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The New International Commentary on the New Testament: Gospels and Acts (NICNT) (6 vols.)

by 6 authors France, R. T., Lane, William L., Green, Joel B., Morris, Leon, Michaels, J. Ramsey, Bruce, F. F.

Eerdmans 1974–2010

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The New International Commentary on the New Testament: Gospels and Acts (NICNT) (6 vols.)
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Overview

This collection includes the volumes on the Gospels and Acts from The New International Commentary on the New Testament to provide an exposition of Scripture that is thorough and abreast of modern scholarship, yet at the same time loyal to Scripture as the infallible Word of God. This conviction is shared by all contributors to The New International Commentary on the New Testament and defines the goal of this ambitious series.

This decades-long project has become recognized by scholars, pastors, and serious Bible students as critical yet orthodox commentary marked by solid biblical scholarship within the evangelical Protestant tradition. The New International Commentary on the New Testament serves as an authoritative guide to the text of Scripture, bridging the cultural gap between today’s world and the world of the Bible. Each volume in the NICNT aims to help us hear God’s word as clearly as possible.

Scholars, pastors, and serious Bible students will welcome the fresh light that this commentary series casts on ancient yet familiar biblical texts. The contributors apply their proven scholarly expertise and wide experience as teachers to illumine our understanding of the New Testament. As gifted writers, they present the results of the best recent research in an interesting, readable, and thought-provoking manner.

Each commentary opens with an introduction to the biblical book, looking especially at questions concerning its background, authorship, date, purpose, structure, and theology. A select bibliography also points readers to resources for their own study. The author’s own translation from the original Hebrew and Greek texts forms the basis of the commentary proper. Verse-by-verse comments nicely balance the in-depth discussions of technical matters—such as textual criticism and critical problems—with exposition of the biblical writer’s theology and its implications for the life of faith today.

With Logos, The New International Commentary on the New Testament will integrate into the Passage Guide. Whenever you enter your passage and click go, results from the NICNT will appear on the text you’re studying. This gives you instant access to exactly what you’re looking for in less time than it would take you to walk over to the bookshelf and begin flipping through a print volume.

Key Features

  • Verse-by-verse commentary
  • In-depth discussion of textual and critical matters
  • Introductions to each book’s authorship, date, purpose, structure, and theology

Praise for the Print Edition

The NIC is an amazing scholarly, protestant, evangelical commentary series. It gives verse-by-verse commentary on almost every book of the Bible, including immensely helpful introductory information. The only thing better than the commentary series itself is being able to have the entire thing with you, on your laptop, wherever you go. The NIC for Logos is a great resource that every seminarian should consider.

—GoingtoSeminary.com review

Individual Titles

The Gospel of Matthew

  • Author: R. T. France
  • Publisher: Eerdmans
  • Publication Date: 2007
  • Pages: 1,223

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

“It is a special pleasure to introduce R. T. (Dick) France’s commentary to the pastoral and scholarly community, who should find it a truly exceptional—and helpful—volume.” So says Gordon Fee in his preface to this work. France’s masterful commentary on Matthew focuses on exegesis of Matthew’s text as it stands rather than on the prehistory of the material or details of Synoptic comparison. The exegesis of each section is part of a planned literary whole supplemented, rather than controlled, by verse-by-verse commentary, allowing the text as a complete story to come into brilliant focus.

Rather than being a “commentary on commentaries,” The Gospel of Matthew is concerned throughout with what Matthew himself meant to convey about Jesus and how he set about doing so within the cultural and historical context of first-century Palestine. France frequently draws attention to the distinctive nature of the province of Galilee and the social dynamics involved when a Galilean prophet presents himself in Jerusalem as the Messiah.

The English translation at the beginning of each section is France’s own, designed to provide the basis for the commentary. This adept translation uses contemporary idioms and, where necessary, gives priority to clarity over literary elegance.

