John Mason Neale was educated at Trinity College, Cambridge where he founded the Cambridge Camden Society (later known as the Ecclesiological Society). He was also the principal founder of the Anglican and Eastern Churches Association, a religious organization founded as the Anglican and Eastern Orthodox Churches Union in 1864. A well known hymnist and translator, his works include An Introduction to the History of the Holy Eastern Church, Essays on Liturgiology and Church History, and O come, O come, Emmanuel.

A Commentary on the Psalms from Primitive and Mediæval Writers, vol. 1: Psalm 1 to Psalm 38

Volume one of the Commentary on the Psalms from Primitive and Mediæval Writers covers Psalms 1–38. In addition to verse-by-verse commentary, each Psalm includes an introduction and various thoughts from the writings of the Church Fathers. Volume one also includes an in-depth introduction to the series, which includes two dissertations: "The Psalms as Employed in the Offices of the Church" and "Primitive and Mediæval Commentators on the Psalms," which provides concise biographical notices of the principal commentators referenced in all four volumes. A third dissertation, "The Mystical and Literal Interpretation of the Psalms," will be found after the thirtieth Psalm.

John Mason Neale (1818–1866) was educated at Trinity College, Cambridge, where he founded the Cambridge Camden Society (later known as the Ecclesiological Society). He was also the principal founder of the Anglican and Eastern Orthodox Churches Union in 1864, later known as the Anglican and Eastern Churches Association. A well-known hymnist and translator, his works include An Introduction to the History of the Holy Eastern Church, Essays on Liturgiology and Church History, and O come, O come, Emmanuel.

Richard Frederick Littledale (1833–1890) was born in Dublin and educated at Bective House Seminary and Trinity College, Dublin. His numerous works include The Priest’s Prayer Book and The People’s Hymnal.

A Commentary on the Psalms from Primitive and Mediæval Writers, vol. 2: Psalm 39 to Psalm 80

Volume two of the Commentary on the Psalms from Primitive and Mediæval Writers covers Psalms 39–80. In addition to verse-by-verse commentary, each Psalm includes an introduction and various thoughts from the writings of the Church Fathers. A dissertation, "Chronology and Authorship of the Psalms," explores the "original" order of the Psalms and discusses the many problems of trying to discern their "true" chronological sequence.

John Mason Neale (1818–1866) was educated at Trinity College, Cambridge, where he founded the Cambridge Camden Society (later known as the Ecclesiological Society). He was also the principal founder of the Anglican and Eastern Orthodox Churches Union in 1864, later known as the Anglican and Eastern Churches Association. A well-known hymnist and translator, his works include An Introduction to the History of the Holy Eastern Church, Essays on Liturgiology and Church History, and O come, O come, Emmanuel.

Richard Frederick Littledale (1833–1890) was born in Dublin and educated at Bective House Seminary and Trinity College, Dublin. His numerous works include The Priest’s Prayer Book and The People’s Hymnal.

A Commentary on the Psalms from Primitive and Mediæval Writers, vol. 3: Psalm 81 to Psalm 118

Volume three of the Commentary on the Psalms from Primitive and Mediæval Writers covers Psalms 81–118. In addition to verse-by-verse commentary, each Psalm includes an introduction and various thoughts from the writings of the Church Fathers.

John Mason Neale (1818–1866) was educated at Trinity College, Cambridge, where he founded the Cambridge Camden Society (later known as the Ecclesiological Society). He was also the principal founder of the Anglican and Eastern Orthodox Churches Union in 1864, later known as the Anglican and Eastern Churches Association. A well-known hymnist and translator, his works include An Introduction to the History of the Holy Eastern Church, Essays on Liturgiology and Church History, and O come, O come, Emmanuel.

Richard Frederick Littledale (1833–1890) was born in Dublin and educated at Bective House Seminary and Trinity College, Dublin. His numerous works include The Priest’s Prayer Book and The People’s Hymnal.

A Commentary on the Psalms from Primitive and Mediæval Writers, vol. 4: Psalm 119 to Psalm 150

Volume four of the Commentary on the Psalms from Primitive and Mediæval Writers covers Psalms 119–150. In addition to verse-by-verse commentary, each Psalm includes an introduction and various thoughts from the writings of the Church Fathers. This volume also includes the dissertation "The Psalms as Used in the Sacraments and Rites of the Church" and provides an index of Scripture references for the entire collection.

