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The New International Commentary on the Old Testament: Prophets (NICOT) (9 vols.)

by 7 authors Dearman, J. Andrew, Block, Daniel I., Oswalt, John N., Thompson, John A., Verhoef, Pieter A., Allen, Leslie C., Robertson, O. Palmer

Eerdmans 1976–2010

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The New International Commentary on the Old Testament: Prophets (NICOT) (9 vols.)
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Overview

This collection includes the volumes on the Prophets from The New International Commentary on the Old Testament to provide an exposition of Scripture that is thorough and abreast of modern scholarship, yet at the same time loyal to Scripture as the infallible Word of God. This conviction, shared by all contributors to The New International Commentary on the Old Testament, defines the goal of this ambitious series.

This decades-long project has become recognized by scholars, pastors, and serious Bible students as critical yet orthodox commentary marked by solid biblical scholarship within the evangelical Protestant tradition. The New International Commentary on the Old Testament serves as authoritative scriptural guides, bridging the cultural gap between today’s world and the Bible’s. Each volume in the NICOT aims to help us hear God’s word as clearly as possible.

Scholars, pastors, and serious Bible students will welcome the fresh light that this commentary series casts on ancient yet familiar biblical texts. The contributors apply their proven scholarly expertise and wide experience as teachers to illumine our understanding of the Old Testament. Gifted writers, they present the results of the best recent research in an interesting, readable, and thought-provoking manner.

Each commentary opens with an introduction to the biblical book in question, looking especially at questions concerning its background, authorship, date, purpose, structure, and theology. A select bibliography also points readers to resources for their own study. The author’s own translation from the original Hebrew and Greek texts forms the basis of the commentary proper. Verse-by-verse comments nicely balance the in-depth discussions of technical matters—such as textual criticism and critical problems—with exposition of the biblical writer’s theology and its implications for the life of faith today.

With Logos, The New International Commentary on the Old Testament will integrate into the Passage Guide. Whenever you enter your passage and click go, results from the NICOT will appear on the text you’re studying. This gives you instant access to exactly what you’re looking for—in far less time than it would take you to walk over to the bookshelf and begin flipping through a print volume, let alone find the information you need.

Key Features

  • Verse-by-verse commentary
  • In-depth discussion of textual and critical matters
  • Introductions to each book’s authorship, date, purpose, structure, and theology

Praise for the Print Edition

The NIC is an amazing scholarly, protestant, evangelical commentary series. It gives verse-by-verse commentary on almost every book of the Bible, including immensely helpful introductory information. The only thing better than the commentary series itself is being able to have the entire thing with you, on your laptop, wherever you go. The NIC for Logos is a great resource that every seminarian should consider.

—GoingtoSeminary.com review

Individual Titles

The Book of Isaiah, Chapters 1–39

  • Author: John N. Oswalt
  • Publisher: Eerdmans
  • Publication Date: 1986
  • Pages: 759

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

The first of John N. Oswalt’s two-part study of the book of Isaiah for the NICOT series, this commentary on chapters 1–39 combines theological acumen, literary sensitivity, philological expertise, and historical knowledge to present a faithful and accurate reading of one of the Old Testament’s most important books.

In the introduction to this work, Oswalt considers Isaiah’s background, unity of composition, date and authorship, canonicity, Hebrew text, theology, and problems of interpretation, and he offers a select bibliography for further research. Oswalt also provides substantial discussions of several issues crucial to the book of Isaiah. He notes, for example, that scholars often divide Isaiah into three divisions, with chapters 1–39 addressing Isaiah’s contemporaries in the eighth century BC, chapters 40–55 presupposing the exile of the sixth century, and chapters 56–66 presupposing the eventual return from exile. While taking this scholarship into account Oswalt defends the unity of the prophetic book and argues convincingly that the whole book can be attributed to the Isaiah of the eighth century.

The commentary proper, based on Oswalt’s own translation of the Hebrew text, provides pastors, scholars, and students with a lucid interpretation of the book of Isaiah in its ancient context as well as an exposition of its message for today.

An excellent conservative commentary on the book of Isaiah. Oswalt’s work is a treasure. It provides solid help in understanding the text and message of this Old Testament book.

