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Biblical Interpretation: Advanced Biblical Theology Studies Certificate Program

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Overview

In the Biblical Interpretation: Advanced Biblical Theology Studies Certificate Program you’ll study biblical theology from a number of different perspectives. You will look at the theology of the Old Testament and the New Testament, exploring the themes and theological motifs that emerge from these sets of writings. You’ll trace the development of important concepts like the kingdom of God, redemption, or glory across the Bible and explore the theological themes of specific books.

BI311 A Biblical Theology of Glory and Exodus is included in this product but is not yet available. It will automatically be added to your library when they ship.

BI311 A Biblical Theology of Glory and Exodus is included in this product but is not yet available. It will automatically be added to your library when it ships.

How to Apply for a Mobile Ed Certificate of Completion

  1. Complete all Mobile Ed courses in this certificate program. This involves viewing all videos and taking all quizzes.
  2. Write a 750-word response on any topic covered for each course in the certificate program. Post your response to the appropriate Faithlife group in the comments section. Search course code here to find group.
  3. Email certificate@faithlife.com once you have completed all videos and quizzes and have posted responses in the appropriate Faithlife group for each Mobile Ed course in the certificate program. Please include your full name, title of completed certificate program, and links for each Faithlife group post in your email.
  4. Our certificate program team will review the application and email the Certificate of Completion once you have completed all requirements. Please allow 7–10 business days for review.
  • Title: Biblical Interpretation: Advanced Biblical Theology Studies Certificate Program
  • Publisher: Lexham Press
  • Product Type: Logos Mobile Education
  • Resource Type: Courseware, including transcripts, audio, and video resources
  • Courses: 8
  • Video Hours: 64

OT303 Theology of Genesis

  • Instructor: David W. Baker
  • Publication Date: 2016
  • Video hours: 3

David W. Baker brings his interest in pedagogy and the Pentateuch to this Mobile Ed course on the theology of Genesis. In OT303 you will be introduced to the meaning and work of biblical theology, how it differs from systematic theology, and how to approach Scripture in a way that affects the reader for God’s glory. In addition, you will participate in a broad study on key theological themes found in the first book of the Bible, including an in-depth look at the picture Genesis paints of God; what it means for humanity to be created in God’s image; the impact of the fall and sin on both humanity and the rest of creation; and God’s plan of restoration and redemption—all informed directly by Scripture. This practical approach to biblical theology will show you how the book of Genesis shapes discipleship today.

Contents:

Unit 1: Introduction to Biblical Theology
  • The Bible and Theology: What and Why?
  • Methodology: How to Do Theology
Unit 2: God, Man, and Creation
  • The Beginning of Time
  • Theology of God in Genesis 1
  • Navigating Lexicons to Explore the Meaning of 'Elohim
  • The Spirit of God
  • Discovering the Meanings of Ruach in Genesis
  • Theology through Literary Structure
  • Theology of Relationships
  • The Image of God
  • Yahweh God’s Relationship with Humanity
  • The Garden of Eden
  • Using Proximity Searching to Research Symbolism from the Garden of Eden
  • Human Sexuality
  • Marriage
  • God and Humanity
Unit 3: Sin and Its Consequences
  • Sin and Covenant: A Canonical Perspective
  • Guilt and Shame
  • Evil
  • The Serpent and Satan
  • Consequences of Sin
  • Cain and Abel
  • Broken Relationships due to the Fall
  • Cain and Seth
Unit 4: Genealogies, the Flood, and God’s Promises
  • Genealogies: Theological and Literary Functions
  • Analyzing Genealogies in the Book of Genesis
  • The Approaching Flood
  • Theological Outcome of the Flood
  • Worship, Covenant, and Circumcision
  • Matriarchs: Sarah, Hagar, and Rebekah
  • Matriarchs: Leah and Rachel
  • The Binding of Isaac
  • The Story of Joseph
Unit 5: Conclusion
  • Theological Overview of Genesis
  • Comparing Theologies of Genesis 1:26
  • Closing Remarks

Dr. David W. Baker is a professor of Old Testament and Semitic languages at Ashland Theological Seminary in Ohio, where he’s taught since 1986, following teaching assignments at the University of Durban-Westville and the University of the Witwatersrand in South Africa. He’s also lectured in Argentina, Australia, Canada, the Netherlands, New Zealand, and the United Kingdom.

NT328 Theological Themes of Luke-Acts

  • Instructor: Darrell L. Bock
  • Publication Date: 2017
  • Video Hours: 3

In NT328, Dr. Bock will walk you through ten theological themes of the unified work Luke-Acts. You will learn what Luke-Acts has to say about salvation, the kingdom, Christians in society, the future of Israel, and so much more. By the end of this course, you will be well acquainted with major themes that are woven throughout the biggest literary work in the New Testament.

