Products>BDAG Biblical Language Collection (17 vols.)

BDAG Biblical Language Collection (17 vols.)

Overview

The BDAG Biblical Language Collection (17 vols.) brings together an impressive collection of linguistic and philological research cited regularly in the standard Greek-English lexicon for the New Testament. The third edition of A Greek-English Lexicon of the New Testament and Other Early Christian Literature, when it was published nearly 20 years ago, represented a watershed moment for New Testament studies. The most well-known change was Danker’s inclusion of extended definitions But sometimes elements of the lexicon that did not change in the 3rd edition are as important as those that did. BDAG is also famous (and some would say “infamous”!) for the vast quantity of its citation of secondary literature. Frederick Danker, himself, believed that these citations of the secondary literature were essential for students and scholars alike. Heeding Danker’s position, the BDAG Biblical Language Collection (17 vols.) aims to make it easier for contemporary students and scholars to benefit from the knowledge of the past that is so often cited in pages of BDAG.

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  • Includes valuable monographs on Ancient Greek and languages related to the New Testament
  • Discover historical and classical Greek grammars and their relevance for New Testament study
  • Expands the usefulness of BDAG for research and study
It is scarcely a mark of scholarly responsibility to excise what one has not first examined in detail for the light that Bauer must have determined a certain scholar had shed on matters discussed in a given entry. Besides, it is poor manners to misapply Matt 20:1-16 and profit from the gains of those who toiled in an earlier time, only unceremoniously to cut them off from memory. “Mortui etiam sentiunt” Swathe-cutters are honor-bound first to examine carefully all such bibliographical entries and excise primarily that which merely repeats previous discussions or has been totally superseded. If, indeed, much of the secondary literature cited by Bauer and deemed otiose was noted in commentaries, that would be an achievement warmly to be greeted, but such is not the case. At one point I was about to chop out a clump of twenty or more titles, but could not find one depository that took account of more than a third. So much for commentary backup!

—Frederick W. Danker in Biblical Greek Language and Lexicography: Essays in Honor of Frederick W. Danker

A further consideration relating to the generous citation of secondary literature is the fact that a given user of the lexicon may be able to locate at least something for further study, given varying personal or institutional bibliographic resources. On the whole, the abundant secondary literature provides the reader with a buffer against “private interpretations” and offers protective ointment against the disease of thinking that knowledge begins with the current generation.

—Frederick W. Danker in Biblical Greek Language and Lexicography: Essays in Honor of Frederick W. Danker

One of the most valuable incidental features of BAGD is the bibliographical data found at the end of many of the articles. Enterprising use of the entries cited will open the door to a vast treasure trove of critical monographs, dissertations, and journal articles, as well as pages and chapters in significant books. If the subject is soteriology, a look at ἀπολύτρωσις, σῴζω, and σταυρός will yield more than twenty-five titles.

—Frederick W. Danker in Multi-Purpose Tools for Bible Study

Few people ever use BDAG to its fullest potential. Just looking for translation glosses barely scratches the surface of the information in BDAG.

—Rodney Decker in An Introduction to the Bauer/Danker Greek-English Lexicon of the New testament

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In the Logos edition, these volumes are enhanced by a cutting-edge set of research tools. Important terms link to dictionaries, encyclopedias, and a wealth of other resources in your digital library. Perform powerful searches to find exactly what you’re looking for. Take the discussion with you using tablet and mobile apps. With Logos Bible Software, the most efficient and comprehensive research tools are in one place, so you get the most out of your study.

Introduction to the Study of the Greek Dialects

  • Author: Carl D. Buck
  • Publisher: Ginn and Company
  • Publication Date: 1910
  • Pages: 354

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5

Carl D. Buck’s introduction to Greek dialectology is a classic textbook that continues to be valued to this day. With broad coverage of the most important dialects, Buck illustrates how each dialect of Ancient Greek varies in morphology and grammar. These differences are essential for the study of the Koine period because many formal idiosyncrasies in the 1st century are a product of different dialect forms becoming standard from one word to the next.

Carl Darling Buck (1855-1955) was an American philologist. He studied at Yale University and taught Classical and Indo-European comparative linguistics at the University of Chicago. He served as Martin A. Ryerson Distinguished Service Professor of Comparative Philology.

