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Georgetown University Press Moral Traditions Series Bundle (48 vols.)
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Overview

The Moral Traditions Series by Georgetown University Press places contemporary moral issues in conversation with moral theologians to engage the Church with the world. The 48 texts included in this series explore the moral traditions of the Church and bring historical views into new light. Leading moral theologians discuss the works of well-known and lesser-known moral theologians of the past and present, illuminating subtle truths and powerful insights into Christian ethics. In the context of contemporary culture, these texts expose the shortcomings of the world and the Church as they use Scripture and the teachings of the Church as a moral compass to seek truth. Exploring many of today’s relevant social issues including bioethics, feminisim, war, and U. S. welfare policy, these texts provide a wealth of wisdom from contemporary Catholic moral theology. The Logos edition of the Moral Traditions Series is comprised of five collections:

In the Logos editions, these valuable volumes are enhanced by amazing functionality. Scripture citations link directly to English translations, and important terms link to dictionaries, encyclopedias, and a wealth of other resources in your digital library. Perform powerful searches to find exactly what you’re looking for. Take the discussion with you using tablet and mobile apps. With Logos Bible Software, the most efficient and comprehensive research tools are in one place, so you get the most out of your study.

Key Features

  • 48 volumes engaging contemporary social issues and moral theology
  • Discussions of historical moral theology and moral theologians
  • Award-winning texts

Individual Titles

Feminist Ethics and Natural Law: The End of the Anathemas

  • Author: Cristina L. H. Traina
  • Series Editor: James F. Keenan, SJ
  • Series: Moral Traditions Series
  • Publisher: Georgetown University Press
  • Publication Date: 1999
  • Pages: 416

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Heated debates over issues like abortion, contraception, ordination, and Church hierarchy illuminate the tension between the ethics of feminism and natural law. In Feminist Ethics and Natural Law, Cristina L. H. Traina seeks to reconcile Roman Catholic natural law and Anglo-American feminist ethics by highlighting the ways their goals and assumptions align.

This text proposes an innovative union of the two supposedly antagonistic schools of thought—a new feminist natural law—that would more comprehensive moral analysis than either existing tradition can alone. This provocative book engages students of moral theology as well as feminists who object to natural law ethics, and suggests how each might find insight in the other.

The interpretation of both the Roman Catholic natural law tradition and Anglo-American feminist ethics is sharp and illuminating. The aim of the whole offers a creative contribution to both traditions and an interesting perspective on the specific authors.

—Margaret A. Farley, Gilbert L. Stark Professor of Christian Ethics, Yale University Divinity School

Cristina L. H. Traina is an assistant professor of religion at Northwestern University. She has a PhD in theology from the University of Chicago Divinity School.

Creative Conformity: The Feminist Politics of U. S. Catholic and Iranian Shi’I Women

  • Author: Elizabeth M. Bucar
  • Series Editor: James F. Keenan, SJ
  • Series: Moral Traditions Series
  • Publisher: Georgetown University Press
  • Publication Date: 2011
  • Pages: 228

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Feminist scholarship has a tendency to identify Catholicism and Shi’i Islam as two religious traditions that have been historically skeptical or even hostile towards feminist claims. Seeking to demonstrate the misleading nature of these claims, Elizabeth Bucar compares the feminist politics of 11 U. S. Catholic and Iranian Shi’i women and explores how these women contest and affirm clerical mandates in order to expand their religious and political roles.

Through scriptural analysis and personal interviews, Creative Conformity reveals how women contribute to the production of ethical knowledge within each of these religious communities and explains how religious authority creates an unintended diversity of moral belief and action.

In Creative Conformity, Elizabeth Bucar makes good use of rhetorical analysis to illumine the ways Roman Catholic and Shi’i women carve out space for themselves while sustaining connections with their respective communities. Readers will learn much from this interesting and unique study.

—John Kelsay, distinguished research professor of religion, Florida State University

Elizabeth Bucar generates tremendous insights through interviewing and studying writings by leaders of women’s movements in both Iran and the United States. Bucar locates herself in the prose through engaging examples, and she frames the comparative inquiry with reflections on the research and practice of feminism in a global setting. Creative Conformity demonstrates the careful work needed to develop a cross-cultural feminist politics, to understand and appreciate the diverse ways that women empower themselves within the traditions they inhabit. The book also provides new ways of thinking and acting for secular academic readers.

—Jonathan Schofer, associate professor of comparative ethics, Harvard Divinity School

Creative Conformity is a welcome addition to the literature on women’s religious thought. Bucar rejects easy binaries between conservative and feminist, and contributes to the current rethinking of agency, ethics, and the female subject . . . This book is vital reading for those concerned with gendered scholarship and activism in Christian and Muslim contexts.

—Kecia Ali, assistant professor of religion, Boston University

Elizabeth M. Bucar is an assistant professor of religious studies at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro. She is the coeditor of Does Human Rights Need God?

Aquinas, Feminism, and the Common Good

  • Author: Susanne M. DeCrane
  • Series Editor: James F. Keenan, SJ
  • Series: Moral Traditions Series
  • Publisher: Georgetown University Press
  • Publication Date: 2004
  • Pages: 236

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Focusing on one of Thomas Aquinas’ great intellectual contributions—the fundamental notion of “the common good,” or the human will toward peace and justice—DeCrane demonstrates the currency of that notion through a contemporary social issue: women’s health care in the United States and, more specifically, black women and breast cancer. In her skillful re-engagement with Aquinas, DeCrane shows that certain aspects of religious traditions previously understood as oppressive to women and minority groups can actually be used to rectify social ills.

DeCrane offers an impressive feminist ethics of the common good. Her foundations are laid carefully and her scholarship is precise. The result is a feminist hermeneutic with broad value for theological ethics, especially in a time when justice and rights must be debated cross-culturally, and human suffering hangs in the balance.

Lisa Sowle Cahill, professor of theology, Boston College

Creative Conformity is a welcome addition to the literature on women’s religious thought. Bucar rejects easy binaries between conservative and feminist, and contributes to the current rethinking of agency, ethics, and the female subject . . . This book is vital reading for those concerned with gendered scholarship and activism in Christian and Muslim contexts.

—Kecia Ali, assistant professor of religion, Boston University

It is a pleasure to read a text which so succinctly reviews major hermeneutical positions and so clearly and carefully elucidates and critiques the Aristotelian/Thomistic understanding of the common good. Susanne DeCrane’s work is an advance in feminist ethics and a superb example of a feminist methodology.

—Patricia Walter, associate professor of systematic theology, Aquinas Institute of Theology, St. Louis

The feminist hermeneutical method creatively used to interpret the principle of the common good in the thought of Thomas Aquinas is illuminating. It has important, practical implications for health care in the U.S.

—Patricia Lamoureux, professor of moral theology, St. Mary’s Seminary & University, Baltimore

It is a pleasure to read a text which so succinctly reviews major hermeneutical positions and so clearly and carefully elucidates and critiques the Aristotelian/Thomistic understanding of the common good. Susanne DeCrane’s work is an advance in feminist ethics and a superb example of a feminist methodology.

—Patricia Walter, associate professor of systematic theology, Aquinas Institute of Theology, St. Louis

Susanne M. DeCrane is vice president of mission integration, director of the spiritual care department, and consulting ethicist of St. Joseph’s Medical Center in Towson, Maryland.

Medicine and the Ethics of Care

  • Editors: Diana Fritz Cates and Paul Lauritzen
  • Series Editor: James F. Keenan, SJ
  • Series: Moral Traditions Series
  • Publisher: Georgetown University Press
  • Publication Date: 2002
  • Pages: 368

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

In these essays, a diverse group of ethicists draw insights from both religious and feminist scholarship in order to propose creative new approaches to the ethics of medical care. While traditional ethics emphasizes rules, justice, and fairness, the contributors to this volume embrace an “ethics of care,” which regards emotional engagement in the lives of others as a basic part of discerning what we ought to do on their behalf.

A sensitive and sensible exploration of important new directions in bioethics from several highly respected voices . . . Their essays grip one’s attention and expand one’s horizons.

—Lisa Sowle Cahill, J. Donald Monan Professor of Theology, Boston College

Curious about what feminism, narrative, and the ethics of care mean for bioethics? Medicine and the Ethics of Care is an excellent place to begin satisfying that curiosity. Some of the voices are familiar and distinguished; some are new and exciting. All are worth reading.

—Thomas H. Murray, president, The Hastings Center

Diana Fritz Cates is an associate professor of ethics in the School of Religion at the University of Iowa. She is the author of Choosing to Feel: Virtue, Friendship, and Compassion for Friends.

Paul Lauritzen is a professor and the chair of the department of religious studies and the director of the program in applied ethics at John Carroll University. His books include Cloning and the Future of Human Embryo Research.

Ethics and Economics of Assisted Reproduction: The Cost of Longing

  • Author: Maura A. Ryan
  • Series Editor: James F. Keenan, SJ
  • Series: Moral Traditions Series
  • Publisher: Georgetown University Press
  • Publication Date: 2003
  • Pages: 192

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Infertility treatment is costly, time-consuming, invasive, and emotionally and physically arduous, yet technology remains the focus of most public discussion of the topic. Drawing on concepts from medical ethics, feminist theory, and Roman Catholic social teaching, Maura A. Ryan analyzes the economic, ethical, theological, and political dimensions of assisted reproduction.

Ryan contends that meaningful questions about medical appropriateness and social responsibility can only be raised by ceasing to treat assisted reproduction as a consumer product. She places infertility treatments within broader commitments to the common good, understanding reproductive rights as an inherently social, rather than individual, issue.

[A]n excellent book that makes significant contributions to the diverse fields of ethical theory and public policy analysis. Ryan displays a sophisticated understanding of feminist theory, medical ethics, and Catholic social teaching on economic justice . . . well worth the attention of ethicists, medical practitioners, lawyers, and clergy engaged in formulating responses to involuntary human infertility.

Medical Humanities Review

Instead of discussing reproductive technology in terms of privacy and rights, Ryan offers a compelling theological and ethical analysis of the world of reproductive medicine rooted in the tradition of the common good. Argued with exceptional care, this book is a singular contribution to the literature on the ethics of assisted reproduction.

—Paul Lauritzen, director of the program of applied ethics, John Carroll University

Maura A. Ryan is associate provost at the University of Notre Dame and coeditor of The Challenge of Global Stewardship: Roman Catholic Responses.

Family Ethics: Practices for Christians

  • Author: Julie Hanlon Rubio
  • Series Editor: James F. Keenan, SJ
  • Series: Moral Traditions Series
  • Publisher: Georgetown University Press
  • Publication Date: 2010
  • Pages: 272

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

According to Julie Hanlon Rubio, sex, money, eating, spirituality, and service are all areas for practical application of family ethics. In each area, intentional practices can function as acts of resistance to a cultural and middle-class conformity that promotes materialism over relationships. These practices forge deep connections within the family and help families live out their calling to be in solidarity with others and participate in social change. It is through these everyday moral choices that most Christians can live out their faith—and contribute to progress in the world.

This book dives into the tradition and situates itself within academic discussions, but it is written in accessible prose that is always connected to the practical and everyday lives of families. It is certainly appropriate for the educated non-specialist, and will be an invaluable resource for pastors and other Christian leaders ministering to families.