Amid the wide array of Matthew commentaries available today, France’s world-class stature, his clear focus on Matthew and Jesus, his careful methodology, and his user-friendly style promise to make this volume an enduring standard for years to come.

R. T. France, long recognized as a Matthean scholar par excellence, now presents a crowning achievement in this superb full-length commentary. With the firm hand of a seasoned scholar, France offers a lively, insightful commentary marked above all by solid, no-nonsense exegesis. This is vintage France, and every student of Matthew will find great rewards here. I recommend this volume with the highest enthusiasm.

Donald A. Hagner, George Eldon Ladd Professor Emeritus of New Testament, Fuller Theological Seminary

This commentary will be of great benefit to scholars and exegetical preachers alike. Close analysis and sensible comments are the hallmarks of this book, and it will now stand appropriately alongside other recent major treatments of Matthew . . . while making its own significant contribution. This is a responsible, scholarly, and illuminating contribution to the study and interpretation of Matthew’s gospel.

Expository Times

R. T. France is an honorary research fellow in the department of theology and religious studies at the University of Wales in Bangor.

The Gospel of Mark

  • Author: William L. Lane
  • Publisher: Eerdmans
  • Publication Date: 1974
  • Pages: 678

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

The Gospel of Mark is significant in many ways. Not only was it the first Gospel to be written and an important literary source for Matthew and Luke, but it is also best characterized as a witness document, a proclamation of salvation through Jesus Christ, which received its creative impulse from the early apostolic preaching. Mark bears witness to the word of revelation that Jesus is the Messiah, the Son of God.

In this widely praised commentary by William L. Lane, Mark is revealed as a theologian whose primary intention was the strengthening of the people of God in a time of fiery persecution by Nero. Using redaction criticism as a hermeneutical approach for understanding the text and the intention of the evangelist, Lane considers the Gospel of Mark as a total literary work and describes Mark’s creative role in shaping the Gospel tradition and in exercising a conscious theological purpose. By taking care to indicate how the text was heard by Mark’s contemporaries while also placing the study of Mark within the frame of reference offered by modern Gospel research, Lane has constructed a thorough going work that is at once useful to scholars and highly intelligible to nonspecialists.

Lane is to be commended for his splendid work. It is the best English commentary on Mark . . . a standard.

Bibliotheca Sacra

The exposition is full and perceptive, and never loses sight of the objective of bringing the whole thrust of Mark’s Gospel to the attention of the reader.

Reformed Theological Review

From the opening sentence this commentary is clear, creative, well written, and extremely well informed. All in all, a great commentary.

Restoration Quarterly

William L. Lane was a Paul T. Walls Chair in Wesleyan and Biblical Studies at Seattle Pacific University in Seattle, WA.

The Gospel of Luke

  • Author: Joel B. Green
  • Publisher: Eerdmans
  • Publication Date: 1997
  • Pages: 1,020

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

This highly original commentary on the Gospel of Luke is unique for the way it combines concerns with first-century culture in the Roman world with understanding the text of Luke as a wholistic, historical narrative. Focusing primarily on how each episode functions within Luke’s narrative development, Joel B. Green provides countless fresh perspectives on and new insights into the Third Gospel. His extended examination of Luke’s literary art and Luke’s narrative theology allows the Evangelist to address clearly and convincingly both ancient and contemporary readers.

Insisting on the narrative unity of Luke-Acts, Green highlights in this volume the centrality of God’s purpose to bring salvation to all people. Against the backdrop of the conflicted first-century world of the Mediterranean, Green proposes that the purpose of Luke-Acts would have been to strengthen the early Christians in the face of opposition by assuring them in their interpretation and experience of the redemptive purpose and faithfulness of God and by calling them to continued faithfulness and witness in God’s salvific project.