Contents:

Introduction
  • Introducing the Speaker and the Course
Unit 1: The First Theological Theme of Luke-Acts
  • Legitimization
Unit 2: The Second Theological Theme of Luke-Acts
  • The Gospel Is Bigger than You Think
Unit 3: The Third Theological Theme of Luke-Acts
  • The Main Actor in Luke-Acts
  • The Proclamation of the Gospel through Prophecy and Pattern: Part 1
  • The Proclamation of the Gospel through Prophecy and Pattern: Part 2
  • The Proclamation of the Gospel through Prophecy and Pattern: Part 3
Unit 4: The Fourth Theological Theme of Luke-Acts
  • Jesus: From the Earth Up
Unit 5: The Fifth Theological Theme of Luke-Acts
  • The Holy Spirit: Evidence of the New Era, Enablement for Mission
Unit 6: The Sixth Theological Theme of Luke-Acts
  • The Now and Not Yet Kingdom
  • Jesus’ Two Comings
Unit 7: The Seventh Theological Theme of Luke-Acts
  • Salvation
  • Repentance
  • Faith
  • The Responses to Forgiveness
  • Driving Home Salvation: Part 1
  • Driving Home Salvation: Part 2
Unit 8: The Eighth Theological Theme of Luke-Acts
  • The Relationship between Jews and Gentiles
Unit 9: The Ninth Theological Theme of Luke-Acts
  • Christians in Society
Unit 10: The Tenth Theological Theme of Luke-Acts
  • The Future of Israel: Part 1
  • The Future of Israel: Part 2
Conclusion
  • Concluding the Course

Dr. Darrell L. Bock, research professor of New Testament studies and professor of spiritual development and culture at Dallas Theological Seminary, serves as editor-at-large for Christianity Today, and is on the board of Chosen People Ministries and Wheaton College. From 2000 to 2001, Dr. Bock served as president of the Evangelical Theological Society.

He has earned international recognition as a Humboldt Scholar for his work in Luke-Acts, historical Jesus study, biblical theology, as well as with messianic Jewish ministries. He has published articles in the Los Angeles Times and The Dallas Morning News and is a well-known author of over 30 books. His publications include Studying the Historical Jesus: A Guide to Sources and Methods, Jesus according to Scripture, an NIV Application Commentary on Luke, Breaking the Da Vinci Code, and commentaries on Acts and Luke in the Baker Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament (BECNT) series.

NT344 Paul's Theology and the Letter to the Philippians

  • Instructor: Robert B. Sloan, Jr.
  • Publication Date: 2015
  • Video hours: 3

What were Paul’s core theological beliefs? What framework did he use to organize his beliefs, and how did these beliefs relate to one another? In this course, Dr. Robert Sloan explores the theological concepts and terminology in Philippians and uses these as a window into the mind of Paul. He moves you beyond a book-level understanding to understanding Paul’s theology as whole.

Contents:

Introduction
  • Introducing the Speaker and the Course
Unit 1: Core Theological Beliefs in Philippians
  • Introducing the Core Theological Beliefs in Philippians
  • The Biblical God of Creation, Redemption, and Restoration
  • The Biblical Narrative Reveals God’s Purposes
  • Identifying the People of God
  • Finding and Studying Old Testament Passages Quoted in the New Testament
  • The People of God Are Those in Christ
Unit 2: Christ and the Gospel in Philippians
  • Jesus Is the Messiah
  • Jesus the Son Acts as the Agent of God
  • The Incarnate Jesus Represents God’s People before God
  • “In Christ” as Federalism and Substitution
  • Researching Passages on Christ as the “Second Adam”
  • Gospel from the Old Testament to the Preaching of Jesus
  • “Gospel”: Death and Resurrection of Jesus
Unit 3: Other Theological Themes in Philippians
  • Discipleship
  • Resurrection and New Creation
  • Researching the “New Creation”
  • The Journey of Death
  • Assurance of Salvation
  • The Work of the Spirit
Conclusion
  • Encapsulating Pauline Theology in Philippians

Dr. Robert B. Sloan, Jr. is the president of Houston Baptist University and previously served as president and chancellor of Baylor University, where he was a member of the faculty and the founding dean of George W. Truett Theological Seminary. Dr. Sloan has published extensively and has pastored churches throughout Texas and beyond.