The Way

Even coming from a rich Catholic background of understanding, her concepts and applications can be used by any denomination . . . Anyone looking for a refreshing read on family ethics will not be disappointed with Dr. Rubio’s work.

Theological Book Review

This book is a ‘must read’ for anyone who is interested in family life, marriage and relationships in general. It will provoked much discussion in many areas of sexual morality as well as making ordinary married couples feel more at home in theological discussions on sexuality, family and marriage.

The Furrow

Quite simply, with this volume, Julie Hanlon Rubio has now emerged as one of the most insightful theologians today on the theology of marriage and family.

—Richard R. Gaillardetz, Murray/Bacik Professor of Catholic Studies, University of Toledo

Rubio is that rare voice that manages to keep ideals in clear view while appreciating the importance of negotiation, compromise, persistence, and practicality. This book will satisfy everyone from scholars to students to all those working out connections between faith and family.

—Lisa Sowle Cahill, Monan Professor of Theology, Boston College

Julie Hanlon Rubio is an associate professor Christian ethics at Saint Louis University. She is the author of A Christian Theology of Marriage and Family and coeditor of Readings in Moral Theology No. 15.

The Sexual Person: Toward a Renewed Catholic Anthropology

  • Authors: Todd A. Salzman and Michael G. Lawler
  • Series Editor: James F. Keenan, SJ
  • Series: Moral Traditions Series
  • Publisher: Georgetown University Press
  • Publication Date: 2008
  • Pages: 352

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Two principles capture the essence of the official Catholic position on the morality of sexuality: first, that any human genital act must occur within the framework of heterosexual marriage; second, each and every marriage act must remain open to the transmission of life. In this comprehensive overview of Catholicism and sexuality, theologians Todd A. Salzman and Michael G. Lawler examine and challenge these principles. Remaining firmly within the Catholic tradition, they contend that the Church is being inconsistent in its teaching by adopting a dynamic, historically conscious anthropology and worldview on social ethics and the interpretation of scripture while adopting a static, classicist anthropology and worldview on sexual ethics.

Winner of the 2009 First Place Award for Best Book in Theology from the Catholic Press Association

Stimulating reading for theologians and graduate students.

Religious Studies Review

Salzman and Lawler have succeeded brilliantly in combining a rigorous historical-critical engagement of the Catholic moral tradition with a set of creative, forward-looking proposals . . . Salzman and Lawler have written an engaging, well-researched book that handles extremely complicated and controversial questions in a nuanced and intellectually rigorous manner.

Theological Studies

The present volume is their clearest and most detailed critical inquiry into sexual anthropology to date. The dialogue that this volume should generate between the authors and the advocates of the New Natural Law Theory will be very valuable.

Catholic Library World

Todd Salzman and Michael Lawler’s new book . . . is among the most important works in Catholic sexual ethics to emerge in the last two decades.

National Catholic Reporter

Todd A. Salzman is a professor of Catholic theology and chair of the department of theology at Creighton University. He is the coeditor of Marriage in the Catholic Tradition: Scripture, Tradition, and Experience and author of What Are They Saying About Roman Catholic Ethical Method?

Michael G. Lawler is professor emeritus of Catholic theology at Creighton University. He is the author of What Is and What Ought to Be: The Dialectic of Experience, Theology, and Church and Marriage and the Catholic Church: Disputed Questions.

Theological Bioethics: Participation, Justice, and Change

  • Author: Lisa Sowl Cahill
  • Series Editor: James F. Keenan, SJ
  • Series: Moral Traditions Series
  • Publisher: Georgetown University Press
  • Publication Date: 2005
  • Pages: 320

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

As a theological ethicist and progressive Catholic, Lisa Sowle Cahill does not want to cede the “religious perspective” to fundamentalists and the pro-life movement, nor does she want to submit to the gospel of a political liberalism that champions individual autonomy as holy writ. In Theological Bioethics, Cahill calls for progressive religious thinkers and believers to join in the effort to reclaim the best of their traditions through jointly engaging political forces at both community and national levels.

Winner of the 2006 First Place Award for Outstanding Theology Books from the Catholic Press Association

Offers a vision and a voice that enriches the field of bioethics and invites the reader to take specific practical steps: actions that will eventually become true democratic activism, both locally and globally.

The Way

If more of us who are interested in theological bioethics were to follow [Cahill’s] call to engagement and to justice, there might really be change.

Allen Verhey, professor of Christian ethics, The Divinity School, Duke University

Lisa Sowle Cahill is the J. Donald Monan Professor of Theology at Boston College. A former president of the Society of Christian Ethics and the Catholic Theological Society of America, her books include Sex, Gender, and Christian Ethics, Family: A Christian Social Perspective, and Love Your Enemies: Disciplieship, Pacifism, and Just War Theory.

Introduction to Jewish and Catholic Bioethics: A Comparative Analysis

  • Author: Aaron L. Mackler
  • Series Editor: James F. Keenan, SJ
  • Series: Moral Traditions Series
  • Publisher: Georgetown University Press
  • Publication Date: 2003
  • Pages: 280

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Leavened with compassion, common sense, and a readable style, this introduction to complicated bioethical issues from both Jewish and Catholic perspectives is informative and accessible. Aaron Mackler takes the reader through methodology in Roman Catholic moral theology and compares and contrasts it with methodology as it is practiced in Jewish ethics. He then examines key contemporary ethical topics for both Jewish and Catholic ethicists: euthanasia and assisted suicide, end-of-life decisions, abortion, in vitro fertilization, and the ever-growing problem of justice regarding access to health care and medical resources. He summarizes general tendencies in the comparison of the two traditions, and addresses the significance of convergence and divergence between these traditions for moral thinkers within each faith community, and generally in western democracies like the United States.

Anyone hoping to understand the spectrum of bioethical opinions today will want to read this superb, well-written, and accurate summary of the similarities and differences in both traditions. Highly recommended to scholars, health professionals, policymakers, and bioethicists.

—Edmund D. Pellegrino, professor emeritus of medicine and medical ethics, Center for Clinical Bioethics, Georgetown University Medical Center

Mackler’s mastery of the literature from both traditions is obvious, and his conclusions are balanced.

—Andrew Lustig, department of religious studies, Rice University

Aaron Mackler is one of the most thoughtful and thorough scholars of the field of Jewish bioethics, and this book is in a sense a continuation of a dialogue both historical and central to religious ethics, the interlocution between Jewish and Catholic interpretive communities, as both struggle with the emerging dilemmas of contemporary medicine.

—Laurie Zoloth, professor of medical ethics and humanities, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University

Diana Fritz Cates is an associate professor of ethics in the School of Religion at the University of Iowa. She is the author of Choosing to Feel: Virtue, Friendship, and Compassion for Friends.

Paul Lauritzen is a professor and the chair of the department of religious studies and the director of the program in applied ethics at John Carroll University. His books include Cloning and the Future of Human Embryo Research.

Jewish and Catholic Bioethics: An Ecumenical Dialogue

  • Editors: Edmund D. Pellegrino and Alan I. Faden
  • Series Editor: James F. Keenan, SJ
  • Series: Moral Traditions Series
  • Publisher: Georgetown University Press
  • Publication Date: 2002
  • Pages: 368

Drawing on multiple interconnected scriptural and spiritual sources, the Jewish tradition of ethical reflection is intricate and nuanced. This book presents scholarly Jewish perspectives on suffering, healing, life, and death, and compares them with contemporary Christian and secular views.

[An] excellent book for students and health professionals who are inspired by the Hebrew Bible and/or the Christian New Testament.

Australasion Catholic Record

A probing combination of Jewish, Christian and secular thought. This volume challenges many preconceptions about fundamental ethical beliefs of major religions.

—Kevin O’Rourke, OP, Saint Louis University Health Sciences Center

Edmund D. Pellegrino is the chairman of the president’s council on bioethics, and professor emeritus of medicine and medical ethics at the Center for Clinical Bioethics at Georgetown University Medical Center. He is the author of numerous books, including Helping and Healing: Religious Commitment in Health Care and The Christian Virtues in Medical Practice.

Alan I. Faden is a professor of neuroscience, neurology, and pharmacology at the Georgetown University Medical Center. He is coauthor of Medical Harm: Historical, Conceptual, and Ethical Dimensions of Iatrogenic Illness.

Christian Love: How Christians Through the Ages Have Understood Love

  • Author: Bernard V. Brady
  • Series Editor: James F. Keenan
  • Series: Moral Traditions Series
  • Publisher: Georgetown University Press
  • Publication Date: 2003
  • Pages: 320

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Christians are taught that God is love and are commanded to love, their neighbors and their enemies. Throughout the history of Christianity, the meaning of this love has been controversial. This book explores the tradition of Christian reflection on the meaning and experience of love, loving, and being loved.

Many books have been written about Christian love, but no book has gathered together this kind of primary source material and covered such a wide range of perspectives, allowing the reader to engage directly with the thought and experience of some of the greatest Christian minds on the topic of love. Bernard Brady covers with remarkable clarity the breadth and depth of discussions on Christian love from the Bible to contemporary experience to create this—a survey of how Christians through the ages have understood love.

This collection provides direct access to some of the most distinctive and influential biblical and Christian statements on love . . . The volume could be very useful as a text for classes not only on the subject of Christian love but as an overview of basic directions of Christian thought over the centuries. It is also accessible enough for more general reflection for Christians as individuals or in groups.

Horizons

With a judicious use of secondary sources and penetrating personal commentary, Bernard V. Brady introduces the reader to the major texts dealing with Christian love from the Scriptures through all the periods of church history down to the present. Students and teachers alike will learn much from the work of this very talented pedagogue.

—Charles E. Curran, Elizabeth Scurlock University Professor of Human Values, Southern Methodist University

Bernard V. Brady is a professor of theology at the University of St. Thomas and the author of The Moral Bond of Community: Justice and Discourse in Christian Morality.

Love, Human and Divine: The Heart of Christian Ethics

  • Author: Edward Collins Vacek, SJ
  • Series Editor: James F. Keenan
  • Series: Moral Traditions Series
  • Publisher: Georgetown University Press
  • Publication Date: 1996
  • Pages: 336

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Although the two great commandments to love God and to love our neighbors as ourselves are central to Christianity, few theologians or spiritual writers have undertaken an extensive account of the meaning and forms of these loves. Most accounts, in fact, make love of God and love of self either impossible or immoral. Integrating these two commandments, Edward Vacek, SJ, develops an original account of love as the theological foundation for Christian ethics.

Vacek criticizes common understandings of agape, eros, and philia, examining the arguments of Aquinas, Nygren, Outka, Rahner, Scheler, and other theologians and philosophers. He defines love as an emotional, affirmative participation in the beloved’s real and ideal goodness, and he extends this definition to the love between God and self. Vacek proposes that the heart of Christian moral life is loving cooperation with God in a mutually perfecting friendship.

This book, based on broad and critical research, should be a standard reference for years to come.

—Richard A. McCormick, SJ, formerly of the University of Notre Dame

Vacek breaks through the polemics that have too often dominated twentieth-century discussions to a view of Christian love that is simultaneously humanistic and God-centered. Deeply informed both by reflection on the experience of love and by the vast literature about it, this book makes a creative contribution to a Christian ethic that achieves its fulfillment in friendship with God. An important achievement.

—David Hollenbach, SJ, Margaret O’Brien Flatley Professor of Catholic Theology, Boston College

Edward Collins Vacek, SJ, is professor of moral theology at the Weston School of Theology.