Comparative Grammar of Greek and Latin

  • Author: Carl D. Buck
  • Publisher: University of Chicago Press
  • Publication Date: 1933
  • Pages: 421

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5

The product of over forty years of research and teaching, Buck’s comparative grammar provides insight into the grammatical structure of two sister languages within the Indo-European family. No familiarity with other IE languages, such as Sanskrit or Gothic is necessarily, but occasionally, Buck provide reference to them for additional illustration of Indo-European similarities.

Carl Darling Buck (1855-1955) was an American philologist. He studied at Yale University and taught Classical and Indo-European comparative linguistics at the University of Chicago. He served as Martin A. Ryerson Distinguished Service Professor of Comparative Philology.

The Syriac Forms of New Testament Proper Names

  • Author: Francis Crawford Burkitt
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press
  • Publication Date: 1912
  • Pages: 32

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5

While the New Testament is a collection of Greek writings, in the last period of the second century saw the New Testament begin to be translated into the languages of the surrounding area. While for Latin, translating Greek names offered little difficulty, the situation for Syriac, a Semitic language, was more complicated. More interesting is the reality that many names in Greek are translate from Hebrew, another Semitic language. This provides a fascinating opportunity to see how a translator chose to render names from one Semitic language into Greek and then another translator chose to convert them into a second Semitic language.

Francis Crawford Burkitt, was an English theologian and scholar. As Norris Professor of Divinity at the University of Cambridge from 1905 until shortly before his death, Burkitt was a sturdy critic of the notion of a distinct “Caesarean Text” of the New Testament put forward by B. H. Streeter and others.

The Vocabulary of Menander

  • Author: Donald Blythe Durham
  • Publisher: Princeton University
  • Publication Date: 1913
  • Pages: 112

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5

For nearly two thousand years, Menander’s reputation as a writer of pure Attic has been tarnished by attacks from atticizing grammarians of later centuries. Recent additions to the extant body of his writings provide opportunity to comparison diction and language independent of his critics. This monograph examines Menander’s vocabulary, as compared with both his predecessors and his successors. For this reason, it makes a valuable contribution both to Classical Greek, but also Koine and New Testament studies.

Donald Blythe Durham (1883-1950) was an American philologist.

The Form of the Ancient Greek letter: A Study in Greek Epistolography

  • Author: Francis Xavier J. Exler
  • Publisher: Catholic University of America
  • Publication Date: 1923
  • Pages: 140

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5

Exler’s dissertation analyzes fixed expressed used in Ancient Greek letter writing. It provides a survey of the usage of formulas for openings and closing the ancient papyri letters, as well as other conventional and fixed expressions from the Ptolemaic and Roman periods, from the third century B.C. up to the third century A.D. Exler provides valuable insight into the fixed expressions used by letter writers like Paul in the New Testament.

Francis Xavier J. Exler was born at Winssen, Netherlands, November 30, 1891. He received his elementary education in the parish schools, and his classical training in the preparatory seminary of the archdiocese of Utrecht and in the Latin School of Gemert.

Essays and Studies

  • Author: Basil Lanneau Gildersleeve
  • Publisher: N. Murray
  • Publication Date: 1890
  • Pages: 540

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5

Essays and Studies presents Basil L. Gildersleeves thoughts and insights into a variety of educational, literary, historical, and classical topics, including: University work in America and classical philology, grammar and aesthetics, The legend of Venus, Xanthippe and Socrates, Apollonius of Tyana, Lucian, the emperor Julian. Platen's poems, and Maximilian; his travels and his tragedy.

Basil Lanneau Gildersleeve was born in Charleston, South Carolina, in October 1831, the son of the Rev. Benjamin Gildersleeve and the former Emma Louisa Lanneau. When he was about fourteen years old, he moved with his family to Richmond, Virginia, and lived there through the Civil War. Gildersleeve went to Baltimore, Maryland, in 1876 as professor of Greek at the Johns Hopkins University, which had just been founded. He died in Baltimore in January 1924.