Journal of the Evangelical Theological Society

This book is a solid piece of scholarship and may be recommended to pastors and teachers alike as an exemplary piece of conservative research and exposition.

Review & Expositor

This commentary will be one of the most widely used and appreciated [in the NICOT series], and perhaps even one of the flagship volumes.

Southwestern Journal of Theology

John N. Oswalt is a visiting distinguished professor of Old Testament at Asbury Theological Seminary in Wilmore, KY. Former president of Asbury College and former professor of Old Testament and Semitic languages at Asbury Theological Seminary, he also served on the translation team for the New International Version of the Bible.

The Book of Isaiah, Chapters 40–66

  • Author: John N. Oswalt
  • Publisher: Eerdmans
  • Publication Date: 1998
  • Pages: 773

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

The second of John N. Oswalt’s two-part study of the book of Isaiah for the NICOT series, this commentary provides exegetical and theological exposition on the latter 27 chapters of Isaiah for scholars, pastors, and students who seek to know the perennial meaning of the text in contemporary terms.

Though Oswalt’s main introduction to Isaiah is found in his commentary on chapters 1–39, this second volume opens with an important discussion of scholarly debate over the unity/diversity of Isaiah. In this work Oswalt makes stronger his case for reading the entire book of Isaiah as written by a single author—a position not common in other recent commentaries. Oswalt’s work stands alone, then, as an attempt to take seriously Israel’s historical situation at the time chapters 40–66 were composed while also seeking to understand how these chapters function as a part of Isaiah’s total vision written in the late 700s or early 600s BC.

Assuming the single authorship of Isaiah, the verse-by-verse commentary aims to interpret chapters 40–66 in light of the book as a whole. While not neglecting issues of historical criticism or form criticism, the commentary focuses mainly on the theological meaning of the text as indicated especially by the literary structure. Building on his earlier argument that the central theme of Isaiah is servanthood, Oswalt keeps readers focused on the character of Israel’s sovereign Redeemer God, on the blind servant Israel, and on the ultimate work of the Suffering Servant in whom the world can find its Savior.

This is a commentary in which the meaning of the book of Isaiah for today is taken as seriously as is its meaning for its original readers.

R. N. Whybray, former emeritus professor of Hebrew and Old Testament studies, Univeristy of Hull

The prophetic book of Isaiah has called for major critical reappraisal in the past two decades with renewed awareness of the significance of its structure as a single complete book. Oswalt’s second volume on Isaiah explores fully the thematic interconnections and developments that lend to the book its essential unity. I feel confident that it will mark a significant turning point in which its combination of critical and evangelical insights will lead to a better understanding of the complex nature of the biblical prophetic writings.

Ronald E. Clements, professor emeritus of Old Testament studies, King’s College, University of London

John N. Oswalt is a visiting distinguished professor of Old Testament at Asbury Theological Seminary in Wilmore, KY. Former president of Asbury College and former professor of Old Testament and Semitic languages at Asbury Theological Seminary, he also served on the translation team for the New International Version of the Bible.

The Book of Jeremiah

  • Author: J. A. Thompson
  • Publisher: Eerdmans
  • Publication Date: 1980
  • Pages: 831

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

The Old Testament prophets played a crucial role in the history of Israel. Although there were many prophets who brought the message of God to his people, we have records of only a few. Of these, our knowledge of Jeremiah is probably the most complete. In this commentary, J. A. Thompson examines the book of Jeremiah with its message urging the people of Israel to be true to their covenant Lord and to live in conformity with his covenant requirements.

Thompson begins his study by looking at the role of the prophets in Israel, and Jeremiah’s place among them. He then discusses the historical setting of Jeremiah’s message. From this background, Thompson moves to an examination of the book of Jeremiah itself, focusing on its structure and composition before considering some important issues for exegesis—the date of Jeremiah’s call, the significance of the symbolic actions he used, and the relationship between Jeremiah and Hosea. Lastly, Thompson examines the text and poetic forms of Jeremiah.

This is by far the most comprehensive work that has been done on the prophet Jeremiah. This is an excellent work that is sure to become the classical major study of this prophet. A must for any serious student of the Bible.

Southwestern Journal of Theology

Thompson’s Jeremiah rivals John Bright’s commentary as the best in English on Jeremiah. His highly competent treatment lends itself to use by scholars and teachers as well as for sermon preparation and personal study.