Moral Evil

  • Author: Andrew Michael Flescher
  • Series Editor: James F. Keenan
  • Series: Moral Traditions Series
  • Publisher: Georgetown University Press
  • Publication Date: 2013
  • Pages: 288

The idea of moral evil has always held a special place in philosophy and theology because the existence of evil has implications for the dignity of the human and the limits of human action. Andrew M. Flescher proposes four interpretations of evil, drawing on philosophical and theological sources and using them to trace through history the moral traditions that are associated with them.

Flescher eschews the temptation to think of human agents who commit evil as outside the norm of human experience. Instead, through the honing of moral skills and the practice of attending to the needs of others, Flescher offers a plausible and hopeful approach to the reality of moral evil.

. . . Flescher offers a subtle and incisive analysis of evil that is compelling, insightful, and ultimately calls us to cultivate those virtues that alone can protect us from the force of evil in human life.

—Louis E. Newman, John M. and Elizabeth W. Musser Professor of Religious Studies, Carleton College

Flescher’s analysis is penetrating and ethically unflinching. At the same time, it reflects great compassion. This book ought to be read by everyone who longs for goodness and is pained by its absence.

—Diana Fritz Cates, professor and chair, department of religious studies, University of Iowa

The conclusion to the book makes a superb contribution by developing a connection between the author’s favorite model—Augustinian privation and Aristotelian virtue ethics—a worthy contribution to the field of ethics.

—Dale S. Wright, Gamble Distinguished Professor of Religious Studies, Occidental College

Andrew Michael Flescher is a member of the core faculty, program in public health, an associate professor of preventive medicine, and an associate professor of English at Stony Brook University. He is the author of Heroes, Saints, and Ordinary Morality.

The Banality of Good and Evil: Moral Lessons from the Shoah and Jewish Tradition

  • Author: David R. Blumenthal
  • Series Editor: James F. Keenan
  • Series: Moral Traditions Series
  • Publisher: Georgetown University Press
  • Publication Date: 1999
  • Pages: 336

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

People who helped exterminate Jews during the shoah (Hebrew for “holocaust”) often claimed that they only did what was expected of them. Intrigued by hearing the same response from individuals who rescued Jews, David R. Blumenthal proposes that the notion of ordinariness used to characterize Nazi evil is equally applicable to goodness. In this provocative book, Blumenthal develops a new theory of human behavior that identifies the social and psychological factors that foster both good and evil behavior.

Writing with power and insight, Blumenthal shows readers of all faiths how we might replace patterns of evil with empathy, justice, and caring, and with a renewed attention to moral education, perhaps prevent future shoahs.

Honorable Mention at The Gustavus Myers Outstanding Book Awards 2000

Blumenthal has written an unusually well-reasoned, well-researched, and well-presented book involving his post-Holocaust moral and religious reflections on preventing future genocides . . . Blumenthal’s effort to integrate his science-based findings about values with selected prosocial teachings in Judaism and to commend this approach for those of other faiths adds a traditional richness to his work.

Choice

[Blumenthal] challenges readers to confront their own behavior and ask whether they live their lives in a way that facilitates the doing of good.

—Deborah E. Lipstadt, Dorot Professor of Modern Jewish and Holocaust Studies, Emory University

. . . Blumenthal is to be commended for the brilliance and the erudition with which he has handled a very difficult and provocative subject in this masterful work.

Conservative Judaism

David R. Blumenthal is Jay and Leslie Cohen Professor of Judaic Studies in the department of religion at Emory University. He is the author of many books, including God at the Center and Facing the Abusing God: A Theology of Protest.

Shaping the Moral Life: An Approach to Moral Theology

  • Author: Klaus Demmer
  • Translator: Brian McNeil
  • Series Editor: James F. Keenan
  • Series: Moral Traditions Series
  • Publisher: Georgetown University Press
  • Publication Date: 2000
  • Pages: 96

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Although he is one of the most influential Catholic theologians in Europe, very few of Klaus Demmer’s writings are available in English. This translation of his well-known work on moral theology introduces Demmer’s thought to English-speaking audiences.

In an original synthesis of scholastic and continental philosophy, Demmer brings the Catholic moral tradition into conversation with contemporary philosophical schools—transcendental, hermeneutical, and analytical—to fashion a moral theology in the spirit of the Second Vatican Council. He shows the richness of the neoscholastic tradition in shaping and being shaped by our contemporary self-understanding.

A major contribution to shaping the complex landscape of fundamental moral theology . . . Serious students of moral theology will not want to miss Demmer’s fresh and original insights.

—Richard M. Gula, SS, Franciscan School of Theology, Graduate Theological Union

Klaus Demmer, MSC is a member of the Order of the Missionaries of the Sacred Heart. From 1970 to 2003 he was a professor of moral theology at the Pontifical Gregorian University in Rome. He has published over 25 books on moral theology and is considered the foremost European moral theologian of his generation.

The Acting Person and Christian Moral Life

  • Author: Dalene Fozard Weaver
  • Series Editor: James F. Keenan
  • Series: Moral Traditions Series
  • Publisher: Georgetown University Press
  • Publication Date: 2011
  • Pages: 226

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In this provocative analysis of contemporary Catholic moral theology Darlene Fozard Weaver shows the person as a moral agent acting in relation to God. Using an overarching theological context of sinful estrangement from and gracious reconciliation in God, Weaver shows how individuals negotiate their relationships with God in and through their involvement with others and the world.

Darlene Weaver’s, The Acting Person and the Christian Moral Life, should represent a new starting point for sterile debates in ethics, and in particular Catholic moral theology. Drawing on philosophical accounts of the role of description for naming moral actions, she provides a constructive account of how theological language should do its proper work.

Stanley Hauerwas, Carole Baker Research Associate, Duke Divinity School

Building on a thoughtful, sympathetic, and yet challenging study of recent Catholic moral theology, Weaver shows how our human engagement with material and relational goods forms our wills and contributes to our ongoing relationship with God. This is a well-argued, important study which deserves, and I expect to receive, wide attention.

—Jean Porter, John A. O’Brien Professor of Moral Theology, University of Notre Dame

Dalene Fozard Weaver is an associate professor of theology and the director of the Theology Institute at Villanova University. She is the author of Self Love and Christian Ethics and coeditor of The Ethics of Embryo Adoption and the Catholic Tradition.

Defending Probabilism: The Moral Theology of Juan Caramuel

  • Author: Julia Fleming
  • Series Editor: James F. Keenan
  • Series: Moral Traditions Series
  • Publisher: Georgetown University Press
  • Publication Date: 2006
  • Pages: 224

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Probabilism is a moral system that was developed in the early seventeenth century to resolve problems of everyday life. This method of solving difficult moral cases allowed the believer to rely upon a view that was judged defensible in terms of its arguments or the authorities behind it, even if the opposite opinion was supported by stronger arguments or more authorities. The theologian Juan Caramuel, a Spanish Cistercian monk, whom Alphonso Liguori famously characterized as “the prince of laxists,” has been regarded as one of the more extreme—and notorious—proponents of probabilism. As the only full-length English study of Caramuel’s theological method, Defending Probabilism seeks to reappraise Caramuel’s legacy, claiming that his model of moral thinking, if better understood, can actually be of help to the Church today.

A valuable insight into a period in the history of moral theology that is too little appreciated today . . . I would strongly recommend this text to every student or moral theology, but especially to candidate priest-confessors.

—Joseph A. Selling, LOUVAIN STUDIES

This meticulous study of an obscure (but in his time notorious) moral theologian sheds light on a very modern problem, the certitude with which we can affirm our moral beliefs.

—Albert Jonsen, professor emeritus of ethics in medicine, University of Washington

It is rare to find a book on an obscure theologian that forces one to rethink standard assumptions. Julia Fleming’s book is such a one. The colorful life and complex thinking of Juan Caramuel are reconstructed with research of primary sources that is detailed and convincing. More importantly, she illustrates how the history of modern moral theology needs to be reassessed.

—Raphael Gallagher, CSsR, professor of systematic moral theology, The Alphonsian Academy of the Pontifical Lateran University, Rome

Julia Fleming is an associate professor of theology at Creighton University.

Living the Truth: A Theory of Action

  • Author: Klaus Demmer
  • Translator: Brian McNeil
  • Series Editor: James F. Keenan
  • Series: Moral Traditions Series
  • Publisher: Georgetown University Press
  • Publication Date: 2010
  • Pages: 176

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In this first English translation of Living the Truth, Klaus Demmer relates moral theology to pastoral theology by offering a complete theory of action. Its crucial element is truthfulness, which Demmer claims is a basic attitude that must be translated concretely into our individual decisions. Demmer demonstrates that the demand for truthfulness offers a critical corrective to the usual praxis whereby ethical norms are formulated. This has significant consequences for every area of ethical directives, including questions about celibacy and partnerships.

Demmer moves away from the act-centered morality that dominates the neo-Scholastic manuals of moral theology. His concern is to show how our actions embody and carry out a more original anthropological project. Not only does this anthropological project condition our insights into goods and values, it provides the criteria by which our actions are judged morally. This book will be welcomed by all who are looking for ethical norms, and by all whose task it is to formulate such norms.

Klaus Demmer’s Living the Truth is the signature work of one of the most influential Catholic moral theologians of the last fifty years. His central concern with freedom, truthfulness, and the ‘ethical praxis’ of Christian life will enrich English-speaking moral theology as it has already shaped the European. This carefully argued analysis of moral agency ought to be read by every moral theologian.

Stephen J. Pope, professor of theology, Boston College

In this book, English-speaking moral theologians for the first time have access to the very influential hermeneutical ethical method of one of Europe's foremost moral theologians . . . a veritable mind opener.

Charles E. Curran, Elizabeth Scurlock University Professor of Human Values, Southern Methodist University

In understanding Demmer better, we may also better understand ourselves and our horizons.

—From the foreword by James F. Keenan, SJ

Klaus Demmer, MSC is a member of the Order of the Missionaries of the Sacred Heart. From 1970 to 2003 he was a professor of moral theology at the Pontifical Gregorian University in Rome. He has published over twenty-five books on moral theology and is considered the foremost European moral theologian of his generation.

Handbook of Roman Catholic Moral Terms

  • Author: James T. Bretzke
  • Series Editor: James F. Keenan
  • Series: Moral Traditions Series
  • Publisher: Georgetown University Press
  • Publication Date: 2013
  • Pages: 288

The Handbook of Roman Catholic Moral Terms contains more than 800 moral terms, offering concise definitions, historical context, and illustrations of how these terms are used in the Catholic tradition, including Church teaching and documents.

Designed to serve as a vital reference work for libraries, students and scholars of theology, priests and pastoral ministers, as well as all adults interested in theological enrichment or continuing education, the Handbook of Roman Catholic Moral Terms is the most comprehensive post-Vatican II work of its kind available in English.

This book is an invaluable point of entry to a worldview and logic that survives still as the scaffolding of official Roman Catholic pronouncements on sexual and biomedical ethics. Anyone who needs to teach, counsel, or write in these areas will pull Bretzke’s book frequently off the shelf.

—Lisa Sowle Cahill, Monan Professor of Theology, Boston College

This much-needed reference work for students and scholars of all stripes is a resource that can guide research and clarify discussions of complex issues often confused by the misuse of key concepts.