Syntax of Classical Greek, Volume 1

  • Author: Basil Lanneau Gildersleeve
  • Publisher: American Book Company
  • Publication Date: 1900
  • Pages: 208

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5

Gildersleeve’s Syntax of Classical Greek from Homer to Demosthenes is a syntax of style from one perspective, but also a historical syntax of Greek literature. This unique feature of the book results, first, from the author’s collection of examples representative of all the various eras and genres of Greek literature and, second, from the special attention he gives in the grammatical descriptions to the historical evolution of the language. Gildersleeve makes a point focus on a single grammatical topic at a time and avoids mixing examples of different linguistic issues in the same place. The primary illustrations of usage are then also provided with translation, followed by additional untranslated examples.

Basil Lanneau Gildersleeve was born in Charleston, South Carolina, in October 1831, the son of the Rev. Benjamin Gildersleeve and the former Emma Louisa Lanneau. When he was about fourteen years old, he moved with his family to Richmond, Virginia, and lived there through the Civil War. Gildersleeve went to Baltimore, Maryland, in 1876 as professor of Greek at the Johns Hopkins University, which had just been founded. He died in Baltimore in January 1924.

Syntax of Classical Greek, Volume 2

  • Author: Basil Lanneau Gildersleeve
  • Publisher: American Book Company
  • Publication Date: 1911
  • Pages: 168

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5p>

Gildersleeve’s Syntax of Classical Greek from Homer to Demosthenes is a syntax of style from one perspective, but also a historical syntax of Greek literature. This unique feature of the book results, first, from the author’s collection of examples representative of all the various eras and genres of Greek literature and, second, from the special attention he gives in the grammatical descriptions to the historical evolution of the language. Gildersleeve makes a point focus on a single grammatical topic at a time and avoids mixing examples of different linguistic issues in the same place. The primary illustrations of usage are then also provided with translation, followed by additional untranslated examples.

Basil Lanneau Gildersleeve was born in Charleston, South Carolina, in October 1831, the son of the Rev. Benjamin Gildersleeve and the former Emma Louisa Lanneau. When he was about fourteen years old, he moved with his family to Richmond, Virginia, and lived there through the Civil War. Gildersleeve went to Baltimore, Maryland, in 1876 as professor of Greek at the Johns Hopkins University, which had just been founded. He died in Baltimore in January 1924.

An Historical Greek Grammar

  • Author: Antonius Nicholas Jannaris
  • Publisher: Macmillan
  • Publication Date: 1897
  • Pages: 737

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5

Jannaris grammar is a historical one in the truest sense of the world. Surveying the history of the language from the Classical period up to the end of the 19th century, Jannaris examines ancient texts, inscriptions, papyri, and the popular speech of his own contemporary period. Primarily interested in the continuity of the Greek language through history, he provides an essential window into the period of the language between the New Testament and the modern period with keen insight and an avoidance of speculative reasoning.

Antonius N. Jannaris was a native Greek who specialized in historical philology and linguistics in the 19th century.

Historical and Linguistic Studies in the Literature Related to the New Testament Vol. 1

  • Editors: Ernest D. Burton, Shailer Mathews, Clyde W. Votaw, and Edgar J. Goodspeed
  • Publisher: University of Chicago Press
  • Publication Date: 1909
  • Pages: 620

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5

The Department of Biblical and Patristic Greek issues, from time to time, Historical and Linguistic Studies in Literature Related to the New Testament. These studies are grouped in three series: I, Texts; II, Linguistic and Exegetical Studies; III, Historical Studies. Included in this volume are studies of the virgin birth, the Kingdom of God in the church fathers, Tatian Diatessaron and the Synoptic problem, the infinitive in the work of Polybius compared with Biblical Greek, studies of μετανοέω, and διαθήκη, Irenaeus’s testimony to John’s Gospel, and the resurrection in the Ante-Nicene period.

Historical and Linguistic Studies in the Literature Related to the New Testament Vol. 2

  • Editors: Ernest D. Burton, Shailer Mathews, Clyde W. Votaw, and Edgar J. Goodspeed
  • Publisher: University of Chicago Press
  • Publication Date: 1914
  • Pages: 598

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5

The Department of Biblical and Patristic Greek issues, from time to time, Historical and Linguistic Studies in Literature Related to the New Testament. These studies are grouped in three series: I, Texts; II, Linguistic and Exegetical Studies; III, Historical Studies. This volume includes: “Outline of New Testament Christology” by John Cowper Granberry, “The sources of Luke’s Perean section” by Dean Rockwell Wickes, “The legal terms common to the Macedonian inscriptions and the New Testament” by William Duncan Ferguson, “The Christology of the Epistle to the Hebrews” by Harris Lachlan MacNeill, “Syntax of the participle in the Apostolic Fathers" by Henry B. Robison, “A historical examination of some non-Markan elements in Luke” by Ernest William Parsons.

