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Linguistic Studies in Ancient West Semitic Update (7 vols.)

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Overview

The series Linguistic Studies in Ancient West Semitic is devoted to the ancient West Semitic languages, including Hebrew, Aramaic, Ugaritic, and their near congeners. It includes monographs, collections of essays, and text editions informed by the approaches of linguistic science. The material studied will span from the earliest texts to the rise of Islam.

Students and serious scholars will appreciate the detailed linguistic analysis and practical instructions found in this seven-volume collection. The Linguistic Studies in Ancient West Semitic Series gathers expert scholarship on phonology, morphology, and syntax of biblical Hebrew and Ugaritic.

  • Provides research from top linguistics scholars
  • Includes detailed analysis of phonology, morphology, and syntax of ancient languages
  • Contains valuable discussions for students at introductory and scholarly levels
  • Linguistic Studies in Ancient West Semitic Update (7 vols.)
  • Editors: Cynthia L. Miller-Naudé and Jacobus A. Naudé
  • Series: Linguistic Studies in Ancient West Semitic
  • Publisher: Eisenbrauns
  • Volumes: 7
  • Pages: 3,100
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In the Logos edition, these volumes are enhanced by amazing functionality. Important terms link to dictionaries, encyclopedias, and a wealth of other resources in your digital library. Perform powerful searches to find exactly what you’re looking for. Take the discussion with you using tablet and mobile apps. With Logos Bible Software, the most efficient and comprehensive research tools are in one place, so you get the most out of your study.

Advances in Biblical Hebrew Linguistics: Data, Methods, and Analyses

  • Editors: Adina Moshavi and Tania Notarius
  • Series: Linguistic Studies in Ancient West Semitic (LSAWS)
  • Publisher: Eisenbrauns
  • Publication Date: 2017
  • Pages: 424

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5

In recent decades, the study of Biblical Hebrew has profited enormously from the application of methodologies derived from general linguistics. During the 16th World Congress of Jewish Studies, Adina Moshavi and Tania Notarius organized sessions devoted to exploring new developments in Biblical Hebrew linguistics, bringing together many of the world’s experts in the field. The papers in this volume are based on research presented at those sessions, along with additional articles specifically written for this volume. The essays included here address topics in philology, language contact, text-linguistics and linguistic pragmatics, syntax, and applied linguistics. The collection showcases Biblical Hebrew linguistics as a dynamic and innovative endeavor that is making important contributions to the study of the Bible, Hebrew language, and modern linguistics.

Adina Moshavi currently works at the Department of Hebrew and Semitic Languages, Bar Ilan University. Adina does research in Biblical Hebrew Linguistics, including syntax, semantics, pragmatics and conversation analysis of Biblical Hebrew.

Tania Notarius is a Lecturer of Hebrew and North-West Semitic languages at the Rothberg International School (Hebrew University) and Polis: The Jerusalem Institute of Languages and Linguistics, as well as an Affiliated Researcher at the University of Free State (Bloemfontein, South Africa). She holds a Ph.D. from the Hebrew University (Department of Hebrew Language) and an M.A. and B.A. from Moscow State University (Romance Langauges of Literature). She is the author of The Verb in Archaic Biblical Poetry.

Judging the Judges: A Narrative Appraisal Analysis

  • Author: Mary L. Conway
  • Series: Linguistic Studies in Ancient West Semitic (LSAWS)
  • Publisher: Eisenbrauns
  • Publication Date: 2019
  • Pages: 392

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5

The book of Judges is full of characters of ambivalent moral integrity and acts of dubious propriety, such as Jael’s murder of Sisera and the sacrifice of Jephthah’s daughter. And yet the terse narrative and the reticent narrator frequently leave the ethical character of these actions in doubt. In order to avoid reading contemporary worldviews and ethics into this ancient text, Mary L. Conway applies a blend of narrative and functional linguistic theories to her analysis of the stories of the six major judges in an effort to more accurately identify the unifying ideological stance of the book.

Using an interdisciplinary approach that employs the concepts of narrative perspective alongside appraisal theory, Conway evaluates the judges within their historical context in order to determine whether their actions are normative or aberrant. The lexicogrammatical and ideational evidence produced by this methodology reveals contrasts and trajectories within and across the narratives that, Conway argues, give insight into the character and actions of the Israelites and YHWH and the relationship between them.

