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Scottish Christianity in the Modern World: In Honour of A. C. Cheyne

by Brown, Stewart J., Newlands, George

T&T Clark 2000

Runs on Windows, Mac and mobile.
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Overview

A new and wide-ranging study of Christianity in Scotland, from the eighteenth century to the present. The contributors include D. W. D. Shaw, Ian Campbell, Kenneth Fielding, William Ferguson, Barbara MacHaffie, Peter Matheson, John McCaffrey, Owen Chadwick, David Thompson, Keith Robbins, Andrew Ross, Stewart J. Brown, and George Newlands.

Topics encompass varieties of unbelief, challenges to the Westminster confession, John Baillie, Queen Victoria and the Church of Scotland, the Scottish ecumenical movement, the disestablishment movement, and Presbyterian-Catholic relations.

With Logos Bible Software, this volume is completely searchable, with passages of Scripture appearing on mouseover, as well as being linked to your favorite Bible translation in your library. This makes this text more powerful and easier to access than ever before for scholarly work or personal Bible study. With the advanced search features of Logos Bible Software, you can perform powerful searches by topic or Scripture reference—finding, for example, every mention of “tranformation ,” or “Church history.”

Key Features

  • Introduction by the editors
  • Essays in modern, mainly Scottish, religious and social history

Product Details

  • Title: Scottish Christianity in the Modern World: In Honour of A. C. Cheyne
  • Editors: Stewart J. Brown and George Newlands
  • Publisher: T & T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2001
  • Pages: 336

About the Editors

Stewart J. Brown is a professor of Ecclesiastical history and the dean of the faculty of Divinity at University of Edinburgh.

George Newlands is a professor of theology at University of Glasgow.