BI301 A Biblical Theology of the Kingdom of God

  • Instructor: Nicholas Perrin
  • Publication Date: 2016
  • Video Hours: 9

Explore the kingdom through the parables of Jesus and learn what the kingdom is, who the kingdom belongs to, and how one lives in the kingdom. Discover that the kingdom is what God does, and that He just might use you in his work. This kingdom is to be characterized by sharing, by working together, by forgiving each other, and by being empowered by the Holy Spirit. Most importantly, it is a kingdom centered on Jesus the Messiah and on worship—and this is just a foretaste of what’s going to happen when the kingdom comes in its fullness.

Contents:

Introduction
  • Introducing the Speaker and the Course
Unit 1: Scholarship
  • Quest for the Historical Jesus: Reimarus
  • Quest for the Historical Jesus: Strauss
  • Quest for the Historical Jesus: Holtzmann and Renan
  • Ethical Kingdom of God
  • Eschatological Kingdom of God
  • Existential Kingdom of God
  • The Already/Not Yet Kingdom of God
Unit 2: Kingdom in the Old Testament
  • King of Creation—Old Testament
  • King of Creation—New Testament
  • Kingdom of God in the Psalms
  • The King’s Relationship to Adam
  • Image of God in the Old Testament
  • Covenant of Creation
  • Messiah as King and Priest
Unit 3: Old Testament Covenants
  • Noachic Covenant
  • Implications of the Noachic Covenant
  • Context for the Abrahamic Covenant
  • Abrahamic Covenant
  • Affirmation of the Abrahamic Covenant
  • Context for the Mosaic Covenant
  • Elements of the Mosaic Covenant
  • Mosaic Covenant and God’s Kingdom
  • Davidic Covenant
  • New Covenant
Unit 4: Kingdom in Matthew
  • Genealogy of Jesus
  • Birth of Jesus
  • The New Moses
  • Baptism of Jesus
  • Temptations of Jesus
  • Sermon on the Mount
  • Parable of the Sower
  • The Great Commission
Unit 5: Kingdom in Mark
  • Mark’s Prologue
  • Jesus’ Early Opposition
  • Cleansing the Leper
  • Cleansing the Demoniac
  • Peter’s Confession of Jesus as Christ
  • Cleansing the Temple
  • The Crucifixion
Unit 6: Kingdom in John
  • John’s Prologue
  • Followers of John the Baptist
  • Nicodemus
  • The Paralytic
  • Triumphal Entry
  • Washing the Disciples’ Feet
  • Vine and Branches
  • Peter’s Reinstatement
Unit 7: Kingdom in Romans
  • Background of Romans
  • Paul’s Calling
  • Obedience of Faith
  • Gentiles and the Law
  • Law
  • Power of the Spirit
  • Fulfilling the Law
Unit 8: Kingdom in Other Epistles
  • Sonship of Christ (Hebrews)
  • Superiority of Christ (Hebrews)
  • Living in Exile (1 Peter)
  • Living in Hope (1 Peter)
  • Vision of the Kingdom (Revelation)
  • A Present Kingdom (Revelation)
Conclusion
  • Three Answers

Nicholas Perrin, PhD, is the Franklin S. Dyrness Professor of Biblical Studies and dean of Wheaton College Graduate School. Between 2000 and 2003, he was research assistant for N.T. Wright and has since authored and edited numerous articles and books, including Thomas and Tatian (Society of Biblical Literature / Brill); Thomas: The Other Gospel (Westminster John Knox); Lost in Transmission: What We Can Know about the Words of Jesus (Thomas Nelson); and Jesus the Temple (SPCK; Baker Academic), the first of a three-part trilogy on the historical Jesus. He is also coeditor of the recently revised edition of Dictionary of Jesus and the Gospels (InterVarsity).

BI311 A Biblical Theology of Glory and Exodus

  • Instructor: Erika Moore
  • Publication Date: Forthcoming
  • Video Hours: 9

In A Biblical Theology of Glory and Exodus Dr. Erika Moore explores the themes of God’s glory and the exodus in both the Old and New Testaments. Dr. Moore begins by defining biblical theology and explaining its importance and its Christocentric nature. She then explores prophecy fulfillment with a focus on the promised land and the use of the Old Testament in the New. From there, Dr. Moore traces the theme of God’s glory from the Pentateuch all the way to Revelation. The course concludes by tracing the use of exodus imagery throughout the Bible.