—Richard M. Gula, SS, professor emeritus of moral theology, Franciscan School of Theology

Bretzke’s Handbook is comprehensive, practical, and thoughtfully written. Intelligently organized with helpful references, it draws the reader to a richer understanding and appreciation of the catholic moral tradition. It will be a valuable resource for any student of moral theology.

—Eric Marcelo O. Genilo, SJ, assistant professor, Loyola School of Theology

James T. Bretzke, SJ is a professor of moral theology at Boston College School of Theology and Ministry. He has taught at Jesuit universities in Rome, Seoul, Manila, Berkeley, and Milwaukee. He is the author of several books, including A Morally Complex World: Engaging Contemporary Moral Theology. In 2007, Bretzke won the College Theology Society’s Best Article Award for his article, “A Burden of Means: Interpreting Recent Catholic Magisterial Teaching on End-of-Life Issues.”

The Catholic Moral Tradition Today: A Synthesis

  • Author: Charles E. Curran
  • Series Editor: James F. Keenan
  • Series: Moral Traditions Series
  • Publisher: Georgetown University Press
  • Publication Date: 1999
  • Pages: 272

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In The Catholic Moral Tradition Today Charles E. Curran provides a succinct, coherent account of his wide-ranging work in Catholic moral theology, pointing out agreements, disagreements, and changes in significant aspects of the Catholic moral tradition. His systematic approach explores major topics in a logical development, including the ecclesiological foundation and stance of moral theology, the person as moral subject and agent, conscience and decision making, the role of the Church as a teacher of morality, and virtues, principles and norms.

Curran condenses and organizes a large amount of material to show that the Catholic theological tradition is in dialogue with contemporary life and thought while remaining conscious of its rich history. Of great interest to theologians for its broad synthetic scope, this book is also a thorough introduction to the Catholic moral tradition for students and interested readers, including non-Catholics.

Students who want to understand the Catholic moral tradition will find this book to be a rich resource. Curran knows the tradition in all its nuances and intricacies.

Journal of the American Academy of Religion

The breadth of Curran’s comprehensive synthesis is striking.

New York Times Book Review

[The Catholic Moral Tradition Today] will provide the student with a firm grounding in the Catholic moral tradition in a clearly written and engaging style.

Catholic Library World

. . . the text reflects a career’s worth of astute scholarly and pastoral study and reflection on the matters it treats.

—Christine Firer Hinze, associate professor of theology, Marquette University

A superb piece of scholarship and synthesis of contemporary Catholic morality. I foresee this book being used widely as a textbook or required reading in schools of theology.

—Richard M. Gula, SS, Franciscan School of Theology

This magisterial presentation of the Catholic moral tradition is the work of one of the greatest 20th century moral theologians . . . It is the distillation of his life’s work.

—J. Philip Wogaman, senior minister, Foundry United Methodist Church

Charles E. Curran is the Elizabeth Scurlock University Professor of Human Values at Southern Methodist University. He has served as president of three national societies: the American Theological Society, the Catholic Theological Society of America, and the Society of Christian Ethics. He has written or edited more than forty books, including The Origins of Moral Theology in the United States.

The Christian Case for Virtue Ethics

  • Author: Joseph J. Kotva Jr.
  • Series Editor: James F. Keenan
  • Series: Moral Traditions Series
  • Publisher: Georgetown University Press
  • Publication Date: 1997
  • Pages: 240

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In The Christian Case for Virtue Ethics, Joseph Kotva defines virtue ethics and demonstrates its ability to voice Christian convictions about how to live the moral life. He evaluates virtue theory in light of systematic theology and Scripture, arguing that Christian ethics could be profitably linked with neo-Aristotelian virtue ethics. His work provides a thorough but accessible introduction to recent philosophical accounts of virtue and offers an original Christian adaptation of these ideas. It will be of value to students and scholars of philosophy, theology, and religion, as well as to those interested in the debates surrounding virtue ethics.

Anyone looking for a good book to read on the recent ‘return to virtue’ in moral theory should begin with Kotva. Not only has he read everything that has been written on the subject but even more, he has read it well. His accounts of recent philosophical discussions are as interesting and well done as his constructive theological task. His use of Scripture is particularly noteworthy.

Stanley M. Hauerwas, Gilbert T. Rowe Professor of Theological Ethics, Duke University

This excellent new book should be welcomed by readers looking for an introduction to virtue ethics, celebrated by those looking for an apology for virtue ethics, and prized by those looking for a constructive Christian account of virtue ethics.

Allen Verhey, The Evert J. and Hattie E. Blekkink Professor of Religion, Hope College

Joseph J. Kotva Jr. received his doctorate in theology and ethics from Fordham University. He is pastor of the First Mennonite Church of Allentown, Pennsylvania.

The Context of Casuistry

  • Editors: James F. Keenan and Thomas A. Shannon
  • Series Editor: James F. Keenan
  • Series: Moral Traditions Series
  • Publisher: Georgetown University Press
  • Publication Date: 1995
  • Pages: 256

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This collection of essays was assembled in direct response to Albert Jonsen and Stephen Toulmin’s The Abuse of Casuistry, in which they pointed out the substantial changes in moral methodology used by the Catholic Church over the last few centuries. These essays approach casuistry from a wide variety of angles, but all of them agree that comparing contemporary attempts to address moral issues with the sixteenth century method of moral reasoning is a mistake. This collection emerged from the Annual Conference of the Society of Christian Ethics in 1993, where the authors of these essays discovered the ways their scholarship aligned.

The current debate about casuistic method and the relation of case reasoning to ethical theory can benefit from a closer study of the history . . . The Context of Casuistry contributes importantly to this discovery.

—From the foreword by Albert R. Jonsen

We are finally beginning to see that casuistry, once so despised, points a way out of the great dilemmas in moral reasoning we face today. To read this superb book is to emerge from a cloud of unknowing.

—John W. O’Malley, SJ, distinguished professor of church history, Weston Jesuit School of Theology

No one who is interested in the structure of moral reasoning can afford to ignore these scholarly essays.

—Richard M. Gula, SS, professor of moral theology, St. Patrick’s Seminary

James F. Keenan has been a Jesuit of the New York Province since 1970 and an ordained priest since 1982. He is a member of the board of directors for the Catholic Theological Society of America, a fellow of the Institute for Advanced Studies in Humanities at the University of Edinburgh, and a fellow of the Center of Theological Inquiry at Princeton. He has published numerous articles in scholarly journals including Theological Studies, Journal of Moral Theology, and the Asian Christian Review. His published books include The Ethics of the Word: Voices in the Catholic Church Today, Moral Wisdom: Lessons and Texts from the Catholic Tradition, and Goodness and Rightness in Thomas Aquinas’s Summa Theologiae.

Thomas A. Shannon is professor emeritus of religion and social ethics in the department of humanities and arts at Worcester Polytechnic Institute.

The Critical Calling: Reflections on Moral Dilemmas Since Vatican II

  • Author: Richard A. McCormick
  • Series Editor: James F. Keenan
  • Series: Moral Traditions Series
  • Publisher: Georgetown University Press
  • Publication Date: 2006
  • Pages: 434

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Father McCormick begins The Critical Calling with his personal affirmation of the work of Vatican II: “I believe the Council was a work of the Spirit—desperately needed, divinely inspired, devotedly and doggedly carried through.” Still, he stresses this was no uncritical endorsement of everything the Council did and said. Part One includes a discussion of fundamental moral theology that looks at the relationship between the church hierarchy and individual moral decision making and several chapters addressing issues precipitated by actions involving Cardinal Josef Ratzinger, now Pope Benedict XVI. Part Two focuses on practical and pastoral questions that touch on contemporary concerns ranging from abortion to AIDS, divorce, homosexuality, and teenage sexuality.

Richard McCormick was a moral theologian of the very first rank, demonstrating all the qualities he said we should expect of Catholic moral theology of the future. He was eminently insightful, realistic, scientifically informed, straightforward, ecumenical, and catholic in every sense of the word. The book is an impressive representation indeed of all that Father McCormick contributed to the Church over the past three decades and more.

—Richard P. McBrien, Crowley O’Brien Professor, University of Notre Dame

Richard A. McCormick, SJ (1922–2000) was one of the leading U.S. Roman Catholic moral theologians of the 20th century. He was the John A. O’Brien Professor of Christian Ethics in the department of theology at the University of Notre Dame until his retirement in 1999, and a former senior research scholar of the Kennedy Institute of Ethics. Father McCormick was well-known for his annual “Moral Notes” published in the Jesuit quarterly Theological Studies from 1965 to 1984.

The Development of Moral Theology: Five Strands

  • Author: Charles E. Curran
  • Series Editor: James F. Keenan
  • Series: Moral Traditions Series
  • Publisher: Georgetown University Press
  • Publication Date: 2013
  • Pages: 288

Charles Curran in his newest book, The Development of Moral Theology: Five Strands, brings a unique historical and critical analysis to the five strands that differentiate Catholic moral theology from other approaches to Christian ethics—sin and the manuals of moral theology, the teaching of Thomas Aquinas and later Thomists, natural law, the role of authoritative church teaching in moral areas, and Vatican II. Significant changes have occurred over the course of these historical developments. In addition, pluralism and diversity exist even today, as illustrated in the theory of natural law proposed by Cardinal Ratzinger. Useful to anyone who studies Catholic moral theology, The Development of Moral Theology illuminates the importance of a truly theological and critical approach to moral theology in the light of the historical development of the five strands.

This book is a significant contribution to our understanding of the development of moral theology. By Curran’s wise choice of five critical historical strands in the history of moral theology, he provides needed background, particularly for those new to the field. His presentation of the history of the various understandings of natural law alone makes the book a valuable contribution. This book will be particularly valuable for those too young to remember the pre-Vatican II church as well as the Council itself because Curran deftly presents the currents of thought that led us to the Council, through it, and to our current debates in moral theology.

Thomas Shannon, professor emeritus of religion and social ethics, Worcester Polytechnic Institute

This is a mature and insightful work by one of the most respected scholars within the discipline.

Kenneth R. Himes, OFM, Boston College

Accessible to students and to a general audience in its broader narrative, Curran’s volume also offers professionals an insightful analysis of recent history and events. This book is a valuable addition to any theological library.

—Julia Fleming, associate professor, Creighton University

This thematic history of moral theology is vintage Curran: scholarly, accessible, and enlightening. Few living moral theologians can match Curran’s masterful control of the literature and communicate so clearly. A perfect text for graduate courses and scholars seeking a broad understanding of what the field of moral theology looks like today and how we got here.

—Julie Hanlon Rubio, associate professor of Christian ethics, St. Louis University

Charles E. Curran is the Elizabeth Scurlock University Professor of Human Values at Southern Methodist University. He has served as president of three national societies: the American Theological Society, the Catholic Theological Society of America, and the Society of Christian Ethics. He has written or edited more than forty books, including The Origins of Moral Theology in the United States.

The Evolution of Altruism and the Ordering of Love

  • Author: Stephen J. Pope
  • Series Editor: James F. Keenan
  • Series: Moral Traditions Series
  • Publisher: Georgetown University Press
  • Publication Date: 1995
  • Pages: 176

In this book, Stephen J. Pope argues that contemporary scientifically-based theories of the evolution of altruism provide important insights into one of the fundamental moral problems of Christian ethics—the natural basis of love and its ordering. He explores the contributions evolutionary theory makes to our understanding of the biological foundations of kin preference and reciprocal care, the limits of love, and the need for an ordering of love. He proposes that understanding human nature in its broader evolutionary context brings to ethics a needed balance between the personal and biological dimensions of human nature.