In a market flooded with commentaries, Green’s stands out as exceptional. He is a discerning and reliable guide to Luke’s Gospel: with clarity and verve he points readers to the subtleties of the narrative and to the power of its theological vision. His commentary demonstrates the considerable potential of a reading informed by knowledge of Luke’s cultural world and by the best of current scholarly methods. Erudite yet passionate, sophisticated yet lucid—this is rich fare indeed.

—John T. Carroll, Harriet Robertson Fitts Memorial Professor of New Testament, Union Presbyterian Seminary

This commentary makes the Gospel of Luke come alive for contemporary readers. Greek accomplishes in an admirable fashion the challenging task of interpreting Luke as persuasive narrative (utilizing and contributing to social-scientific and literary insights into Luke-Acts) and composing a verse-by-verse commentary with careful attention to linguistic, historical-critical, and theological data.

Edgar V. McKnight, research professor, Furman University

My shelf is filled with solid exegetical commentaries on Luke. This one exceeds them all in one respect—its vivid presentation of the good news this Gospel reveals.

Mark Allan Powell, Robert and Phyllis Leatherman Professor of New Testament, Trinity Lutheran Seminary

Joel B. Green is a professor of New Testament interpretation at Fuller Theological Seminary in Pasadena, CA.

The Gospel of John

  • Author: J. Ramsey Michaels
  • Publisher: Eerdmans
  • Publication Date: 2010
  • Pages: 1,132

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

In this detailed, elegantly written commentary J. Ramsey Michaels gives primary attention to the Gospel of John in its present form rather than to the sources or traditions behind it. Michaels examines both the Gospel’s literary character and its theological significance for the Christian community in its own time and through the ages. This landmark commentary—17 years in the making, reflecting 50 years of classroom teaching, and packed with fresh insights—will prove highly useful to scholars, students, and pastors.

This is a commentary for which it was well worth waiting. The fruit of a lifetime’s engagement with John’s Gospel, it manages to be both conservative and original. Above all, it does superbly what the best commentaries do—immerse readers in the text itself. Michaels takes us with him deep into this Gospel’s story of Jesus, expertly probing the narrative, asking questions about it that we may not have thought of, and pointing out details, nuances, and connections we may have missed, all the while ensuring we do not avoid the text’s larger, sometimes uncomfortable, truth claims. Readers will emerge invigorated, enlightened, and inspired. The excellence of Michaels’ substantial and intriguing close reading makes his commentary one to which readers will return again and again for continuing stimulus in their own study of John.

Andrew T. Lincoln, Portland Professor of New Testament Studies, University of Gloucestershire

A senior Johannine scholar here weaves together fresh thinking on John’s Gospel with his years of engagement with the Gospel and its earlier scholarly interpreters. This new commentary is attentive to the details of the text, to structural clues, and to the cohesiveness of John’s narrative as a whole; while clearly sensitive to the Greek text, it is written to be intelligible for English readers.

Craig S. Keener, professor of New Testament, Asbury Theological Seminary

J. Ramsey Michaels has produced a masterful commentary, the fruit of well over half a century of careful study of John’s Gospel. He draws upon a wealth of resources, ancient and modern, as he engages both the larger historical, literary, and theological dimensions of the text, as well as fine details of grammar and textual variants. His analysis is marked by many original insights that are grounded in careful attention to the text itself, and his clear, engaging style makes this commentary a page-turner.

Rodney A. Whitacre, professor of biblical studies, Trinity School for Ministry

This new commentary—part of Eerdmans’ acclaimed NICNT series—gives primary attention to John’s gospel in its present form rather than the sources or traditions behind it. J. Ramsey Michaels assumes that the John who authored the book is someone very close to Jesus and, therefore, that the gospel is a testimony to events that actually happened in the life of Jesus. Yet Michaels does not ignore the literary character of the gospel of John or its theological contribution to the larger Christian community from its own time to the present day. Through a detailed verse-by-verse commentary, Michaels reveals how the gospel of “the disciple whom Jesus loved” is a unified composition, intertwined with the synoptics, yet drawing on material none of them cover.