John Mason Neale (1818–1866) was educated at Trinity College, Cambridge, where he founded the Cambridge Camden Society (later known as the Ecclesiological Society). He was also the principal founder of the Anglican and Eastern Orthodox Churches Union in 1864, later known as the Anglican and Eastern Churches Association. A well-known hymnist and translator, his works include An Introduction to the History of the Holy Eastern Church, Essays on Liturgiology and Church History, and O come, O come, Emmanuel.

Richard Frederick Littledale (1833–1890) was born in Dublin and educated at Bective House Seminary and Trinity College, Dublin. His numerous works include The Priest’s Prayer Book and The People’s Hymnal.

Understanding “Our Father”: Biblical Reflections on the Lord’s Prayer

The prayer at hand has been called many things: the Pater Noster, the Our Father, the Model Prayer, the Lord’s Prayer. In Understanding “Our Father,” Dr. Scott Hahn presents a unique meditation on this common prayer, leading readers to consider its wealth of meaning. Relying on the Fathers and Doctors of the Church as well as on Sacred Scripture, Dr. Hahn takes each of the seven petitions of the Our Father individually and draws out the implications of the prayer given to us by Christ Himself.

Spirit and Life: Essays on Interpreting the Bible in Ordinary Time

The prayer at hand has been called many things: the Pater Noster, the Our Father, the Model Prayer, the Lord’s Prayer. In Understanding “Our Father,” Dr. Scott Hahn presents a unique meditation on this common prayer, leading readers to consider its wealth of meaning. Relying on the Fathers and Doctors of the Church as well as on Sacred Scripture, Dr. Hahn takes each of the seven petitions of the Our Father individually and draws out the implications of the prayer given to us by Christ Himself.

Scripture Matters: Essays on Reading the Bible from the Heart of the Church

In Scripture Matters: Essays on Reading the Bible from the Heart of the Church Dr. Hahn takes a penetrating look into the depths of Scripture, showing the reader how to uncover its many layers of meaning and inspiration.

Scripture Matters serves as both an instructional guide to reading the Bible and a delightful meditation on the grandeur of God’s Word. Dr. Hahn effectively illustrates his discussion with the writings of Saint Thomas Aquinas, Saint Josemaría Escrivá, Cardinal Ratzinger, and other exemplary scholars of Scripture who truly speak “from the heart of the Church.”

Answering the New Atheism: Dismantling Dawkins’ Case against God

Atheist Richard Dawkins thinks that

  • Religious belief is a virus that infects inferior genes
  • Religion is not only a form of infantile regression—it’s an especially pernicious kind of insanity
  • “Dyed-in-the-wool faith-heads are immune to argument”
  • Teaching religion to your children is a form of child abuse

Dawkins’ inflammatory rhetoric and bad reasoning are misleading millions of readers who don’t see the holes in his argument. In a lively and fair analysis, Hahn and Wiker expose the shoddy reasoning, logical blunders, and factual errors of Dawkins’ bestseller The God Delusion. Along the way, Hahn and Wiker offer a cogent and convincing argument for God’s existence.

The Catholic Mary: Quite Contrary to the Bible?

Theology and beliefs concerning the Blessed Virgin Mary, Mother of our Lord Jesus, have long been contentious issues between Catholics and Protestants. The latter often maintain that “the Catholic Mary” is a corruption of the true biblical Mary: the humble and lowly handmaiden.

Catholic apologist Dave Armstrong, a former evangelical Protestant, shows how the “Catholic” and the “biblical” Mary are indeed one and the same—there's no conflict. Armstrong tackles controversial topics such as Mary's Immaculate Conception, Assumption, perpetual virginity, the term of “spouse of the Holy Spirit,” the request for Mary to intercede, the Rosary, and the flowery and seemingly excessive devotional language of the saints. And he considers the idea of Mary as distributor of God’s grace and salvation—what St. Paul and indeed all of us are meant to be. Armstrong provides biblical and rational support for all Catholic Marian beliefs and practices, making them accessible, understandable, and articulable by all who accept the inspiration of the Bible.