Pope has emerged as a leading voice both in the theological analysis of the nature of love and in the relation of Christian love to evolutionary theories of altruism. This book is among the most persuasive recent studies in theological ethics and will become a benchmark for informed future discussions.

Theological Studies

Stephen J. Pope is a professor in the department of theology at Boston College.

Heroes, Saints, and Ordinary Morality

  • Author: Andrew Michael Flescher
  • Series Editor: James F. Keenan
  • Series: Moral Traditions Series
  • Publisher: Georgetown University Press
  • Publication Date: 2003
  • Pages: 352

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Traditional approaches to ethics have suggested there is a sharp distinction between ordinary people and those called heroes and saints, as well as between duties and acts of supererogation—going beyond the expected. Flescher seeks to undo these standard dichotomies by looking at the lives and actions of certain historical figures—Holocaust rescuers, Martin Luther King, Jr., Dorothy Day, and others—who appear to be extraordinary but were, in fact, ordinary people. Heroes, Saints, and Ordinary Morality shifts the way we see ourselves in relationship to those we admire from afar—it asks us not only to admire, but to emulate. Furthermore, it challenges us to actively seek the acquisition of virtue as seen in the lives of heroes and saints, to learn from them, a dynamic aspect of ethical behavior that goes beyond the mere avoidance of wrongdoing.

Equally at home in moral philosophy and theological ethics, Flescher offers a powerful critique of the division in ethics between moral duty and supererogation. This work should open a significant debate over the validity of this distinction.

—Stephen G. Post, professor of bioethics, Case Western Reserve University

In a scholarly yet lucid and persuasive fashion, Andrew Flescher rejects traditional notions of supererogation and argues that moral development toward altruism is a requirement of virtue. In Heroes, Saints, and Ordinary Morality, he suggests how virtue ethics, properly understood, undermines all notions of moral complacency and makes possible the movement of character toward sainthood. An incisive and ambitious contribution to debates over the nature and limits of both commonsense morality and virtue.

—Terrence Reynolds, department of theology, Georgetown University

Flescher offers a compelling case that altruism is within the grasp of ordinary mortals. In a rich and nuanced discussion, Flescher not only succeeds in repositioning the underexplored idea of supererogation to the center of moral reflection, but then presents his reader with a challenge to move forward in the moral life to discern new possibilities for personal moral development. Flescher offers here a stunning intellectual achievement, but even more importantly he prods the reader to reflect on moral complacency while providing clues for how to envision a better, more virtuous life.

—Lloyd Steffen, chair of religious studies, Lehigh University

Drawing on materials as diverse as ethical theory, classical literature, and the memoirs of Holocaust rescuers, Flescher argues that heroism and saintlinesss have a place in all of our lives because each of us has a lifelong duty to become morally better than we are.

—Ronald M. Green, Eunice and Julian Cohen Professor for the Study of Ethics and Human Values, Dartmouth College

Andrew Michael Flescher is an assistant professor in the department of religious studies and the director of the Center for Applied and Professional Ethics at California State University at Chico.

Who Count As Persons?: Human Identity and the Ethics of Killing

  • Author: John F. Kavanaugh, SJ
  • Series Editor: James F. Keenan
  • Series: Moral Traditions Series
  • Publisher: Georgetown University Press
  • Publication Date: 2001
  • Pages: 240

Today in every corner of the world men and women are willing to kill others in the name of “realism” and under the guise of race, class, quality of life, sex, property, nationalism, security, or religion. We justify these killings by either excluding certain humans from our definition of personhood or by invoking a greater good or more pressing value.

In Who Count As Persons?, Kavanaugh contends that neither alternative is acceptable. He formulates an ethics that opposes the intentional killing not only of medically “marginal” humans but also of depersonalized or criminalized enemies. Offering a philosophy of the person that embraces the undeveloped, the wounded, and the dying, he proposes ways to recover a personal ethical stance in a global society that increasingly devalues the individual.

This book offers a powerful, challenging view of the human person for the modern world as a basis for ethical decision making, especially on life-and-death issues . . . We have much to learn from Father John Kavanaugh. He is insightful and learned, and his passionate concern for the dignity of human beings flows from every page.

National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly

A richly insightful and provocative exploration of the diverse ideologies invented to justify degrading or taking human life.

Choice

All college and seminary libraries need this prophetic book in their collections.

Ethics

[Kavanaugh’s] book is challenging, moving, and provocative.

—Jean Bethke Elshtain, former Laura Spelman Rockefeller Professor of Social and Political Ethics, University of Chicago Divinity School

A thoughtful, passionate, and contemporary defense of the human person.

—Charles J. Dougherty, president, Duquesne University

John F. Kavanaugh, SJ is a professor of philosophy at Saint Louis University. He is the author of Following Christ in a Consumer Society and The Word Embodied. He writes the “Ethics Notebook” column for the publication, America.

American Protestant Ethics and the Legacy of H. Richard Niebuhr

  • Author: William Werpehowski
  • Series Editor: James F. Keenan
  • Series: Moral Traditions Series
  • Publisher: Georgetown University Press
  • Publication Date: 2002
  • Pages: 272

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In this careful analysis and evaluation of the monumental influence of Niebuhr, Werpehowski traces four streams of thought flowing from Niebuhr’s theology, particularly in relation to ethics. In a tightly knit and comprehensive investigation of the work of four contemporary ethicists, important in their own right—Paul Ramsey, Stanley Hauerwas, James Gustafson, and Kathryn Tanner—Werpehowski explores how the legacy of Niebuhr has impacted their thought and work. He presents a concise analytical criticism of the development of the four ethicist’s construction of ethics in a way that interweaves and puts the four into a dialogue and conversation with Niebuhr and each other.

[A] carefully written and wide-ranging work . . . A great strength of this book is that Werpehowski reads the figures he takes up fairly and insightfully. His interpretations challenge a number of entrenched exegetical stereotypes.

Theology Today

Superior scholarship . . . Perfect for upper-level undergraduate courses on twentieth-century Christian ethics.

—Gilbert Meilaender, author of The Theory and Practice of Virtue and Working: Its Meaning and Its Limits

A scholarly, well-written book involving insightful analysis and perceptive criticism.

—Charles E. Curran, Elizabeth Scurlock University Professor of Human Values, Southern Methodist University

William Werpehowski is a professor in the theology and religious studies department at Villanova University and the director of the Center for Peace and Justice Education. He is the coeditor of The Love Commandments: Essays in Christian Ethics and Moral Philosophy and The Essential Paul Ramsey: A Collection.

Catholic Moral Theology in the United States: A History

  • Author: Charles E. Curran
  • Series Editor: James F. Keenan
  • Series: Moral Traditions Series
  • Publisher: Georgetown University Press
  • Publication Date: 2008
  • Pages: 368

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In this magisterial volume Charles E. Curran surveys the historical development of Catholic moral theology in the United States from its 19th century roots to the present day. His perspective is unique: for nearly 50 years, he has been a major influence on the development of the field and has witnessed first-hand the dramatic increase in the number and diversity of moral theologians in the academy and the Church. No one is more qualified to write this first and only comprehensive history of Catholic moral theology in the United States.

Winner of the 2009 First Place Award for Best Book in History in the Catholic Press Association Book Awards

Winner of the 2008 American Publishers Award for Professional and Scholarly Excellence in Theology and Religion

This book and Curran’s work generously deserve the attention of all those Catholics who believe that history matters, and that the church finds its mission in that essential framework given its best expression in Vatican II’s ‘Pastoral Constitution on the Church in the Modern World.’ As many have turned away from the promise of the council, Curran has done as much as any American Catholic to keep hope alive.

National Catholic Reporter

Curran covers a tremendous amount of ground in these chapters, over complex and controversial territory . . . [H]e is to be given high marks for the way he summarizes carefully and fairly the theological arguments with which he has disagreed . . . I am grateful for Curran’s scholarly work in this book. As a ‘participant observer,’ Charles Curran has chronicled history fairly and clearly—no small accomplishment for someone whose own voice has been such an important part of the story.

America

The book is a wonderful gift to the church that could come only from one so deeply involved in the very development of the field as both a careful observer of events but also as one of the most significant moral theologians of our time.

Conscience

The sheer breadth of this historical survey of Catholic moral theology in the United States would be daunting to any theologian except Curran, whose synthetic mind and critical grasp of the discipline make possible a succinct analysis of key figures as well as newer scholars.

Religious Studies Review

This volume needs to be in every university and college library. Nothing compares to the breadth and depth of this historical study of United States moral theology. Any who teach in the discipline of theology need to read the book, even if their specialty is not moral theology.

Horizons

This is a highly readable account, written by an expert, and is suitable for undergraduates and the general reader.

Theological Book Review

Charles E. Curran is the Elizabeth Scurlock University Professor of Human Values at Southern Methodist University. He has served as president of three national societies: the American Theological Society, the Catholic Theological Society of America, and the Society of Christian Ethics. He has written or edited more than forty books, including The Origins of Moral Theology in the United States.

John Cuthbert Ford, SJ: Moral Theologian at the End of the Manualist Era

  • Author: Eric Marcelo O. Genilo, SJ
  • Series Editor: James F. Keenan
  • Series: Moral Traditions Series
  • Publisher: Georgetown University Press
  • Publication Date: 2007
  • Pages: 240

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Ford is best known for his influential contribution to Catholic teachings on three moral issues. His objection to the Allied practice of obliteration bombing during World War II by drawing a sharp distinction between combatants and noncombatants is still widely studied today. Ford campaigned for alcohol education for both clergy and laity and introduced a pastoral approach for assisting and counseling alcoholics. As a member of the Papal Commission on Population, Family, and Birth Rate during the 1960s, Ford was an unyielding defender of the traditional Catholic teaching on birth control that still reigns today. Eric Genilo leaves the reader with an in-depth portrait of an extraordinary man who dedicated his life to defending the Church and protecting society’s most vulnerable members.

Honorable Mention for the 2008 Book Award for a First Time Author of a Book at the Catholic Press Association Book Awards

John C. Ford, SJ, played a leading role in Catholic moral theology for over thirty years beginning in the late 1930s. Now, thanks to Eric Marcelo O. Genilo, contemporary moral theologians have a judicious, perceptive, in-depth, and balanced critical evaluation of Ford’s work.

—Charles E. Curran, Elizabeth Scurlock University Professor of Human Values, Southern Methodist University

Genilo offers students of Catholic moral theology a sharp diagnosis of the complex mind and method of John Ford as well as a rich survey of the strengths and weaknesses of the larger moral tradition in which he operated . . .

Theological Studies

This work is significant contribution to the history of moral theology. The author has accessed the writings of his chosen subject and has examined them judiciously . . . this book should be required reading for any course in the history of moral theology.

Catholic Historical Review

This is one of the better intellectual histories of one of the major forces in Catholic theology of the twentieth century; a man who set the stage for contemporary moral discourse.

Catholic Library World

Eric Marcelo O. Genilo, SJ, is an assistant professor of moral theology in the Loyola School of Theology at Ateneo de Manila University in the Philippines.