D. A. Carson, research professor of New Testament, Trinity Evangelical Divinity School

J. Ramsey Michaels is professor emeritus of religious studies at Missouri State University in Springfield, Missouri, and an adjunct professor of New Testament at Bangor Theological Seminary in Portland, Maine. He is the author of several commentaries and over two hundred articles on the New Testament.

The Gospel According to John

  • Author: Leon Morris
  • Edition: revised
  • Publisher: Eerdmans
  • Publication Date: 1971
  • Pages: 888

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Hailed as perhaps “the best commentary on any book of the Bible by an evangelical in recent decades” by Christianity Today when it was first published in 1971, Leon Morris’ Gospel According to John has become one of the enduring standard commentaries on John’s Gospel.

Recognizing the central importance of the Fourth Gospel in any series on the New Testament, Morris devoted more than 10 years to preparing this volume. Written with considerable acumen and a thorough knowledge of the previous scholarly work on the Johannine text, The Gospel According to John is one of the largest and most comprehensive commentaries ever to come out of the evangelical community.

This revised edition includes significant modifications and additions made in the light of more recent writings on John’s Gospel. While maintaining substantially the same stance as in his original work, Morris here references important secondary sources and studies that have appeared over the last two decades. The commentary is now also based on the New International Version.

Preachers will find Morris’ exegetical hints helpful inasmuch as they will lead to greater accuracy in expounding the text. The text of the exposition can be read with profit by the average layperson. In the footnotes students of the Word will find the most amazing and delightful array of material. It is a pleasure to recommend this perceptive and valuable treatment.

Journal of the Evangelical Theological Society

Scholarly yet eminently readable and useful to anyone who is studying the Fourth Gospel seriously.

Eternity

A masterpiece of scholarship and readability.

United Evangelical

Certainly this is the best extended treatment of the Fourth Gospel.

Criswell Theological Review

Leon Morris (1914–2006) retired as a principal of Ridley College in Melbourne, Australia in 1979. He was the author of more than 40 books, including The Apostolic Preaching of the Cross and the volumes on Matthew and Romans in The Pillar New Testament Commentary.

The Book of Acts

  • Author: F. F. Bruce
  • Publisher: Eerdmans
  • Publication Date: 1988
  • Pages: 564

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

First published in 1954, F. F. Bruce’s volume on the Book of Acts in the NICNT series has stood for more than 50 years as a standard commentary on Acts. In keeping with the effort to be faithful to the description “new” in the series title, however, Bruce undertook a thorough revision of this commentary before his death in 1990.

Expanded and fully updated, this volume now reflects the best elements of recent notable contributions to the study of Luke-Acts as well as the author’s own deepened understanding gained from years of further reflection on the text. Whereas the first edition used the text of the American Standard Version of 1901, this revision is based on Bruce’s own fresh translation of the Greek text. The result is a work that makes transparent the walls between the first and the twentieth centuries and enables readers to hear not only the voice of Luke but the Word of God.

This is a learned, informative, critical, and eminently readable commentary which no one should overlook.

C. K. Barrett, former emeritus professor of divinity, University of Durham

Like the 40 or so books that have previously come from Bruce’s pen, this is a definitive work which even those who already own the first edition would do well to acquire.

Bruce M. Metzger, New Testament scholar and professor

Marked by meticulous scholarship, lucidity of expression, and a sound historical sense. This [revised] commentary looks set to serve a new generation of readers . . . as the first edition did in its time.

Evangel

F. F. Bruce was Rylands Professor of Biblical Criticism and Exegesis at the University of Manchester, England. During his distinguished career he wrote numerous commentaries and books and served as general editor of the New International Commentary on the New Testament series from 1962 to 1990.

Product Details

  • Title: The New International Commentary on the New Testament: Gospels and Acts (NICNT)
  • Series: The New International Commentary on the New Testament
  • Publisher: Eerdmans
  • Volumes: 6
  • Pages: 5,505