Contents:

Introduction
  • Introducing the Speaker
  • Course Objectives
  • Course Introduction
Unit 1: Introduction to Biblical Theology
  • Need for Biblical Theology
  • Defining Biblical Theology
  • Importance of Biblical Theology (Part 1)
  • Importance of Biblical Theology (Part 2)
  • Themes in Biblical Theology
  • Avoiding the Old Testament
  • Historical Dimension to Biblical Theology (Part 1)
  • Historical Dimension to Biblical Theology (Part 2)
  • Historical Dimension to Biblical Theology (Part 3)
  • Unfolding of Salvation History
  • Christocentric Nature of Biblical Theology (Part 1)
  • Christocentric Nature of Biblical Theology (Part 2)
  • Christocentric Nature of Biblical Theology (Part 3)
  • Brief History of Biblical Theology
  • Relationship between Biblical and Systematic Theology
Unit 2: Aspects of Fulfillment
  • Types of Fulfillment
  • Eden, Abram, Milk and Honey
  • Curses for Disobedience
  • Eternal Davidic Kingdom
  • Ezekiel’s Prophecy of Restoration
  • Earthy Prophecies of Abundance
  • Prophecies Unfulfilled
  • Timing of the “Last Days”
  • Between D-Day and V-Day
  • Hidden Valleys
Unit 3: Use of the Old Testament in the New
  • Introduction
  • Human and Divine Author
  • Sensus Plenior, Typology, and Allegory
  • Typology in Luke 3–4
  • Biblical Theology and Morality
Unit 4: Tracing God’s Glory: Old Testament
  • Defining God’s Glory
  • Dwelling Place for God
  • Temple of Solomon
  • God’s Promised Presence
  • Hezekiah’s Faithfulness
  • Manasseh, Josiah and the Fall of Assyria
  • Puppet Kings of the Southern Kingdom
  • Crisis of Faith
  • Songs of Zion
  • Jeremiah and Hananiah
  • Listening to Jackals
  • Summary of Israelite Beliefs
  • Ezekiel’s First Vision (Part 1)
  • Ezekiel’s First Vision (Part 2)
  • Ezekiel’s Second Vision (Part 1)
  • Ezekiel’s Second Vision (Part 2)
  • Ezekiel’s Second Vision (Part 3)
  • Ezekiel’s Fourth Vision
  • Cyrus Defeats Babylon
  • Cyrus Frees the Jews
  • A Good Beginning
  • Haggai’s Successful Warning
  • God Encourages His People
  • New Temple, No Glory
  • Shift in Postexilic Pronouncements
Unit 5: Tracing God’s Glory: New Testament
  • Glory of God in Luke
  • Glory of God in Matthew
  • Christ First and Last
  • Jesus’ Body as Tabernacle, Temple
  • Miracles and God’s Glory
  • Suffering and Glory
  • Glory in the Church
  • Jars of Clay
  • Christ’s Glory in Our Weakness
  • Vision of Future Glory
Unit 6: Tracing the Exodus in Scripture
  • Foreshadows of the Exodus
  • Return to Egypt
  • Historical Context of Moses and the Exodus
  • Moses and the Non-burning Bush
  • Plagues in Egypt
  • First Passover
  • The Exodus
  • The Exodus in Joshua
  • The Exodus in Psalms
  • The Exodus in Amos
  • The Exodus in Isaiah
  • The Exodus in Jeremiah
  • The Exodus in Ezekiel
  • The Exodus in Ezra-Nehemiah (Part 1)
  • The Exodus in Ezra-Nehemiah (Part 2)
  • The Exodus in Second Chronicles
  • The Exodus in Matthew
  • The Exodus in Luke
  • The Exodus in John
  • The Exodus in Paul’s Letters
  • The Exodus in Revelation (Part 1)
  • The Exodus in Revelation (Part 2)
Conclusion
  • Listening to God Speak

Dr. Erika Moore received a BA in political science with a minor in third-world development from Wheaton College, as well as an MAR and a PhD in hermeneutics and biblical studies from Westminster Theological Seminary, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

She’s currently professor of biblical studies and Hebrew at Trinity School for Ministry (Ambridge, PA) where she serves as chair of the biblical-studies department and as director of the STM (masters in sacred theology) program. She’s contributed to The Everyday Study Bible, The Woman’s Study Bible, The Dictionary of Biblical Imagery, The New Dictionary of Apologetics, Dictionary of the Old Testament: Wisdom, Poetry, and Writings, Presence, Power and Promise: The Role of the Spirit of God in the Old Testament, and has coauthored The Psalms as Christian Worship (2010) and The Psalms as Christian Lament with Bruce Waltke and James Houston.