John Paul II and the Legacy of Dinitatis Humanae

  • Author: Hermínio Rico, SJ
  • Series Editor: James F. Keenan
  • Series: Moral Traditions Series
  • Publisher: Georgetown University Press
  • Publication Date: 2002
  • Pages: 288

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It was by far the most controversial document to emerge from Vatican II—Dignitatis Humanae, or the Declaration on Religious Freedom. Drafted largely by prominent Jesuit theologian John Courtney Murray, it represented a departure from previous Catholic teachings in that it accepted the separation between Church and State and declared religious freedom a fundamental human right. In doing this, it set forth guidelines for the role of the Catholic Church in liberal, secular, and pluralistic societies.

Nearly four decades later, Hermínio Rico examines the continued relevance of this declaration in today’s world, comparing its most paradigmatic interpretations, and proposing a reconsideration of its import for contemporary church-society relationships. He offers a detailed analysis of how Pope John Paul II has appropriated, interpreted, and developed the main themes of the document, and how he has applied them to such contentious modern issues as the fall of c and the rise of secular pluralism. In addition, Rico sets forth his own vision of the future of Dignitatis Humanae, and how the profound themes of the declaration can be applied in years to come to help the church find a way to engage effectively with, and within, pluralistic societies.

Rico has made an important and timely contribution to the issue of religious freedom in general and to the understanding of Vatican II's Dignitatis Humanae in particular.

Theological Studies

Scholars interested in contemporary Catholic thought on religious freedom and the intellectual contribution of John Courtney Murray will profit greatly from this explanation.

Journal of Religion

A most insightful study . . . Rico’s extremely well researched work helps us think more fruitfully about the significance and ethical implications of pivotal developments for our increasingly pluralistic church and world.

—Thomas Massaro, SJ, professor of moral theology, Jesuit School of Theology in Berkeley, Santa Clara University

Hermínio Rico, SJ, is the editor of the Jesuit cultural monthly journal Brotéria—Cristianismo e Cultura, and a guest lecturer at the Faculdade de Teologia, Universidade Católica Portuguesa, Lisbon.

Josef Fuchs on Natural Law

  • Author: Mark Graham
  • Series Editor: James F. Keenan
  • Series: Moral Traditions Series
  • Publisher: Georgetown University Press
  • Publication Date: 2002
  • Pages: 282

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Appointed by Pope John XXIII to the Pontifical Commission on Population, Family, and Birth, Fuchs ultimately found himself disappointed in his three years of service and spent the next thirty years exploring a broad array of issues pivotal to a reconstruction of Roman Catholic natural law theory. This is the first full-length analysis of Fuchs’ efforts.

. . . a very enlightening analysis of the intellectual development of one of the most influential Catholic moral theologians in the last half of the twentieth century.

Theology Today

All persons interested in understanding the dramatic developments in Roman Catholic moral theology during the twentieth century owe a great debt to Mark Graham. [He] has produced an impressive work of theological scholarship. It is an important book in its own right and will serve to keep the legacy of Josef Fuchs alive to all persons engaged in Christian ethical reflection.

Journal of Religion

Mark Graham is an assistant professor of theology and religious studies at Villanova University.

Loyal Dissent: Memoir of a Catholic Theologian

  • Author: Charles E. Curran
  • Series Editor: James F. Keenan
  • Series: Moral Traditions Series
  • Publisher: Georgetown University Press
  • Publication Date: 2006
  • Pages: 314

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Loyal Dissent is the candid and inspiring story of a Catholic priest and theologian who, despite being stripped of his right to teach as a Catholic theologian by the Vatican, remains committed to the Catholic Church. Over a nearly fifty-year career, Charles E. Curran has distinguished himself as the most well-known and the most controversial Catholic moral theologian in the United States. On occasion, he has disagreed with official church teachings on subjects such as contraception, homosexuality, divorce, abortion, moral norms, and the role played by the hierarchical teaching office in moral matters. Throughout, however, Curran has remained a committed Catholic, a priest working for the reform of a pilgrim church. His positions, he insists, are always in accord with the best understanding of Catholic theology and always dedicated to the good of the church.

In this poignant and passionate memoir, Curran recounts his remarkable story from his early years as a compliant, pre-Vatican II Catholic through decades of teaching and writing and a transformation that has brought him today to be recognized as a leader of progressive Catholicism throughout the world.

Winner of the 2007 First Place Award for Best Biography at the Catholic Press Association Book Awards

An inspiration. It is the story of a man totally dedicated to his vocation as theologian and priest, one who was treated harshly and unjustly and harbors no slightest touch of bitterness . . . His book is entertaining, enlightening, challenging and hope-filled.

Doctrine & Life

Readers here encounter both an autobiographical work and a reflective memoir chronicling Curran’s evolving moral reasoning. He adroitly confronts established moral tenets with the brilliance of a scholar and the sensitivity of a seasoned pastor.

Library Journal

As this newly released memoir recounts, at a relatively young age Curran became, by choice and circumstance, the most infamous American Catholic theologian of his time.

America

Engrossing, enlightening, salted with humor, poignant, and profoundly inspiring, this memoir recounts the journey of one of the leading theologians of the Catholic Church in this country. Curran has been at the center of historic events. His own account of things, especially the gracious charity with which he views opponents, is stunning. His stories of personal, intellectual, and spiritual choices are linked, quite unselfconsciously, with the mantra ‘for truth and for the good of the church.’ To borrow the title of a best-selling book, this is a heartbreaking work of staggering genius—not just human talent, but the genius of a faith-filled life. A powerful read for anyone who is active in the church today.

Elizabeth A. Johnson, CSJ, distinguished professor of theology, Fordham University

Charles E. Curran is the Elizabeth Scurlock University Professor of Human Values at Southern Methodist University. He has served as president of three national societies: the American Theological Society, the Catholic Theological Society of America, and the Society of Christian Ethics. He has written or edited more than forty books, including The Origins of Moral Theology in the United States.

Overcoming Our Evil: Human Nature and Spiritual Exercises in Xunzi and Augustine

  • Author: Aaron Stalnaker
  • Series Editor: James F. Keenan
  • Series: Moral Traditions Series
  • Publisher: Georgetown University Press
  • Publication Date: 2009
  • Pages: 352

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Overcoming Our Evil examines and compares the thought and practice of the early Christian Augustine of Hippo, and the early Confucian Xunzi. Both have sophisticated and insightful accounts of spiritual exercises, and both make such ethical work central to their religious thought and practice. Yet to understand the two thinkers’ recommendations for cultivating virtue we must first understand some important differences. Aaron Stalnaker disentangles the competing aspects of Augustine and Xunxi’s ideas of “human nature.” His groundbreaking comparison of their ethical vocabularies also drives a substantive analysis of fundamental issues in moral psychology, especially regarding emotion and the complex idea of “the will,” to examine how our dispositions to feel, think, and act might be slowly transformed over time. The comparison meticulously constructs vivid portraits of both thinkers demonstrating where they connect and where they diverge, making the case that both have been misunderstood and misinterpreted. By shedding light on these seemingly disparate ancient figures in unexpected ways, Stalnaker redirects recent debate regarding practices of personal formation, and exposes the intellectual and political issues involved in the retrieval of “classic” ethical sources in diverse contemporary societies, illuminating a path toward a contemporary understanding of difference.

Honorable Mention for the 2007 Book by a First Time Author Award at the Catholic Press Association Book Awards

This is an essential volume for scholars, students, and academic libraries.

Religious Studies Review

Anyone concerned with moral psychology, moral education, or virtue ethics will find a great deal in Overcoming Our Evil.

Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy

This intellectually inspiring and conceptually uplifting study takes comparative studies to a higher level by providing an intriguing and effective model of inquiry. It fosters a healthy search for and meaningful understanding of diversity of thinking across cultures. Astonishingly varied information and insight capture the reader’s attention and mind, offering numerous and valuable aids to grasping various terms, concepts, and themes in the study of Chinese and Western philosophy. A clear and penetrating writing style also elevates the significance of this work. The book is not merely an intellectual delight to read, but it is also a master work that may serve as a durable scholarly resource, to which one may return time and again for edification and inspiration.

Journal of Chinese Philosophy

Aaron Stalnaker is an associate professor in the Department of Religious Studies at Indiana University. He was awarded his PhD in religious studies from Brown University in 2001. From July 1992 through June 1994 he worked with Volunteers in Asia in the Peoples Republic of China, where he taught English at a technical college in Manchuria.

The Ground Beneath the Cross: The Theology of Ignacio Ellacuría

  • Author: Kevin F. Burke, SJ
  • Series Editor: James F. Keenan
  • Series: Moral Traditions Series
  • Publisher: Georgetown University Press
  • Publication Date: 2004
  • Pages: 264

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Ignacio Ellacuría’s writings directly address one of the most vexing issues in theology today: can theologians account for the demands arising from both the particularity of their various social-historical situations and also the universal claims of Christian revelation? Kevin F. Burke provides the first comprehensive analysis of Ellacuría’s thoughts and explains how this inspiring martyr based his theology in a philosophy of historical reality—the “ground beneath the cross”—and interprets the suffering of “the crucified peoples” in the light of Jesus’ crucifixion. Ellacuría thus inserts the theological realities of salvation and transcendence squarely within the course of human events, and he connects these to the Christian mandate to “take the crucified peoples down from their crosses.”

Placing Ellacuría’s thought in the context of historical trends within the Roman Catholic Church, particularly Vatican II and the rise of liberation theology in Latin America, Burke argues that Ellacuría makes a distinctive contribution to contemporary Catholic theology.

A fine comprehensive introduction to the theology of Ignacio Ellacuría . . . richly rewarding.

Theological Studies

The Ground Beneath the Cross is a densely, if carefully, argued and learned book. It should stand the test of time as the standard exposition, in English, of the theology of Ignacio Ellacuría.

Journal of Hispanic-Latino Theology

As Burke’s fine book shows us, Ellacuría demonstrates the continuing promise of liberation theology, and the price of living out its consequences.

—Dean Brackley, SJ, author of Divine Revolution: Salvation and Liberation in Catholic Thought

An outstanding contribution . . . rightfully places Ellacuría as one of the major Christian theologians of the twentieth century.

—Maria Pilar Aquino, associate professor of theology and religious studies, University of San Diego

Kevin F. Burke, SJ is acting president and associate professor of systematic theology at the Weston Jesuit School of Theology at Berkeley.

The Moral Theology of Pope John Paul II

  • Author: Charles E. Curran
  • Series Editor: James F. Keenan
  • Series: Moral Traditions Series
  • Publisher: Georgetown University Press
  • Publication Date: 2005
  • Pages: 280

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Pope John Paul II is the second longest serving pope in history and the longest serving pope of the last century. His presence has thrown a long shadow across our time, and his influence on Catholics and non-Catholics throughout the world is undeniable. Much has been written about this pope, but until now, no one has provided a systematic and thorough analysis of the moral theology that underlies his moral teachings and its astonishing influence. And no one is better positioned to do this than Charles E. Curran, widely recognized as the leading American Catholic moral theologian.

While finding much to admire, Curran is nonetheless fiercely precise in his analysis and rigorously thoughtful in his criticism of much of the methodological aspects of the pope’s moral theology as he examines the pope’ use of scripture, tradition, and previous hierarchical teaching, as well as theological aspects including Christology, eschatology, and the validity of human sources of moral wisdom and knowledge, his use of anthropology, the ethical model, and natural law. Brilliantly constructed and fearlessly argued, this will be the definitive measure of Pope John Paul II’s moral theology for years to come.