Christianity Today

An outstanding commentary that is bound to become a standard classic for English-speaking students.

Journal of the Evangelical Theological Society

A helpful conservative commentary on Jeremiah for years to come.

Bibliotheca Sacra

J. A. Thompson was a senior lecturer and reader in the department of middle Eastern studies at the University of Melbourne.

The Book of Ezekiel, Chapters 1–24

  • Author: Daniel I. Block
  • Publisher: Eerdmans
  • Publication Date: 1997
  • Pages: 908

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

To most modern readers the book of Ezekiel is a mystery. Few can handle Ezekiel’s relentless denunciations, his unconventional antics, his repetitive style, and his bewildering array of topics. This excellent commentary by Daniel I. Block makes sense of this obscure and often misunderstood prophet and demonstrates the relevance of Ezekiel’s message for the church today.

An extensive introduction helps to orient readers of Ezekiel’s prophecies to the times, methods, and message of the prophet and to the special literary features of the book. Block then deals successively with each literary/prophetic unit of Ezekiel. The treatment of each unit consists of a fresh translation of the text accompanied by technical textual notes, a discussion of the style and structure of the pericope, a verse-by-verse commentary on the unit, and theological reflections on the significance of the unit. Throughout the commentary special attention is also paid to the rhetorical methods that the prophet employs to get his message across to his original audience.

A worthy addition to the NICOT series, this commentary will fast be recognized as an invaluable tool for the study of the Old Testament. In bringing questions of contemporary importance to the text of this ancient document, Block convincingly demonstrates not only that the message of Ezekiel can be understood but also that its message is desperately needed by the church in the 21st century.

This encyclopedic study of the first half of the book of Ezekiel blends the best exegetical research from all spectrums of the scholarly world. If you want to know just about everything we know about the life, times, and words of Ezekiel, this is the sourcebook.

—Lawrence Boadt, emeritus professor of Scripture studies, Washington Theological Union

This fine commentary is both lucid and thorough and will be an essential work of reference on the book of Ezekiel.

Gordon J. Wenham

Block’s commentary is the finest work ever produced on the prophetic writing. His volume is a model of solid exegesis, well-informed biblical theology, and engaging pastoral warmth.

David S. Dockery

Daniel I. Block is Gunther H. Knoedler Professor of Old Testament at Wheaton College in Wheaton, Illinois.

The Book of Ezekiel, Chapters 25–48

  • Author: Daniel I. Block
  • Publisher: Eerdmans
  • Publication Date: 1998
  • Pages: 849

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

To many modern readers the prophecies of Ezekiel are a mystery. This commentary by Daniel Block—which completes his two-volume study of the whole book of Ezekiel—seeks to answer the questions that contemporary readers bring to the text by examining the language, the message, and the methods of this obscure and often misunderstood Hebrew prophet. The result of 12 years of study, this volume, like the one on chapters 1–24, provides an excellent discussion of the background of Ezekiel and offers a verse-by-verse exposition of each literary/prophetic unit in Ezekiel 25–48 that not only makes clear the prophet’s message to his original readers but also shows that Ezekiel’s ancient wisdom and vision are still very much needed by the church in the 21st century.

A thorough, meticulous, and information-filled commentary. Readers will find here some of the best, and certainly the most extensive material on a biblical book that may well have particular appeal and relevance in our postmodern age.

Elmer A. Martens, professor emeritus of Old Testament, Mennonite Brethren Biblical Seminary

Block considers his chief task to be the interpretation of the book of Ezekiel in its canonical form. His philological scrupulousness, which is grounded in familiarity with the latest scholarship, is matched by a concern for the theological issues raised by the book of Ezekiel and for its homiletic potential. Critical judgment and respect for Ezekiel’s sacred status are happily combined.

Moshe Greenberg, former professor of biblical studies, Hebrew University in Jerusalem

Daniel I. Block is Gunther H. Knoedler Professor of Old Testament at Wheaton College in Wheaton, Illinois.

The Book of Hosea

  • Author: J. Andrew Dearman
  • Publisher: Eerdmans
  • Publication Date: 2010
  • Pages: 428

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

In this solid theological commentary on the book of Hosea, J. Andrew Dearman considers the prophetic figure’s historical roots in the covenant traditions of ancient Israel, includes his own translation of the biblical text, and masterfully unpacks Hosea’s poetic, metaphorical message of betrayal, judgment, and reconciliation.