Bible Conversations: Catholic-Protestant Dialogues on the Bible, Tradition, and Salvation

Bible Conversations includes 15 dialogues loosely based on the encounters of the author, a Catholic apologist, with Protestants over the course of nearly five years of private correspondence and internet discussion on lists and bulletin boards. Armstrong deals with the most important and fundamental issues that divide Protestants and Catholics:

  • The relationship of the Bible and tradition
  • The authority of the Church
  • The possibility of Bible-like infallibility for the Church and for tradition
  • The process of salvation
  • The relationship of faith and works
  • The doctrine of “salvation by works”—do Catholics believe in it?
  • The beauty of “grace alone”
  • And more!

Biblical Catholic Answers for John Calvin

In many ways, John Calvin has shaped the history of Protestantism even more than Martin Luther himself. Book four of John Calvin’s monumentally influential work of systematic theology, Institutes of the Christian Religion, gets to the heart of the disagreement between Catholics and Protestants. Armstrong's work is an in-depth critique of the major themes of this portion, from a biblical and Catholic perspective. The back-and-forth, Socratic nature of this volume allows the reader to consider Calvin’s arguments and ponder orthodox Catholic replies to them, deciding which are more plausible or have more of a “ring of truth” to them.

Calvin himself claimed that his work was supposed to be primarily for students and laypeople (the masses), not scholars and theologians. He wrote: “My intention was only to furnish a kind of rudiments, by which those who feel some interest in religion might be trained to true godliness. . . . in a simple and elementary form adapted for instruction.” His goals were to “assist the simple in this matter, and, as it were, lend them their hand to guide and assist them in finding the sum of what God has been pleased to teach us in His Word” and provide “a summary of Christian doctrine.”

Therefore, a popular-level critique from a Catholic perspective (the same that Calvin opposes throughout his work) is altogether appropriate—and long overdue. Armstrong has deliberately kept the polemics to a bare minimum, even though Calvin is often highly provocative and polemical (and insulting toward Catholicism and Catholics). The goal of this volume is to concentrate on rational arguments from Scripture and history. Also included are 66 “ecumenical” pages detailing where Catholics and Calvin (and Calvinists) can agree—on a surprisingly great many things.

Biblical Catholic Eucharistic Theology

Catholic apologist and prolific author Dave Armstrong has compiled his writing on the Eucharist and the Sacrifice of the Mass, 15 years of internet dialogues summarized in a Scripture-packed 23 chapters. Armstrong covers an ample range of topics:

  • The special presence of God in physical objects prior to the incarnation
  • Comparison of the indwelling and the Real Presence
  • Doubting disciples in the Eucharistic discourse of John 6
  • Exclusion of non-Catholics from Catholic communion
  • St. Augustine’s and John Calvin’s views
  • The Church Fathers on the Sacrifice of the Mass
  • St. Paul’s “priestly” references
  • Biblical, analogical arguments for the Sacrifice of the Mass
  • The Protestant “idolatry” accusation
  • Biblical evidence for wholehearted formal, liturgical worship

The volume also examines the facts of Church history in depth, with much corroboration from Protestant scholarly sources. Armstrong’s explanations help make Catholic teachings on the Holy Eucharist and the Mass understandable, plausible, and easy to harmonize with the teaching of the Bible.

Biblical Catholic Salvation: Faith Working through Love

Catholic apologist and author Dave Armstrong leads the reader on a fascinating theological journey through many different ideas related to salvation and justification theology (soteriology). Armstrong devotes special emphasis to demonstrating that Catholics do not believe in “works-salvation.” It may surprise some to learn that Catholics, like Protestants, embrace Grace Alone and reject both Pelagianism and semi-Pelagianism.

The overwhelming theme is the biblical evidence for Catholic soteriological positions. To that end, these chapters are devoted specifically to a critique of Calvinism—or self-described “Reformed” theology—and its beliefs with regard to the five points of what is known as “TULIP”: total depravity, unconditional election, limited atonement, irresistible grace, and perseverance of the saints. This volume includes hundreds of biblical passages fully written out (RSV) for the convenience of the reader.