Winner of the 2006 Second Place Award for Oustanding Theology Books at the Catholic Press Association Book Awards

A must for American Catholic intellectuals who care about authentic Catholic conversation around what we most deeply value in our tradition.

Horizons

Curran draws on a wealth of knowledge and experience to evaluate John Paul II’s work. He covers complex matters in his distinctive clear and direct style. For all who want a serious, critical analysis in relation to Catholic social tradition and the development of moral theology, this treatment is unsurpassed.

—Lisa Sowle Cahill, J. Donald Monan Professor of Theology, Boston College

No one serious about understanding Catholic social teaching can ignore this work.

—John T. Pawlikowski, professor of social ethics, Catholic Theological Union

A penetrating analysis of the moral theology of one of the dominant religious leaders of our time by one of contemporary Catholicism’s most respected thinkers. Catholics and non-Catholics alike will be impressed by Fr. Curran’s insights and criticisms and by the fair-minded and gracious spirit in which he offers them.

—J. Philip Wogaman

I know of no book that examines so skillfully and carefully the theological and ethical method the pope utilizes in formulating his moral teaching.

Kenneth R. Himes, chair, department of theology, Boston College

Charles E. Curran is the Elizabeth Scurlock University Professor of Human Values at Southern Methodist University. He has served as president of three national societies: the American Theological Society, the Catholic Theological Society of America, and the Society of Christian Ethics. He has written or edited more than forty books, including The Origins of Moral Theology in the United States.

The Origins of Moral Theology in the United States: Three Different Approaches

  • Author: Charles E. Curran
  • Series Editor: James F. Keenan
  • Series: Moral Traditions Series
  • Publisher: Georgetown University Press
  • Publication Date: 1997
  • Pages: 336

Charles E. Curran presents the first in-depth analysis of nineteenth-century Catholic moral theology in the United States, focusing on three significant figures—Aloysius Sabetti, Thomas J. Bouquillon, and John B. Hogan—and demonstrating that methodological pluralism and theological diversity existed in the Church even then.

So little attention has been paid to the development of moral theology in this country that these authors are unknown to many scholars. Curran’s book corrects this oversight and proposes that the ferment revealed in their writings offers important lessons for contemporary Catholic moral theology. The Origins of Moral Theology in the United States describes how all three men dealt in different ways with the increasing role of authoritative teachings in moral theology from the Vatican. He also shows how they reflected their American context and the views of their own time on women and sexuality.

A significant contribution to our understanding of the development of both moral theology and modern Roman Catholicism.

Journal of Ecclesiastical History

Charles E. Curran is the Elizabeth Scurlock University Professor of Human Values at Southern Methodist University. He has served as president of three national societies: the American Theological Society, the Catholic Theological Society of America, and the Society of Christian Ethics. He has written or edited more than forty books, including The Origins of Moral Theology in the United States.

The Church and Secularity: Two Stories of Liberal Society

  • Author: Robert Gascoigne
  • Series Editor: James F. Keenan
  • Series: Moral Traditions Series
  • Publisher: Georgetown University Press
  • Publication Date: 2009
  • Pages: 192

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The Church and Secularity argues that the Church can serve liberal societies in a positive way and that its own social identity, rooted in Eucharistic communities, must be bound up with the struggle for human rights and resistance to the commodification of the human in all its forms. Drawing on the theology of St. Augustine and Vatican II, Robert Gascoigne considers the meaning of secularity as a shared space for all citizens, asking how the Church can contribute to human dignity and human rights.

An engaging vision of how the Christian community can help liberal modernity live up to its positive potential. By nurturing the virtues of humility, reverence, and hope among citizens, the church will contribute desperately needed support for human dignity and human rights. A valuable theological contribution to current debates in moral and political theory.

David Hollenbach, SJ, Boston College

Gascoigne’s engagement with contemporary liberal society is both challenging and generous. In a highly accessible and sympathetic way, he presents an interpretation of both the best and worst aspects of liberalism. Theologians may find some of their negative assessments of liberalism challenged by Gascoigne’s robust theological vision; whilst those secularists who are keen to marginalize religious voices, should find the theological description of the ills of modern society uncomfortably illuminating.

—Christopher Insole, department of theology and religion, Durham University UK

Robert Gascoigne is a professor and head of the school of theology at Australian Catholic University. He is the author of The Public Forum and Christian Ethics and Freedom and Purpose: An Introduction to Christian Ethics.

Prophetic & Public: The Social Witness of U. S. Catholicism

  • Author: Kristin E. Heyer
  • Series Editor: James F. Keenan
  • Series: Moral Traditions Series
  • Publisher: Georgetown University Press
  • Publication Date: 2006
  • Pages: 248

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Prophetic & Public approaches the relationship between public morality and religious commitment through the example of the Catholic Church. Kristin Heyer looks at two prominent Catholics—Michael Baxter and Bryan Hehir—as a way of discussing norms for practice of public theology. Heyer also analyzes case studies of three U.S. Catholic advocacy groups: The U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops, NETWORK, and Pax Christi USA. Through her analysis she shows the various ways that the organizations’ Catholic identity impacts their social and political efforts. From her investigations come norms that define possibilities and limits for political actions based on religious conviction.

Winner of the 2006 College Theology Society’s Best Book Award

Heyer’s careful work opens up fresh avenues of conversation about the possibilities and limits of public theology by developing a vision of social witness rooted in the hope of common ground.

—Margaret Pfeil, assistant professor of theology, University of Notre Dame

With careful attention to particular and well-chosen scholarly voices and advocacy groups, the author succeeds in presenting a study that is, as claimed, critical, comparative and constructive.

—David O’Brien, professor of Roman Catholic studies, College of Holy Cross

I have taught and written on many of the issues Heyer covers but have never been able to put together, in such a concise and clear manner, the relevant theory, practice and ethical guidelines. The combination is quite impressive. I would use it in a course I taught on religion and politics and recommend it highly to students.

—John A. Coleman, SJ, Casassa Professor of Social Values, Loyola Marymount University

This is an important book, one that despite U.S. focus would be very useful in other contexts . . . In addition, it is pleasant (and all too rare with academic studies) to find that the book is well written and could be read profitably and without difficulty by nonacademics.

Theological Studies

Kristin E. Heyer is Bernard J. Hanley Professor of Religious Studies at Santa Clara University.

Democracy On Purpose: Justice and the Reality of God

  • Author: Franklin I. Gamwell
  • Series Editor: James F. Keenan
  • Series: Moral Traditions Series
  • Publisher: Georgetown University Press
  • Publication Date: 2001
  • Pages: 376

Western moral and political theory in the last two centuries has widely held that morality and politics are independent of a divine reality. Claiming that this consensus is flawed, prominent theologian Franklin I. Gamwell argues that there is a necessary relation between moral worth and belief in God. Without appealing to the beliefs of any specific religion, Gamwell defends a return to the view that moral and political principles depend on a divine purpose.

Engaging in a dialogue with such major representatives of the dominant consensus as Kant, Habermas, and Rawls, and informed by the philosophical writings of Alfred North Whitehead, this book makes the case for a neoclassical metaphysics that restores a religious sensibility to our political life.

A most worthwhile addition to any college or university library.

Religious Studies Review

Democracy on Purpose succeeds in redeeming the claim that metaphysical theism is a necessary basis for political theory, and in showing that ‘democracy depends on a divine purpose’ favoring justice. This is a uniquely important contribution to political theory and an appropriate follow-up to his redemption of claims for the necessity of metaphysical theism in moral theology.

Journal of Religion

Franklin Gamwell wrestles with giants. In weaving his powerful argument that democracy and justice must rest on a comprehensive theistic teleology, he engages critically but respectfully with Aquinas, Kant, Reinhold Niebuhr, Habermas, Apel, and Rawls. Gamwell’s resulting position is both intellectually and historically engaged.

—Ronald M. Green, Eunice and Julian Cohen Professor for the Study of Ethics and Human Values, Dartmouth College

Franklin I. Gamwell is professor of religious ethics at the University of Chicago Divinity School. His books include The Meaning of Religious Freedom: Modern Politics,Democratic Resolution, The Divine Good: Modern Moral Theory, and Necessity of God

Kinship Across Borders: A Christian Ethic of Immigration

  • Author: Kristin E. Heyer
  • Series Editor: James F. Keenan
  • Series: Moral Traditions Series
  • Publisher: Georgetown University Press
  • Publication Date: 2012
  • Pages: 208

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Kinship Across Borders analyzes contemporary US immigration in the context of fundamental Christian beliefs about the human person, sin, family life, and global solidarity. Kristin Heyer expertly demonstrates how current US immigration policies reflect harmful neoliberal economic priorities, and why immigration cannot be reduced to security or legal issues alone. Rather, she explains that immigration involves a broad array of economic issues, trade policies, concerns of cultural tolerance and criminal justice, and, at root, an understanding of the human person.

Winner of the 2013 Third Place Award for Catholic Social Teaching at the Catholic Press Association Book Awards

Kinship Across Borders presents a powerful analysis of the injustice of the current immigration system and an engaging alternative based on human solidarity and Christian commitment. It will inspire action that can make a difference.

David Hollenbach, SJ, university chair in human rights and international justice, Boston College

Impressive for its interdisciplinary scholarship, powerful stories, and clear argumentation, Kinship Across Borders will prove useful for a wide readership, including politicians, pastoral workers, and students and professionals in the field of theological ethics.

—Anne Patrick, William H. Laird Professor of Religion and the Liberal Arts, emerita, Carleton College

In an immigration debate dominated by economic and utilitarian approaches, Heyer's brilliant work opens up the ethical terrain and reminds us that what we need is not only more information but a new imagination. As she looks at the human costs of the migrant in light of the Christian tradition, she calls us to examine not only how people cross political borders but also how they might cross the walls and barriers that exists in the human heart.

—Daniel G. Groody, CSC, associate professor of theology, University of Notre Dame

Kinship Across Borders is a necessary text for university libraries that maintain collections in Theology, Politics, Law or Philosophy. It should be read by anyone interested in finding solutions to the immigration problems we all face today.

Catholic Library World

Kristin E. Heyer is Bernard J. Hanley Professor of Religious Studies at Santa Clara University.

The Global Face of Public Faith: Politics, Human Rights, and Christian Ethics

  • Author: David Hollenbach, SJ
  • Series Editor: James F. Keenan
  • Series: Moral Traditions Series
  • Publisher: Georgetown University Press
  • Publication Date: 2003
  • Pages: 312

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The Global Face of Public Faith addresses the hotly debated question of the role religion should play in politics in both the American and international contexts. David Hollenbach, SJ, engages the fear that public religion threatens American democracy and could lead to a global clash of civilizations or new religious wars. Hollenbach argues that Christianity can attain common ground with other religious communities, thus becoming a force for peace and human rights.

. . . Hollenbach presents us with an excellent and finely drawn work on the role of Christian ethics in this debate. When reflection on moral judgment and courage are called for, this work presents a context and a call.

Gregorianum

These important essays show that no one has a better grasp than David Hollenbach of the significant issues involved in the role of the church and religion in a pluralistic society in the light of both the Catholic tradition and the broad contemporary debate in the United States. We are all in his debt.