  • Instructor: Erika Moore
  • Publication Date: 2017
  • Video Hours: 9

A Biblical Theology of Redemption: Themes and Interpretation (BI312) by Dr. Erika Moore takes an in-depth look at redemption. The course opens with an introduction to biblical theology and how it compares to systematic theology. From there, Dr. Moore examines the history of redemption, beginning with Genesis and the early covenants and moving through the Old Testament into the New. The course concludes by looking at union with Christ and discussing how redemption is applied to believers. An example of how to preach redemption from the Old Testament is also provided.

Contents:

Introduction
  • Introducing the Speaker and the Course
Unit 1: Preliminary Issues and Distinctions
  • Definition of Biblical Theology: God’s Active Self-Disclosure
  • Definition of Biblical Theology: Former Events Explained by Later Revelation
  • Dangers Biblical Theology Guards Against
  • Christocentric Nature of Biblical Theology: Taught by Jesus
  • Christocentric Nature of Biblical Theology: Taught by the Apostles
  • How Biblical Theology Differs from Systematic Theology
  • Relationship between Redemption and Revelation
Unit 2: Covenantal Nature of Redemption
  • Definition of Redemption
  • Covenant of Redemption
  • Trinitarian Foundation of Redemption
  • Covenants in Redemptive History
Unit 3: The Fall Sets the Stage
  • Meta-Narrative of Scripture and the Need for Redemption
  • Two Seeds in Genesis 3:15: Enmity between Satan and Humanity
  • Two Seeds in Genesis 3:15: The Seed of the Serpent
  • Two Seeds in Genesis 3:15: The Seed of the Woman
Unit 4: The Exodus and the Roots of Israel’s Laws
  • From the Garden to Egypt
  • The Exodus from Egypt
  • The First Passover
  • Passover Reflected in Leviticus
  • Meaning and Significance of the Sacrificial System
  • Celebration and Obligation
  • Segullah: God’s Mad Money
  • Care for the Disenfranchised in Society
Unit 5: Echoes of Redemption in Subsequent Revelation
  • Echoes of Redemption in Joshua and Judges
  • The Book of Ruth, Part 1: Naomi Widowed
  • The Book of Ruth, Part 2: Ruth Meets Boaz
  • The Book of Ruth, Part 3: Ruth Redeemed by Boaz
  • The Book of Ruth, Part 4: Ancestors of David and Jesus
Unit 6: Echoes of Redemption in the Prophets
  • Prophetic Reflections: Who Are the Prophets?
  • Prophetic Use of Exodus Imagery
  • Why the Exile Led to a Crisis of Faith
  • Radical Solution Needed: Jeremiah
  • Radical Solution Needed: Ezekiel
  • A Second Exodus: Out of Babylon
Unit 7: The Postexilic Situation
  • Problems Faced by the Returnees: The Devastation of Jerusalem
  • Problems Faced by the Returnees: Land Disputes
  • Problems Faced by the Returnees: External and Internal Opposition
  • Postexilic Period under Ezra and Nehemiah
  • A Better Redemption Is Coming
  • Did God Lie to Israel? Rescue and Restoration
  • Did God Lie to Israel? Changed Hearts and Restoration of the United Kingdom
Unit 8: The Exodus Motif in the Psalter
  • Source of Encouragement
  • Source of Confusion: Two Linked Royal Psalms
  • Source of Confusion: A Bidimensional View of Kingship
  • Source of Confusion: A Delayed Fulfillment
  • The Redemption Concept in the Intertestamental Period
Unit 9: Redemption in the New Testament
  • Broadening and Narrowing
  • Nature of the Kingdom
  • Daniel 7, the Son of Man: The Chaos of the World
  • Daniel 7, the Son of Man: God’s Victory and Eternal Reign
  • Isaiah’s Suffering Servant
  • Isaiah’s Suffering Servant and Daniel’s Son of Man
  • First-Century Context of Redemption and Ransom
  • Redemption: Victory of Christ over Satan
  • Jesus as the True Israel
  • The Transfiguration and Jesus’s Exodus
  • Jesus as a Second Moses
Unit 10: Union with Christ
  • Redemption Applied: Situational Awareness
  • Union with Christ: The Hub of the Wheel
  • Union with Christ: In His Session
  • Union with Christ: All the Blessings
  • Union with Christ: Implications for Christian Living
  • Freed from God’s Wrath and Slavery to Sin
  • Freed from Slavery to Sin and Works Righteousness
Unit 11: Redemption Applied to the Believer
  • Calling
  • Regeneration, Faith and Repentance, Justification
  • Sanctification and Perseverance
  • Adoption: The Spirit Brings a Family Resemblance
  • Adoption: We Cry, “Abba! Father!”
  • Adoption: Coheirs with Christ
  • Glorification
  • Redemption and the Contemporary Church
Unit 12: Preaching Redemption
  • Eschatological Hope in the Midst of Woe
  • Exile, Hope, and Despair
  • The Root and the Branch
Conclusion
  • Redemption across Testaments and Time