This is a welcome addition to the NICOT series on one of the most important prophets of ancient Israel. The introduction is especially helpful on Hosea’s use of metaphors and similes, and readers will not be disappointed by Dearman’s thorough and penetrating exegesis.

Bill T. Arnold, Paul S. Amos Professor of Old Testament Interpretation, Asbury Theological Seminary

Hosea’s complexities begin with translation and extend to its rich use of imagery. Andrew Dearman brings his considerable skills as a Hebraist and historian as well as his expert literary and theological sensitivities to bear on the interpretation of this important book. Serious engagement with the book of Hosea now starts with Dearman’s commentary.

Tremper Longman III, Robert H. Gundry Professor of Biblical Studies, Westmont College

Dearman’s commentary provides the most recent deep engagement with the ancient text of Hosea the prophet. Dialoguing with the best of scholarship, the commentary offers both detailed exegesis of the text with accompanying translation from the original Hebrew, as well as general overviews at key literary junctures to orient the reader to the progressive development of the book as a whole. Particularly helpful is Dearman’s sensitivity to the social context of ancient Israelite households. He restores the vivid metaphorical colors of the book of Hosea long faded by history. This is a welcome addition to the NICOT series.

Mark J. Boda, professor of Old Testament, McMaster Divinity College, McMaster University

The book of Hosea is pound for pound as difficult a prophetic book as one can find in the Bible, so we appreciate the work of J. Andrew Dearman in this extraordinary commentary. Dearman captures well the metaphorical theology of Hosea, and his thoughtful reflection on the text attends to the various issues of every passage in the book. In his appendices he guides the reader through ten topics that dominate Hosea scholarship. Readers will consistently appreciate Dearman’s clear and succinct writing style. Reading this commentary is a treat.

Stephen Reid, professor of Christian Scriptures, Baylor University

J. Andrew Dearman is a professor of Old Testament at Fuller Theological Seminary’s regional campus in Houston, Texas. His books include Religion and Culture in Ancient Israel and the New International Version Application Commentary Series volume on Jeremiah and Lamentations.

The Books of Joel, Obadiah, Jonah, and Micah

  • Author: Leslie C. Allen
  • Publisher: Eerdmans
  • Publication Date: 1976
  • Pages: 427

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

The eloquent and uncompromising calls for social righteousness by some of the Minor Prophets are familiar to many, yet the writings themselves are probably the least studied and least known texts of the Old Testament. Those who are familiar with these books are also aware of the historical and literary problems that plague their study. Drawing on insights from various perspectives—theological, historical, and literary—Leslie Allen’s commentary on Joel, Obadiah, Jonah, and Micah carefully and imaginatively reconstructs the stage on which the message of these four books was conveyed to their Hebrew hearers and shows what relevance, in turn, they hold for contemporary Christians.

For each of the books there is a substantial introduction in which the full range of scholarly opinion is presented and assessed, a select bibliography, the author’s own translation of the text—a significant contribution to biblical studies in itself—and an extensive commentary. The commentary on Micah is foundational for these four books in that it treats at greater length some of the same forms and motifs that appear in Joel, Obadiah, and Jonah. The introductory material for Joel includes discussions of canonicity and textual criticism that apply to the entire volume.

An excellent commentary that provides all the aids to understanding the biblical text for which the reader might wish. The author’s treatment of the problems—literary, historical, and theological—is well informed, fair, and judicious. He demonstrates wide knowledge and fine scholarly judgment.

Journal of Biblical Literature

Among the excellent major commentaries . . . evangelicals will look first to Leslie C. Allen’s Joel, Obadiah, Jonah, and Micah.

Christianity Today

Allen should be commended highly for his neat and concise organization of the complex information on these four books of the Minor Prophets.

Choice

Allen’s work is very good, and his commentary should be read by all serious students of these prophets.

Restoration Quarterly

Leslie C. Allen is a senior professor of Old Testament at Fuller Theological Seminary in Pasadena, CA. He has also written commentaries on Psalms and Ezekiel for the Word Biblical Commentary and on Chronicles for The New Interpreter’s Bible.