Historical and Linguistic Studies in the Literature Related to the New Testament Vol. 4. Part 1

  • Author: Arthur Wakefield Slaten
  • Editors: Ernest D. Burton, Shailer Mathews, Clyde W. Votaw, and Edgar J. Goodspeed
  • Publisher: University of Chicago Press
  • Publication Date: 1918
  • Pages: 86

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5

The Department of Biblical and Patristic Greek issues, from time to time, Historical and Linguistic Studies in Literature Related to the New Testament. These studies are grouped in three series: I, Texts; II, Linguistic and Exegetical Studies; III, Historical Studies. This volume examines the usage of qualitative nouns in Paul’s letters and the manner of their translation in the Revised Version.

Historical and Linguistic Studies in the Literature Related to the New Testament Vol. 4, Part 2

  • Author: Alfred Morris Perry
  • Editors: Ernest D. Burton, Shailer Mathews, Clyde W. Votaw, and Edgar J. Goodspeed
  • Publisher: University of Chicago Press
  • Publication Date: 1920
  • Pages: 140

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5

The Department of Biblical and Patristic Greek issues, from time to time, Historical and Linguistic Studies in Literature Related to the New Testament. These studies are grouped in three series: I, Texts; II, Linguistic and Exegetical Studies; III, Historical Studies. This volume focuses on the sources Luke used in the writing of his passion narrative.

Studies in Classical Philology, Vol. 1

  • Editors: William Gardner Hale, Paul Shorey, Frank B. Tarbell, and Carl D. Buck
  • Publisher: University of Chicago Press
  • Publication Date: 2001
  • Pages: 260

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5

The Departments of Greek, Latin, Archeology, and Comparative Philology at the University of Chicago published at intervals a collection of papers written by professors and graduate students of the university, on subjects within the domain of classical philology. This first volume includes study of the subjunctive in Greek and Latin, Greek theater, an inscriptional study of Attic vases, the Oscan-Umbrian verbal system, and an analysis of the concept of goodness ibn Plato’s Republic.

Studies in Classical Philology, Vol. 2

  • Editors: William Gardner Hale, Paul Shorey, Frank B. Tarbell, and Carl D. Buck
  • Publisher: University of Chicago Press
  • Publication Date: 1895
  • Pages: 256

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5

The Departments of Greek, Latin, Archeology, and Comparative Philology at the University of Chicago published at intervals a collection of papers written by professors and graduate students of the university, on subjects within the domain of classical philology. This second volume includes a lexicographical study of Greek inscriptions and a historical survey of Greek noun formation.

Studies in Classical Philology, Vol. 3

  • Editors: William Gardner Hale, Paul Shorey, Frank B. Tarbell, and Carl D. Buck
  • Publisher: University of Chicago Press
  • Publication Date: 2001
  • Pages: 278

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5

The Departments of Greek, Latin, Archeology, and Comparative Philology at the University of Chicago published at intervals a collection of papers written by professors and graduate students of the university, on subjects within the domain of classical philology. Volume 3 includes a study of papyri from Karanis, the use of repetition in Latin for emphasis and intensity, and a study of Epideictic literature.

Studies in Classical Philology, Vol. 4

  • Editors: William Gardner Hale, Paul Shorey, Frank B. Tarbell, and Carl D. Buck
  • Publisher: University of Chicago Press
  • Publication Date: 2001
  • Pages: 240

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5

The Departments of Greek, Latin, Archeology, and Comparative Philology at the University of Chicago published at intervals a collection of papers written by professors and graduate students of the university, on subjects within the domain of classical philology. Volume 34 include “Santae Silviae Peregrinatio” by Edward A. Bechtel and “The General Civil and Military Administration of Noricum and Raetia” by Mary Bradford Peaks.

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