Dr. Erika Moore received a BA in political science with a minor in third-world development from Wheaton College, as well as an MAR and a PhD in hermeneutics and biblical studies from Westminster Theological Seminary, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

She’s currently professor of biblical studies and Hebrew at Trinity School for Ministry (Ambridge, PA) where she serves as chair of the biblical-studies department and as director of the STM (masters in sacred theology) program. She’s contributed to The Everyday Study Bible, The Woman’s Study Bible, The Dictionary of Biblical Imagery, The New Dictionary of Apologetics, Dictionary of the Old Testament: Wisdom, Poetry, and Writings, Presence, Power and Promise: The Role of the Spirit of God in the Old Testament, and has coauthored The Psalms as Christian Worship (2010) and The Psalms as Christian Lament with Bruce Waltke and James Houston.

NT305 New Testament Theology

  • Instructor: Douglas J. Moo
  • Publication Date: 2015
  • Video Hours: 12

Survey the structures and purpose of New Testament theology with renowned Bible scholar and author Dr. Douglas Moo. This expansive course looks at key concepts that emerge from the different books of the New Testament, and explains the overall message God has for the church. Dr. Moo examines the diversity of the New Testament writings, stressing the importance of reading each book in its own context, as well as the unity that arises from their divine inspiration. As he says in the course:

I understand the Bible, then, to be a divine–human book that speaks to every generation. This is its very nature. Because it’s a divine book, inspired by God, there is a unity to it that transcends time and place. But because it’s a human book, because the Bible was written by particular human individuals, it has an undeniable historical context that we have to recognize. Not to recognize that context will be to miss its meaning again and again. But the Bible is a book that speaks to every generation, and that inevitably requires that we engage in the hermeneutical task—the task of trying to understand how this ancient Word of God can relevantly address the current church.

With over 30 years of New Testament research and teaching experience, Dr. Moo is the ideal guide, helping you bridge the gap between what ancient writers meant and what the New Testament means for God’s people today.

Contents:

Introduction
  • Introducing the Speaker and the Course
Unit 1: Locating Biblical Theology
  • History of Biblical Theology
  • Recent Emphases in Biblical Theology
  • Horizons of Biblical Theology
  • Looking Up Biblical Theology with the Reference Box
  • Blending the Horizons
  • Exegesis and Theology
  • Understanding Biblical Theology
  • Issues in Theology: Canon
  • Issues in Theology: Organization
  • Issues in Theology: The Center
  • Approaches to the New Testament
  • Using the Factbook and Searching the Logos Library
  • Genres: The Gospels
  • Genres: The Gospels and Jesus
  • Genre: Acts, Paul, and the General Epistles
  • Studying Paul’s Missionary Journeys with Timelines and the Atlas Tool
  • Genre: The Book of Revelation
Unit 2: The Old Testament in New Testament Theology
  • The New Testament Use of the Old, Part 1
  • Searching for Old Testament Quotations in the New Testament
  • The New Testament Use of the Old, Part 2
  • “Realm” as Organizing Principle
Unit 3: Fundamental Structures of New Testament Theology
  • The Last Days
  • The Kingdom of God
  • The Spirit of God
  • Using the Parallel Passages Feature to Find Connections in Scripture
  • The Good News
  • Studying “Gospel” with the Bible Word Study Tool
Unit 4: The Center of the New Realm
  • New Testament Titles for Jesus
  • Messiah
  • Son of Man
  • Israel
  • The Ultimate Human
  • Lord
  • God (“Theos”)
  • How Jesus Came to Be Viewed as God
Unit 5: Inauguration of the New Realm
  • Models of the Atonement
  • The Cross and the Gospels
  • The Cross and the Early Church
  • The Cross and Paul: Penal Substitution
  • Performing a Bible Word Study on the Word “Messiah”
  • The Cross and Paul: Reconciliation
  • The Cross and Hebrews: Sacrifice and Presentation
  • The Cross and Christus Victor
  • The Cross and Revelation
  • Understanding the Atonement
  • Resurrection and the New Realm
Unit 6: The Old Realm
  • Predicament and Solution
  • The Spirit World
  • The World and Sin
  • Adam’s Sin and All People
  • The Nature of Human Beings
  • The Effects of Sin
  • The Law in the Old Realm
  • The Law in the New Testament
Unit 7: Entering the New Realm
  • God’s Grace
  • God’s Election
  • Conversion and Initiation
  • Repentance and Faith
  • Searching for a Specific Greek Phrase with Greek Lemmas
  • Following Jesus
  • The Language of Justification
  • The Righteousness of God
  • The Reformation View of Justification
  • An Introduction to the New Perspective on Paul
  • Critique of the New Perspective
  • N. T. Wright’s View on Justification
  • Rethinking Forensic Justification
  • Rethinking Justification by Faith Alone
  • Rethinking “Already/Not Yet” Justification
  • Comparing Bible Translations of Galatians 5:5
  • Integrating James and Paul
Unit 8: Living in the New Realm
  • The Overlap of the Ages
  • Dead to Sin and Alive to Christ
  • The Old and New Man
  • Life in the Spirit: John’s Gospel
  • Life in the Spirit: Paul’s Letters
  • Ethics and the Kingdom
  • An Inner Transformation
  • The Role of the Old Testament Law
  • Studying the Ten Commandments
  • Matthew 5 and the Law
  • The Shape of the Christian Life: Sanctification
  • The Shape of the Christian Life: Sexual Practice
  • Love in Action: Philemon
  • Blessed Are the Poor
  • Christians in Society
Unit 9: The People of the New Realm
  • Israel and the Church
  • Israel and the Church: The Pattern and an Exception
  • “Church” in the New Testament
  • Images for the Church
  • Water Baptism
  • The Lord’s Supper
  • Spiritual Gifts
  • Creating a Custom Passage Guide
  • Offices in the Church
  • Church Organization in the Pastoral Epistles
  • Women and Ministry
Unit 10: The Consummation of the New Realm
  • The Parousia
  • The Olivet Discourse: Matthew 24
  • Rapture and Resurrection
  • Judgment of Unbelievers
  • Judgment and Believers
  • The Millennium and the Eternal State
  • The Destiny of Creation
  • Using the Text Converter Tool
Conclusion
  • Course Summary