The Books of Nahum, Habakkuk, and Zephaniah

  • Author: O. Palmer Robertson
  • Publisher: Eerdmans
  • Publication Date: 1990
  • Pages: 384

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

The close-knit bond between prophecy and history, according to O. Palmer Robertson, becomes particularly clear through the study of Nahum, Habakkuk, and Zephaniah. As the historical context of their messages is explored, it becomes ever more apparent that biblical history—in addition to providing the context for prophecy—actually embodies and functions as prophecy. The events that occurred to Judah and its neighbors spoke in anticipation of world-shaking circumstances that were yet to come.

In this commentary Robertson combines the insights of biblical theology with a keen awareness of the age in which we live. After first dealing with the relevant background issues of Nahum, Habakkuk, and Zephaniah—redemptive-historical setting, theological perspective, date and authorship, and so on—Robertson applies the care and precision of an exegete and the concern of a pastor to his verse-by-verse exposition of each book. The result is a relevant confrontation with the ancient call to repentance and faith—a confrontation greatly needed in today’s world.

Robertson has produced an outstanding volume that treats three of the lesser-known Old Testament prophecies. He writes in a clear style with an emphasis on the rich theological meaning of these prophets and with a pastor’s insight regarding their relevance to Christians today.

Tremper Longman III, Robert H. Gundry Professor of Biblical Studies, Westmont College

O. Palmer Robertson’s work on Nahum, Habakkuk, and Zephaniah is a first-class theological commentary with unique applications to the present day. His conclusions are balanced and well aimed with regard to the particulars of the immediate historical situation as well as with regard to the overall canonical stance of the ongoing drama of revelation. From these three orphan books of the Old Testament Robertson has crafted a most memorable message for the present-day church.

Walter C. Kaiser Jr., president emeritus, Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary

O. Palmer Robertson is the director and principal of African Bible College in Uganda, and has formerly taught at Reformed Theological Seminary, Westminster Theological Seminary, and Covenant Theological Seminary. His previous books include The Christ of the Covenants, The Christ of the Prophets, and The Israel of God.

The Books of Haggai and Malachi

  • Author: Pieter A. Verhoef
  • Publisher: Eerdmans
  • Publication Date: 1987
  • Pages: 384

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

This commentary by Pieter A. Verhoef offers a thorough exegesis and exposition of Haggai and Malachi—two important books of Scripture that, unfortunately, are not only little studied but have sometimes been maligned by contemporary scholarship—and stresses the relevance of these prophets’ messages in terms of continuity and discontinuity for the Christian church.

Verhoef’s introduction to each book elucidates the questions of authorship, style, text, structure, historical background, and message. Making extensive use of structural analysis, Verhoef argues convincingly for the authenticity, unity, and integrity of both books.

Verhoef also brings his knowledge of the ancient Near East, the Old Testament, and past and current biblical scholarship to bear in the commentary proper, and he displays theological acumen and pastoral sensitivity in tailoring his exposition for the student and pastor as well as for the scholar.

Verhoef’s commentary is first-rate. It is replete with compelling insights into the meaning of the biblical text and with clearly stated understandings of the biblical message. Scholars, preachers, and Bible students alike can benefit greatly from this volume.

Restoration Quarterly

Providing a synthesis and analysis of a broad range of scholarship on Haggai and Malachi as well as offering his own insights into major issues, Verhoef contributes to the scholarship of these books. He carefully discerns the major points of difference between scholars and systematically considers translational options. A helpful commentary.

Hebrew Studies

This is an attractive commentary, clear, detailed, with fair treatment of a wide range of interpretations.

The Expositor Times

Readers will enjoy Verhoef’s strong scholarship, his exegetical excellence, his appreciation of these books’ contribution to Old Testament prophecy, and his ability to make these prophecies relevant for today.

Journal of the Evangelical Theological Society

Pieter A. Verhoef is a well-known South African Old Testament scholar, and is a professor emeritus of Old Testament at the University of Stellenbosch. He is the author of numerous books and articles in the field of biblical studies.

Product Details

  • Title: The New International Commentary on the Old Testament: Prophets (NICOT)
  • Series: The New International Commentary on the Old Testament
  • Publisher: Eerdmans
  • Volumes: 9
  • Pages: 5,743