Biblical Evidence for the Communion of Saints

This volume consists entirely of papers, essays, and dialogues originally posted on Dave Armstrong’s website and blog. Originally written between 1995 and 2011, they have been edited, revised, and combined in various ways, in order to clarify Armstrong’s thoughts and eliminate repetition. Most of the queries that Armstrong originally responded to came from the Protestant brethren in Christ. These dialogues afforded him the opportunity to defend and clarify what Catholics believe with regard to the communion of saints and to demonstrate that Catholic beliefs are in harmony with both the Holy Scriptures and the beliefs of the early Church.

This volume’s 21 chapters cover many topics, including the invocation, intercession, and veneration of saints and angels, as well as images, idolatry, relics, purgatory, prayer for the dead, and “controversial” devotional practices. It is Dave Armstrong's hope and prayer that his ruminations along these lines may be edifying.

Development of Catholic Doctrine: Evolution, Revolution, or an Organic Process?

C. S. Lewis, the famous Anglican writer, once wrote: “The very possibility of progress demands that there should be an unchanging element . . . the positive historical statements made by Christianity have the power . . . of receiving, without intrinsic change, the increasing complexity of meaning which increasing knowledge puts into them.”

Doctrine clearly develops within Scripture—that's the nature of “progressive revelation”. A few examples include the doctrines of the afterlife, the Trinity, the Messiah (eventually revealed as God the Son), the Holy Spirit (Divine Person in the New Testament), the equality of Jews and Gentiles, bodily resurrection, and sacrifice of lambs evolving into the sacrifice of Christ. This book serves as an introduction to the notion of doctrinal development, written from a popular lay apologetics standpoint.

Martin Luther: Catholic Critical Analysis and Praise

The views set forth in this volume are certainly one-sided—and purposely so, in order to form a conscious counter-argument to the accepted Protestant “mythology,” of Martin Luther.

The objective Christian student of 16th-century Church history needs to consult works written from a critical Catholic (as well as Protestant) perspective, in order to foster a closer examination—and perhaps a partial reappraisal—of Luther. The full, multi-faceted truth concerning important historical figures is invariably more fascinating than the usual myths that circulate about. Dave Armstrong aims to present Luther as he was: no more, no less.

Armstrong does not regard Luther as an essentially “evil” or “bad” man, and does not deny at all his good intentions and sincerity—though he often questions Luther’s wisdom and foresight, as will be evident. He admires Martin Luther in many ways, especially for Luther’s passion and boldness and bravery in standing up for what he believed. This volume is not about “Luther-bashing” or attempted historical revisionism. It is simply a Catholic examination of Martin Luther: critical in the expected areas, but also happily “ecumenical” in those instances where Luther is an eloquent proponent of a position that Catholics also hold.

More Biblical Evidence for Catholicism

In More Biblical Evidence for Catholicism, Dave Armstrong’s purpose is to accumulate biblical arguments in support of distinctively Catholic doctrinal positions, with Protestant readers particularly in mind. He touches on the closely related subjects of sola Scriptura (the Protestant notion of Scripture Alone), the Catholic Church’s high regard for Holy Scripture, and criticm from the separated Christian brethren regarding matters of ecclesiology (church) and tradition. Additionally, Armstrong devotes a fair degree of emphasis to certain common and erroneous charges against the Catholic Church and to back-and-forth discussion so that readers can have a sense of interaction with opponents of various Catholic doctrines—as well as a sense of how such charges and opponents might be answered with Scripture, history, and reason.

Orthodoxy and Catholicism: A Comparison

In this volume, Dave Armstrong compares Orthodoxy and Catholicism from a Catholic perspective. He covers such topics as oneness and ecclesiology, the papacy, cæsaropapism, ecumenical councils, doctrinal developments, modernity, contraception, and divorce.

Fundamentals of Catholic Dogma

Heralded as a must-read for priests, students, and laypersons of the Catholic faith, Fundamentals of Catholic Dogma covers the various teachings and doctrines of the Catholic Church. This book provides Scriptural and historical support for Church dogma. Ott’s single-volume encyclopedia is written clearly and directly, providing an overview of Catholic dogma in an efficient and explicit manner.