Dr. Douglas Moo teaches New Testament at Wheaton College in Wheaton, Illinois. For over 20 years, his ministry was based at Trinity Evangelical Divinity School in Deerfield, Illinois. His academic interests revolve around the interface of exegesis and theology. Dr. Moo seeks to model to students a rigorous approach to the Greek text that always asks the “so what” questions of ultimate significance and application. The Pauline and general epistles have been his special focus within the NT canon.

In the next few years, he will be writing commentaries on Galatians and Hebrews, a Pauline theology, and a theological and practical book on creation care.

Dr. Moo has also been active in his local church, serving as elder most years, teaching and preaching to the church, and conducting home Bible studies. Because of his New Testament expertise, he has served on the Committee on Bible Translation—the group of scholars charged with revising the text of the NIV and with producing the TNIV.

OT300 Old Testament Theology

  • Instructor: Bruce Watke
  • Publication Date: 2018
  • Video Hours: 16

Survey the themes and purpose of the Old Testament with renowned Old Testament scholar Bruce Waltke. You’ll get a clearer understanding of how the different books of the Old Testament fit together to tell the grand story of God’s plan of salvation. The course covers creation, the fall, God’s covenants with His people, and God’s great acts of redemption and deliverance in the Old Testament. Dr. Waltke explores how the different genres of literature in the Old Testament explain and expand on the story of the Old Testament and how this story is relevant to you. As he says in the course:

“Through biblical theology I hope you will know God personally—not only learn about Him, but you will come to know Him personally. And also through this course, you will know who you are and where you fit into the scheme of things—that you are a part of a great story of salvation history. You are part of the establishment of God’s kingdom on earth.”

Contents:

Introduction
  • Introducing the Speaker and the Course
Unit 1: Basis, Task, and Method
  • Aims of the Course: To Know God
  • Aims of the Course: To Know Self
  • Course Particulars
  • The Basis of Old Testament Theology (Part 1)
  • The Basis of Old Testament Theology (Part 2)
  • The Basis of Old Testament Theology: Implications
  • Task of Theology: Preliminary Issues
  • Preliminary Issues: Two Collections
  • Preliminary Issues: Blocks of Writing
  • Contrasting Types of Theology (Part 1)
  • Contrasting Types of Theology (Part 2)
  • Method: Narrative Theology
  • Plot Is Similar to Fiction
  • Evaluative Point of View
  • Evaluative Point of View and Characterization
Unit 2: Cosmos
  • Introduction and Audience
  • Structure of First Creation Account
  • Understanding “And the Earth”
  • Chaos Restrained; Meaning of “Day”
  • Meaning of “Create”; Framework Hypothesis
  • Meaning of “Firmament”; Creation in Context
  • Conclusion to Cosmos
Unit 3: Adam and Bride
  • Mankind and the Male
  • The Bride
  • Marriage and Motherhood
  • Equality of Men and Women
  • Conclusion to Adam and Bride
Unit 4: Garden: Probation and Fall
  • Introduction to Probation and Fall
  • Garden of Eden: Humanity on Probation
  • The Fall and Its Consequences (Part 1)
  • The Fall and Its Consequences (Part 2)
  • The Fall and Its Consequences (Part 3)
  • Epilogue
Unit 5: Abrahamic Covenant
  • Introduction to the Abrahamic Covenant
  • Spread of Grace, Spread of Sin
  • Creation and Re-creation
  • Promise, Covenant, and Oath
  • Holy Olive Tree (Part 1)
  • Holy Olive Tree (Part 2)
  • Holy Olive Tree (Part 3)
Unit 6: God as Deliverer
  • Introduction to God as Deliverer
  • God’s Name
  • Israel’s Redemption from Egypt
  • Excursus: Typology and Balaam
  • Typology in the Passover
  • Feast of the Unleavened Bread
Unit 7: God as Warrior
  • Introduction to God as Warrior
  • Deuteronomy and Joshua
  • Judges, United Monarchy, and Naaman
  • Prophets and the Church
  • Secular War and Spiritual War
Unit 8: Old and New Covenants
  • Torah as Catechistic Teaching
  • Kingdom of Priests
  • Ten Commandments
  • Content of the Ten Commandments
  • Commandments Pertaining to God
  • Transitional Commandment: The Sabbath (Part 1)
  • Transitional Commandment: The Sabbath (Part 2)
  • Commandments Pertaining to Humanity (Part 1)
  • Commandments Pertaining to Humanity (Part 2)
  • Commandments Pertaining to Humanity (Part 3)
  • Relationship between Old and New Covenants
Unit 9: Deuteronomy
  • Introduction to Deuteronomy
  • Structure and Content of Deuteronomy
  • Moses’s Second Address
  • Literary Genre and Theology
Unit 10: Liturgy
  • Introduction to Liturgy
  • Liturgy and Ethics
  • Sacred Sites, Objects, and Personnel
  • Sacred Personnel, Seasons, and Institutions
  • General Regulations for Sacrifice
  • Historical Development of Theme (Part 1)
  • Historical Development of Theme (Part 2)
Unit 11: Doctrine of the Land
  • Sanctuary and Land
  • Impact and Theological Features
  • The Land: Contrasting the Testaments
  • Doctrine of the Land: Jesus’s Teaching (Part 1)
  • Doctrine of the Land: Jesus’s Teaching (Part 2)
  • Doctrine of the Land: Paul’s Teaching
  • Land as Spiritual Territory
Unit 12: Davidic Covenant
  • Introduction to the Davidic Covenant
  • Gift of the Warlords: Book of Judges
  • Crossing of Fates
  • Kingship Texts: Pro and Con
  • Davidic Covenant
Unit 13: Psalms
  • Introduction to the Psalms
  • Psalms in Their Historical Context
  • Superscripts and King Motifs
  • Royal Interpretation and Form Criticism
  • Liturgical Approach and Postexilic Interpretation
  • Editing the Psalter
  • Exegetical and Theological Significance of the Five Books
  • Messiah
  • Messiah in the New Testament
Unit 14: Prophets
  • Introduction to the Prophets
  • Identification of Israel’s Prophets and Their Message
  • What Manner of Men Were the Prophets?
  • Holy War and Interpreting the Prophets
Unit 15: Wisdom
  • Introduction to Wisdom Literature
  • Background on Proverbs
  • Why Attain Wisdom?
  • What Is Wisdom and Where Can It Be Found?
  • Agur’s Ladder

Bruce K. Waltke, well-known as a masterful teacher with a pastor’s heart, is Professor Emeritus at Regent College and Distinguished Professor Emeritus at Knox Theological Seminary. He earned his ThD in Greek and New Testament at Dallas Theological Seminary and his PhD in ancient Near Eastern languages and literatures at Harvard University. He was honored with a Doctor of Letters by Houghton College.

Professor Waltke has taught at Dallas Theological Seminary, Regent College, Westminster Theological Seminary, Reformed Theological Seminary, and Knox Theological Seminary, and has lectured at many additional seminaries.

Among the numerous works Professor Waltke has published on the Old Testament are An Introduction to Biblical Hebrew Syntax; An Old Testament Theology: An Exegetical, Canonical, and Thematic Approach; and commentaries on Genesis, Psalms, Micah, and Proverbs. He serves on the committee responsible for the text of the New International Version of the Bible.

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