In this trailblazing study, Conway models a new approach to biblical interpretation that lays bare the ethics of the book of Judges. It will be of interest to biblical studies scholars, in particular Old Testament scholars, as well as seminary students and pastors.

Mary L. Conway is Assistant Professor of Old Testament at McMaster Divinity College

Language Change in the Wake of Empire: Syriac in Its Greco-Roman Context

  • Author: Aaron Michael Butts
  • Series: Linguistic Studies in Ancient West Semitic (LSAWS)
  • Publisher: Eisenbrauns
  • Publication Date: 2016
  • Pages: 312

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5

It is well documented that one of the primary catalysts of intense language contact is the expansion of empire. This is true not only of recent history, but it is equally applicable to the more remote past. An exemplary case (or better: cases) of this involves Aramaic. Due to the expansions of empires, Aramaic has throughout its long history been in contact with a variety of languages, including Akkadian, Greek, Arabic, and various dialects of Iranian. This books focuses on one particular episode in the long history of Aramaic language contact: the Syriac dialect of Aramaic in contact with Greek.

In this book, Butts presents a new analysis of contact-induced changes in Syriac due to Greek. Several chapters analyze the more than eight-hundred Greek loanwords that occur in Syriac texts from Late Antiquity that were not translated from Greek. Butts also dedicates several chapters to a different category of contact-induced change in which Syriac-speakers replicated inherited Aramaic material on the model of Greek. All of the changes discussed in the book are located within their broader Aramaic context and analyzed through a robust contact linguistic framework.

By focusing on the Syriac language itself, Butts introduces new–and arguably more reliable–evidence for locating Syriac Christianity within its Greco-Roman context. This book, thus, is especially important for the field of Syriac studies. The book also contributes to the fields of contact linguistics and the study of ancient languages more broadly by analyzing in detail various types of contact-induced change over a relatively long period of time.

Aaron Michael Butts (PhD University of Chicago) is associate professor in the Department of Semitic and Egyptian Languages and Literatures at The Catholic University of America as well as director of its Institute of Christian Oriental Research (ICOR).

Non-Semitic Loanwords in the Hebrew Bible: A Lexicon of Language Contact

  • Author: Benjamin J. Noonan
  • Series: Linguistic Studies in Ancient West Semitic (LSAWS)
  • Publisher: Eisenbrauns
  • Publication Date: 2019
  • Pages: 548

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5

Ancient Palestine served as a land bridge between the continents of Asia, Africa, and Europe, and as a result, the ancient Israelites frequently interacted with speakers of non-Semitic languages, including Egyptian, Greek, Hittite and Luwian, Hurrian, Old Indic, and Old Iranian. This linguistic contact led the ancient Israelites to adopt non-Semitic words, many of which appear in the Hebrew Bible. Benjamin J. Noonan explores this process in Non-Semitic Loanwords in the Hebrew Bible, which presents a comprehensive, up-to-date, and linguistically informed analysis of the Hebrew Bible’s non-Semitic terminology.

In this volume, Noonan identifies all the Hebrew Bible’s foreign loanwords and presents them in the form of an annotated lexicon. An appendix to the book analyzes words commonly proposed to be non-Semitic that are, in fact, Semitic, along with the reason for considering them as such. Noonan’s study enriches our understanding of the lexical semantics of the Hebrew Bible’s non-Semitic terminology, which leads to better translation and exegesis of the biblical text. It also enhances our linguistic understanding of the ancient world, in that the linguistic features it discusses provide significant insight into the phonology, orthography, and morphology of the languages of the ancient Near East. Finally, by tying together linguistic evidence with textual and archaeological data, this work extends our picture of ancient Israel’s interactions with non-Semitic peoples.

A valuable resource for biblical scholars, historians, archaeologists, and others interested in linguistic and cultural contact between the ancient Israelites and non-Semitic peoples, this book provides significant insight into foreign contact in ancient Israel.