—Charles E. Curran

David Hollenbach, SJ, holds the Margaret O’Brien Flatley Chair in Catholic Theology at Boston College, and is the author of several books on ethics, including Catholicism and Liberalism and The Common Good and Christian Ethics.

Law’s Virtues: Fostering Autonomy and Solidarity in American Society

  • Author: Cathleen Kaveny
  • Series Editor: James F. Keenan
  • Series: Moral Traditions Series
  • Publisher: Georgetown University Press
  • Publication Date: 2012
  • Pages: 304

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According to Cathleen Kaveny, the law is best understood as a moral teacher encouraging people to act virtuously, rather than a police officer requiring them to do so. In Law’s Virtues Kaveny expertly applies this theoretical framework to the controversial moral-legal issues of abortion, genetics, and euthanasia. In addition, she proposes a moral analysis of the act of voting, in dialogue with the election guides issued by the US bishops. Moving beyond the culture wars, this bold and provocative volume proposes a vision of the relationship of law and morality that is realistic without being relativistic and optimistic without being utopian.

Winner of the 2013 First Place Award for Faithful Citizenship at the Catholic Press Association Book Awards

[Kaveny’s] scholarly, thoughtful, well-written, balanced exposition of the complex issue of the role of law and its application to the burning issues of abortion, euthanasia, and genetics is must reading for all those interested in this contemporary discussion.

—Charles Curran, Elizabeth Scurlock University Professor of Human Values, Southern Methodist University

Through an impressive analysis that draws on her scholarly training in law and theology, Kaveny argues for a more nuanced view of how law can function as a moral teacher in a pluralistic society, reminding us that good lawmaking is practical, not merely theoretical, and the laws we make must teach lessons to ordinary people, not saints.

—Veinvent Rougeau, dean, Boston College Law School

Cathleen Kaveny’s Law’s Virtues offers a lively, carefully nuanced, freshly creative approach to law and morality in a pluralistic society. Here is a major contribution to substantive dialogue and debate on controversial issues, and a welcome model of respect for conversation partners.

—Margaret Farley, Gilbert L. Stark Professor Emerita of Christian Ethics, Yale University School

Moving beyond the ‘culture wars’ model of political engagement, Cathleen Kaveny digs deep in Law’s Virtues to deliver a must read for anyone who cares about the relationship of law and morality in our pluralistic society.

America Magazine

Cathleen Kaveny is John P. Murphy Foundation Professor of Law and a professor of theology at the University of Notre Dame. She holds a JD and a PhD in religious ethics from Yale University. She is a regular columnist for Commonweal.

That They Be One: The Social Teaching of the Papal Encyclicals 1740-1989

  • Author: Michael J. Schuck
  • Series Editor: James F. Keenan
  • Series: Moral Traditions Series
  • Publisher: Georgetown University Press
  • Publication Date: 1991
  • Pages: 240

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That They Be One offers a textually inclusive and topically broad-gauged review of Catholic social teaching in its historical development, with a forthright assessment of its regrettable contradictions as well as of its valuable consistencies.

Schuck’s volume will be indispensable for those interested in the theological grounding and coherence of Catholic social teaching.

America

Michael J. Schuck is an associate professor of theology at Loyola University in Chicago and the former director of the Joan and Bill Hank Center for the Catholic Intellectual Heritage.

The Origins of War: A Catholic Perspective

  • Author: Matthew A. Shadle
  • Series Editor: James F. Keenan
  • Series: Moral Traditions Series
  • Publisher: Georgetown University Press
  • Publication Date: 2011
  • Pages: 256

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In The Origins of War, Matthew A. Shadle examines several sources to better understand why war happens. Shadle retrieves biblical literature and the teachings of figures from church tradition to set the course for the book, then explores the growing awareness of historical consciousness within the Catholic tradition—the way beliefs and actions are shaped by time, place, and culture. He examines the work of contemporary Catholic thinkers like Pope John Paul II, Jacques Maritain, John Courtney Murray, Dorothy Day, Brian Hehir, and George Weigel, and then advocates for constructivism.

Shadle offers a new and potentially fruitful avenue for our understanding of war-and ultimately to the appreciation of a just peace . . . The book may be recommended for programs in peace studies and graduate and seminary libraries.

—Patrick Hayes, Catholic Library World

This book stands apart from other recent books on Catholicism and war by engaging the modern theology of nature and grace as well as the international relations theory of constructivism. All those interested in the theology, ethics, philosophy, and politics of war and peace will find value in Shadle’s potent analysis.

—Brian Stiltner, associate professor of religious studies, Sacred Heart University

Matthwe Shadle is an assistant professor of moral theology at Loras College in Dubuque, Iowa

The Social Mission of the U. S. Catholic Church: A Theological Perspective

  • Author: Charles E. Curran
  • Series Editor: James F. Keenan
  • Series: Moral Traditions Series
  • Publisher: Georgetown University Press
  • Publication Date: 2010
  • Pages: 208

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Charles E. Curran explores the social mission of the U.S. Catholic Church from a theological perspective, analyzing and assessing four aspects: the importance of social mission, who carries it out, how it is carried out, and the roles that the Church and individual Catholics play in supporting these efforts. The Social Mission of the U.S. Catholic Church describes the proper role of bishops, institutions, and movements in the Church, but insists that the primary role belongs to all the baptized members of the Church as they live out the social mission in their daily lives.

Winner of the Third Place Award for Social Concerns at the Catholic Press Association Book Awards

Curran has given us a book to motivate and guide us in this mission. Anyone who wants to see how the social teaching of the church can come to life ought to read it.

America Magazine

Father Curran reminds us that any church that would call itself Catholic must first preach and practice justice.

U. S. Catholic

Thoroughly researched and documented, featuring reliable judgements at every turn, this volume belongs in every Catholic library. Displaying a lively style of presentation and extremely clear organization, this eminently readable work deserves a wide audience.

American Catholic Studies

A work of fine scholarship that skillfully ranges over a complex set of topics. It is clearly and accessibly written and geared toward a general theological readership.

Missiology

Father Curran opens up the trajectories of the social mission of the Catholic Church over the last 300 years with the goal of clarifying the theological and ecclesial challenges before us at the present time. A 'must read' for Catholics who would venture into the fray of public policy debate.

—Marvin L. Mich, STD, director of social policy, Catholic Family Center

Charles E. Curran is the Elizabeth Scurlock University Professor of Human Values at Southern Methodist University. He has served as president of three national societies: the American Theological Society, the Catholic Theological Society of America, and the Society of Christian Ethics. He has written or edited more than forty books, including The Origins of Moral Theology in the United States.

United States Welfare Policy: A Catholic Response

  • Author: Thomas J. Massaro, SJ
  • Series Editor: James F. Keenan
  • Series: Moral Traditions Series
  • Publisher: Georgetown University Press
  • Publication Date: 2007
  • Pages: 272

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The Welfare Reform Act of 1996 drastically changed the delivery of social services in the United States for the first time in sixty years. More than a decade later, according to Catholic social ethicist Thomas Massaro, a disturbing gap exists between the laws we have enacted as a nation and the moral concerns we profess as a people.

Honorable Mention for the 2008 Social Concerns Award at the Catholic Press Association Book Awards

[A] valuable resource in setting out what religious social ethics require of a more just welfare policy.

Politics and Religion

This new volume should set moral theology on a new course with its detailed integration of Catholic social teaching and the concrete realities of welfare policy in America.

—John T. Pawlikowski, OSM, Catholic Theological Union

The distinctiveness of this text is that it constitutes an excellent case study of how to connect the ethical principles of a faith-based tradition to a specific public policy.

—John Francis Burke, professor of political science, University of St. Thomas

This volume thoughtfully blends a discussion of Catholic social teaching and American social welfare politics, in an effort to explain the relationship between doctrine, episcopal advocacy, and national policymaking. It is well written, thoroughly researched, and rich in its content. United States Welfare Policy makes an important contribution to the fields of policy-making, legislative politics, Christian ethics, and moral theology, and it should be of interest to specialists across those fields.

—Elizabeth Oldmixon, associate professor of political science, University of North Texas

Thomas J. Massaro, SJ, is a Jesuit priest of the New England Province and an associate professor of moral theology at Weston Jesuit School of Theology in Cambridge, Massachusetts. He is the author of Living Justice: Catholic Social Teaching in Action and coeditor of American Catholic Social Teaching.

Catholic Social Teaching, 1891-Present: A Historical, Theological, and Ethical Analysis

  • Author: Charles E. Curran
  • Series Editor: James F. Keenan
  • Series: Moral Traditions Series
  • Publisher: Georgetown University Press
  • Publication Date: 2002
  • Pages: 272

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Charles E. Curran offers the first comprehensive analysis and criticism of the development of modern Catholic social teaching from the perspective of theology, ethics, and church history. Curran studies the methodology and content of the documents of Catholic social teaching, generally understood as comprising twelve papal letters beginning with Leo XIII’s 1891 encyclical Rerum novarum, two documents from Vatican II, and two pastoral letters of the U.S. bishops.

Intended for scholars and students of Catholic social ethics, as well as those involved in Catholic social ministry, this volume will also appeal to non-Catholic readers interested in an understanding and evaluation of Catholic social teaching.

[Curran] is a master teacher whose writing gives wonderfully clear expression to the careful, comprehensive, and yet critical approach he brings to theological ethics.

Journal of the American Academy of Religion

Curran’s strongest book in years. It is a fresh, original, and balanced analysis, one that shows Curran’s careful scholarship and discerning judgments in a striking way. It may create more controversy for Curran, but its existence is an argument for academic freedom as well as the values promoted in Catholic social teaching. It is a welcome addition to Curran’s mature work and deserves wide attention inside and outside the tradition in which he writes.

Journal of Religion

This work by Charles E. Curran is scholarly, accessible, and committed. The presentation of the content and methodologies of Catholic social teaching is energetic and insightful. His own proposals regarding both possible future developments and the resolution of existing tensions are constructive and engaging.

Irish Theological Quarterly

[A] valuable contribution to the study of Catholic social thought that will be informative to the historian and moral theologian alike . . . insightfully conveys both the strengths and limitations of a major strand of Christian ethical deliberation.

American Catholic Studies

Charles E. Curran is the Elizabeth Scurlock University Professor of Human Values at Southern Methodist University. He has served as president of three national societies: the American Theological Society, the Catholic Theological Society of America, and the Society of Christian Ethics. He has written or edited more than forty books, including The Origins of Moral Theology in the United States.

Product Details

  • Title: Georgetown University Press Moral Traditions Series Bundle
  • Series Editor: James F. Keenan
  • Series: Moral Traditions Series
  • Publisher: Georgetown University Press
  • Volumes: 48
  • Pages: 13,296

About James F. Keenan

James F. Keenan has been a Jesuit of the New York Province since 1970 and an ordained priest since 1982. He is a member of the board of directors for the Catholic Theological Society of America, a fellow of the Institute for Advanced Studies in Humanities at the University of Edinburgh, and a fellow of the Center of Theological Inquiry at Princeton. He has published numerous articles in scholarly journals including Theological Studies, Journal of Moral Theology, and the Asian Christian Review. His published books include The Ethics of the Word: Voices in the Catholic Church Today, Moral Wisdom: Lessons and Texts from the Catholic Tradition, and Goodness and Rightness in Thomas Aquinas’s Summa Theologiae.