Benjamin J. Noonan is Associate Professor of Old Testament and Hebrew at Columbia International University. He is coeditor of “Where Shall Wisdom Be Found?” A Grammatical Tribute to Professor Stephen A. Kaufman

The Morphophonological Development of the Classical Aramaic Verb

  • Author: Joseph L. Malone
  • Series: Linguistic Studies in Ancient West Semitic (LSAWS)
  • Publisher: Eisenbrauns
  • Publication Date: 2019
  • Pages: 688

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5

This book offers a diachronic and synchronic account of the verb morphology and phonology of Aramaic from its initial appearance early in the first millennium B.C.E. until the second millennium C.E.

Aramaic, a subfamily of Semitic, is closely related to Hebrew and the other Canaanite languages; together, the two subfamilies of Aramaic and Canaanite constitute the northwest branch of the Semitic phylum. In this study, Joseph L. Malone focuses on thirteen dialects of Aramaic, chosen from a candidate list of approximately twice that number. The specific varieties of Aramaic examined here are chosen to provide an optimal chronological and geographical range. In a similar vein, the finite verb serves as the subject of this study, based on the assumption that a thorough treatment of the verb will asymptomatically involve most of the patterns and processes that hold for the grammar as a whole. The tools of this study are drawn from standard generative linguistics, though care is taken to explicate these in more traditional terms where it is deemed necessary.

This book is essential reading for linguists who study the Semitic language families, and in particular those interested in Northwest Semitic languages.

Joseph L. Malone is Professor Emeritus of Linguistics at Barnard College and Columbia University. In addition to many articles and essays, he is the author of Tiberian Hebrew Phonology

The Relative Clause in Biblical Hebrew

  • Author: Robert D. Holmstedt
  • Series: Linguistic Studies in Ancient West Semitic (LSAWS)
  • Publisher: Eisenbrauns
  • Publication Date: 2016
  • Pages: 472

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5

This book is the result of 15 years of research on the ancient Hebrew relative clause as well as the effective application of modern linguistic approaches to an ancient language corpus. Though the ostensible topic is the relative clause, including a full discussion of the various relative words used to introduce Hebrew relative clauses and a detailed presentation of the relevant comparative Semitic data, this work also carefully navigates the challenges of analyzing a “dead” language and offers a methodological road map for the analysis of any feature of Biblical Hebrew grammar. With the appendixes of relative clause data, including the author’s English translations, the work aims at comprehensiveness, exhaustiveness, and full transparency in data, method, and theory.

Robert D. Holmstedt is Assistant Professor in the Department of Near and Middle Eastern Civilizations at the University of Toronto, where he teaches ancient Hebrew and Northwest Semitic languages.

The Syntax of Volitives in Biblical Hebrew and Amarna Canaanite Prose

  • Author: Hélène M. Dallaire
  • Series: Linguistic Studies in Ancient West Semitic (LSAWS)
  • Publisher: Eisenbrauns
  • Publication Date: 2014
  • Pages: 264

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5

During the past century, numerous books and articles have appeared on the verbal system of Semitic languages. Thanks to the discovery of Ugaritic texts, Akkadian tablets, Canaanite letters found at Tell el-Amarna in Egypt, Hebrew and Aramaic inscriptions, and the Dead Sea Scrolls, our understanding of the phonology, morphology, and syntax of the Semitic languages has increased substantially.

Dallaire focuses primarily on prose texts in Biblical Hebrew and Amarna Canaanite in which the verbal system (morphemes, syntax) expresses nuances of wishes, desires, requests, and commands. According to her, volitional concepts are found in every language and are expressed through verbal morphemes, syntagmas, intonation, syntax, and other linguistic means.

The Syntax of Volitives in Biblical Hebrew and Amarna Canaanite Prose attempts to answer the following questions: Do volitives function in a similar way in Biblical Hebrew and Amarna Canaanite? Where and why is there overlap in morphology and syntax between these two languages? What morphological and syntactical differences exist between the volitional expressions of the languages? In attempting to answer these questions, the author bears in mind the fact that, within each of these two languages, scribes from different areas used specific dialectal and scribal traditions (for example, northern versus southern, peripheral versus central).

Hélène Dallaire is Earl S. Kalland Professor of Old Testament and Semitic Languages; Director of Messianic Judaism at Denver Seminary

$219.99

Save $80.00 (26%)
Reg:$299.99

Gathering interest